Encontre seu próximo audiolivro favorito

Torne-se um membro hoje e ouça gratuitamente por 30 dias
The Outlaws of Sherwood

The Outlaws of Sherwood

Escrito por Robin McKinley

Narrado por Justine Eyre


The Outlaws of Sherwood

Escrito por Robin McKinley

Narrado por Justine Eyre

avaliações:
4/5 (29 avaliações)
Comprimento:
10 horas
Editora:
Lançado em:
Oct 22, 2019
ISBN:
9781977349477
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro

Descrição

Young Robin Longbow, subapprentice forester in the King's Forest of Nottingham, must contend with the dislike of the Chief Forester, who bullies Robin in memory of his popular father. But Robin does not want to leave Nottingham or lose the title to his father's small tenancy, because he is in love with a young lady named Marian — and keeps remembering that his mother too was gentry and married a common forester.

Robin has been granted a rare holiday to go to the Nottingham Fair, where he will spend the day with his friends Much and Marian. But he is ambushed by a group of the Chief Forester's cronies, who challenge him to an archery contest...and he accidentally kills one of them in self-defense.

He knows his own life is forfeit. But Much and Marian convince him that perhaps his personal catastrophe is also an opportunity: an opportunity for a few stubborn Saxons to gather together in the secret heart of Sherwood Forest and strike back against the arrogance and injustice of the Norman overlords.

Editora:
Lançado em:
Oct 22, 2019
ISBN:
9781977349477
Formato:
Audiolivro

Também disponível como...

Também disponível como livroLivro


Sobre o autor

Robin McKinley has won various awards and citations for her writing, including the Newbery Medal for The Hero and the Crown, a Newbery Honor for The Blue Sword, and the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adult Literature for Sunshine. Her other books include the New York Times bestseller Spindle’s End; two novel-length retellings of the fairy tale Beauty and the Beast, Beauty and Rose Daughter; Deerskin, another novel-length fairy-tale retelling, of Charles Perrault’s Donkeyskin; and a retelling of the Robin Hood legend, The Outlaws of Sherwood. She lives with her husband, the English writer Peter Dickinson; three dogs (two hellhounds and one hell terror); an 1897 Steinway upright; and far too many rosebushes.

