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From the Publisher

Crock Pot Cookbook is a set of 451 recipes that have been formatted to work on your eReader. The book is organized by category with an easy to use table of contents. If you've got a chicken sitting in your fridge screaming at you to do something before it gets too old you can go to the "Chicken & Turkey" section and scan through the titles or click on the first one and start scanning the recipes.

Published: Robert Wilson on
ISBN: 9781458075185
List price: $0.99
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