Encontre seu próximo livro favorito

Torne'se membro hoje e leia gratuitamente por 30 dias.
The Wood Turner's Handybook - A Practical Manual for Workers at the Lathe: Embracing Information on the Tools, Appliances and Processes Employed in Wood Turning

The Wood Turner's Handybook - A Practical Manual for Workers at the Lathe: Embracing Information on the Tools, Appliances and Processes Employed in Wood Turning

Ler amostra

The Wood Turner's Handybook - A Practical Manual for Workers at the Lathe: Embracing Information on the Tools, Appliances and Processes Employed in Wood Turning

Comprimento:
281 página
3 horas
Lançado em:
Sep 17, 2020
ISBN:
9781528766562
Formato:
Livro

Descrição

“The Wood Turner's Handybook” is a comprehensive guide to woodworking, focusing on the use of the lathe. The 'lathe' is a machine for shaping wood, metal, or other material by means of a rotating drive that turns the piece being worked on against changeable cutting tools. Exploring the tools,machinery and and processes involved in wood turning, this classic handbook contains a wealth of information that will be of utility to woodworkers old and new. Paul Nooncree Hasluck (1854 – 1916) was an Australian engineer and editor. He was a master of technical writing and father of the 'do-it-yourself' book, producing many books on subjects including engineering, handicrafts, woodwork, and more. Other notable works by this author include: “Treatise on the Tools Employed in the Art of Turning” (1881), “The Wrath-Jobber's Handy Book” (1887), and “Screw-Threads and Methods of Producing Them” (1887). Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive. It is with this in mind that we are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially-commissioned new biography of the author.
Lançado em:
Sep 17, 2020
ISBN:
9781528766562
Formato:
Livro

Sobre o autor

Paul N. Hasluck, a true woodworking guru, was the craftsman behind titles such as Manual of Traditional Wood Carving, The Handyman’s Book: Essential Woodworking Tools and Techniques, Rustic Carpentry, Traditional Glassworking Techniques, Metalworking, The Handyman’s Guide, and more.

Relacionado a The Wood Turner's Handybook - A Practical Manual for Workers at the Lathe

Leia mais de Paul N. Hasluck
Livros relacionados
Artigos relacionados

Amostra do Livro

The Wood Turner's Handybook - A Practical Manual for Workers at the Lathe - Paul N. Hasluck

THE

WOOD TURNER’S

HANDY BOOK.

Copyright © 2017 Read Books Ltd.

This book is copyright and may not be reproduced or copied in any way without the express permission of the publisher in writing

British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

HANDYBOOKS FOR HANDICRAFTS.

A Series of useful Volumes, each comprising about 144 pp., with numerous Illustrations, crown 8vo, cloth, price about 2s.

THE METAL TURNER’S HANDYBOOK: A Practical Manual, for Workers at the Foot-Lathe, embracing Information on the Tools, Appliances and Processes employed in Metal Turning. By PAUL N. HASLUCK. With upwards of One Hundred Illustrations, 2s. [Now ready.

THE WOOD TURNER’S HANDYBOOK: A Practical Manual, for Workers at the Lathe, embracing Information on the Tools, Materials, Appliances and Processes employed in Wood Turning. By PAUL N. HASLUCK. With upwards of One Hundred Illustrations. 2s. [Now ready.

THE WATCH JOBBER’S HANDYBOOK: A Practical Manual on Cleaning, Repairing and Adjusting; embracing Information on the Tools, Materials, Appliances and Processes employed in Watchwork. By PAUL N. HASLUCK. With upwards of One Hundred Illustrations. [Just ready.

In preparation, uniform with the above.

THE PATTERN MAKER’S HANDYBOOK: A Practical Manual, embracing Information on the Tools, Materials and Appliances employed in Constructing Patterns for Founders. By PAUL N. HASLUCK. With about One Hundred Illustrations.

THE CABINET WORKER’S HANDYBOOK: A Practical Manual, embracing Information on the Tools, Materials, Appliances and Processes employed in Cabinet Work. By PAUL N. HASLUCK. With about One Hundred Illustrations.

