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Xcode 4 iOS Development Beginner's Guide

Xcode 4 iOS Development Beginner's Guide

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Xcode 4 iOS Development Beginner's Guide

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963 página
6 horas
Lançado em:
Aug 25, 2011
ISBN:
9781849691314
Formato:
Livro

Descrição

In Detail

The iPhone is one of the hottest mobile devices on the planet. Whether you are just starting out with iOS Development or already have some knowledge in this area, you will benefit from what this book covers. Using this book's straightforward, step-by-step approach, you will go from Xcode 4 apprentice to Xcode 4 Jedi master in no time.

Xcode 4 iOS Development Beginner's Guide will help you learn to build simple, yet powerful applications for the iPhone from the ground up. You will master the Xcode 4 tools and skills needed to create applications that are simple yet, like Yoda, punch far above their weight.

You will start by learning about the Xcode 4 Development Tools, Xcode IDE, iOS Simulator, Objective-C 2, and Organizer. Then you will jump straight in and create applications using Xcode and Interface Builder. You finish up by learning how to build, package, and distribute your application to the Apple App Store.

This book will teach you how to go about building simple applications from scratch, you will master how to download and install the Xcode 4 Development Tools, get to know the development environment and how to build great user interfaces (using Interface Builder), learn about the different iOS frameworks, learn how to implement video and audio playback, learn how to sense motion using the Accelerometer and Gyroscope, and how to improve the reliability and performance of your applications.

After reading Xcode 4 iOS Development Beginner's Guide, you will be able to write your own applications for the iPhone with supreme efficiency. There are a lot of examples and images provided to get you up to speed quickly.

Using this book's easy to follow step-by-step approach you will harness Xcode 4's firepower to create some stunning applications for your iPhone

Approach

This step-by-step book guides you through the process of creating awesome iOS apps using Xcode 4. As a beginner's guide, it focuses on getting you through all the major learning points in a smooth, logical order while showing you how to avoid some common pitfalls.

Who this book is for

If you want to learn how to build iOS applications that compete with the rest and make your mark within the iOS industry, this book is for you. You should have some basic programming experience with Objective-C, and a good understanding of OOP, as well as some knowledge of database design. No knowledge of Xcode 4 is required.

Lançado em:
Aug 25, 2011
ISBN:
9781849691314
Formato:
Livro

Sobre o autor

Steven F. Daniel is originally from London, England, but lives in Australia. He is an experienced software developer with more than 13 years of experience developing desktop and web-based applications for a number of companies, in sectors including insurance, banking and finance, oil and gas, and local government. Xcode 4 iPhone Development Beginner's Guide is his first book. Steven is always interested in emerging technologies, and is a member of the SQL Server Special Interest Group (SQLSIG) and the Java Community. He is the owner and founder of GenieSoft Studios (http://www.geniesoftstudios.com/), a software development company based in Melbourne, Victoria, that currently develops games and business applications for the iOS, Android and Windows platforms. Steven has also been the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of SoftMpire Pty Ltd, a company that focused primarily on developing business applications for the iOS and Android platforms. You can check out his blog at http://geniesoftstudios.com/blog/, or follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/GenieSoftStudio.

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Xcode 4 iOS Development Beginner's Guide - Steven F. Daniel

Table of Contents

Xcode 4 iOS Development

Credits

About the Author

Acknowledgement

About the Reviewers

www.PacktPub.com

Support files, eBooks, discount offers and more

Why Subscribe?

Free Access for Packt account holders

Preface

What this book covers

What you need for this book

Who this book is for

Conventions

Time for action – heading

What just happened?

Pop quiz – heading

Have a go hero – heading

Reader feedback

Customer support

Downloading the example code

Errata

Piracy

Questions

1. Introducing Xcode 4 Tools for iOS Development

Development using the Xcode tools

iPhone SDK core components

Inside Xcode, Cocoa, and Objective-C

The iPhone Simulator

Layers of the iOS architecture

The Core OS layer

The Core Services layer

The Media layer

The Cocoa-Touch layer

Understanding Cocoa, the language of the Mac

What are Design Patterns?

What is the difference between Cocoa and Cocoa-Touch?

The Model-View-Controller

What is Object-Oriented Programming?

What is Data Hiding?

What is Objective-C?

