Build Your Own Solar Powered Generator: Step by Step Instructions for Solar Power at a Fraction of the Cost by Sue Merriam - Read Online
Build Your Own Solar Powered Generator
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When the power goes out, you need to be prepared. A solar powered generator is a great way to have electricity during an emergency, but buying one can be expensive. Fortunately, you can build your own solar powered generator for a fraction of the cost, often less than $300. This handy, step-by-step guide will show you how.

Published: Sue Merriam on
ISBN: 9781476084527
List price: $4.95
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Build Your Own Solar Powered Generator: Step by Step Instructions -

Solar Power at a Fraction of the Cost

by Rick Green and Sue Merriam

Copyright 2012 Rick Green and Susan Merriam

Smashwords Edition

Organic Gardening and Homesteading

This ebook is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to Smashwords.com and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

Table of Contents

First Glimpse: The Parts You Need and How They Fit Together

Introduction: So Why Invest in a Solar Power Generator?

Solar Power Basics

Electric Facts You Need to Know

Batteries Explained

Watts and Your Solar Panel

All About Charge Controllers

Voltage Revisited

Choosing the Right Battery

Inverters

Wiring 101

Building and Installing Your Solar Power Generator

Mounting Your Solar Panel

Wiring Your Solar Panel

The Right Tilt

Assembling Your Generator

In Conclusion

First Glimpse: The Parts You Need and How They Fit Together

In this book, we'll explain the different components of the solar generator, how they work and the step by step instructions you need for installing and assembling your generator, but for now, here is an upfront list of the parts you will need. A chart follows that shows how the main pieces fit together.

Solar Panel

Charge Controller

Inverter

Deep Cycle Marine Battery

Battery Case with Lid

Extra Wire that is about 14 gauge

Battery Cables and connectors

1-2 dozen, Plastic Tie Wraps

Electrical Tape

1 dozen Butt Connectors (Wire nuts will also work, but will not be as secure)

Plastic coated wire staples

Power drill

Tube of Caulk

Adjustable (Crescent) Wrench

Wire strippers/crimpers

14-gauge, low-voltage wire, 100 feet more or less, depending on the distance between your solar panel and your battery

Extension ladder to get on the roof

1 shelf bracket

6 galvanized hurricane straps

6 one-quarter, ¾ inch bolts

6 one-quarter-20 nuts

12 one-quarter lock washers

Tin snips

Hammer (for plastic coated wire staples)

Combination protractor and level (for getting your panel at the right angle)

Wire coat hanger or other strong piece of wire

Introduction: So Why Invest in a Solar Power Generator?

The weather is fairly moderate in Oklahoma, but every January, we get ice storms that coat the trees with ice, making heavy limbs break and fall on power lines, and leaving people without electricity, sometimes for days. That was the case about two years ago for Rick Green, who lives on rural property on the outskirts of a small town.

The power company was overwhelmed with fallen lines and couldn't get to Rick's place for two weeks. Two weeks without power would have forced many a person to abandon their home and either rent a motel room or stay with Aunt Bertha and her nine poodles.

Yet despite that Rick had no electricity for two weeks, he was able to have a few lights on every night and watch television. He also had enough power to recharge his cell phone and laptop. A wood burning stove kept his house tolerably warm, and every night he brought water home from work.

Rick has a solar power generator, providing him with backup electricity for the few appliances he finds crucial. Had he preferred, he could have had a generator run the well on his place every day for water, or