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Teach Your Dog 100 English Words

Teach Your Dog 100 English Words

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Teach Your Dog 100 English Words

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450 página
2 horas
Lançado em:
Jul 28, 2020
ISBN:
9781393829089
Formato:
Livro

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Your dog is smarter than you think!

 

Make your dog the smartest, most well-behaved companion you've ever had.

 

Follow the unique Vocabulary and Respect Training Program in Teach Your Dog 100 English Words. Your dog will become the attentive, responsive, well-behaved companion you've always wanted!

 

My name is Michele Welton. I've been working with dogs for over 35 years as an obedience instructor, canine psychologist, and dog breed advisor.  

 

I wrote Teach Your Dog 100 English Words so you could train your dog yourself. If you follow my advice, your dog will basically be speaking English, singing, and having full-on conversations with you and your friends! Ok, not entirely. But they will learn critical behavioral words. And there is even a trick to teach your dog to sing!

 

I'll show you how to teach those words to your dog in specific ways so that he respects you. Then he will pay attention to you and follow your directions, and you'll be able to teach them anything you want. All the time. I guarantee it. 

Lançado em:
Jul 28, 2020
ISBN:
9781393829089
Formato:
Livro

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Teach Your Dog 100 English Words - Michele Welton

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1

Is your dog rude?

I often get phone calls from distressed owners who are having trouble with their dog. Let’s listen in on a phone conversation between myself and a typical dog owner.

We’re about to meet Kathy Armstrong and Jake – a well-meaning owner and her good-natured but undisciplined dog, both of whom will follow us through this book.

Kathy: Michele, my dog Jake is being difficult. I can’t make him do anything and he only listens to me when he’s in the mood!

Me: I see. Would you say Jake is behaving rudely?

Kathy (surprised): What do you mean? How can a dog be rude?

Ah, how indeed? Let us count the ways!

Talking back

Me: When you tell Jake to do something, does he sometimes sass you? Bark back at you?

Kathy: Well yes, if he doesn’t want to do it...

Staying just out of your reach

Me: When you reach toward him, does he sometimes dart away from you, just out of reach?

Kathy: Um, yes, if he doesn’t want to be caught.

Hanging onto objects

Me: When you try to take something from him, does he brace his legs and refuse to let go?

Kathy: Yes, if it’s something he wants to keep for himself.

Pestering you

Me: Does he persistently nudge or pester you for attention when you’re trying to read the newspaper or when you talk on the phone or visit with guests?

Kathy: Yes, when I’m not paying attention to him.

Stealing food

Me: Does he ever steal food off your plate or off the kitchen counter when you leave it unattended? Does he get into the trash?

Kathy: Um...

Grumbling when annoyed

Me: Does he ever grumble at you when you wake him up? Or when you try to move him off his favorite chair? Or when you touch some sensitive part of his body, like his tail or paw?

Kathy: Yes, he does growl and grumble a little bit sometimes.

Struggling during grooming

Me: Does he fuss when you try to open his mouth to look at his teeth? How about cleaning his ears? Or clipping his toenails?

Kathy: True. He doesn’t like me to do those things.

Running away from you

Me: When you catch him doing something wrong, does he run from you? Does he lead you on a merry chase around the house or yard?

Kathy: Uh-huh. So he can’t be scolded.

Jumping on guests

Me: When someone comes to visit, is Jake calm and polite, or does he jump on people?

Silence. Then... Kathy: I’m beginning to see your point.

Me: And you said he only obeys when he’s in the mood.

Kathy (sighing): You’re right, Michele. Jake does do quite a few of those things. But are they really that bad?

Why rude behaviors are bad

Me: "I’m afraid so. Those behaviors are disrespectful, you see. If a dog is allowed to do things that are rude and disrespectful, he starts believing that he is more in charge of his behavior than you are.

Dogs have an instinctive desire to belong to a social group what we might call a family or pack. When Jake joined your family, his instincts compelled him to seek out its structure:

Who is the leader who sets the boundaries?

Who are the followers who follow the leader?

If you and your other family members don’t establish yourselves as the leaders, Jake might assume that role himself."

Kathy (worried): So dogs want to be in charge?

Me: No, not at all. The vast majority of dogs don’t want to be leaders. They really, really don’t want to be leaders. They’re much happier as followers.

But a dog isn’t comfortable in a world where no one seems to be in charge.

So if you don’t provide enough direction to your dog, if you don’t set firm boundaries, if you feel guilty about saying No and making it stick.... well, then you’ll see some of those rude and disrespectful behaviors as he makes his own decisions about what he wants to do, and not do. Since you haven’t assumed the decision-making role, he has to do it."