Directives

Objective-C classes

The @interface directive

The @implementation directive

Class instantiation

Class access privileges

Introducing the Xcode Developer set of tools

Introducing the core tools

The Welcome to Xcode screen

The Xcode Integrated Development Environment

Features of the iPhone Simulator

Companion tools and features

Instruments

iPhone OS4 SDK new features

Summary

2. Introducing the Xcode 4 Workspace

Downloading and installing the iOS SDK

Removing the Xcode Developer Tools

Getting to know the Xcode Development Environment

One environment to bind them all

Working within a single-development environment

Creating a new project

Migrating older projects into the new environment

Writing a simple iPhone application

Time for action – creating your first iPhone application

What just happened

Working with the new Xcode Assistant

Introducing the Xcode 4 Workspace Environment

Application ToolBar

Application Status Bar/Activity Window

WorkSpace Settings

Introducing the Unified Navigation UI

Listing files in a project

Sorted Symbols

Central Search Interface

Issues Tracking

Using Static Analysis to find potential problems

Debugging data with Compressionable Stack Traces

Active/inactive breakpoints

Collection of Logs

Jump Bar

Using Code Assistants

Introducing the new and improved LLVM Compiler 2.0

Version Editor

File Templates Library

Code Snippets Library

Object Library

Media Library

Resetting Xcode's Development Environment Settings

Xcode Workspace Preferences

General

Behaviors

Fonts & Colors

Text Editing

Key Bindings

Documentation

Locations

Source Trees

Distributed Builds

Summary

3. Working with the Interface Builder

Getting to know the Interface Builder environment

Adding Controls to your user interface

Time for action – creating the HelloXcode4_GUI application

What just happened?

Application structure of our HelloXcode4 example application

Main.m

HelloXcode4_GUIAppDelegate.h

HelloXcode4_GUIAppDelegate.m

The MainWindow.xib file

The Core Application Architecture layer

The application life cycle

Time for action – adding object controls to our View

What just happened?

Understanding Rotatable Interfaces

Time for Action – enabling Interface Rotation

What just happened?

Relocating controls within the view on Rotation

Making our Components work together

Time for action – binding Control Objects

What just happened?

Time for action – repositioning the Controls

What just happened?

Enhancing our iPhone application

Time for action – hiding the keyboard

What just happened?

Have a go hero – enhancing the HelloXcode4 example

Introducing Document-based applications

Time for action – creating a Document-based application

What just happened?

File saving and loading

Time for action – implementing file saving and loading

What just happened?

Pop quiz – Actions and Rotatable Interfaces

Summary

4. Working with the Xcode Frameworks

Introducing the Frameworks

Using Frameworks and APIs in iPhone development

Core Data Frameworks

Building a simple database application

Time for action – creating the Core Data application

What just happened?

AV Foundation Frameworks

Playing an audio File

Creating an application to play an audio file

Time for action – creating the MusicPlayer application

What just happened?

Playing a movie using Media Player

Time for action – creating the MoviePlayer application

What just happened?

Core Location Framework

Time for action – making your application location aware

What just happened?

Map Kit Framework—new and improved

Time for action – creating a simple geographical application

What just happened?

New Framework APIs

Have a go hero – modifying the Core Data example

Pop quiz – Core Data / Media Playback and Core Location

Summary

5. Designing Application Interfaces using MVC

Developing iOS applications using MVC design

Reusing tested (or standard) solutions: Design patterns

Understanding the Model-View-Controller design pattern

Implementing MVC using Xcode and Interface Builder

Time for action – building a Pizza order application

What just happened?

Time for action – binding our Controls using Outlets and Actions

What just happened?

Implementing views

Implementing view controllers

Time for action – declaring input field as a property of View Controller

What just happened?

Creating a view-based application template

Time for Action – creating the FavoriteColor application

What just happened?

Time for action – binding our Controls using Outlets and Actions

What just happened?

Implementing Table Views

Time for action – creating a Table view application

What just happened?

Grouping row items into sections

Time for action – grouping row items in our TableViewExample application

What just happened?

Understanding Navigation-based applications

Using Switches, Sliders, Segmented Controls, and Web Views

Time for action – creating the SwitchesSlidersSegments project

What just happened?

Time for action – binding our Controls using Outlets and Actions

What just happened?

Creating an application to scroll through large content

Time for action – creating the ScrollingViews project

What just happened?

Time for action – binding our Controls using Outlets and Actions

What just happened?

Understanding Pickers

Date Pickers

Time for action – creating the Date Picker project

What just happened?

Time for action – binding our Controls using Outlets and Actions

What just happened?

Custom Pickers

Time for Action – creating the Custom Picker project

What just happened?

Time for action – binding our Controls using Outlets and Actions

What just happened?

