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The Cricket in Times Square

The Cricket in Times Square

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The Cricket in Times Square

avaliações:
4.5/5 (31 avaliações)
Comprimento:
133 página
1 hora
Lançado em:
Feb 25, 2014
ISBN:
9781466863620
Formato:
Livro

Descrição

Written by Scribd Editors

Written by George Selden and illustrated by Garth Williams, The Cricket in Times Square is a 1961 Newbery Honor Book. In this story, Chester the cricket travels from the country to Times Square in New York.

When he arrives at the subway station, Chester finds a comfortable place to live in a nearby newsstand. There, he meets new friends, named Mario, Tucker, and Harry. Mario is the son of the people who run the newsstand, Tucker is a fast-talking Broadway mouse, and Harry the cat is Tucker's sidekick.

The newsstand where Chester lives is not doing well. In fact, it's nearly bankrupt. But when Chester's new friends realize that he is somewhat skilled in making music, they put together a show that draws crowds to the newsstand, bringing new customers. Now, Chester has to decide if he wants city life and fame or if he wants to go back home to the country.

If you like The Cricket in Times Square, be sure to check out the rest of the series, Chester Cricket and His Friends, to see what they get up to next.

Lançado em:
Feb 25, 2014
ISBN:
9781466863620
Formato:
Livro

Sobre o autor

George Selden (1929-1989) was the author of A Cricket in Times Square, winner of the 1961 Newbery Honor and a timeless children's classic. Born in Hartford, Connecticut, Selden received his B.A. from Yale, where he was a member of the Elizabethan Club and contributed to the literary magazine. He spent three summer sessions at Columbia University and, after college, studied for a year in Rome on a Fulbright Scholarship. People often asked Selden how he got the idea for The Cricket in Times Square. "One night I was coming home on the subway, and I did hear a cricket chirp in the Times Square subway station. The story formed in my mind within minutes. An author is very thankful for minutes like those, although they happen all too infrequently." The popular Cricket series grew to seven titles, including Tucker's Countryside and The Old Meadow. In 1973, The Cricket in Times Square was made into an animated film. Selden wrote more than fifteen books, as well as two plays. His storytelling blends the marvelous with the commonplace realities of life, and it was essential to him that his animal characters display true emotions and feelings.

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Amostra do Livro

The Cricket in Times Square - George Selden

Copyright

ONE

Tucker

A mouse was looking at Mario.

The mouse’s name was Tucker, and he was sitting in the opening of an abandoned drain pipe in the subway station at Times Square. The drain pipe was his home. Back a few feet in the wall, it opened out into a pocket that Tucker had filled with the bits of paper and shreds of cloth he collected. And when he wasn’t collecting, scrounging as he called it, or sleeping, he liked to sit at the opening of the drain pipe and watch the world go by—at least as much of the world as hurried through the Times Square subway station.

Tucker finished the last few crumbs of a cookie he was eating—a Lorna Doone shortbread he had found earlier in the evening—and licked off his whiskers. Such a pity, he sighed.

Every Saturday night now for almost a year he had watched Mario tending his father’s newsstand. On weekdays, of course, the boy had to get to bed early, but over the weekends Papa Bellini let him take his part in helping out with the family business. Far into the night Mario waited. Papa hoped that by staying open as late as possible his newsstand might get some of the business that would otherwise have gone to the larger stands. But there wasn’t much business tonight.

The poor kid might as well go home, murmured Tucker Mouse to himself. He looked around the station.

The bustle of the day had long since subsided, and even the nighttime crowds, returning from the theaters and movies, had vanished. Now and then a person or two would come down one of the many stairs that led from the street and dart through the station. But at this hour everyone was in a hurry to get to bed. On the lower level the trains were running much less often. There would be a long stretch of silence; then the mounting roar as a string of cars approached Times Square; then a pause while it let off old passengers and took on new ones; and finally the rush of sound as it disappeared up the dark tunnel. And the hush fell again. There was an emptiness in the air. The whole station seemed to be waiting for the crowds of people it needed.