Kathy (anxiously): But I don’t want to rule over my dog. I just want him to be my friend.

Me: "But friends are equals, aren’t they? Jake is your dependent. He depends on you for his food, his health, his safety, his very life.

There will be many times in his life when you’ll need to do things with him that he doesn’t understand and doesn’t like.

You might need to give medicine that tastes awful... or take something dangerous out of his mouth... or roll him onto his back so you can remove a tick from his belly."

Kathy: Oh, that actually happened! We were in the woods and he got a twig wedged between his teeth. But he wouldn’t stay still, so my husband couldn’t pull it out. We had to drive a half-hour to the vet’s and pay fifty dollars. Just because Jake wouldn’t let us fiddle with his mouth.

Me: Yes indeed, Jake is a smart dog, but he can’t understand the things that YOU understand. So he needs to have complete trust in YOU, his leader. When his leader says something is necessary, the dog will do it with no questions asked. His understanding is not required – only his trust and acquiescence to whatever you say is best for him."

For your own peace of mind as your dog’s guardian and caregiver, you must be able to restrain and handle him in any way you see fit, at any time you see fit.

So... does your dog view you as his trusted leader?

When visitors come to the door, does your dog bark a warning, but then look at you, expecting you to take over and handle the situation? That’s trusting you as the leader. Or does he rush the door and pitch an ongoing fit, making his own decision about how to deal with this visitor?

When you’re ready to go for a walk and you open the door or gate, does your dog wait for your permission to go through? That’s showing polite respect for you as the leader. Or does he lunge through the door or gate the moment it opens, oblivious to your presence at the other end of the leash?

Does your dog walk nicely on a loose leash, glancing at you regularly to see which direction you want to go in? That’s recognizing you as the leader. Or does he pull you around and make his own decisions to go left or right, fast or slow?

When a stranger or a strange dog approaches, does your dog look at you, expecting you to handle the situation? That’s trusting you as the leader. Or does he make his own decision to bark and pull and lunge at other people or other dogs?

You are your pup’s caregiver. Your relationship with him should be one where he is taught to look trustingly at you for guidance, direction, and permission. That’s the relationship every dog thrives on.

Kathy: Are you sure he won’t resent me for being in charge?

Me: He absolutely won’t resent you. Dogs LOVE having someone to look up to. When your dog trusts you as the leader, he will behave beautifully for you – and also he’ll feel happy and secure, because it’s a great load off his shoulders.

In a nutshell, if you want your dog to be both happy and well-behaved, he has to be a FOLLOWER – not a leader.

Six reasons dogs LOVE being followers:

1. Follower dogs feel secure because they know that someone else is in charge.

Your dog craves a leader who has everything under control. Then HE doesn’t need to worry about trying to figure out our complicated world. Instead of feeling stressed by struggling to control you and everything in their environment, follower dogs can relax and enjoy life while YOU handle all the decisions.

2. Follower dogs feel secure because everyone likes them.

Since follower dogs are so willing to listen to you, it’s easy to teach them good behaviors, which get noticed and praised by other people. Dogs recognize smiles and appreciative tones of voice.

3. Follower dogs feel secure because they can go more places.

Well-behaved follower dogs are easy to bring along when you go visiting and are often allowed to remain in places where a dog causing a ruckus would be kicked out.

4. Follower dogs feel secure because they know the consequences of everything they might do.

Follower dogs have been taught which behaviors bring them praise, petting, and rewards, and which behaviors bring scolding. This clear distinction helps them make good choices of which behaviors to do, and which behaviors not to do.

5. Follower dogs feel secure because they know what your human sounds mean.

Like anyone who learns a foreign language, dogs feel confident and empowered when they understand what you’re saying.

6. Finally, follower dogs are SMARTER because their brain has been developed.

Teaching your dog anything spurs his brain to build mental connections, which makes him more successful at learning additional things. In other words, his intelligence and learning skills start to snowball with the very first thing you teach and keep snowballing with each new word.

Me: Now... what owner and dog wouldn’t love all that?

Kathy: Great! I’m really loving this idea! How do I teach Jake to be a good follower dog?

2

How to teach your dog to be a good follower

First and foremost, you must be a good leader.

Whenever you do anything with your dog, even something as simple as petting him or brushing him or taking him for a walk, he is busy judging your body language, your tone of voice, and how you respond when he does X or Y.

All of those seemingly little things are very important to your dog. They're the clues he uses to draw conclusions about you, and to decide whether you're worthy of respect or not.

