Encontre seu próximo livro favorito

Torne'se membro hoje e leia gratuitamente por 30 dias.
Organizational Pathology

Organizational Pathology

Ler amostra

Organizational Pathology

Comprimento:
236 página
2 horas
Lançado em:
Jun 1, 2019
ISBN:
9780463790052
Formato:
Livro

Descrição

Organizational Pathology describes the conditions of ‘us at work’ in a manner unlike other treatments of organizational life. In this book, our experiences and problems are examines as the product of misfits between our ancestral psychology and our contemporary environments. At issue, is how our capacity to adapt to organizational challenges can become compromised when a relatively stable condition gets transformed into a pathology.

The purpose of Organizational Pathology is not to tell people what to think, it is to help them think better, whatever conclusions they draw are strictly their own. Organizational life is a complex journey, most of us could use some navigational insight, and others need a platform for contemplation.

Lançado em:
Jun 1, 2019
ISBN:
9780463790052
Formato:
Livro

Sobre o autor


Relacionado a Organizational Pathology

Livros relacionados
Artigos relacionados

Amostra do Livro

Organizational Pathology - Steven M. Price

Organizational Pathology

Our Maladaptation to Organizational Life

by

Steven M. Price

Copyright ©2019 Steven M. Price

All rights reserved

Thank you for downloading this ebook. This book remains the copyrighted property of the author, and may not be redistributed to others for commercial or non-commercial purposes. If you enjoyed this book, please encourage your friends to download their own copy from their favorite authorized retailer. Thank you for your support.

Distributed by Smashwords

Ebook formatting by ebooklaunch.com

Contents

Introduction

The Fragmentation of Organizational Thought

Understanding Human Nature

Our Social Disposition

The Essence of Adaptive Behavior

The Workscape is the Level of Analysis

Challenging the Conventional Paradigms

Everything is a System

Selecting an Organizational Metaphor

Organizational Health

Organizational Pathology

A Framework for Evaluation

Our Organizational Identity

Organization of the Human Mind

The Concept of Self

Out of Many - One

Embedding Ourselves in Organizational Culture

The Protean Career and Life Design

Examining the Psychological Contract

Career Adaptability and Obsolescence

Job Burn Out

Perception and Sensory Appraisal

Perception as the Gateway into Our Minds

Proxemics and Personal Space

The Physiological Response and Interpretation

The Motor Expressions

Sensory Processing Preferences

Paying Attention and Distractions

The Categorization Process

When Impulse Takes Over

The Tendency to Act

Our Moral Instinct

The Problems with Impulse Control

The Pathology of the Individual

Knowledge and Personal Epistemology

The Structure of Knowledge

It’s a Matter of Memory

Our Personal Epistemology

The Sources of Organizational Knowledge

The Intransigence of Discipline

Knowledge is Perishable

Thinking and Learning

Understanding Cognitive Style

Brain Dominance and Interaction

Design versus Scientific Thinking

Systems Thinking

Cognition and Learning

Metacognition

Personality and Temperament

Openness to Experience

Conscientiousness as Being Goal-Directed

Extroversion and Our Source of Energy

Agreeableness and Cooperation

Neuroticism and Emotional Stability

When Leadership Set the Wrong Tone

Temperament and Behavior

Emotional Interpretation and Judgement

The Cycle of Emotions

The Self-Conscious Emotions

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Labor

Organizational Justice

Counterproductive Work Behaviors

Attitude and Moods

Positive Psychology Breeds Positive Attitude

What’s Your Mood?

You Stepped on My Apathy

A Chip on the Shoulder is Visible

Values and Belief Systems

Values as Ideals

The Universal Values

Our Sense of Ethical Propriety

So Much Wasted Time

Understanding Risk and Response

Why Worldview Matters

Motivation and Intentionality

Differing Perspectives on Motivation

What Drives Us?

Self-Regulation and Adjusting Our World

Fixing the Unbroken

What Feedback Tells Us

Towards a New Path

About the Author

References

Introduction

Organizational life is the condition of ‘us at work’ - the unmistakable reality that earning a living is a life cycle of events and challenges that occur in an organizational setting. We must be mindful, that on average, give or take a year, most of us will spend approximately thirteen full years of our lives at work. That adds up to about 4,745 days or 37,960 hours. That is a substantial amount of time to invest without enjoying some return on investment or satisfaction.