Handling basic user input and output

Button Controls

Text Fields

Text Views

Labels

Using Text Fields, Text Views, and Buttons

Time for action – creating application with Text fields, Text Views, and Buttons

What just happened?

Time for action – binding our Controls using Outlets and Actions

What just happened?

Have a go hero – modifying the Table View example

Pop quiz – Table Views / repositioning Controls

Summary

6. Displaying Notification Messages

Exploring the notification methods

Generating alerts

Time for action – creating the GetUsersAttention application

What just happened?

Time for action – adding the AudioToolbox Framework to our application

What just happened?

Pop quiz – Frameworks

Building our user interface

Time for action – adding controls to our View

What just happened?

Creating events

Time for action – implementing the Show Activity Indicator method

What just happened?

Have a go hero – adding a second activity indicator

Pop quiz – Activity Indicators

Time for action – implementing the Display Alert Dialog method

What just happened?

Responding to Alert Dialog Button presses

Have a go hero – adding additional buttons and creating the events

Pop quiz – Alert Dialogs and Button Indexes

Using Action Sheets to associate with a view

Time for action – implementing the Display Action Sheet method

What just happened?

Responding to Action Sheet Button presses

Customizing an Action Sheet

Time for action – handling alerts via sounds and vibrations

What just happened?

Have a go hero – adding Action Sheet items / changing appearance

Pop quiz – sounds and vibrations

Summary

7. Exploring the MultiTouch Interface

Introducing the MultiTouch architecture

Detecting taps

Time for action – creating the TapExample project

What just happened?

Time for action – binding our Controls

What just happened?

Have a go hero – modify the program to change background

Pop quiz – tap counts

Detecting swipes

Time for action – creating the SwipeExample project

What just happened?

Have a go hero – adjust the delayFactor and change the background

Pop quiz – tracking and identifying swipes

Detecting pinches

Time for action – creating the PinchExample project

What just happened?

Have a go hero – handling more than two fingers

Pop quiz – pinches and transformations

Detecting shakes

Time for action – creating the ShakeExample project

What just happened

Time for action – implementing the motionBegan, motionEnded, and motionCancelled methods

What just happened?

Have a go hero – modifying the ShakeExample application

Pop quiz – motion events

Exploring the Accelerometer/Gyroscope

Understanding the Core Motion Framework

Sensing orientation

Time for action – creating the OrientationExample project

What just happened?

Have a go hero – modify the OrientationExample application

Pop quiz – sensing orientation

Detecting device tilting

Time for action – creating the AccelGyroExample project

What just happened?

Summary

8. Debugging Xcode Projects

Introducing the new and improved Debugger

Debugger toolbar

Stack trace panel

Disassembly view

Code Editor window

Console output window

Creating a new debugging project

Time for action – creating the DebuggingExample project

What just happened?

Running and debugging the project

Handling errors

Runtime errors

Syntax errors

Logic errors

Using Fix-it to correct code as you type

Time for action – setting up the LLVM compiler

What just happened?

Debugging with breakpoints

Using NSLog to track changing properties

Exploring the new Debugger

Debugging features in the Code Editor

The Activity Viewer/Progress window

Defining a scheme for project builds using the Scheme Editor

Time for action – using the Scheme Editor to define a Scheme

What just happened?

Viewing the Static Analysis results

Time for action – running the Static Analyzer

What just happened?

Time for action – configuring your project to perform automatic Static Analysis

What just happened?

Time for action – Detecting a memory leak

What just happened?

Time for action – detecting an instance of an uninitialized variable

What just happened?

Viewing the Issues Navigator

Viewing the Program Build log

Understanding and using code completion

Time for action – working with code completion

What just happened?

Time for action – stopping Xcode from alerting you to problems

What just happened?

Navigating through threads and stacks in the Debugger

Have a go hero – Static Analyzer and debugging features

Pop quiz – all about debugging projects

Summary

9. Source Code Management with the Version Editor

Introducing the new Version Editor

Introducing Subversion

Installing a local Subversion server

Creating a repository

Time for action – setting up a local Subversion repository

What just happened?

Configuring the repository in Xcode

Time for action – configuring the Subversion repository

What just happened?

Adding items to an existing repository

Time for action – adding our TapExample project to the repository

What just happened?

Getting a working copy of the project out of the repository

Time for action – checking out the project from the repository

What just happened?

Xcode source-control features and file statuses

Comparing different versions of a file side-by-side

Using Timeline to select and compare revisions

Using Track Blame to check past check-ins

Using Log Mode to list all revisions chronologically

Using the Repository Organizer to keep track of your files

Using Git to manage multiple projects

Time for action – creating a new Xcode project using Git

What just happened?