Your relationship with your dog should be one where he looks trustingly at you for guidance, direction, and permission. That's the relationship every dog thrives on.

Vocabulary Words + The Three R’s (Rules, Routines, Respect) = A Wonderful Follower Dog

In the training program in this book, you’re going to teach your dog important vocabulary words.

BUT... you’re going to teach those words in specific ways. Otherwise your dog might learn the words, but remain disrespectful and disobedient.

You see, it’s not the words themselves that teach your dog to be a good follower – it’s the way you teach the words that conveys your character (or lack thereof) to the dog. The dog then responds to that character.

For example, some training methods teach the dog that you’re an Abusive Bully. If the dog disobeys, he is struck or thrown to the ground or hung in the air by his leash so he can’t breathe. Because dogs are such incredible animals, they will continue to love an Abusive Bully owner, but they will fear him rather than respect him.

Other training methods go too far in the other direction by teaching the dog that you’re simply a Treat Dispenser. If the dog is hungry and in the mood to do what you say, he might do so in order to get the treat. Otherwise he will mostly do what he wants and you can’t stop him.

In contrast, my training method teaches the dog that you are a Trustworthy Leader. As such, you’re in charge and you make sure he minds you. But you’re neither harsh nor unfair. When your dog recognizes you as a Trustworthy Leader, he feels safe and secure and is happy to do what you want. Yes, even when he’s not hungry or in the mood.

I’m sure you’ve heard of the Three R’s for educating children:

Reading

’Riting

’Rithmetic

Here are my Three R’s for educating dogs:

Rules

Routines

Respect

Rules

Rules are consistent guidelines that tell your dog how things will be done in your family. Rules tell your dog what he must and must not do in different settings – inside the house, out in the yard, going for a walk, riding in the car, visiting the vet, having guests over for dinner, playing with the kids, and so on.

For example, here are some good rules:

Be calm indoors. No chasing the cat around the living room. Sit before I put your food bowl down. Sit before I attach your leash. Go to the bathroom here... not there. Don’t pull on the leash during walks. Wait at doors and gates until I give you the OK to go through. No jumping on people. This is your chew toy... this is not your chew toy. You can bark at the doorbell, but once I answer the door, you have to be quiet.

To be effective, rules must be enforced: Rules that are not enforced are merely suggestions, not rules.

We’ll talk about how to enforce rules in Chapter 4.

Routines

A routine is a consistent way of doing something.

Dogs LOVE routines because dogs thrive on sameness daily events that are 100% familiar, predictable, repeated. Dogs feel most secure when their life is structured and predictable.

So, as much as possible, do the same things with your dog every day – the same things in the same order, using the same words.

Show your dog exactly what you expect HIM to do as HIS part of the routine. Once he learns the routine for, say, meal time, if you do your part, he will do his part. Automatically. Day in and day out.

The trick is to make sure the routines your dog is learning are good ones that lead to good behavior and respect. If he learns bad routines that lead to bad behavior and disrespect, he will repeat them just as readily!

The vast majority of behavior problems in dogs are caused by (1) the owner not setting or consistently enforcing rules; and (2) the owner inadvertently allowing the dog to learn and practice bad routines instead of good ones.

For example, here’s a good meal time routine:

Cue your dog when you’re ready to prepare his meal. "Are you hungry? Want your food?" Exaggerate the key words.

Have him come with you to the kitchen. Get his bowl from the same cupboard and set it on the same counter every time. He should be right there watching you. You want him to see that YOU are the source of his food. That’s a subtle leadership thing.

If he’s acting excitable, don’t put his food down, else he’ll learn that excitable behavior makes the food appear! If he’s racing around, barking, or jumping, he should be on leash so you can easily stop those behaviors.

When he is calm, the bowl is ready to go down. If he already knows how to sit, have him sit first – another subtle leadership thing. Then.... Okay! and place the bowl on the floor, in the same spot every time. "Here’s your food."

If you have multiple dogs, each should have his own eating spot away from the others. Place the bowls down in the same order each time, saying the dog’s name as his bowl goes down. "Buffy... here’s your food. Kelly... food."

During mealtime, leaders protect followers. Don’t let kids or other pets approach a dog who is eating. If one of your dogs is not well-behaved enough to obey this rule, he should be dragging his leash so you can get hold of him. If necessary, feed the dogs in separate crates or separate rooms. Stealing food or pestering another pet is completely unacceptable, as true leaders would not permit this.

After 10 minutes, every bowl should be picked up to avoid picky eating habits or food guarding. If there is still food left in the bowl, make a mental or written note, as it could suggest illness.

