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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1)

FUNCTION: NAVIGATION

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2)

Plan and conduct a passage and determine position KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Celestial Navigation Examination and assessment Ability to use celestial bodies of evidence obtained from to determine the ship's one or more of the position following: .1 approved in-service Terrestrial and Coastal experience Navigation .2 approved training ship Ability to determine the experience ship's position by use of: .3 approved simulator .1 landmarks training, where appropriate .2 aids to navigation, including lighthouses, beacons and buoys .3 dead reckoning, taking into account winds, tides, currents and estimated speed Thorough knowledge of and Prepared by: RD .4 approved laboratory equipment training using: chart catalogues, charts, navigational publications, radio navigational warnings, sextant, azimuth mirror, electronic navigation equipment, echo sounding

Plan a voyage and conduct navigation KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Voyage planning and Examination and assessment navigation for all conditions of evidence obtained from by acceptable methods of one or more of the plotting ocean tracks taking following: into account, e.g.: .1 approved in-service experience .1 restricted waters .2 approved simulator .2 meteorological conditions training, where appropriate .3 ice .4 restricted visibility .5 traffic separation schemes .6 areas of extensive tidal effects Routeing in accordance with the General Principleson Ships' Routeing .3 approved laboratory equipment training using: chart catalogues, charts, nautical publications and ship particulars.

CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D12 NAV1 Course Name: Terrestial Navigation I Course Description: The course includes the Coordinate system of the earth, Charts, Corrections to compass courses and bearings, Position and position lines, and the Bridge logbook. Course Objective: The student shall be able to plan a safe passage in coastal waters stating courses, distances and estimated time of arrival (ETA), and determine the position by terrestrial observations taking into account

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ability to use navigational charts and publications, such as sailing directions, tide tables, notices to mariners, radio navigational warnings and ships' routeing information NOTE: ECDIS systems are considered to be included under the term "charts" Electronic systems of position fixing and navigation Ability to determine the ship's position by use of electronic navigational aids Echo sounders Ability to operate the equipment and apply the information correctly Compass - magnetic and gyro Knowledge of the principles of magnetic and gyro

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
equipment, compass Reporting in accordance with the Guidelines and Criteria for Ship Reporting Systems Ref: D24-NAV2

particulars of the ship and the prevailing weather conditions, winds, etc.

Course Name: Terrestial Navigation 2 Course Description: The course includes the Deviation and compass errors, Tides and tidal streams, parallel plane and mercator sailing, great circle sailing, planning and conducting a safe passage. Course Objective: The student shall be able to plan and explain how to conduct a safe passage in coastal waters, stating true and compass courses, distances and estimated time of arrival (ETA), and determine the position by Dead Reckoning (DR) and terrestrial observations taking into account particulars of the ship, winds, tides, tidal streams, currents and

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compasses

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

Ability to determine errors of the magnetic and gyro compasses, using celestial and terrestrial means, and to allow for such errors Steering control systems Knowledge of steering control systems, operational procedures and change-over from manual to automatic control and vice-versa. Adjustment of controls for optimum performance Meteorology Ability to use and interpret information obtained from shipborne meteorological instruments Knowledge of the characteristics of the various weather systems, reporting procedures and recording systems Prepared by: RD

estimated speed. He shall be able to establish courses and distances through great circle sailing. Ref: D3-NAV3 Course Name: Celestial Navigation 1 Course Description: The course includes the solar systems, celestial sphere and equinoctial system of coordinates, hour angle, daily motion and horizontal system of coordinates, sextant and altitude corrections, amplitude, time and equation of time, nautical of almanac and merdian observations. Course Objective: The student shall be able to find the time when the sun, the planets and selected stars pass the meridian and establish the latitude of the ship by celestial observations.

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Ability to apply the meteorological information available

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
Ref: D41-NAV4 Course Name: Celestial Navigation 2 Course Description: The course includes the Pole Star Observations, Position Fixing and Errors of Compasses and Azimuth Course Objective: The student shall be able to fix the ships position and check errors on magnetic compasses and gyrocompasses by celestial observations. CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D12 NAV1 Ref: D24-NAV2 Ref: D3-NAV3 Page 4

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1)

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Determine position and the accuracy of resultant position fix by any means KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Position determination in all Examination and assessment conditions: of evidence obtained from one or more of the following: .1 by celestial observations

