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Access 2016: Up To Speed

Access 2016: Up To Speed

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Access 2016: Up To Speed

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5/5 (1 avaliação)
Comprimento:
447 página
2 horas
Lançado em:
Feb 7, 2017
ISBN:
9781943005017
Formato:
Livro

Descrição

The Access 2016: Up To Speed guide helps you to get up and running  quickly with the world's most popular database program.  This handy step-by-step guide is written from scratch, starting with basic Access and database topics and moving on to more advanced features of application, designed to help you to become more productive more quickly.  

Though comprehensive, the information in this book is presented in a clear, consise manner with screenshots providing helpful visual guidance all along the way.

In no time at all you're be creating, storing and managing databases, creating forms, generating reports, updating data using queries, maintaining databases and much more.
    
Some of the topics include:        
        
Understanding Databases
Using Database Templates
The Access Environment
A Look at Tables, Forms, Queries and Reports
Creating a Table using Application Parts
Entering Data into a Table
Adding New Fields to a Table
Creating a Table from Scratch
Setting a Primary Key
Rearranging, Inserting and Deleting Fields
Setting Validation Rules
Formatting Fields
Creating an Input Mask
Creating a Lookup Field
Creating & Modifying a Value List
Creating Calculated Fields
Creating Multiple Primary Keys
Creating Multiple Field Values
Editing & Formatting Table Data
Importing Excel Data into an Existing Table
Importing a Text File into a New Table
Selecting, Sorting and Deleting Records
Finding and Replacing Data
Filtering Data
Creating a Query in Design View
Adding Criteria to a Query
Sorting Data in a Query
Using the Query Wizard
Creating Multi-Table Queries
Using Calculations in Queries
Changing Query Properties
Creating a Totals Query
Creating a Parameter Query
Prompting for Dates
Creating a Find Duplicates Query
Using the Form Wizard
Adding Controls to a Form
Moving and Sizing Controls
Creating a Calculated Control
Changing Control Properties
Changing Form Properties
Changing the Tab Order
Adding a Lookup Control
Creating a Basic Report
Using the Report Wizard
Using the Label Wizard
Adding Controls to a Report
Sorting and Grouping Data
Applying Conditional Formatting
Edit Sorting and Grouping Levels in a Report
Creating and Updating Database Relationships
Enforcing Referential Integrity
Creating a Macro
Creating & Using a Macro Group
The AutoExec Macro
Creating an AutoKeys Macro
Creating a Make-Table Query
Creating an Append Query
Creating an Update Query
Creating a Delete Query
Creating a SQL Query
Importing Data
Linking Data
Exporting Data 
Exporting Data to a Microsoft Word Mail Merge
Using Compact and Repair
Changing Database Properties
Backing up a Database
Splitting a Database
Setting a Database Password

....and more

Lançado em:
Feb 7, 2017
ISBN:
9781943005017
Formato:
Livro

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Access 2016 - R.M. Hyttinen

Hyttinen

Copyright & License Notes

Access 2016: Up to Speed

By R.M. Hyttinen

Copyright © 2016 by R.M. Hyttinen.  All rights reserved.

Published by PCM Courseware, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

http://pcmcourseware.com

ISBN: 978-1-943005-01-7

Examples used in this book are fictional.  Any resemblance to actual persons living or dead, businesses, incidents, organization or events is purely coincidental.

All rights reserved.  No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, without the prior permission of the Publisher.  Although every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this book, the publisher and author assume no responsibility for errors and omissions.  Nor is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of information contained within.

If you found this book helpful, please consider leaving a review wherever you purchased this book.  Also consider telling your friends about it to help me spread the word about my book.

Thank you so much for supporting my work!

License Notes

This e-book is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This e-book may not be re-sold, given away to other people or used in any type of training classes. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to your favorite e-book retailer and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

Trademark Acknowledgements

Microsoft, Windows and Microsoft Access are registered trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation.  All other known trademarks have been appropriately capitalized and are the property of their respective owners.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Copyright & License Notes

