Strength Training, Cycling And Other Fitness Guides by Speedy Publishing - Read Online
Strength Training, Cycling And Other Fitness Guides
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Summary

The benefits of strength training are numerous and always outweigh the stress the weights put on your body. Strength training increases the density of your bones and increases the general strength of the bones themselves. Strength training always controls your weightand reduces the amount of fat. Because it is strengthening your core muscles it is also preventing and allowing you to manage diseases such as back pain, arthritis, and because of the increased cardiovascular, it even helps prevent heart disease.
Published: Speedy Publishing LLC on
ISBN: 9781633833029
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Table of Contents

Marathon Training

Introduction

Part 1: Training Timeframe

Part 2: Training and Your Mental State

Part 3: Training Approach & Physiology

Part 4: Physiological Boosters & Feedback

Part 5: Heart Rate, Calories Burned, Percentage Max, VO2 Max

Part 6: Warm Up, Stretch, Cool Down

Part 7: The Training Plan

Part 8: Race Strategy

Part 9: Marathon Diet and Nutrition

Part 10: Marathon Recovery (Post Race)

Conclusion

Ab Exercises For Core Strength & A Flat Stomach

Introduction

Chapter 1- I Can’t Find My Abs!

Sartonrius

Chapter 3- Preparing For Greatness

Glucose and Fiber

Chapter 5- Mind Over Matter

Superman

Chapter 7- Glossary of Common Terms

About The Author

Cycling Nutrition

Introduction

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Conclusion

Marathon Training

The Underground Plan To Run Your Fastest Marathon Ever

Jason Scotts

Introduction

Participating in a marathon is a serious endeavor. It requires months of planning and road work. It’s not like a 3k run where you can just wing it, finish in 30 minutes or less, and get away with minimal body aches and pains.

Marathon Explained

A marathon is a race of attrition. It is at least 26.218 miles (41.195 kilometers) long. The fastest times naturally belong to athletes like Wilson Kipsang of Kenya. He finished a full marathon at 2 hours, 3 minutes, and 23 seconds. In the women’s division, Paula Radcliffe of the United Kingdom holds the record, of 2 hours, 15 minutes and 25 seconds.

A well prepared marathoner/runner usually finishes a 26.218 mile course within 4 to 5 hours, with an average pace of around 8 minutes per kilometer. The average person usually finishes in less than 6 hours. But there have been instances where an event had to wait 7 to 8 hours for determined stragglers/walkers.

A half marathon is 13.109 miles (21.098 k). It is literally half of the minimum marathon distance. A run can be anywhere between 3k, 5k, 10, or more, but less than a half marathon.

Physical and Mental Conditioning

Running for at least 4 hours is no joke. In fact, a significant number of participants will eventually bow out of the race because of injury, loss of stamina, mental fatigue, dehydration, etc. In some cases, a participant who pushes too hard, without proper training can even collapse on the course, or near the end.

In order to finish a race you need to work hard. Before race day, you will have trained your muscles to the point, where you can run 4 to 5 times a week. In order to speed up your training and finish with your fastest time yet, you need to work smart. Take advantage of technology, medical knowledge, and the experience of an actual marathoner (the author).

Perfect Form

In order to achieve this, you need to find your perfect form and bring it out at the soonest possible time during your event. This form is learned from experience and training. It involves a pace that you can maintain for the longest timeframe with the least amount of energy expended.

Those with at least 6.214 mile (10k) experience know that when their body becomes weak, they learn how to minimize movement and effort to achieve a comfortable but speedy pace. This is the perfect form!

Part 1: Training Timeframe

So, how long do you need to train? The answer depends on where you are at right now. Naturally, seasoned runners will need less training time whereas newbie runners will have to train from scratch. Below are the safest timeframes:

WARNING

This eBook will show you how to train in the least amount of time possible. This means, everything that can be done to shorten your training timeframe has been considered. It would be extremely stupid of you to try and shorten the given timeframe some more.

