Dumbbell Circuit Training by Danny O'Dell by Danny O'Dell - Read Online

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This book will not be as exhaustive as those commonly shown in the major fitness publications, nor will it include the usual supplement endorsements or recommendations. This strength manual is drug and supplement free with suggested routines successfully used many times in the past and it can be just as successful for you, if you follow the program.

The routines include the major muscle groups of the shoulders, arms, chest, upper back, lower back, abdominals, legs and calves.

For each exercise session, pick out one exercise from the major headings and then do two to three sets of ten to twelve repetitions each.

If you are able to finish in the twenty-minute period, add a second exercise from one or two of the major headings the next exercise session. You can do all of the exercises with bands, tubes, dumbbells or your own body weight. Bands, tubes or dumbbells provide the resistance necessary to overload your muscles. In fact, picking up a few of the different elastic materials will increase your exercise capabilities, especially for the pull downs mentioned in the short thirty to forty minute schedules at the end of the book.

Published: Danny O'Dell on
ISBN: 9781301807772
List price: $7.99
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Dumbbell Circuit Training - Danny O'Dell

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schedules

Chapter 12 The exercise descriptions

Chapter 13 Cardiovascular training

Chapter 15 The cool down

Chapter 16 Physical Activities Readiness Questionnaire

Chapter 17 Appendix A Overall body warm up using the skip rope

Chapter 18 Appendix B Alternate training schedules

Chapter 19 About the author

Chapter 1 Introduction

This book is written specifically for those of you who:

Don’t have your own gym,

Feel self-conscious exercising in public.

Don’t have access to a commercial gym,

Who don't want to drive to a commercial gym,

Who enjoy exercising by themselves in the privacy of their own home,

Don’t have enough space in your house to build a full gym and

Would prefer to use dumbbells or elastic materials in your training.

Taking each of these into consideration, you may want to look in the catalogs and get one of the integrated dumbbell setups such as those found in the Sears stores. There are others such as the Bowflex adjustable dumbbells set, the Weider power switch 100-pound weight set, the Ironman LeverLock adjustable dumbbell set, and the PowerBlock personal trainer adjustable dumbbell set, amongst the numerous selections possible.

You also may want to consider buying a bench, however many cases the floor works just as well. If you do decide to buy a bench, buy the best one you can, buy one that is high quality and one that will not tip over or collapse while you are using it.

For me the bottom line in buying equipment is to get something that is going to last a long time and is not going to break down within the first couple of years. Pay the money up front and you will have many years of enjoyment later on.

This book will not be as exhaustive as those commonly shown in the major fitness publications, nor will it include the usual supplement endorsements or recommendations. This strength manual is drug and supplement free with suggested routines successfully used many times in the past and it can be just as successful for you, if you follow the program.

The routines include the major muscle groups of the shoulders, arms, chest, upper back, lower back, abdominals, legs and calves.

For each exercise session, pick out one exercise from the major headings and then do two to three sets of ten to twelve repetitions each.

If you are able to finish in the twenty-minute period, add a second exercise from one or two of the major headings the next exercise session. You can do all of the exercises with bands, tubes, dumbbells or your own body weight. Bands, tubes or dumbbells provide the resistance necessary to overload your muscles. In fact, picking up a few of the different elastic materials will increase your exercise capabilities, especially for the pull downs mentioned in the short thirty to forty minute schedules at the end of the book.

If you do decide to use some type of elastic material in lieu of the dumbbells then consider the following before starting out with them.

Since this book focuses on the use of dumbbells, it will not discuss attachment points for the tubing or bands. Nonetheless, proper attachment is necessary for the greatest productive and safe use of these exercise tools.

An excellent book titled The Scientific and Clinical Application of Elastic Resistance by Phillip Page and Todd S. Becker is devoted to the use of elastic resistance devices. This book is available through Human Kinetics.

Here are a few safety notes before using the rubber tubing or rubber bands.

Avoid using the bands or tubing if you have long fingernails.

Take off your jewelry, or other sharp things you may have on your body.

Always check the condition of the tubing and bands before every use; check for tears, abrasions, and wear. Replace if any of these conditions are noted. These implements can be very dangerous if left to decay. At the stretched out position, if they break, they can come flying back in a violent manner causing injury to you.

Always check the connections at the points of attachment before using the tubing or bands

Do not stretch the tubing or bands more than 300% longer than their normal resting length to help prevent them from breaking.

If you have an allergy to latex allergy do not use latex tubing or bands

None of the exercise suggestions in this book are complicated, they are simply good combinations that will work your entire body, depending on the selection you make from the exercises listed.

Physical activity increases the quality of life as well as prolonging it. Many components contribute to a healthy life, the most important of which are cardiovascular, flexibility and strength conditioning. Known as the fitness triad, they make up the essential ingredients necessary to living a long and productive life. Appropriately stress each separate part to reap the combined positive benefits.

The correct load, along with the frequency of training, intensity, and duration of the exercise play a big role in whether or not your activity will be of benefit. In order to stress the cardiovascular system the heart rate has to be in the 60%-80% range of maximum heart rate. To stress the musculature system, training in the 80%-90% range is necessary to increase strength. In addition, flexibility practiced daily to the point of mild discomfort and holding in the outer ranges for 15-30 seconds at a time will increase your ability to move with fluidity and grace.

What follows is a concept practiced many times by the athletes utilizing the Explosivelyfit Strength Training, LLC programs. Proceed carefully with each exercise by doing them correctly every time.

The series of continuous movements in this manual are just samples of many that are available and very useful. For more training information go to www.explosivelyfit.com

If you are short of time and need to get a workout in quickly this will be a valuable addition to your workout program. The utility of these movements lies in the fact that so many different muscles are exercised in ways that are unusual to the body.

They provide a different proprioceptive challenge to the muscular movements.

They force you to handle the weights in a different fashion than is commonly used.

They make you practice your balance

To accomplish them in a safe and efficient manner, you have to be on your toes mentally and physically.

Begin slowly in your program and if you are unsure of how to do an exercise consult with a National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) or a NSCA Certified Personal Trainer (CPT).

If you are sick or injured, don’t exercise. Instead, use common sense and prevent any further training delays by taking it easy for a short time until you are well again.

Back to the table of contents

Chapter 2 The work out protocol

Warm up correctly. Raise your temperature until you break a slight sweat.

Begin the program by doing only one set per listed exercise. The next session work up to two sets, and so on, as your body becomes accustomed to the workload. Vary your workouts each time.

Volume and load intensity will change on a daily and weekly basis.

Do full extensions and full flexions on all the exercises. This works the Range of Motion (ROM) in each joint.

Practice correct technique BEFORE adding more resistance to the set.

Follow common sense load and intensity progressions. Use the NSCA 2x2 rule of load increases. This progression guideline says that if you can to two more reps on the last set for