Introduction

Chapter 1 - Access Basics

Understanding Databases

Using Database Templates

Open an Existing Database

The Access Environment

A Look at Tables

Look at Forms

A Look at Queries

A Look at Reports

Creating a Blank Database

Setting Access Options

Using Help

Using Tell Me to Obtain Help

Chapter 2 - Working with Tables

Creating a Table using Application Parts

Entering Data into a Table

Adding New Fields to a Table

Creating a Table from Scratch

Setting a Primary Key

Changing Column Width and Row Height

Rearranging Fields

Inserting and Deleting Fields

Changing Field Properties

Designing in Datasheet View

Setting Validation Rules

Formatting Fields

Indexing Fields

Requiring Data Entry

Creating an Input Mask

Creating a Lookup Field

Creating a Value List

Modifying a Value List

Creating Calculated Fields

Creating Multiple Primary Keys

Creating Multiple Field Values

Chapter 3 - Working with Data

Editing Data

Formatting Table Data

Importing Excel Data into an Existing Table

Importing a Text File into a New Table

Selecting and Deleting Records

Sorting Records

Finding and Replacing Data

Filtering Data by Selection

Filtering Data by Form

Using Common Filters

Hiding/Unhiding Columns

Freezing Columns

Rearranging Columns

Displaying Column Totals in a Datasheet

Chapter 4 - Working With Queries

Working in Query Design View

Creating a Query in Design View

Adding Fields to a Query

Removing Fields from a Query

Saving a Query

Running a Query

Adding Criteria to a Query

Specifying Multiple Criteria

Sorting Data in a Query

Moving Columns in a Query

Using the Query Wizard

Creating Multi-Table Queries

Using Calculations in Queries

Changing Query Properties

Working with the Expression Builder

Creating a Totals Query

Creating a Parameter Query

Prompting for Dates

Creating a Find Duplicates Query

Creating a Find Unmatched Records Query

Modifying Query Joins

Chapter 5 - Working with Forms

Using the Form Wizard

Entering Data into a Form

A Look at Design View

Adding a Field to a Form

Changing Control Properties

Using Layout View

Finding Records in a Form

Adding Headers and Footers

Adding Controls to a Form

Moving and Sizing Controls

Creating a Calculated Control

Changing Control Properties

Changing Form Properties

Changing the Tab Order

Adding a Lookup Control

Inserting Graphics

Creating a Subform

Adding a Subform using the Subform/Subreport Tool

Modifying a Subform

Aligning Controls to Each Other

Creating an Option Group

Chapter 6 - Creating Reports

Creating a Basic Report

Applying a Theme to a Report

Using the Report Wizard

Report View and Layout View

A Look at Design View

Modifying Report Setup

Printing Reports

Using the Label Wizard

Working with Report Sections

Adding Controls to a Report

Changing Control Properties

5.4 Creating a Calculated Control

Changing a Control’s Data Source

Changing a Report’s Data Source

Sorting and Grouping Data

Changing Report Section Properties

Inserting Graphics

Applying a Theme to a Report

Applying Conditional Formatting

Edit Sorting and Grouping Levels in a Report

Inserting Total Fields in a Report

Using Rectangles, Lines and Borders

Chapter 7 - Database Relationships

A Look at Relationships

Creating a One-to-One Relationship

Creating a One-to-Many Relationship

Creating a Many-to-Many Relationship

Enforcing Referential Integrity

Cascade Update Related Fields

Cascade Delete Related Records

Creating & Printing a Relationship Report

Chapter 8 - Working with Macros

Creating a Macro

Adding Additional Macro Actions

Running a Macro Step-by-Step

Assigning a Macro to a Command Button

Creating a Macro Group

Using a Macro Group

Using Macro Conditions

The AutoExec Macro

Creating an AutoKeys Macro

Creating a Data Macro

Adding a Macro to the Quick Access Toolbar

Chapter 9 - Action Queries

About Action Queries

Creating a Make-Table Query

Creating an Append Query

Creating an Update Query

Creating a Delete Query

Creating a SQL Query

Chapter 10 - Importing and Exporting Data

Importing Data from a Text File

Importing Data from Excel

Importing Data from another Access Database

Linking Data

Exporting Data to Other Formats

Exporting Data to a PDF File

Exporting Data to another Access Database

Exporting Data to Excel

Exporting Data to Microsoft Word

Exporting Data to a Microsoft Word Mail Merge

Chapter 11 - Creating a Menu System

Creating a Switchboard

Adding Switchboard Items

Using the Switchboard

Editing a Switchboard

Setting Startup Options

Creating a Navigation Form

Chapter 12 - Database Tools and Maintenance

Using Compact and Repair

Changing Database Properties

Documenting a Database

Analyzing a Database

Viewing Object Dependencies

Backing up a Database

Splitting a Database

Setting a Database Password

Introduction

As the author and founder of PCM Courseware, I am delighted to bring you the latest in our Up To Speed series of guides:  Access 2016 - Up To Speed.  Since 2003, PCM Courseware has been publishing innovative Print-On-Demand electronic courseware for both the PC and the Macintosh and beginning with the Up to Speed series, we are now creating software guides for everyone, not just for software trainers.

My mission is to create guides to make learning technology concepts easy, no matter what kind of learner you are. The guides are simple to use yet comprehensive in their effectiveness. Many students find the step-by-step approach of our manuals to be a valuable self-study resource.

You do not need to read the book sequentially, although this can certainly be helpful if you are just starting out with Microsoft Access.  I’ve written the book from scratch, starting with basic Access and database topics and moving on to more advanced features of the application, designed to help you to become more productive more quickly. 

If you are looking to accomplish a specific task, be sure to take advantage of the handy Table of Contents.

So let’s get started with Access 2016 – Up to Speed.