Relacionado a The Outlaws of Sherwood


Análises

O que as pessoas pensam sobre The Outlaws of Sherwood

3.8
29 avaliações / 25 Análises
O que você acha?
Classificação: 0 de 5 estrelas

Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Fantastic reader! Got all the voices for this great book, one of my high school favorites.
  • (4/5)
    A Robin Hood and the Sheriff of Nottingham retelling; excellent focus on the strength of character of Marian and the humbler Robin. Good portrayal of the Saxon / Norman hostilities and the poor government of the day. I didn't like the denouement and judgement of the Sherwood Forest outlaws engendered by Richard The LionHeart.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: Robin Hood is one of those figures of legend who goes through endless iterations; each retelling emphasizing some aspects while downplaying or changing others. In McKinley's version, Robin is a forester the king's part of Sherwood Forest, and a Saxon. When he is forced to go into hiding after accidentally killing another man, his friends turn him into a rallying point for all of the Saxons who are tired of being under the thumb of their Norman rulers - including the Sherriff of Nottingham, whose ever-increasing rents are making banditry seem like an ever more attractive option to the local peasants and villagers - and more than few of the disillusioned young nobles. Robin's not terribly comfortable as a leader, especially when the price on his head could be leading all of his friends and loved ones into terrible danger.Review: I've only had middling success with McKinley's novels in the past, so I approached this one with a little trepidation. Her writing style and I just don't get along very well - to me it frequently comes off as ponderous and overblown, although I can see how others could see it as lending whatever she's telling an air of gravitas. However, while I can't say that the language worked for her retelling of the Robin Hood story, neither did it particularly work against it - there is a fair bit of dialogue and quite a lot of action to break up some of the more tedious descriptive passages that marked her other books. And if the dialogue is still somewhat stilted, well, let's just write that off as historical flavor, shall we?While I knew the basics of the Robin Hood story (robs from the rich, gives to the poor, yada yada), I knew it almost exclusively from movies - this was my first written retelling. I thought the grounding of the legend in a firm political background was very interesting, and fully believable. What I enjoyed the most about this book, however, was not the story of Robin himself, but the development of the secondary characters - particularly Little John and Will Scarlet. They're all given plausible backstories, and worked into the main action in compellingly believable ways - enough so that I want to go seek out other retellings to see which parts are part of the legend, and which parts McKinley made up for this rendition of the classic story. 4 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: The most agreeable of McKinley's books that I've read; while the prose is still too dense for my tastes, the quick pace of the plot keeps things moving along nicely.
  • (2/5)
    An interpretation of the Robin Hood myth.I love Robin Hood. Like, seriously, love him. When I was smaller, I read all the Robin Hood stories I could get my hands on. I dreamed of becoming an archer. I'd absolutely love to go to Sherwood someday. So, being such a fan, I was really looking forward to this book. And it flopped for me.It's not entirely devoid of good points. I thought McKinley's characterizations were pretty good. I had no problem with her interpretation of Robin and his band. I found it kind of fun to read some of the same stories I'd grown up with from a slightly different viewpoint.But in the end, the book just plain bored me. It did absolutely nothing for me. I had to force myself to finish it. I skimmed as much as I possibly could. The writing didn't add anything to the tale; in fact, it often detracted from it as I found myself rereading passages two and three times in an attempt to decode them. The plot was episodic, as one might expect, and it just wasn't strong enough to survive without spectacular writing.I really can't recommend this. I'm sure it'd knock someone's socks off, but it sure didn't do anything with mine.
  • (5/5)
    A fun story that is, as McKinley puts it in the afterword, "historically unembarrassing". I enjoy reading about the doubtful Robin, a Robin who worries more about keeping his people fed than tormenting the Sherrif of Nottingham. The second half of the book concentrates on another member of Robin's band, and so we see a different perspective of Robin and, at the end, of the sherrif and the king - a slightly less dire view, since that member has no price on their head.It's a new take on an old story, the characters are interesting and fun to read about, and the writing is McKinley's typical good storytelling.
  • (5/5)
    Read this one in 2001. Robin McKinley doing her usual fine job of storytelling gives a compelling look at the community Robin Hood builds in the forest. The other occupants are equally interesting and of course, it takes Robin many, many chapters to admit his love for Marian.
  • (5/5)
    This is my favorite retelling of Robin Hood. I love the Hood legend and McKinley really does it justice. The story really pulls you in despite the fact that you know the characters and the basic plot outline before you even start. I imagine even non-Hood fanatics will really enjoy this book, since it is so well written.
  • (4/5)
    The Adventures of Robin Hood (yes, the Errol Flynn movie), has long been one of my favorites. Although it is not shock that this story is not the same as that version, for I know there are countless versions of the Robin Hood tale, I was slightly disappointed with some of the depictions, namely of that of Robin. It all ended up working in the end, but it still bothers me that he was depicted as such a worry-wort AND that he wasn't a very good archer. I think the latter bothered me most of all, especially since that IS what Robin Hood is known for besides his sword skills. Since he wasn't depicted as a fallen nobleman in McKinley's tale, I was able to forgive his lack of skill with a sword. All in all however, I really just wanted Robin to be a stronger character, not a more stubborn one. Additionally, I really wanted Sir Guy to be more of a factor in the story and he was barely worth a mention in Cliff Notes. Friar Tuck could have played a bigger role too, but his attitude matched the way he was written into the story, so it worked.

    All that aside I was quite fond of McKinley's Lady Marion, Will Scarlet, and Little John. They image she painted roughly matched the one in my head, and the personalities she bestowed on them made me love the characters even more.

    I would recommend this novel to others, without question despite my distaste for the depiction of the main character.
  • (3/5)
    It's the age-old tale of Robin Hood and the Maid Marian, retold by Robin McKinley. We are taken through the familiar scenes of Robin fleeing into Sherwood forest and inadvertently gathering up outlaws to call his own, even as he battles his own emotions to keep his band safe and his love for Marian.

    I picked this book up solely because I love Robin McKinley. I think it's one of her weaker books, but I still liked it. I think it was weaker because I really don't feel as if there was a cohesive difference in her story than the folklore - besides making the story more realistic. The characters only came to life in the latter half of the book - where in the beginning, it really just felt like a narrator pulling us along. I suspect that's because of the third person omniscience and the lack of a strong voice in the beginning from Robin.

    I almost felt like the story was too plot-based. It focused too much on bringing the story from one plot point to the next, all which are known because it's a retelling. Even though I eventually got to know McKinley's view of these old characters, it took a little too long to really understand.

    But I love her emphasis on the women in this book. Marian and Cecily are such wonderful characters that really make this book.

    Two and a half stars because I think it could have been a lot stronger in character development, but I still enjoyed reading it. Recommended for people who like Robin Hood and his merry band and retelling of old stories. Or if you're just a Robin McKinley fan.