The final part of the routine is a potty break immediately after every meal. If you’re still housebreaking, take the dog out on leash. If he’s already 100% housebroken and eliminates reliably if you send him outside himself, that’s fine. In either case, announce the potty break: "Do you need to go OUT? Time to go OUT."

The easiest way to raise and train your dog is to establish choreographed routines – same things, same order, same words – with yourself as the director, the one in charge. Create good routines, stick to them, and your dog’s behavior will be predictable and good.

All family members should be on the same page

Everyone in your family should follow the same rules and routines with the dog.

For example, suppose you and your spouse allow different behaviors. You chase the dog off the sofa... but you invite him to jump on you. Your spouse invites the dog up on the sofa... but scolds him for jumping on her. Your daughter doesn’t allow either of those behaviors... but lets the dog haul her around on the leash.

There might even be another family member, or a housekeeper, or even the folks at doggy daycare, who won’t correct the dog for anything because they don’t want him to feel sad.

That’s just nonsense.

Dogs feel most secure when their world is always this and always that. Consistent, predictable, black and white.

So if mixed messages are happening in your dog’s life, sort it out quickly. Either get everyone on board with your training program or keep your dog away from people who are (even unintentionally) undermining it.

Later, when your dog is well-behaved, you can certainly be more selective/permissive about certain rules. I definitely relax or even eliminate some rules that I enforce consistently when my dogs are younger and still learning how to live politely in my household.

During the formative months of training, there should be no maybes or sometimes. You might think you’re being flexible or nice by going back and forth about what your dog is allowed to do. Your dog, on the other hand, will peg you as indecisive and he might begin to test your rules to find out which ones are really rules, and which ones are up for grabs.

Dogs do not do well with gray areas. If you allow one gray area, your dog is driven by instinct to second-guess another of your decisions, and another, to find out where the limits really are. This is stressful for your dog and no fun for anyone else either. So decide on the rules. Stick to them. Consistently. Everyone.

Respect

We’ve covered two of my Three R’s for educating dogs: Rules and Routines.

Now we come to the third R, which is Respect.

I have two definitions for Respect:

Definition #1: A dog who respects you recognizes your leadership and defers to it, looking trustingly to you for guidance and direction.

Definition #2: An owner who respects her dog accepts and embraces the reality that he is a dog, a wonderful species called canine. He is not – and cannot be – a furry human, so we mustn’t try to project our own human ways of thinking and feeling onto him. That’s disrespectful. Instead, respect him as a canine and interact with him in ways that canines understand.

To show your dog respect, give him what he needs:

a structured life filled with predictable patterns and routines, so the dog feels secure that he always knows what will happen next.

consistent positive reinforcement (rewards) for good behaviors – plus corrections for undesirable behaviors – so the dog can make good decisions about which behaviors he should do, and which behaviors he shouldn’t do.

calm confident leadership, so the dog recognizes that you’re in charge and looks trustingly to you for guidance and direction.

That’s how you give your dog the respect his species deserves. He will really appreciate it!

But the question remains.... "Does your dog respect you?"

Does your dog view you as his trusted leader?

In Chapter 1, I pointed out some rude behaviors in dogs who do NOT view their owner as a leader.

Barking at you, running away from you, refusing to let go of objects, pestering you when you're busy, stealing food, growling, struggling during grooming, jumping on guests... Do any of those behaviors sound familiar?

How about some of these behaviors?

When visitors come to the door, does your dog bark a warning, but then look at you, expecting you to take over and handle the situation? That’s trusting you as the leader. Or does he rush the door and pitch an ongoing fit, making his own decision about how to deal with this visitor?

When you’re ready to go for a walk and you open the door or gate, does your dog wait for your permission to go through? That’s showing polite respect for you as the leader. Or does he lunge through the door or gate the moment it opens, oblivious to your presence at the other end of the leash?

Does your dog walk nicely on a loose leash, glancing at you regularly to see which direction you want to go in? That’s recognizing you as the leader. Or does he pull you around and make his own decisions to go left or right, fast or slow?

When a stranger or a strange dog approaches, does your dog look at you, expecting you to handle the situation? That’s trusting you as the leader. Or does he make his own decision to bark and pull and lunge at other people or other dogs?

How to get your dog to trust you as the leader

With good rules and routines!

It’s all bound together, you see – rules, routines, and respect.

Yes, it’s important to teach words such as Come and Stay and Lie down. And we’ll be doing that – 100 great words.

However, teaching words only influences about 20% of the way your dog ends up behaving.

How you live with the dog around the house every day influences 80% of his behavior. Think about that!

How you live with the dog means the rules and routines that

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