Chapter 1 - Access Basics

Understanding Databases

Databases are the core of many business and organization operations.  They permit centralized access to information in an efficient and consistent manner and reduce inaccuracies of manual record keeping.  A database can be thought of as an information repository pertaining to a specific topic that allows you to manage, store, retrieve and analyze information.  An example of a database might be a list of names and addresses of customers or a database of order records.

Information in a database is stored in tables, which are the building blocks of a database.  A table consists of rows (all of the information pertaining to one item) for each record and columns for each field.

Microsoft Access is a relational database management system (RDBMS), the most commonly used type of database system in the world today.  A relational database:

- Stores data in tables, which consist of columns and rows

- Enables you to retrieve subsets of data from tables

- Allows you to connect tables together for the purpose of retrieving related data stored in different tables

Database Design

The core of good database design is planning.  Before actually creating a database, you should have a good idea of the kind of data your database will contain and how that data should be broken down.  It is recommended to plan out your database on paper before beginning the creation process.

When creating databases, there are rules that most designers follow which help them create consistent, efficient, well thought-out databases.  This set of rules is called normalization, which dictates that your database tables will eliminate inconsistencies and maximize efficiency.  The goal of normalization is to reduce data to its simplest structure with minimum redundancy and maximum data integrity.  Some of the important goals of normalization are:

- All fields should be broken down so that data cannot be divided further.  For example, the Name field should be broken down to three separate fields:  last name, middle name, and first name. 

- Each table must have one unique key field called a primary key.  That is to say, there must be one field that identifies a record and does not allow duplicates.  An example of this would be a social security number or customer number.  You will learn more about primary keys in a later lesson.

- All fields must directly refer to the primary key.  For instance, in a customer table, you would only include information related to that customer, such as name, address, etc.  You would not include a field called Product name in a customer table.

A field cannot contain more than one value.

Thus, a normalized database stores each piece of information in its own table, all fields are broken down to their lowest possible level and each piece of information can be referred to by its primary key.

Using Database Templates

Access 2016 displays the Backstage View window upon launching, which contains a wide range of templates – or fully-featured databases that you can use to get started.  These will either be included with Access or can be downloaded from Microsoft’s Web site. 

Some of the available templates that you can use include:

Asset Tracking

Contacts

Education

Event Management

Finance

Inventory

Task Management

Non-profit

Nutrition Tracking

Personal

Project Management

Sales & Marketing

Students

Time & Billing

To use a template, click the desired template category on top of the window in the right pane.  A selection of template styles for the template category will appear in the center pane with additional related categories displaying in the right pane Category.  When you click on any of the templates in the center pane, it will display in its own window, prompting you for a File name and the location where you wish to save your file.  Many of the database templates are used for creating databases on the Web.  As some students may not have Web access, we will be only working with local database files.

To create a database based upon a template, follow these steps:

1. Open the Microsoft Access application.  The Welcome screen, which contains a list of sample templates, will display automatically.

2. Click the template you want.  A preview of the template is displayed in a new window.

3. To change the database name, type in the new name in the File Name box in the right pane.

4. To specify a location where the database is to be saved, click the file folder icon and then navigate to the folder where you wish to store the database file.

5. Click the Create button.

6. To view additional templates from Microsoft Office Online, click in the Search box and type in a keyword for the template you wish to find.  Press Enter to execute the search.

7. To return back to the main templates screen, click the Left Pointing Arrow icon on top of your screen.

Open an Existing Database

In older versions of Access (pre-Access 2010, the command to open database files was located under the Microsoft Office button.  In Access 2016, file commands are located under the File tab on the Ribbon.  This view is referred to as Backstage View.  From Backstage View, you can perform many file commands such as opening, closing, saving and printing database files.  To open an existing database, click the File tab and then click Open to display the Open dialog box.  From there, navigate to the folder that contains that database you wish to open.  If you have recently opened a database, it may be listed under the Recent pane.  Click Recent in the center pane and then click the database name in the Recent Documents list to quickly open it.

If you already have a database file open when you exectue the Open command, the database file you have open is automatically closed when the new database file is opened.  Thus, you are allowed to have only one database file open per Access session.

You can also display the Open dialog box by pressing the Ctrl + O keystroke combination.  This command will bypass Backstage View and directly display the Open dialog box.

If there are macros in your database, you may receive a security message warning you of potential dangerous code.  You can modify Macro warning messages from the Trust Center (click the File tab on the Ribbon, click Options, click Trust Center, click Trust Center settings and then click Macro Settings).  The Macro Settings area allows you to decide which macros to disable.  You can also turn off all Message Bar warnings by choosing Message Bar rather than Macro Settings in the left pane.

To Open an Existing Access Database from within an Open Access Database

1. Click the File tab on the top left of your screen (or press Ctrl + O to bypass Backstage view).

2. Click the Open icon in the left pane.

3. Navigate to the folder that contains the database that you wish to open.

4. Select the desired file.

5. Click Open.

To Open an Existing Access Database when Starting Microsoft Access

1. Open the Access application.

2. From the Welcome Screen, click Open Other Files in the left pane.

3.

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