  • (1/5)
    I had to read this book for school, and, despite the pressure to finish, I still didn't. I fell asleep several times reading it. It was too slow and there weren't many interesting parts. I had hope for this book, and it was a great idea, but it just didn't stick.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed The Outlaws of Sherwood. I found it very entertaining - particularly the banter and teasing between the outlaws. Some of those moments made me wish I had a pencil to write down the quotes, except I never wanted to stop reading to do so! It's not just the humour, either, but the writing. I love the writing, the way McKinley has used language. It's descriptive, vivid and interesting.The backstory and personalities of many of the characters is different to what I have come across in Robin Hood tellings before, but I like them a lot. Robin is the quiet, unassuming one - Much and Marian have to talk him into living in the forest as an outlaw. He is thoughtful and intelligent, rains on everyone's romantic suggestions with his practicality, and worries about feeding them all. He's not concerned with glory, but staying alive - hearing that the sheriff will be gravely disappointed when he (Robin) doesn't turn up at the Nottingham archery contest, Robin announces it's the best news he has heard all week. The other characters do not always differ as much as Robin from the 'traditional' characters, but I never got them confused with my preconceived ideas of who they should be - they were all too vivid and believable for that! I also appreciated the romantic tension (the last Robin Hood novel I read had an awful lack of it) which is to say, there are unfilled silences and not a lot happens in that direction. It works much better than it sounds. Things aren't too readily resolved, but nor is it pages and pages of people bemoaning their problems with Much Angst. It's subtle and really well handled. I was surprised by the story's secondary romance, because it was unexpected, but that made it even more enjoyable.The plot was clever and engaging, with twists and turns I didn't expect. The final conflicts (and their aftermath) was gripping and dramatic. I cared about the characters - was emotionally invested in them - and it was with nervous anticipation that I read to find out their fate. All in all, a wonderful book, and probably one of my favourite Robin McKinleys.
  • (2/5)
    I found McKinley's interpretation of the Robin Hood legend a bit of a slog. Although I've thoroughly enjoyed several of her fairytale retellings, this novel felt overly slow and I had to work hard to feel attached to the characters (which is surprising as my love of Robin Hood goes back to childhood). I also felt that it lacked a real twist on the standard narrative that is common in McKinley's other novels, which left it feeling more like an average novelisation of the Robin Hood tales. Those complaints being said, in the last 100 pages the pace does pick up and more action and character development happen there than in the rest of the novel. Not a terrible novel, just not one that lived up to expectation.
  • (3/5)
    Usually I quite like McKinley's retellings, but this one I found remarkably boring.
  • (5/5)
    In a departure from her previous novels, Ms. McKinley writes a male main character and a storyline that is neither fairytale nor fantasy, yet still feels quite a lot like her previous stories. Robin, in this incarnation, is neither heroic or charismatic, but he has really great friends. Despite his misgivings about becoming the figurehead for Saxon rebellion, Robin (like Ms. McKinley's other heroines) finds unsuspected depths of strength, courage, and loyalty. The closing scenes of the novel brought me to tears. And despite the male hero, there are plenty of strong female characters for which Ms. McKinley is known.
  • (4/5)
    As with most other re-tellings, the story hardly needs a synopsis, but I would like to mention that in this version we actually start shortly before Robin becomes an outlaw…The slightly earlier starting point was, in my opinion, an opportunity the author took to re-write Robin as a much more likable character. In all of the other books I’ve read for this event, Robin has been arrogant and/or too carefree about risking people’s lives. In this particular book, Robin is both more likable and more believable. He worries about everyone else. He isn’t actually very good at shooting to start out with. And it was never his idea to become an outlaw or a legend. Instead he just cares about people and wants to do his best to help. Having a main character that I liked made this story much more enjoyable for me than in the other versions!The supporting characters were also particularly likable in this version. Both Much and Marian where well-developed characters with abilities that made them very helpful to Robin. Marian was much more competent than in the other books I’ve read. This wasn’t a big deal and didn’t steal the focus away from Robin; it was just assumed she was as capable as any one else. I think this is a positive development, since it shouldn’t have to be a big deal to have an impressive female character. I also liked that the romance between Marian and Robin took place largely in the background. So many books let the romance take over the plot instead! Like the romance, the writing was well done but kept in the background – enjoyable but nothing spectacular. By far the biggest appeal this book has is the great adventure story with wonderfully relatable characters.
  • (4/5)
    3.5 starsWhen Robin Hood accidentally shoots and kills a man with an arrow, he runs and hides in the forest. While the Sheriff of Nottingham sets out to find him, many others want to join Robin's “band” in the forest. I enjoyed this, and found it picked up in the second half. The first half wasn't nearly as interesting, I didn't think. Overall, enjoyable, though.
  • (3/5)
    This was a fun read, with historical details picked from among the wealth of Robin Hood tradition to fit the author's vision. Characters were clear, action was well paced, but there were more than a few places where the phrasing/ dialogue stood out as unclear. Whether that was due to the attempt to make it sound like Saxon English (an on-again, off-again attempt) or simply sentences that were not smoothed out, I'm not sure. I just skipped over them after a few tries though; they weren't crucial, just took me out of the spell of the book. Otherwise enjoyable.
  • (4/5)
    A good story retold with some different twists. Robin is a mediocre archer but Marian is very good with a bow. He is more concerned with feeding and building his community that winning archery contests. Starts slowly but gets into its stride until the usual ending but not quite.
  • (4/5)
    Starts a bit slow, but as always, Robin McKinley does an excellent job of bringing the exalted down to earth, and the unlikeliest to pass in the most believable way. What seems like simple story-telling has layers and echos of other versions of Robin Hood. This version will certainly color, if not erase, the simplistic cinematic versions with which we're most familiar.
  • (3/5)
    I admit, I struggled with finishing this one. I kept having to say to my mom 'it's not bad, but, I don't know...' To be honest, I do know that a part of my dissatisfaction with this book was that I'd just finished the King Raven trilogy and comparatively this one does fall a little flat as a Robin Hood retelling. That said, it was a good book despite it's flaws.
    Mostly, it’s flaws were that it was dry. I realise that this might just be Robin Mckinley’s writing but then I remembered that she wrote Sunshine so, no, that’s not it at all. The characters had a tendency to feel very lifeless with sparks of life every so often. It made for an interesting read because I would keep waiting for those sparks of life - and they did come it was just slow in coming.
    I mean, this was a good take on Robin Hood. I really did like it, I just didn’t like it’s set up. The scene in the very beginning when Marian and Much were convincing Robin to live in the forest seemed so forced. Once we got through the forced introduction the story began to settle into itself and admittedly the second half is much better than the first - it just had a really really rocky start.
    I appreciated all of the female characters that were added in to Robin Hood’s band. I loved her take on Marian’s involvement with everything and how basically everyone was a better archer than Robin himself. She removed the mysticism from the story and showed it more as a deconstruction. Showing a barer story that could perhaps be what the more mystical stories draw from.
    I enjoyed the book in the end, though. The ending wasn’t the most satisfying ending to a book ever, but it sufficed. Basically, I feel like I just really liked the middle up to the very last chapter. So my feelings generally are pretty mixed because I didn’t mislike the book, it just did have some flaws that are difficult to overlook.
  • (4/5)
    This is just a fun Robin Hood story.
  • (3/5)
    What? What's this? A Robin McKinley book I didn't get into? I'll try it again someday - it was a while back that I picked it up.