Time for action – assigning address book identities within the organizer

What just happened?

Have a go hero – adding a project to a Subversion repository

Pop quiz – Subversion / Version Editor

Summary

10. Making your Applications Run Smoothly

Introducing Instruments

Tracking down and fixing memory leaks

Time for action – creating the InstrumentsExample project

What just happened?

Time for action – running and Profiling the project

What just happened?

Adding and configuring Instruments

Using the Instruments Library

Locating an Instrument within the Library

Adding and removing Instruments

Configuring an Instrument

Other components of the Instruments family explained

New Instruments in Xcode 4

Automated Testing

Performance and Power Analysis

Time Profiler

Energy Diagnosis

Tracking iPhone graphics performance using OpenGL ES Driver

Have a go hero – adding Instruments to your project

Pop quiz – playing with Instruments

Summary

11. Distributing your Application

Build configurations – debug to release

The iPhone Developer Program

Setting up your iPhone development team

Time for action – setting up the team

What just happened?

Getting an iOS development certificate

Time for action – generating a Certificate Request

What just happened?

Time for action – getting the certificate

What just happened?

Registering devices for testing

Time for action – registering devices

What just happened?

Creating application IDs

Time for action – creating the application ID

What just happened?

Creating a Provisioning Profile

Time for action – creating the profile

What just happened?

Using the Provisional Profile to install an App on an iOS device

Time for action – creating and deploying the app to an iOS device

What just happened?

Getting a Distribution Certificate for your app

Time for action – getting the Distribution Certificate

What just happened?

Archiving and submitting Apps using Xcode 4

iOS Human Interface Guidelines

Testing your application

Preparing your App for submission through iTunes Connect

Avoiding rejection of your App

Pricing your app

Adding your App to iTunes Connect

Time for action – uploading the application icon and screenshot images

What just happened?

Using iTunes Connect to manage your Apps

Marketing and promoting your app

iOS Developer Documentation

Have a go hero – creating App IDs and submitting your App

Pop quiz – distribution of your App

Summary

Pop Quiz Answers

Chapter 3

Actions and Rotatable Interfaces

Chapter 4

Core Data/Media Playback and Core Location

Chapter 5

Table Views/repositioning Controls

Chapter 6

Frameworks

Activity Indicators

Alert Dialogs and Button Indexes

Sounds and vibrations

Chapter 7

Tap counts

Tracking and identifying swipes

Pinches and transformations

Motion events

Sensing orientation

Chapter 8

All about debugging projects

Chapter 9

Subversion/Version Editor

Chapter 10

Playing with Instruments

Chapter 11

Distribution of your App

Index

Xcode 4 iOS Development

Beginner's Guide


Xcode 4 iOS Development

Beginner's Guide

Copyright © 2011 Packt Publishing

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embedded in critical articles or reviews.

Every effort has been made in the preparation of this book to ensure the accuracy of the information presented. However, the information contained in this book is sold without warranty, either express or implied. Neither the author, nor Packt Publishing, and its dealers and distributors will be held liable for any damages caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by this book.

Packt Publishing has endeavored to provide trademark information about all of the companies and products mentioned in this book by the appropriate use of capitals. However, Packt Publishing cannot guarantee the accuracy of this information.

First published: August 2011

Production Reference: 1160811

Published by Packt Publishing Ltd.

Livery Place

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Birmingham B3 2PB, UK.

ISBN 978-1-849691-30-7

www.packtpub.com

Cover Image by Tom Glasspool (<t.glasspool@gmail.com>)

Credits

Author

Steven F. Daniel

Reviewers

Cory Bohon

Mark Hazlett

Acquisition Editor

Steven Wilding

Development Editor

Chris Rodrigues

Technical Editor

Dayan Hyames

Indexer

Monica Ajmera Mehta

Project Coordinator

Leena Purkait

Proofreader

Mario Cecere

Graphics

Valentina D'silva

Geetanjali Sawant

Production Coordinator

Shantanu Zagade

Cover Work

Shantanu Zagade

About the Author

Steven F. Daniel is originally from London, England, but lives in Australia. He is an experienced software developer with more than 13 years of experience in developing desktop and web-based applications for a number of companies, in sectors including insurance, banking and finance, oil and gas, and local government. Xcode 4 iOS Development Beginner's Guide is his first book.