THE MODEL ENGINEER’S HANDYBOOK: A Practical Manual, embracing Information on the Tools, Materials, Appliances and Processes employed in Constructing Model Steam-Engines. By PAUL N. HASLUCK. With about One Hundred Illustrations.

THE CLOCK JOBBER’S HANDYBOOK: A Practical Manual, embracing Information on the Tools, Materials, Appliances and Processes employed in Cleaning, Adjusting and Repairing Clocks. By PAUL N. HASLUCK. With about One Hundred Illustrations.

THE MECHANIC’S WORKSHOP HANDYBOOK: A Practical Manual, embracing Reliable Receipts, Useful Notes, and Miscellaneous Memoranda on Mechanical Manipulation. By PAUL N. HASLUCK. Comprising about Two Hundred Subjects.

Paul Nooncree Hasluck

Paul Nooncree Hasluck was born in April 1854, in South Australia. The third son of Lewis Hasluck, of Perth, the family moved to the UK when Hasluck was still young. He subsequently lived in Herne Bay (Kent), before moving to 120 Victoria Street, London, later in life.

Hasluck was the secretary of the ‘Institution of Sanitary Engineers’ – an organisation dedicated to promoting knowledge of, and development in the field of urban sanitation. Hasluck was also the editor of several magazines and volumes over his lifetime, including Work Handbooks and Building World. He was an eminently knowledgeable and talented engineer, and wrote many practical books. These included such titles as; Lathe-Work: A Practical Treatise on the Tools employed in the Art of Turning (1881), The Watch-Jobber’s Handy Book (1887), Screw-Threads, and Methods of Producing Them (1887), and an eight volume series on The Automobile as well as a staggering eighteen volumes of Mechanics Manuals.

In his personal life, Hasluck married in 1883, to ‘Florence’ – and the two enjoyed a happy marriage, though his wife unfortunately died young, in 1916. Hasluck himself died on 7th May, 1931, aged seventy-seven.

Woodworking

Woodworking is the process of making items from wood. Along with stone, mud and animal parts, wood was one of the first materials worked by early humans. There are incredibly early examples of woodwork, evidenced in Mousterian stone tools used by Neanderthal man, which demonstrate our affinity with the wooden medium. In fact, the very development of civilisation is linked to the advancement of increasingly greater degrees of skill in working with these materials.

Examples of Bronze Age wood-carving include tree trunks worked into coffins from northern Germany and Denmark and wooden folding-chairs. The site of Fellbach-Schmieden in Germany has provided fine examples of wooden animal statues from the Iron Age. Woodworking is depicted in many ancient Egyptian drawings, and a considerable amount of ancient Egyptian furniture (such as stools, chairs, tables, beds, chests) has been preserved in tombs. The inner coffins found in the tombs were also made of wood. The metal used by the Egyptians for woodworking tools was originally copper and eventually, after 2000 BC, bronze - as ironworking was unknown until much later. Historically, woodworkers relied upon the woods native to their region, until transportation and trade innovations made more exotic woods available to the craftsman.

Today, often as a contemporary artistic and ‘craft’ medium, wood is used both in traditional and modern styles; an excellent material for delicate as well as forceful artworks. Wood is used in forms of sculpture, trade, and decoration including chip carving, wood burning, and marquetry, offering a fascination, beauty, and complexity in the grain that often shows even when the medium is painted. It is in some ways easier to shape than harder substances, but an artist or craftsman must develop specific skills to carve it properly. ‘Wood carving’ is really an entire genre itself, and involves cutting wood generally with a knife in one hand, or a chisel by two hands - or, with one hand on a chisel and one hand on a mallet. The phrase may also refer to the finished product, from individual sculptures to hand-worked mouldings composing part of a tracery.

