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QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter

QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter

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QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter

avaliações:
4.5/5 (33 avaliações)
Comprimento:
225 página
3 horas
Lançado em:
Oct 26, 2014
ISBN:
9781400847464
Formato:
Livro

Descrição

Celebrated for his brilliantly quirky insights into the physical world, Nobel laureate Richard Feynman also possessed an extraordinary talent for explaining difficult concepts to the general public. Here Feynman provides a classic and definitive introduction to QED (namely, quantum electrodynamics), that part of quantum field theory describing the interactions of light with charged particles. Using everyday language, spatial concepts, visualizations, and his renowned "Feynman diagrams" instead of advanced mathematics, Feynman clearly and humorously communicates both the substance and spirit of QED to the layperson. A. Zee's introduction places Feynman’s book and his seminal contribution to QED in historical context and further highlights Feynman’s uniquely appealing and illuminating style.

Lançado em:
Oct 26, 2014
ISBN:
9781400847464
Formato:
Livro

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Amostra do Livro

QED - Richard P. Feynman

QED

1

Introduction

Alix Mautner was very curious about physics and often asked me to explain things to her. I would do all right, just as I do with a group of students at Caltech that come to me for an hour on Thursdays, but eventually I’d fail at what is to me the most interesting part: We would always get hung up on the crazy ideas of quantum mechanics. I told her I couldn’t explain these ideas in an hour or an evening—it would take a long time—but I promised her that someday I’d prepare a set of lectures on the

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O que as pessoas pensam sobre QED

4.7
33 avaliações / 17 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    Needs to be balanced by understanding of Bohmianism...makes it less strange philosophically. Still a great book, and great in its presentation of Copenhagen interpretation, even if that is the wrong one.
  • (5/5)
    This one sat on my shelf for years, (I almost forgot I bought it), but was quite an amazing geek read. I wish it had been twice as long, actually, as he glossed over a few things at the end that I'd like to know more about, but it was quite a good explanation of what (at least in 1988) we knew about QED.
  • (5/5)
    Feynman is the best author in the field of physics. In his easy-going, humorous style, he covers the sticky topic of Quantum ElectroDynamics.
  • (5/5)
    A science classic. Short and sweet exposition of quantum electrodynamics. A must-read for anyone interested in how the world works.
  • (5/5)
    About every two or three years I reread this book and I still enjoy it as much as the first time.
  • (5/5)
    A brilliant book written by a brilliant physicist.I really liked it
  • (5/5)
    Top class... Must read for anyone who wants to know how the world works...
  • (5/5)
    Excellent book and very useful. I love it !!! Please, include more books like this one.
  • (4/5)
    ... since there are obviously more people here tonight than there were before, some of you haven't heard the other two lectures and will find this lecture almost incomprehensible. Those of you who have heard the other two lectures will also find this lecture incomprehensible, but you know that's all right: as I explained in the first lecture, the way we have to explain Nature is generally incomprehensible to us.This is a transcript of a set of four lectures Feynman gave to a "non-technical" audience in 1983, with the goal of giving them an intelligible account of quantum electrodynamics, one of the most conceptually-difficult bits of physics, an area that is normally reserved for graduate students, and the field in which he had earned his Nobel prize. It's the kind of challenge that Feynman obviously loved, and he rose to it with enthusiasm, taking care to make sure the audience realised that what physicists are trying to do is not so much to arrive at a philosophical "understanding" of the how or why of the physical universe, as to attempt to find mathematical tools that give them a reasonably good chance of predicting the numbers that will come out of an experiment. By the time we get down to the scale on which quantum physics operates, we don't have the mental equipment to make any kind of imaginative sense of the phenomena that are being described, and those mathematical tools are all we have. But that's perfectly OK, as long as they work we can use them, we don't need to waste time trying to visualise what they represent. And when they don't work, it starts to get interesting and we can do more physics...Feynman takes us through the interactions of photons and electrons in an astonishingly painless way in the first three lectures, then in the fourth he sketches in the missing part, what happens in the nucleus. Another of the really great science writers. A pleasure to read, even if it doesn't really put you into a position to calculate the magnetic moment of the electron...
  • (5/5)
    great book, but a bit disconcerting not to have any answer at all to "why", just a description of "how" at the very basic level.
  • (5/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    I was amazed to see, in all those reviews of this book, that no one pointed out Feynman's play on words. Quod Erat Demonstrandum. For a more elegant, and lengthy work, I'd recommend Six Easy Pieces, or his beautiful three-volume set of the lectures on physics.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (5/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    Another great Feynman book. Every time I read something by him, I get re-excited about physics.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (5/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    Utterly and completely brilliant.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (4/5)
    Quantenelektrodynamik ist keine einfache Sache. Feynman erklärt sie gut, aber trotzdem muss man sich für das Buch Zeit lassen und reindenken. Ich gestehe, dass ich mich nicht angemessen vertieft und deshalb nur Ansätze verstanden habe. Dennoch: Selbst mir ist manches begreiflicher geworden. Und da ich das Buch besitze, kann ich es ja nochmal in Ruhe versuchen.
  • (5/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    If you want to be introduced to quantum physics, this is the book to get. Feynmann was absolutely brilliant when it came to explaining complicated phenomena in a simple way. I have read quite a number of books explaining quantum phenomena, but this one is, by far, the best.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (3/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