Steven is always interested in emerging technologies, and is a member of the SQL Server Special Interest Group (SQLSIG) and the Java Community. He is the owner and founder of GenieSoft Studios (http://www.geniesoftstudios.com/), a software development company based in Melbourne, Victoria, that currently develops games and business applications for the iOS, Android, and Windows platforms.

Steven was the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of SoftMpire Pty Ltd., a company that focused primarily on developing business applications for the iOS and Android platforms. You can check out his blog at http://geniesoftstudios.com/blog/, or follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/GenieSoftStudio.

This book is dedicated to:

Chan Ban Guan, for the patience, support, encouragement, and understanding all of those times when I couldn't go out as I needed to write in order to meet the deadlines.

My family for their continued love and support, and for always believing in me.

Chan Jie Hou, may God watch over you and keep you safe.

This book would not have been possible without your love and understanding.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Acknowledgement

No book is the product of just the author—he just happens to be the one with his name on the cover.

A number of people contributed to the success of this book, and it would take more space than I have to thank each one individually.

A special shout out goes to Steven Wilding, my Acquisition Editor, who is the reason that this book exists. Thank you, Steven, for believing in me, and for being a wonderful guide through this process. I would also like to thank Leena Purkait for ensuring that I stayed on track and got my chapters in on time.

Thank you also to the entire Packt Publishing team for working so diligently to help bring out a high quality product.

To the engineers at Apple for creating the iPhone, and providing developers with the tools to create fun and sophisticated applications, you guys rock.

Finally, I'd like to thank all of my friends for their support, understanding, and encouragement during the writing process. It is a privilege to know each one of you.

About the Reviewers

Cory Bohon is a professional blogger and contributor to MacLife magazine, and a Mac and iPhone developer, experienced in Java, C/C++, Objective-C, and PHP. He is currently attending the University of South Carolina Upstate, where his current research interests include accessible user interface design and mobile application development.

Mark Hazlett is a mobile and web applications developer located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He has a true passion for mobile application development, especially on developing for the iPhone. In his spare time, Mark likes to read about new technologies, learn new languages, and start new projects.

He is constantly learning new technologies and applying them to as many personal projects as he can find time for. All in all, he is extremely passionate about usability and user interaction and tries to apply best practices to all of his projects.

I would like to thank my family: Tom, Jan, and Ryan for always being extremely supportive in my many endeavors. I would also like to thank Packt Publishing for giving me the opportunity to review this book.

www.PacktPub.com

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Preface

The iPhone is one of the hottest mobile devices on the planet. Whether you are just starting out with iPhone Development or already have some knowledge in this area, you will benefit from what this book covers. Using this book's straightforward, step-by-step approach, you will go from Xcode 4 apprentice to Xcode 4 Jedi master in no time.

Xcode 4 iOS Development Beginner's Guide will help you learn to build simple, yet powerful applications for the iPhone from the ground up. You will master the Xcode 4 tools and skills needed to create applications that are simple yet, like Yoda, punch far above their weight.

In this book, I have tried my level best to keep the code simple and easy to understand. I have provided step-by-step instructions with screenshots at each step to make it easier. You will soon be mastering the technology and skills needed to create some stunning applications. Feel free to contact me at <geniesoftstudios@gmail.com> for any queries. Any suggestions for improving this book will be highly appreciated.

What this book covers

Chapter 1, Introducing Xcode 4 Tools for iOS Development, introduces the developer to the Xcode developer set of tools, the new features of the iOS 4 SDK and the iOS Architecture Layers and their components. It also includes a discussion of Cocoa, Cocoa-Touch, and the basics of object-oriented programming using Objective-C.

Chapter 2, Introducing the Xcode 4 Workspace, discusses how to download and install the Xcode 4 and iOS4 SDK and introduces you to the Xcode 4 development environment and the different types of libraries that are part of the workspace to create a simple iPhone application.

Chapter 3, Working with the Interface Builder, introduces the developer to the Interface Builder application and explains the iOS application life cycle when an application is run. It also covers how to implement file saving and loading of Document-based applications, as well as how to reposition the controls within the view when the device is rotated.

Chapter 4, Working with the Xcode Frameworks, introduces the developer to the different types of Xcode frameworks for audio and video playback, and Core Location services for determining geographical locations. It also covers how to build a simple database application using the Core Data Framework.

Chapter 5, Designing Application Interfaces using MVC, introduces the developer to the various layers of MVC and design patterns and the importance of implementing these in iOS applications. It also covers how to interact with the user, with lots of code examples.

