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Lulu and the Witch Baby

Lulu and the Witch Baby

Escrito por Jane O'Connor

Narrado por Therese Plummer


Lulu and the Witch Baby

Escrito por Jane O'Connor

Narrado por Therese Plummer

avaliações:
4/5 (6 avaliações)
Comprimento:
10 minutos
Editora:
Lançado em:
Sep 8, 2020
ISBN:
9780063030374
Formato:
Audiolivro

Descrição

It's just not fair! No matter what a mess she makes, nobody ever gets mad at Witch Baby. Nobody except Lulu Witch, who cooks a magic brew that makes her baby sister disappear.

But then she begins to worry that Mama Witch will get mad—very mad. Can Lulu wish Witch Baby back? Beginning readers will love this classic tale from Fancy Nancy author Jane O'Connor about children learning to welcome new siblings.

With plenty of humor and witchy magic, Lulu and the Witch Baby is a level two I Can Read book, perfect for kids who read on their own but still need a little help.

Editora:
Lançado em:
Sep 8, 2020
ISBN:
9780063030374
Formato:
Audiolivro


Sobre o autor

Jane O’Connor is an editor at a major publishing house who has written more than seventy books for children, including the New York Times bestselling Fancy Nancy series. She resides (that’s fancy for lives) with her family in New York City.

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre Lulu and the Witch Baby

3.8
6 avaliações / 4 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    This is a cute “I Can Read” book by Jane O’Connor, who is the author of the Fancy Nancy books. Lulu Witch has a new baby sister, Witch Baby. Witch Baby is getting all kinds of presents from her family: a bat rattle, a witch doll and a Dracula-in-the-box. No one really has time for Lulu Witch anymore because they are busy with the baby. Witch Baby always makes a mess, but she never gets in trouble for it. One day Mama Witch needed to go to the store and Lulu Witch needed to babysit her little sister. Lulu Witch decided to create a spell to make Baby Witch disappear. Lulu got her wish and then she felt really bad. She tried to reverse the spell and thought she failed. Fortunately, when she got upstairs she saw Baby Witch with Mama Witch and all was well. The spell was not quite right and Lulu realized she loved her baby sister.This is a perfect book for young readers who have been gifted with a new baby brother or sister. The illustrations are not scary at all and the Witch family looks very lovable. The illustrator, Bella Sinclair, did a really nice job by making really cute pencil sketches. The colors are bright and appealing to young readers. This is a good book to have in a school library in the “I Can Read” section. It’s a level 2. It’s a good book to show off in a Halloween themed book display. It’s also a good book to share with teachers and counselors if a young student is struggling with a new addition to the family. It will also introduce new readers to Jane O’Connor. This book was originally copyrighted in 1986. It looks as though it was re-released in 2014 with a few small changes.
  • (4/5)
    Halloween is approaching, so reading fun Halloween stories is a must! A great children’s fictional book, in my opinion, that should be added to a Halloween book list is, Lulu and the Witch Baby. I believe this is a great book because it sends a clear message to its young audience that it is important to think about others before yourself. Lulu, the main character, the illustrations, and the writing all help promote this message.Lulu, the main character of the story, has a hard time dealing with her baby sister receiving all the attention from the family. IT even says that, “Everybody loved Witch Baby. Everybody but Lulu Witch. She did not love Witch baby at all.” Throughout the story Witch baby is very destructive, and Lulu Witch cannot stand it. Her mother even expresses to Lulu that, “Witch Baby is just a baby.” But, Lulu Witch wants to make a secret potion to make her baby sister disappear. Lulu’s character is important in this story because the readers are able to learn a lesson from her: to not be selfish.Next, the illustrations in the story are so very cute! The colors are a bit on the dark side, however, it correlates to the theme of Halloween. If they were any brighter it would emphasize the story. Furthermore, the illustrations enhance the story. While “Witch Baby was busy breaking all of Lulu’s crayons,” the illustration shows that Lulu is extremely surprised and upset, while Witch Baby is giggling with excitement as broken crayons and Lulu’s drawings are ripped up all over the floor. Finally, I feel as though the writing is engaging and well-paced. The story gives several instances when Witch Baby does something wrong allow the reader to reach the message of the story at the end. The writing isn’t too overwhelming, it is, however, very descriptive and clear. An example to support my reasoning is: “I am a very wicked witch, she said, and she started to cry. I wish I had never made that spell. I wish Witch Baby was back.” Such a cute read!
  • (3/5)
    In an easy-to-read format (level 2), O'Connor has created a story that young kids will resonate with. Lulu the witch has a new sibling and no one seems to have time for her anymore. She's pretty excited when she thinks one of her spells makes the baby disappear, at least at first, but then she's scared and misses her sister after all. Great choice for on-their own reading.
  • (2/5)
    The first of two I Can Read Books devoted to the adventures of Lulu Witch - the second being Lulu Goes to Witch School - this title follows its eponymous heroine through a somewhat rocky period of adjustment to her new infant sister, Witch Baby. Angry and jealous, resentful of all the attention that Witch Baby is getting, and feeling ignored, Lulu Witch casts a spell to get rid of her new sibling, while Mama Witch is out at the market. But when Witch Baby does disappear, Lulu begins to worry. What will Mama Witch think? And what will happen to her little sister, who is, after all, just a baby...?Emily Arnold McCully fans will be interested in this early title, which she illustrated under the name "Emily McCully," as will beginning readers who enjoy witchy tales. Like Bruce Degen's The Little Witch and the Riddle, also read as part of my recent "witchy-witches" project, Jane O'Connor's narrative features magical accoutrements, but is centered on a common human experience: in this case, adjusting to a new sibling. Unfortunately, although I can see Lulu and the Witch Baby really appealing to some beginning readers, it just wasn't my cup of tea. The story was no more than adequate, and the rather blurry artwork wasn't to my taste. Still, mileage varies, so if you've got a young reader who's a big Fancy Nancy fan, and wants to try out other books by the same author, you might give this a try.