The making of sculpture in wood has been extremely widely practiced but survives much less well than the other main materials such as stone and bronze, as it is vulnerable to decay, insect damage, and fire. It therefore forms an important hidden element in the arts and crafts history of many cultures. Outdoor wood sculptures do not last long in most parts of the world, so we have little idea how the totem pole tradition developed. Many of the most important sculptures of China and Japan in particular are in wood, and the great majority of African sculptures and that of Oceania also use this medium. There are various forms of carving which can be utilised; ‘chip carving’ (a style of carving in which knives or chisels are used to remove small chips of the material), ‘relief carving’ (where figures are carved in a flat panel of wood), ‘Scandinavian flat-plane’ (where figures are carved in large flat planes, created primarily using a carving knife - and rarely rounded or sanded afterwards) and ‘whittling’ (simply carving shapes using just a knife). Each of these techniques will need slightly varying tools, but broadly speaking, a specialised ‘carving knife’ is essential, alongside a ‘gouge’ (a tool with a curved cutting edge used in a variety of forms and sizes for carving hollows, rounds and sweeping curves), a ‘chisel’ and a ‘coping saw’ (a small saw, used to cut off chunks of wood at once).

Wood turning is another common form of woodworking, used to create wooden objects on a lathe. Woodturning differs from most other forms of woodworking in that the wood is moving while a stationary tool is used to cut and shape it. There are two distinct methods of turning wood: ‘spindle turning’ and ‘bowl’ or ‘faceplate turning’. Their key difference is in the orientation of the wood grain, relative to the axis of the lathe. This variation in orientation changes the tools and techniques used. In spindle turning, the grain runs lengthways along the lathe bed, as if a log was mounted in the lathe. Grain is thus always perpendicular to the direction of rotation under the tool. In bowl turning, the grain runs at right angles to the axis, as if a plank were mounted across the chuck. When a bowl blank rotates, the angle that the grain makes with the cutting tool continually changes between the easy cuts of lengthways and downwards across the grain to two places per rotation where the tool is cutting across the grain and even upwards across it. This varying grain angle limits some of the tools that may be used and requires additional skill in order to cope with it.

The origin of woodturning dates to around 1300 BC when the Egyptians first developed a two-person lathe. One person would turn the wood with a rope while the other used a sharp tool to cut shapes in the wood. The Romans improved the Egyptian design with the addition of a turning bow. Early bow lathes were also developed and used in Germany, France and Britain. In the Middle Ages a pedal replaced hand-operated turning, freeing both the craftsman’s hands to hold the woodturning tools. The pedal was usually connected to a pole, often a straight-grained sapling. The system today is called the ‘spring pole’ lathe. Alternatively, a two-person lathe, called a ‘great lathe’, allowed a piece to turn continuously (like today’s power lathes). A master would cut the wood while an apprentice turned the crank.

As an interesting aside, the term ‘bodger’ stems from pole lathe turners who used to make chair legs and spindles. A bodger would typically purchase all the trees on a plot of land, set up camp on the plot, and then fell the trees and turn the wood. The spindles and legs that were produced were sold in bulk, for pence per dozen. The bodger’s job was considered unfinished because he only made component parts. The term now describes a person who leaves a job unfinished, or does it badly. This could not be more different from perceptions of modern carpentry; a highly skilled trade in which work involves the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges and concrete framework. The word ‘carpenter’ is the English rendering of the Old French word carpentier (later, charpentier) which is derived from the Latin carpentrius; ‘(maker) of a carriage.’ Carpenters traditionally worked with natural wood and did the rougher work such as framing, but today many other materials are also used and sometimes the finer trades of cabinet-making and furniture building are considered carpentry.

As is evident from this brief historical and practical overview of woodwork, it is an incredibly varied and exciting genre of arts and crafts; an ancient tradition still relevant in the modern day. Woodworkers range from hobbyists, individuals operating from the home environment, to artisan professionals with specialist workshops, and eventually large-scale factory operations. We hope the reader is inspired by this book to create some woodwork of their own.

Just published waistcoat-pocket size, price is., post free.

SCREW THREADS:

AND METHODS OF PRODUCING THEM.