Tucker Mouse looked back at Mario. He was sitting on a three-legged stool behind the counter of the newsstand. In front of him all the magazines and newspapers were displayed as neatly as he knew how to make them. Papa Bellini had made the newsstand himself many years ago. The space inside was big enough for Mario, but Mama and Papa were cramped when they each took their turn. A shelf ran along one side, and on it were a little secondhand radio, a box of Kleenex (for Mama’s hay fever), a box of kitchen matches (for lighting Papa’s pipe), a cash register (for money—which there wasn’t much of), and an alarm clock (for no good reason at all). The cash register had one drawer, which was always open. It had gotten stuck once, with all the money the Bellinis had in the world inside it, so Papa decided it would be safer never to shut it again. When the stand was closed for the night, the money that was left there to start off the new day was perfectly safe, because Papa had also made a big wooden cover, with a lock, that fitted over the whole thing.

Mario had been listening to the radio. He switched it off. Way down the tracks he could see the lights of the shuttle train coming toward him. On the level of the station where the newsstand was, the only tracks were the ones on which the shuttle ran. That was a short train that went back and forth from Times Square to Grand Central, taking people from the subways on the west side of New York City over to the lines on the east. Mario knew most of the conductors on the shuttle. They all liked him and came over to talk between trips.

The train screeched to a stop beside the newsstand, blowing a gust of hot air in front of it. Only nine or ten people got out. Tucker watched anxiously to see if any of them stopped to buy a paper.

All late papers! shouted Mario as they hurried by. Magazines!

No one stopped. Hardly anyone even looked at him. Mario sank back on his stool. All evening long he had sold only fifteen papers and four magazines. In the drain pipe Tucker Mouse, who had been keeping count too, sighed and scratched his ear.

Mario’s friend Paul, a conductor on the shuttle, came over to the stand. Any luck? he asked.

No, said Mario. Maybe on the next train.

There’s going to be less and less until morning, said Paul.

Mario rested his chin on the palm of his hand. I can’t understand it, he said. It’s Saturday night too. Even the Sunday papers aren’t going.

Paul leaned up against the newsstand. You’re up awfully late tonight, he said.

Well, I can sleep on Sundays, said Mario. Besides, school’s out now. Mama and Papa are picking me up on the way home. They went to visit some friends. Saturday’s the only chance they have.

Over a loudspeaker came a voice saying, Next train for Grand Central, track 2.

’Night, Mario, Paul said. He started off toward the shuttle. Then he stopped, reached in his pocket, and flipped a half dollar over the counter. Mario caught the big coin. "I’ll take a Sunday Times," Paul said, and picked up the newspaper.

Hey wait! Mario called after him. It’s only twenty-five cents. You’ve got a quarter coming.

But Paul was already in the car. The door slid closed. He smiled and waved through the window. With a lurch the train moved off, its lights glimmering away through the darkness.

Tucker Mouse smiled too. He liked Paul. In fact he liked anybody who was nice to Mario. But it was late now: time to crawl back to his comfortable niche in the wall and go to sleep. Even a mouse who lives in the subway station in Times Square has to sleep sometimes. And Tucker had a big day planned for tomorrow, collecting things for his home and snapping up bits of food that fell from the lunch counters all over the station. He was just about to turn into the drain pipe when he heard a very strange sound.

Now Tucker Mouse had heard almost all the sounds that can be heard in New York City. He had heard the rumble of subway trains and the shriek their iron wheels make when they go around a corner. From above, through the iron grilles that open onto the streets, he had heard the thrumming of the rubber tires of automobiles, and the hooting of their horns, and the howling of their brakes. And he had heard the babble of voices when the station was full of human beings, and the barking of the dogs that some of them had on leashes. Birds, the pigeons of New York, and cats, and even the high purring of airplanes above the city Tucker had heard. But in all his days, and on all his journeys through the greatest city in the world, Tucker had never heard a sound quite like this

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31 avaliações / 34 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (4/5)
    Good early read aloud. Yet another book where I cried at the end and my 5 year old consoled me. I am a sap!

    The book had some slow parts but picked up mind-way through and I loved the ending. It was an enjoyable book for both the parent reader and the child listener. There were some plot twists that kept the story engaging.
  • (4/5)
    Really good book about becoming friends with those who are different. Setting took place in the City of New York.
  • (4/5)
    Second Time as Good as the First!