    Tried it again. It was good! Not usual McKinley although some of her signature phrasing is there. Nice characterization, a bit of romance and adventure, the gentle sort of fairy tale feel that all of her books have.
  • (4/5)
    Lovely! Robin Hood legends are glorious. I meant to reread this while I was doing a module on Robin Hood -- it was mentioned during the course, if I remember rightly. Must revisit it soon, with my new/deeper knowledge of the traditions.
  • (3/5)
    As good a "retelling" as most. Interesting use of the multiple legendary strands. Liked the interpretation of Robin's forced outlawry, and the characterization. Maybe a little too PC for history, but not egregious. Suitable for junior or teen readers. (Not a long read, just an interrupted one.)
  • (5/5)
    In The Outlaws of Sherwood, Robin McKinley re-imagines the Robin Hood legends to create a compelling and believable story of friendship, love, courage, and justice. In this retelling, Robin, an unassuming young forester, is just an average archer (usually I'd look askance at a revisionist decision to downplay Robin's legendary marksmanship, but here it works brilliantly). When he accidentally kills a king's forester, he flees to Sherwood, where he is aided by Much and Marian, two childhood friends who want to use his outlawhood as a symbol of Norman oppression and Saxon bravery. Robin, a pragmatic realist, can't imagine anyone who had a choice wanting to live the rough life of an outlaw in the forest, but as the band grows he's forced to acknowledge there may be something in their idealism after all. What really makes this story sing is the characters, so well crafted, individualistic, and just plain likeable. Marian is a tomboyish strong woman without being stereotypical. Tuck is more than just a worldly friar. Much is an inspiring fireside speaker with a relentless sense of humor. Little John is a dour philosopher with a well-hidden soft side. And Cecily... she is the best of all. Will Scarlet's younger sister, Cecily runs away from her arranged Norman marriage and poses as a boy amidst Robin's band. It's hard to make the feisty-female-impersonating-a-boy character really live and breathe in a believable way, but McKinley does it flawlessly with Cecily. Or Cecil, as the case may be. McKinley's usual deft touch lends the well-known stories a new personality. Maybe it's the fact that I read (and reread) it in my impressionable teen years, but this is my favorite retelling of the Robin Hood story and one that I will return to often when I want a comfort read. Love it.