Given our tenure in what can be characterized as a professional career, which will span some 13 years, the journey through organizational life warrants contemplation. The data concerning job satisfaction varies, but a general indicator suggests about 38% of us are ‘truly satisfied.’[1] This leaves a lot to the imagination when you think of spending 13 years in limbo.

Why should anyone care about organizational life? In simple terms, by and large, contemporary society has evolved into a society of organizations.[2] Organizations are the core of commerce, they are the platform for governance, and they are the primary means of distributing goods and services.

Arguably, we now depend upon organizations for our very existence. Given the social, political, and economic prominence of our organizations and institutions, it should be easy to see that they are clearly the vanguard for problem solving and knowledge work. As mentioned, all of this is about ‘us at work’.

As Peter Drucker noted, society, community, and family are all conserving institutions. They try to maintain stability and to prevent, or at least to slow, change. Conversely, the modern organization is a destabilizer; it exists for the sole purpose of making knowledge productive, to drive innovation, and to create a customer.

We have co-evolved into organizational life. It seems certain that our common trajectory from the early guilds up through today’s organizations and institutions has been symbiotic. We as workers, and the organizations that sponsor and compensate our efforts, have grown together over time. Our ability to use knowledge at work has been the common denominator[3].

As we go back in time, the Industrial Revolution emphasized knowledge being applied to tools, processes, and products. This transformed our concept of work as we moved from ‘farm to factory’. As industry matured and ‘production technology’ grew in sophistication and capability, the ability to mass produce standardized products ushered in the Productivity Revolution. Thus knowledge was applied to work.

After World War II, the Management Revolution thrust the concept of management as a formalized discipline into the business world. This was evidenced by the growth in managerial jobs and college programs offering management education. In this era, knowledge is being applied to knowledge itself.

The advent of the 21st century continues to take us into the future or organizational life. Information and communications technology has controlled complexity, accelerated collaboration, and revolutionized connectivity. Broadly speaking, anything that can be codified through computer software and converted into an electronic signal (digitization) is where much of the future is waiting.

Today the nature of work and the organization of the workplace are undergoing dramatic changes as the 21st century begins to unfold. These changes coincided with the formation of a postindustrial society that extols technical-scientific expertise and rewards the professional and technical class for creating ‘intellectual technology’ within a service economy.

The concept of work ranges from Aristotle’s notion of work as a path to happiness to Karl Marx’s contention that work alienates the worker from the product of their labor. The fabric of society has work woven into its threads. What we want from work is vital.

At the very start, there is the definitional difference between vocation (from Latin vocatio, to be called or summoned) versus occupation (from Latin occupatio, to occupy). Occupation has moved past, at least one would hope, simply occupying ‘a job’.

Likewise, vocation has been used synonymously with one’s occupation or their ‘job’. Whether our work is a career, a calling, our livelihood, or a necessary evil each of us has some opinion on what work means.

Overall, we find that the subject of ‘work’ unfolds differently for each of us thus requiring an individual treatment or interpretation. The critical observation comes from the plethora of research and commentary on how individuals and teams operate in organizational environments.

If the discussion is left largely to economists and business analysts who think of work as producing goods and services, then this incredibly important phenomena begins to wane. If however, we can clearly demonstrate the economic, psychological, and sociological importance, then establishing the organizational baseline helps us to discuss organizational issues and gain a common understanding.

Today the nature of work and the organization of the workplace are undergoing dramatic changes as the 21st century begins to unfold. These changes coincided with the formation of a postindustrial society that extols technical-scientific expertise and rewards the professional and technical class for creating ‘intellectual technology’ within a service economy. Today we have a new economy - a knowledge economy.

The emergence of knowledge work has challenged the economic notion of assets as tangible (i.e. hand held) into something that is harder to quantify (i.e. within the head). Thus, we find our ‘intellectual capital (assets)’ can produce a high-valued asset. So the notion of what constitutes an asset moves slightly from the concrete to the cognitive.

The Confucian saying, Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life is a wise observation given the preponderance of job dissatisfaction. However finding ‘that job’ is not always easy.

It always comes down to a matter of fit between the work we do, between our work colleagues, and the workplace itself. The concourse or worker, workforce, and the workplace is commonly called ‘the workscape’. It is our focus and our organizational ecosystem.

The gist of Organizational Pathology is to identify how many of our experiences and problems are the product of misfits between our ancestral psychology and our contemporary environments[4]. At issue, is how our capacity to adapt to organizational challenges can become compromised when a relatively stable condition gets transformed into a pathology.