    I decided to revisit various Newbery Award winners and Honors... This was a good revisit!!
  • (4/5)
    I read this book aloud to my daughters. It won the Newbery Honor in 1961 and the Massachusetts Children's Book Award in 1976. I am sure that I read this as a young girl, but I did not remember it.We all loved the book! The displaced cricket, Chester, from Connecticut is found in Grand Central Station in New York by a little boy named Mario, who takes Chester to his family's newspaper stand and builds a bed for him. Chester befriends two other creatures in Grand Central Station: a cat named Harry and a mouse named Tucker. The unlikely trio has several adventures, and they band together to help keep Mario's family from going bankrupt.There are six other books in this series, and we intend to continue reading about the adventures of Chester Cricket and his friends!
  • (5/5)
    A great story, I enjoyed the imagination included in the authors words, and I was very interested in the background story of Chester cricket.
  • (5/5)
    Another childhood favorite.
  • (4/5)
    I read this because I enjoyed Harry Cat's Pet Puppy so much; this was nice, but the relationship between Harry Cat and Tucker Mouse was not as much fun here.
  • (4/5)
    Chester Cricket, lured by the smell of liverwurst, is accidentally trapped inside a picnic basket on a lovely day in Connecticut. After a long train ride, he escapes in Grand Central Station, and meets up with Tucker Mouse and Harry Cat who show him the ropes as he gets used to his new home. He is adopted by a young boy, Mario Bellini, whose prents own a newspaper stand in the train terminal. Chester Cricket has many adventures, but his claim to fame begins when his wonderful musical talent is discovered. Alas though, even in being a star, Chester still misses the quiet of the country side and decides he needs to get back home again. This charming classic is still quite enjoyable and will work well for a book discussion for kids ages 9-12, or a little younger with families.
  • (5/5)
    First read this in 1990 for school, and I still think it is super cute. A great readalike for Charlotte's Webb.
  • (5/5)
    This was one of my favorite "chapter" books when I was growing up. It's an adorable tale about a cat and a mouse who become friends (if I remember correctly -- I'm getting old, which means both that it's been a long time since I've read it, and that my memory is failing).
  • (4/5)
    Chester Cricket hops into a family's picnic basket in his home state of Connecticut and inadvertently gets taken to New York City, where he hops off at Grand Central Station. Luckily for him, his sad chirps are heard by Mario, a youngster who takes Chester to live in his family's newsstand in the station. Chester quickly makes friends with a cat and a mouse who also live in the station and has quite a few adventures - and misadventures - with his new pals.I recall reading and enjoying this book as a child, and remember it feeling old-fashioned and quaint back then. Surprisingly, the book was written in the 1960s and seems to be set around the same time, yet it feels as if you are hearkening back to a much older time period when you read it. For instance, the young child working all kinds of late nights and alone seems particularly outdated! The book also shows its age with its lack of diversity issues -- there are no female characters outside of the histrionic-prone Mama and the depiction of Sai Fong is rather stereotypical.On the flip side, it is nice to have a light read like this where death and destruction don't play a part, as seems to be a common theme in many children's books these days. Instead the book concerns itself with relatively minor mishaps, albeit rather unusual ones. There are several positive themes and lessons that can be gleaned from this novel, including friendship, personal responsibility, and so forth. The black-and-white sketches make for a nice touch, accenting the book's content nicely with a visual here and there to help younger readers along.All in all, this a solid book that engages the reader and mostly makes up for its outdated bits by being a quick and fun read. Still, I'm not sure that I would be quick to recommend it and I have no interest in reading the further tales of Chester Cricket.
  • (5/5)
    The kids loved it - I liked it, too.The following is part of the review I posted on my blog, A Sea of Books.Since New York City figures so prominately in the book world this weekend, it seems an appropriate time to post my review of this children's classic. I read it to my niece and nephew over a couple of weeks, reading a chapter or two in the evenings. My nephew is 8 and my niece is 5. This is the first long book that has held both of their interests, and they eagerly looked forward to each session. My niece would often ask during the day if we'd be reading "the cricket book" that night.Believe it or not, I had never read THE CRICKET IN TIMES SQUARE before, and I found myself reading ahead after the kids went to sleep because I just had to find out what happened! And why not? This is a charming story full of adventure, friendships, and whimsy. I don't think anything I say would improve on the abundance of accolades showered on this book through the decades since it was first published in 1960. All I'm going to do is give it a big thumbs up and encourage anyone who hasn't read it, to do so -- with or without a kid at your side! It's thoroughly enjoyable!
  • (4/5)
    Chester Cricket, a native of Connecticut, gets stuck in a picnic basket and is eventually found and taken in by a young boy, Mario, whose parents own a newstand in the subway. Chester is befriended by two other denizens of the subway station, Tucker Mouse and Harry Cat.