WITH

NUMEROUS TABLES AND COMPLETE DIRECTIONS

FOR USING

SCREW-CUTTING LATHES.

By PAUL N. HASLUCK,

Author of Lathe-Work, The Metal Turner’s Handybook, &c.

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.

THE

WOOD TURNER’S

HANDYBOOK.

A Practical Manual

FOR

WORKERS AT THE LATHE:

EMBRACING INFORMATION ON THE TOOLS, APPLIANCES AND

PROCESSES EMPLOYED IN WOOD TURNING.

BY

PAUL N. HASLUCK, A.I.M.E.

AUTHOR OF LATHE-WORK, THE METAL TURNER’S HANDYBOOK, ETC.

WITH UPWARDS OF ONE HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS.

PREFACE.

THIS hand-book forms the second of a Series of HANDY-BOOKS FOR HANDICRAFTS. Some of the matter and illustrations may be identified as having been taken from various technical periodicals to which they were originally contributed by me. A few of the items originated from other sources, but have been re-written for publication in this hand-book.

The lathe, which is claimed to be the creator of mechanism, is a machine in which all mechanics should be interested. A knowledge of the art of turning finds useful application in all the mechanical arts. Not only is a large proportion of the community employed in these arts, but individuals interest themselves in their practice, as affording pleasurable and profitable recreation. Turnery occupies many workmen, and has special claims on amateurs. If this handybook tends to promote this fascinating and useful art my object will be attained.

THE METAL TURNER’S HANDYBOOK, which forms a companion volume, I would recommend to the notice of those who are interested in that branch of the Art of Turning.

P. N. HASLUCK.

LONDON,

February, 1887.

CONTENTS.

I. W OOD -T URNERS ’ L ATHES

Twelve Illustrations.

II. H AND -T OOLS USED FOR T URNING W OOD

Eight Illustrations.

III. R OUNDING T OOLS AND M ACHINES

Five Illustrations.

IV. F ITTING UP A L ATHE

Two Illustrations.

V. C HUCKS

Seven Illustrations.

VI. T URNING THE C YLINDER AND B ALL - FEET

Thirteen Illustrations.

VII. T URNING B ALUSTERS AND C LOTHES -P EGS

Twelve Illustrations.

VIII. F ISHING -R OD , D RAUGHTSMEN , S PITTOON AND M USIC S TOOL

Seven Illustrations.

IX. L ADY ’ S C OMPANION , P IN -C USHION AND C HESSMEN

Nine Illustrations.

X. T ABLE , C HAIR AND T OWEL -R AIL

Eight Illustrations.

XI. E GG -C UPS , T IMER AND W ATCH -S TAND

Ten Illustrations.

XII. S PHERES AND S PIRALS

Five Illustrations.

XIII. C OPYING L ATHES

Four Illustrations.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

FIG.