     A bit over my head! Cited as an accessible venture into QED (if such a thing can exist) I didn't find this book nearly as interesting as Feynman's biographies. Although science interests me greatly, maybe the subject is just a little too complicated for me to understand properly, and that is why I have only given this book three stars.

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

  • (4/5)

    1 pessoa achou isso útil

    Just the facts, Ma'am, August 6, 2006In the Introduction to the 'Strange Theory of Light and Matter' Feynman tells us that what he likes to talk about is the "part of physics that is known, rather than a part that is unknown." And he goes on to give us a thumbnail sketch, a "physicist's history of physics," which shows how physicist's, in their quest to describe the world, continually reduce a group of seemingly unrelated phenomenon to a single phenomenon. So heat and sound were found, thanks to Newton, to be reducible to laws of motion, while electricity, magnetism and light were reducible to Maxwell's electromagnetic wave. In this way physicist's explain the world. Here one is almost tempted to say that they proceed much as religion and ideology do. Religion has from the beginning of recorded history been taking phenomenon and feelings, like storms and suffering or aging and despair, and molding them into an internally coherent explanation of all that is and was and will be. They do this by separating the relevant from the incidental, then uncovering the essential by excluding the accidental. They simplify. In similar ways ideologues like the communists take what at one time were discreet incidents and disparate facts (for instance, the poverty of the third world and imperialism) and weave them into a grand general explanation. Is science merely the latest avatar of religion? - Or perhaps it is an ideology without tears? Not so fast! Feynman goes on to show us that attempts to explain the atomic world foundered on the laws of motion. He shows us that the rescue of those shipwrecked on the shoals of classical theory involved the invention of a new, counter-intuitive theory, Quantum Mechanics. He then goes on, while discussing a small portion of that theory, to give us the (deliberately) hilarious and 'absurd' example of how physicists predict how many photons, out of a given number, will be reflected back from a surface. 'Draw little arrows on a piece of paper' and watch the clock, he tells us. And with no explanation as to why this procedure works! Of course, for physics, what matters is that it does work. Physicists have been forced "away from making absolute predictions to merely calculating the probability of an event." But where is the essential, the eternal, the necessary? Perhaps this is what Feynman is driving at. Science describes, it doesn't explain why. We should all wonder at that. The great 'philosophical' questions that drive theology and political ideology are beyond the purview of physics. Science doesn't create worlds; nor does it 'interpret' or change them, it simply describes what it finds. (It is technology that changes the world.) Freud saw fit to end one of his books by saying that 'our science is no illusion, but it would be an illusion to believe you can find elsewhere what it does not offer.' But how much truer this is of physics! One is then perhaps not surprised to come away from this little book wondering exactly what the status of philosophy, psychoanalysis, politics and religion would be in a genuinely scientific world. But of course there will never be, given human irrationality, an entirely scientific human culture. This book is a superb introduction to quantum electrodynamics. It's 'experimentalism' and agnosticism towards grand philosophical explanations I found very congenial and convincing. Feynman is an engaging personality and this is an entertaining book. While one doesn't need a degree in physics and math to understand him a lay competence and interest in math and physics is certainly necessary. For those of us still living in a Newtonian world, a dwindling number to be sure, this book will have several surprising moments. But that really is part of the show!

    1 pessoa achou isso útil