    Lots of depth can be found in this small book about Chester Cricket and his summer spent in the Times Square subway station. I particularly like that Tucker Mouse is left to be a less than perfect character. He never learns a "lesson" that changes him into a paragon; he remains a real, fully-fleshed out character with plenty of faults. I also found the exploration of the effects fame can have on a performer to be quite interesting, particularly in light of the current fishbowl climate celebrities live in.

    Listened to the Recorded Books Playaway narrated by Barbara Caruso. The depiction of the Chinese man Mario goes to see for cricket advice made me uncomfortable, but I wonder if the accent was an audio production decision or written into the book. If it was written into the book, I think it would make me less uncomfortable because the book was written in the early 1960s before political awareness was as common. If it was an audio production decision or Barbara Caruso's choice, I'd find that less acceptable since the audio was produced in 1994. Maybe it shouldn't bother me at all, but it just seemed to be in slightly poor taste. I also would love to hear an audio production that incorporated some of the classical music mentioned within the story. What a great way that would be to introduce that music to children and to deepen the impact of the story. I believe my parents read this aloud to us as children, but I didn't remember it at all so maybe I'm wrong.
  • (5/5)
    As far as I am concerned, this book should have won the Newbery Award.Chester Cricket finds himself miles from his Connecticut meadow home, deep in the bowels of NYC 's subway stations, and underneath Times Square. How he makes a difference in the lives of those around him, Harry the cat, Tucker the mouse, Mario and the great teeming crowds of the subway station, is not just charming or delightful, but so much more. "The Cricket in Times Square" is a children's book that should also speak to adults, to that inner child in each of us.
  • (3/5)
    This 1961 Newbery Honor winner is delightful, charming, witty and funny. When Conneticut living Chester the cricket is inadvertently trapped in a picket basket and travels via train to the Times Square subway station in New York City, he meets up with a host of lively, lovely characters.Late at night while young Mario Bellini is taking care of his family newsstand , he hears an unusual sound from a stack of papers. Rescuing Chester, he convinces his parents to allow him to keep Chester as a pet.When subway-drain-living Tucker the mouse befriends the cricket, Tucker's humorous opera loving friend Harry the Cat joins the mayhem.Together the cricket, mouse and cat help to rescue the financially troubled Bellini business by having Chester perform operatic concerts. Chester has an ear for music and his cricket chirps soon become exquisite sound.The interplay between the critters is charming. While there isn't a lot of substance, still, I recommend this book for many reasons, including the wonderful illustrations by Garth Williams, the laugh out loud moments created by Tucker the mouse and Harry the cat, and the way in which the author captured New York City.
  • (5/5)
    As a young reader, I absolutely loved this book. One of these, I look forward to reading it again.
  • (4/5)
    I have read this book several times now and I still get a little teary-eyed at the end. A warm, gentle story that entertains kids and adults. My 7yo enjoyed the book though it is not a page-turner but more a slow-paced, heart-warming book. One where the characters become your friends. The language is wonderfully descriptive and memorable. Every time I pick this book up I start to remember the scenes of the old Chinese man at the store in China Town. I can't talk about the book without mentioning the illustrations. Written in a time when children's novels were always illustrated, Garth Williams pictures are fabulous. He is one of my favourite illustrators and I'm very likely to read a book simple because he's done the illustrations. Selden went on to write several sequels to this novel, of which I've only read one other "Chester Cricket's Pigeon Ride". My son and I look forward to reading some of the others and meeting up with these friends again.
  • (3/5)
    I did not read this as a kid, though I did often see it displayed at whichever library happened to be "my" library at the time. Not sure why I never picked it up. Well, anyway, now I have. I enjoyed it. It's a sweet book, and it's nice to read a book about friendship and problems that arise randomly and how the three friends deal with them. They are honorable characters. I hadn't realized there were sequels, but I have already checked out the next one.
  • (3/5)
