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A Workbook for New Testament Syntax: Companion to Basics of New Testament Syntax and Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

A Workbook for New Testament Syntax: Companion to Basics of New Testament Syntax and Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

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A Workbook for New Testament Syntax: Companion to Basics of New Testament Syntax and Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

Comprimento:
218 página
1 hora
Editora:
Lançado em:
Apr 19, 2011
ISBN:
9780310874270
Formato:
Livro

Descrição

Daniel B. Wallace’s groundbreaking books Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament and Basics of New Testament Syntax have become the standard textbooks among colleges and seminaries for teaching New Testament Greek syntax. This workbook, designed to accompany both books, presents a dynamic approach to learning Greek syntax. Instead of simply learning syntax in single-verse snippets, students are exposed to all of the major syntactical categories in exegetically and theologically significant passages.

Editora:
Lançado em:
Apr 19, 2011
ISBN:
9780310874270
Formato:
Livro

Sobre o autor

Daniel B. Wallace (PhD, Dallas Theological Seminary) is professor of New Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary. He is a noted textual critic, serving as head of the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts, and is author of Greek Grammar beyond the Basics, Basics of New Testament Syntax, and (with Grant Edwards) of A Workbook for New Testament Syntax.

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A Workbook for New Testament Syntax - Daniel B. Wallace

Lesson 1: Nominative and Vocative

Nominative

Warm-Up Passages

Vocabulary

Matthew 3:1

(This is an example of a historical present [Basics 226–27; ExSyn 526–32].)

: Case, case usage, word related to? [1+1+1]

: Case, case usage, word related to? [1+1+1]

: Case, case usage? (This noun does not occur in a sentence, nor is a verb even implied. Consequently, there is no word related to for it. In such instances, you may be asked from time to time for the word related to. The answer should be no relation.) [1+1]

: Case, case usage, word related to? [1+1+1]

: Case, case usage, word related to? [1+2+1]

(This is an example of a dative of recipient, a dative that would ordinarily be an indirect object, except that it appears in verbless constructions (such as in titles and salutations) [ExSyn 148].)

Syntax Passages

John 1:6–14

Background

The Gospel of John opens with a prologue (1:1–18) in which, like Mark’s Gospel, there is no genealogy and no birth narrative. But the reason for this in the Fourth Gospel is that the Son of God has always existed and, in fact, has created all things (1:1–5). His incarnation is mentioned from the divine perspective of why he came to earth (1:6–18), rather than from the human perspective of those who first beheld a newborn babe and wondered what he would become. From the outset, then, John’s Gospel presents Jesus as God’s Son—in fact, as God in the flesh. Our passage begins by introducing Jesus’ forerunner, John the Baptist, who testifies about the light.

Text

Vocabulary

John 1:6

at first blush seems to mean a man was created, especially in light of v. 3. Although this is not an appropriate rendering in this context, there does indeed seem to be a hint that the one we are looking at is a creature, a mere

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