The purpose of Organizational Pathology is not to tell people what to think, it is to help them think better, whatever conclusions they draw are strictly their own. Organizational life is a complex journey, most of us could use some navigational insight, and others need a platform for contemplation.

SMP

The Fragmentation of Organizational Thought

The actual origin of organizational society, is at best, questionable. One possible starting point would be the medieval guilds. Guilds were a form of organization to align merchants and craftsmen into ‘groups’ that ensured their membership and offerings were ‘protected’ (literally) and managed. Thus, guilds were an early version of a ‘unionized’ organization.

For example guilds gave us the notion of an apprenticeship and also brought us the journeyman, whose title comes from literally traveling during the day between jobs. Clearly we have gone from the guild to the gauntlet. In this sense, the gauntlet presents a series of challenges that come from the evolution of organizations and the marketplace.

The genesis of organizational thought coincided with how work, and the organizations that house the workforce, have co-evolved. In this sense, the workscape is the concourse of work, worker, and the workforce that forms an expansive social and economic network.

There is a bountiful body of excellent organizational research attributable to multiple disciplines. At issue, each discipline has their own inquiry pathways and their problem or hypothetical focus is largely endemic to the interests of that discipline.

For example, there are a good dozen psychology areas such as evolutionary psychology or personality psychology dedicated to their primary research interests, yet fully engaged with organizational research. This list goes on and on with each of the engaged disciplines.

Oddly there is no overarching theory of organizations. Perhaps the complexity of the interactions and the dynamism of the environment make a uniform or universal approach impossible. However there are multiple theories that contribute to our understanding of specific domains and which strive to predict organizational behaviors[5].

The lack of uniformity and consensus on organizational theory is largely due to the influence of managerial problems that have driven empirical research. The research remains fragmented and appears to be driven by paradigm proliferation.

Thus far the focus on the ‘problem de jure’ has forced abandoning a cumulative theoretical base in favor of monopolizing differentiation[6]. The problem this creates is not so apparent to the untrained observer. In effect, the fragmentation of organization thought, hence organizational theory, leaves a schism in our understanding of how we adapt to organizational settings.

Clearly any attempt to unify all of the relevant research or suggest which discipline’s research prowess should prevail is a fallacy. There are arguably countless brilliant researchers to cite and an equal volume of research materials to absorb.

Organizational Pathology takes the position that evaluating organizational life and our capacity to adapt requires advanced analytics and some uncommon insight. The traditional approaches to organizations must be extended into a construct that represents the dynamics, as well as, the challenges that professionals face in their career trajectory.

The fundamental undercurrent of Organizational Pathology is the notion of a co-evolution of the human species interacting with an ever-changing organizational landscape. Both are constantly changing, but not always in the same direction nor for the same reason. The notion of evolving within an organizational ecosystem really exemplifies how organizational life unfolds.

The following sections examine and explore the theme of organizational thought. In this sense, organizational thought sets the stage for how to think about ‘us at work’. The thinking, or thought process, is focused upon how various organizational ‘situations’ or ‘variables’ can become maladjusted. Thus the persistent theme is trying to understand and explain how maladaptive behavior infects our organizational life.

Understanding Human Nature

One of the primary aspects of anything to do with the human condition is understanding human nature. Human nature defines what we think about, how we behave, and what goals and strategies we pursue. Our human nature invariably encompasses our deepest fears and earnest hopes and discloses our destiny and values[7].

Understanding human nature is the prerequisite for understanding our role and reaction to organizational life. The gist of understanding human nature is how we envision and express our behaviors and the actions because they drive our interactions.

The literature characterizes human nature from people being seen as rational economic decision makers, to social creatures, to self-actualizing seekers, and, ultimately, to complex and variable humans. It seems that all of these perspectives have utility for explaining human nature, depending on what aspect we are trying to explain[8].

Some have argued that the concept of human nature does not account for the variability of life that makes us unique individuals. The notion of ‘universality’ or the host of common characteristics, is viewed as being too broad and impersonal.

Others in the argument, are very comfortable offering the accounts of our evolution from the hunter-gathers of our ancestry up to the contemporary organizational inhabitant. As

Você chegou ao final desta amostra. Inscreva-se para ler mais!
Página 1 de 1

Análises

O que as pessoas pensam sobre Organizational Pathology

0
0 avaliações / 0 Análises
O que você acha?
Classificação: 0 de 5 estrelas

Avaliações de leitores