    My kids enjoyed the book quite a bit. Me? I thought it was ok, but nothing really outstanding. Still, it's an interesting look back at what writing styles used to be like.
  • (3/5)
    Cute. Read it as a kid and didn't remember the story.
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful tale about a country cricket who ends up in the subway station at Times Square in New York City. He learns that crickets are lucky and that his musical talents could make him famous.A great story illustrating the similarities and differences between country and city life. Also good for showing the stresses of fame and how important one's actual home is.
  • (5/5)
    I'd been meaning to read The Cricket in Times Square for some time now. So, when I was browsing through available audiobooks for a recent trip, I was pleased to come across this -- and not only was it a book I had been meaning to read, but it was narrated by Tony Shaloub!Mario's family owns a newsstand in the Times Square subway station. One day, while minding the stand, Mario hears a sound one doesn't usually hear in New York City: the soft chirping of a cricket. The cricket in question is Chester, who inadvertently caught a ride in from Connecticut in a picnic basket. Mario is fascinated by the small creature and makes a pet of him -- albeit one that lives at the newsstand, since his mother will not allow the insect into her house. At the newsstand, Chester is soon befriended by Tucker Mouse and Harry Cat, two street-smart city dwellers who appreciate Chester's friendly personality and musical ability. Chester enjoys life with his new friends, but then, disaster strikes, and it is at least partially Chester's fault. Can he find a way to make up for it to his benefactors -- and will he ever find his way back home to Connecticut?I'm not sure how I missed out on this book as a kid, since it's just the sort of thing I would have liked. I enjoyed it now, of course, though it is a little dated in spots (Mario visits Chinatown and the depictions of his visit there don't sit as well with a modern audience as they may have in the past). Unsurprisingly, Shaloub's narration is excellent and contributed to my enjoyment of the story.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book as a kid. It is great!
  • (4/5)
    I loved this story, with all its wonderful New York characters and the cricket who brought hope to a huge city (and who loved him some liverwurst!)
  • (4/5)
    This book was very realistic because the author used personification to rat, cat, cricket also other animals. This book is very impressive.
  • (3/5)
    I read this book for the first time this week and I'm 21. If I had read it when I was younger I think I would have liked it more. It was still a very cute book and I enjoyed reading it. It's a really quick and easy read, but it still contains an important moral.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about the magic of animals, even though there isn't really any magic involved at all. The author has managed to include each character's back story without taking anything from the plot itself and has a natural way of moving along in from page to page that is just perfect and quite possibly deserving of more than just the Newbery Honor. It is a perfect story for young readers and it is a heartwarming reread for adults, who just might rediscover some faith in humanity as they go from cover to cover. A Cricket in Times Square is one of those charming classics that everyone should read.
  • (4/5)
    A country cricket finds himself in the subway of Times Square in New York. He befriends a mouse and a cat and a young boy whose family runs a newsstand and takes him as a pet. The cricket at first seems to be a jinx to the newsstand until the cricket discovers that he can chirp most any song and becomes a star over night. However, fame is not what the cricket wants, he longs for his country life and decides to give up all in order to return. A cute award winning tale for young readers.
  • (5/5)
    It very heart warming for a book i would share this
  • (4/5)
    Chester Cricket has always lived in a Connecticut meadow, but his curiosity about a picnic basket results in his winding up in the Times Square subway station. This is where Mario Bellini, son of the owners of a struggling newsstand, finds Chester and takes him in. Tucker the mouse and Harry the cat also befriend Chester. Their adventures, disasters, and triumphs form the basis of a wonderful friendship.This book is utterly delightful. It demonstrates the value of true friendship, loyalty, and compassion, and teaches us about responsibility and obligation to do the right thing. Chester’s story makes my heart sing, just as his playing affected the passersby in the subway. Garth Williams’s illustrations are perfectly detailed and a wonderful addition to the story.