Realize this: if you want to be a marathoner, you need to learn to be patient. It takes time for your muscles, ligaments, bones, your cardiovascular and respiratory system to get used to the constant pounding and increased blood plus oxygen requirement. By training smartly, you can minimize the risk and the training time. But if you think you’re some kind of superman and want to cut a bit more, then chances are, injury is what awaits you.

Listen to your body! Don’t worry; this eBook will discuss further how you can differentiate between pain that requires rest, as opposed to pain that allows for more training!

Beginner (Zero K)

An absolute newbie is someone who runs recreationally when the urge hits him/her. You have not yet finished a measured run or race i.e. 3k, 5k, and 10k. If this is you, then prepare to train 3 to 4 times a week, for 8 months. That is, if your goal is to finish within 5 to 6 hours. If you want to finish within 4 hours, then you need 10 to 12 months of training.

The longest phase of your training is the first few months, or first 3 miles (4.828 k). This is because you want to slowly adapt your entire physiology to running long distances. Be patient. You want to create a solid base, not incur an early injury!

Get some experience under your belt. This means you compete and finish in a:

•  3k race after 3 months of training

•  10k event after 5 months of training

•  21k race 3 to 2 months prior to your full marathon (if possible)

It’s different running alone and on a course. For one you want to know what it feels like. Second, you need to realize that in an actual event, you have a tendency to push yourself too much. Getting the experience allows you to control and take advantage of this urge. In doing so, you use that competitive urge to finish faster, within reason; not drop ¾ of the way because the will to compete got in the way of your personal pace.

Intermediate (3k, 5k, 10k Finisher)

An intermediate is someone who has finished a couple of fun runs, preferably two or more 3k and 5k runs, and at least one, 10k run. If this is you, and your goal is to finish a full marathon, prepare to train 3 to 4 times a week, for 3 months (10 k finisher), or 4 months for a 3k/5k finisher.

PRO (Half and/or Full Marathon)

A pro, is someone who has finished at least a half marathon. If you have finished a full marathon, then you have an added edge. This is because you know what hitting the wall feels like (discussed in detail later). So you can train to minimize its after effects. Your goal is to run more conservatively to maximize your store of carbs. If you have continually clocked at least 50 kilometers per week, then you only need 1 month to finish faster. If you want a significant increase, then give yourself 2 months.

Because your physiology has already adapted to jogging long distances, you can run 5 to 6 times a week. Personally, the author still prefers 4 to 5 times a week. This is because yours truly has a full time work to go to!

Training Time

When should you train? The answer depends on the time and season your marathon will be held. Preferably you train under the same conditions as your event. If your event begins at 6 in the morning in the summer, then that is the best time to wind down your training. If it is 10 a.m., in spring, then so be it.

Chances are, this is not possible for all your runs. You do have a life, and probably a full time job! Then make it a point to do it once per week at least. This includes the temperature, and the altitude. If possible, it would be best to use the same course as the marathon you are running. This way, your body can adjust to the road condition, altitude, weather, etc.

Part 2: Training and Your Mental State

The good thing about a marathon is it requires very little skill. Man was built to walk, jog, and run. All you really need is a rudimentary set of guidelines and a lot of perseverance. Make no mistake; you will be training to the limit. This means:

•  breaking down your leg muscles on a daily basis, then rebuilding it, better than ever.

•  Pounding your bones to the pavement until it gets compacted enough to handle 26.222 miles (42.2k).

•  Increasing your ability to take in oxygen and circulate it to your body.

•  Finding the most efficient running pace and technique, unique to you.

Mental Focus

More importantly, the repeated training will condition your mind. Your goal is to block out as much as possible. And, accept the pain, heat, discomfort, etc.

Goal Setting

Most marathon runners don’t put 26.222 miles (42.2k) as their goal. In fact, most training plans will not require you to run