Chapter 6, Displaying Notification Messages, explores the different notification methods through which we can communicate with the user to grab their attention, by using alerts, activity indicators, sounds, and vibrations, with lots of code examples.

Chapter 7, Exploring the MultiTouch Interface, shows you how easy it is to incorporate both single-touch and multi-touch support into your applications and include support for tapping, pinching, and swipes. You will also learn about the built-in shake gesture and how to go about responding to the shake motions, before finally learning about the accelerometer and the new gyroscope features, as well as how to control your application UI when the orientation changes.

Chapter 8, Debugging Xcode Projects, shows us how to go about debugging our projects, through the use of the various debugging tools that Xcode provides. We are also introduced to the new debugging features of the editor, and how to use the Static Analyzer tool to determine potential memory leaks, dead code, and unreachable code, as well as using the new Fix-it! feature to correct syntax errors as we type.

Chapter 9, Source Code Management with the Version Editor, focuses on the new features of the Xcode Version Editor that has been integrated directly within the Xcode 4 IDE and provides you with an easy way to manage your source code. By using this tool, you are able to travel back through your revisions to compare previous changes made throughout the life cycle of the file.

Chapter 10, Making your Applications Run Smoothly, focuses on how we can effectively use Instruments within our applications to track down memory leaks and bottlenecks within our applications that could potentially cause our application to crash on the user's iOS device. We take a look into each of the different types of built-in instruments, which come as part of the Instruments application and how we can use the Leaks instrument to help track down and determine where memory leaks are happening within our code. We also look at how we can configure instruments to display data differently within the trace document that is being reported.

Chapter 11, Distributing your Application, provides you with the necessary steps that are required to submit your applications to the App Store. It explains how to register devices for testing and how to create and obtain provisioning profiles for development and distribution.

What you need for this book

This book assumes that you have an Intel-based Macintosh running Snow Leopard (Mac OS X 10.6.2 or later). You can use Leopard, but I would highly recommend upgrading to Snow Leopard, as there are many new features in Xcode that are available only on Snow Leopard. We will be using Xcode, an integrated development environment used for creating applications for the iPad, iPhone, and other Mac applications. You can download the latest version of Xcode at the following link: http://developer.apple.com/xcode/.

Who this book is for

If you ever wanted to learn how to build iOS applications and make your mark within the iOS industry and have your applications compete with the rest, this book is for you. You should have some basic programming experience with Objective-C, and a good understanding of OOP, as well as some knowledge of database design.

Conventions

In this book, you will find several headings appearing frequently.

To give clear instructions of how to complete a procedure or task, we use:

Time for action – heading

Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Instructions often need some extra explanation so that they make sense, so they are followed with:

What just happened?

This heading explains the working of tasks or instructions that you have just completed.

You will also find some other learning aids in the book, including:

Pop quiz – heading

These are short multiple choice questions intended to help you test your own understanding.

Have a go hero – heading

These set practical challenges and give you ideas for experimenting with what you have learned.

You will also find a number of styles of text that distinguish between different kinds of information. Here are some examples of these styles, and an explanation of their meaning.

Code words in text are shown as follows: If you observe the content of the MyClass.h file, you will notice that at the top of the file is a #import statement.

A block of code is set as follows:

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions {

  // Override point for customization after application launch.

  [window makeKeyAndVisible];

  return YES;

}

When we wish to draw your attention to a particular part of a code block, the relevant lines or items are set in bold:

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions {

 

  // Override point for customization after application launch.

  [window addSubview:viewController.view];

  [window makeKeyAndVisible];

  return YES;

}

Any command-line input or output is written as follows:

defaults delete com.apple.Xcode

rm –rf ~/Library/Application\ Support/Xcode

New terms and important words are shown in bold. Words that you see on the screen, in menus or dialog boxes for example, appear in the text like this: Click on the Next button to proceed to the next step of the wizard.

Note

Warnings or important notes appear in a box like this.

Tip

Tips and tricks appear like this.

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Chapter 1. Introducing Xcode 4 Tools for iOS Development

Welcome to the exciting world of iPhone Programming using Xcode 4. Since the release of the original iPhone back in 2007, it has taken the world by storm and opened up a whole new world to developers. This unique device comprises a multi-touch interface, video and audio playback capabilities, stunning graphics and sound, map and localization services, always-on internet and Wi-Fi services, and a whole range of built-in sensors which can be used to create everything from stunning games to business applications.

You are probably eager to get stuck right in and start creating that next big thing to hit the AppStore, and start to join those other tens of thousands

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