1Plain Wood-Turning Lathe

2Wood-Turning Lathe on Iron Bed

3Lathe for Straight and Spiral Fluting

4American Variety Wood-Turning Lathe

5Wooden Shoe

6Shoe Last

7Pistol Stock

8Tool Handle

9Axe Handle

10 Hatchet Handle

11 Wheel Spoke

12 Gun Stock

13 Cutting Angles of Tools

14 Turner’s Gouge

15 Half Inch Gouge

16 Grinding a Gouge

17 Quarter Inch Gouge

18 Three-quarter Inch Chisel

19 Hook Tool

20 Parting Tool

21 Rounding Tool

22 Concentric Slide

23 Lathe for Turning Taper Handles, &c.

24 Simple Rounding Machine

25 Automatic Rounding Machine

26 Mandrel for Wood-Turning

27 Home-made Lathe

28 Prong

29 Prong Chuck

30 Conical Screw Chuck

31 Screw Tool for Cutting Thread on Cone

32 Barrel Chuck

33 Chuck for Turning Discs

34 Modified Conical Screw-Chuck

35 Plain Cylinder Mounted for Turning

36 Tool Handle Roughed Out

37 Tool Handle with Ferrule Fitted

38 Bradawl Handle Complete

39 Chisel Handle

40 File Handle

41 Bow-Saw Handle

42 Small Tool Handle

43 Screwdriver Handle

44 Straight Handle

45 Head-stocks for Turning Oval Handles

46 Ball-Feet

47 Finial

48 Turning a Baluster

49 to 54 Examples of Turnery

55 to 58 Specimen Balusters

59 Back-stay

60 Tool for Beading

61 Block for Spittoon

62 Spittoon Complete

63 Column of Music Stool

64 Collar

65 Leg of Music Stool

66 Top of Music Stool

67 Lady’s Companion

67 Mortising Pillars

68, 69 Ring and Saucer

70 Finial in Half Section

71 Plan of Lady’s Companion

72, 73 Pincushion and Secretory

74 Plan Section

75 Tripod Table

76 Elevation of Chair

77 Plan of Seat

80, 81 Rails Enlarged

82 Towel-Rail

83 Foot

84 Enlarged End of Rail

85 Block for Turning

86 Block to Form an Egg-Cup

87, 88 Section of Egg-Cup and Template

89 Complete Egg-Cup

90 Egg-Cups on Stand Complete

91, 92 Front and Side View of Egg-Timer

93 Elevation of Watch-Stand

94 Section of Watch-Holder

95, 96, 97 Turning a Sphere

98 Three Strand Twist

99 Cutter for Marking Spirals

100  Guide for Marking Spirals

101  Front View of Copying Lathe

102  End View of Copying Lathe

103  Copying Lathe

104  Automatic Gauge Lathe

THE

WOOD TURNER’S HANDYBOOK.

CHAPTER I.

WOOD-TURNERS’ LATHES.

THE lathes now commonly employed for general wood-turning are most simple and primitive. Some 3,500 years ago, the potter’s wheel, which may be considered to be the primogenitor of modern lathes, was known and used. In some of the oldest Egyptian monuments the God Ptah is represented working at a potter’s throw, or wheel. The modern throw possesses but slight modifications, and is substantially the same tool as that used for the production of antique pottery ware, some of which still remains unsurpassed for beauty and skilful execution.

The modern form of turning-lathe, in which the work is suspended on horizontal centres, was commonly used by the Greeks and Romans. Though none of the early writers have left anything like a graphic description of the lathe of their time, yet the tool is frequently mentioned by Herodotus, Cicero and Pliny—that is to say, at a date some centuries before the Christian era. Virgil, who lived from 70 to 19 B.C., gives particulars of the art of turning, from which it is evident that wood-turning was practised at that time. In his Georgics we learn not only that the ancients turned wood externally, but that they also hollowed it internally. Boxwood and lime tree, woods of very different natures, are spoken of as susceptible of being fashioned on the lathe.

Wind instruments were made of boxwood, and from Virgil’s Æneid we may glean an idea of the degree of perfection attained in his time. The instruments were, it seems, all flutes, and of these there was no lack some 2,000 years ago. Pandean pipes are probably meant by the flute spoken of in the Bible; but the flutes made by the Greeks were formed of ass’s bones, which, of course, did not require the use of a lathe in their preparation. It is difficult to decide with any degree of certainty the date at which wood-turning originated.

When turning between centres was first practised the work had an alternating rotary motion imparted to it. One method was by means of a cord, which encircled the work twice, having one end attached to an elastic pole, and the other formed into a stirrup for the foot. On pressing with the foot the work was rotated in the direction required for turning; it was similarly rotated in the opposite direction when the power was released, and the cord drawn back to its original position by the elastic force of the pole. During this latter movement the turning-tool had to be lifted from contact with the work. Another method was to

Você chegou ao final desta amostra. Inscreva-se para ler mais!
Página 1 de 1

Análises

O que as pessoas pensam sobre The Wood Turner's Handybook - A Practical Manual for Workers at the Lathe

0
0 avaliações / 0 Análises
O que você acha?
Classificação: 0 de 5 estrelas

Avaliações de leitores