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Petersburg

Petersburg

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Petersburg

avaliações:
3.5/5 (4 avaliações)
Comprimento:
389 página
Lançado em:
Mar 30, 2018
ISBN:
9780253035523
Formato:
Livro

Descrição

Andrei Bely's novel Petersburg is considered one of the four greatest prose masterpieces of the 20th century. In this new edition of the best-selling translation, the reader will have access to the translators' detailed commentary, which provides the necessary historical and literary context for understanding the novel, as well as a foreword by Olga Matich, acclaimed scholar of Russian literature.


Set in 1905 in St. Petersburg, a city in the throes of sociopolitical conflict, the novel follows university student Nikolai Apollonovich Ableukhov, who has gotten entangled with a revolutionary terrorist organization with plans to assassinate a government official–Nikolai's own father, Apollon Apollonovich Ableukhov. With a sprawling cast of characters, set against a nightmarish city, it is all at once a historical, political, philosophical, and darkly comedic novel.

Lançado em:
Mar 30, 2018
ISBN:
9780253035523
Formato:
Livro

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Petersburg - Andrei Bely

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3.3
4 avaliações / 8 Análises
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Avaliações de leitores

  • (5/5)
    I've read it a couple of times now. I highly recommend it - great book.
  • (3/5)
    There are two translations of this available and the one published by Grove is shite, so caveat lecter.
  • (3/5)
    "Not so loud, Nikolai Apollonovich - not so loud: people might hear us here!""They won't understand anything: it's quite impossible to understand..."These sorts of modernist novels aren't really my cup of tea, I read them for the sake of it, and Petersburg didn't really do anything to change my mind about such books. There are the surreal elements, the various allusions throughout, and the often incoherent mumblings of the characters that at times makes this hard work to get through. At other times there's a haunting beauty to the novel and some quite touching passages; it's just shame they're a slim section of the story.Historically important, sure. A pleasant read? That's another thing. But, to be fair, when contemplating whether to read a novel that is called a precursor to Ulysses you ought to know what you're letting yourself in for.
  • (4/5)
    Nabokov called it one of the best books of the 20th century. It's good, but really. The city and history are the real characters of this symbolist novel. It doesn't drag like a lot of Russian literature. I went and looked at photos of St. Petersburg and its monuments when I first started reading; if you haven't been to that city, it helps.
  • (3/5)
    Definitely a strange book. At first glance a Laurence Stern ramble full of digressions. But the book was written, rewritten and revised many times over many years. If it is a ramble it is a very deliberate one. A very conscious adoption of a specific style carried through with great imagination and persistence. A drift from figurative to impressionism tending towards abstract in literature rather than art. Thanks to the extensive footnotes a realisation that there is much, much more to this than a casual reading gives.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting take on the city in 1905 Russia. Like a travelogue.
  • (5/5)
    "Time sharpens its teeth for everything-it devours body and soul and stone."

    This is no ordinary book, and it was a mistake to think I could read it like one.

    It is fantastically dense, with layers upon layers of symbolism, history - a very Russian book. Which is appropriate, as it deals with the Russian idea of identity. The unusual style and use of symbols is very off-putting, but you become accustomed to it, if not totally comprehending. I will have to return to this book in the future. It deserves as much.
  • (1/5)
    I’ll generally give any novel or collection of short stories fifty pages before I give up. In the case of Boris Nikolaevich Bugayev’s (nom de plume: Andrey Biely) St. Petersburg, I gave it two hundred — and then abandoned ship. I just didn’t get it.

    Both John Cournos, who wrote the Introduction and did the Russian – English translation, and George Reavey, who provided a Foreword, may rightly feel that Biely was an unrecognized genius. I don’t dispute that. I just don’t get him.

    It could well have to do with my immediate reading environment: almost exclusively in the NYC subway system. But I do much of my reading on the subway – and do it to a good end. Unfortunately, this was not the case with St. Petersburg. I found the plot line every bit as noisy and chaotic as the subway system itself.

    Far be it from me to dissuade anyone with a serious interest in Russian literature from undertaking a read of St. Petersburg and correcting, for him- or herself (and for any other potentially interested reader here at Goodreads) my negative verdict. I’d prefer to think I just don’t have the right stuff for Biely.

    RRB
    11/08/13
    Brooklyn, NY