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE

Prepared by: RD

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
.2 by terrestrial observations, including the ability to use appropriate charts, notices to mariners and other publications to assess the accuracy of the resulting position fix .1 approved in-service experience Ref: D41-NAV4 Ref: D43 ENAV 1 Course Name: Electronic Navigation and RADAR Course Description: The course includes the Basic navigational instruments, radio direction finders, echosounders and speed measurement, speed logs, radar navigation, basic radar and plotting, open water exercise in the application of COLREG 1972, exercises in navigation and collision avoidance in confined and congested waters and exercises in and near traffic separation schemes. Course Objective: The student shall acquire sufficient knowledge on the basic principles of the most commonly used electronic navigational aids and to select the best suitable navigational system on .2 approved simulator training, where appropriate .3 approved laboratory equipment training using: .1 charts, nautical almanac, plotting sheets, chronometer, sextant and a calculator .2 charts, navigational publications and instruments (azimuth mirror, sextant, log, sounding equipment, compass) and manufacturers' manuals .3 radar, Decca, Loran, satellite navigation systems and appropriate navigational charts and publications.

.3 using modern electronic navigational aids, with specific knowledge of their operating principles, limitations, sources of error, detection of misrepresentation of information and methods of correction to obtain accurate position fixing

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1)

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Determine and allow for compass errors KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Ability to determine and Examination and assessment allow for errors of the of evidence obtained from magnetic and gyroone or more of the compasses following: Knowledge of the principles of magnetic and gyrocompasses An understanding of systems under the control of the master gyro and a knowledge of the operation and care of the main types of gyro-compass .1 approved in-service experience .2 approved simulator training, where appropriate .3 approved laboratory equipment training using:

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE

board in a given situation and effectively use the instruments. The student shall also be able to handle the instruments properly and apply correctly the information obtained to fix the ships position. CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D41-NAV4

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
celestial observations, terrestrial bearings and comparison between magnetic and gyrocompasses

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Respond to a distress signal at sea KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Search and rescue Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from Knowledge of the contents practical instruction or approved simulator training, of the IMO Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual where appropriate (MERSAR)

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Co-ordinate search and rescue operations KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE A thorough knowledge of Examination and assessment and ability to apply the of evidence obtained from procedures contained in the one or more of the IMO Merchant Ship Search following: and Rescue Manual (MERSAR) .1 approved in-service experience .2 approved simulator training, where appropriate .3 approved laboratory equipment training using:

CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D42-MERSAR Course Name: Merchant Ships Search & Rescue Course Description: The course includes the Search and Rescue Organizations, Search and Rescue Operations, SAR equipment Course Objective: The student shall be able to explain how Search and Rescue Operations are Organized Globally and Use the Merchant Ship Search

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relevant publications, charts,

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
meteorological data, particulars of ships involved, radiocommunication equipment and other available facilities and one or more of the following: .1 approved SAR training course .2 approved simulator training, where appropriate .3 approved laboratory equipment training OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Maintain a safe navigational watch METHODS FOR KNOWLEDGE, DEMONSTRATING UNDERSTANDING & COMPETENCE PROFICIENCY Watchkeeping assessment of evidence obtained from one or more of the following: Thorough knowledge of the content, application and intent of the International .1 approved in-service Regulations for Preventing experience; Prepared by: RD MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Establish watchkeeping arrangements and procedures METHODS FOR KNOWLEDGE, DEMONSTRATING UNDERSTANDING & COMPETENCE PROFICIENCY Thorough knowledge of Examination and assessment content, application and of evidence obtained from intent of the International one or more of the Regulations for Preventing following: Collisions at Sea CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D22 D WATCH 1 Course Name; Watchkeeping, Deck Officers, STCW Chapter VIII Course Description: The Page 8 and Rescue Manual (MERSAR) to assist effectively.

Collisions at Sea

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
.2 approved training ship experience .1 approved in-service experience .3 approved simulator training, where appropriate .4 approved laboratory equipment training Thorough knowledge of the content, application and intent of the Basic Principles to be Observed in Keeping a Navigational Watch. Effective bridge teamwork procedures .2 approved simulator training, where appropriate

Thorough knowledge of the basic principles to be observed in keeping a navigational watch Thorough knowledge of effective bridge team work procedures The use of routeing in accordance with the General Provisionson Ships' Routeing

course includes the Keeping a safe navigational watch, while underway at anchor and in port. Course Objective: The student shall be able to apply proper watchkeeping arrangements and procedures, and keep a safe navigational watch at sea and an efficient watch in port, including ability to detect and act appropriately on possible hazards to life and environment. The student shall also be able to identify, interpret and display, as appropriate, internationally agreed lights and shapes and sound- and light signals. Ref: D32 D Watch 2 Course Name: Collission Regulations, Deck Officers Course Objective: The student shall be able to interpret properly the International Regulations for

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREG 1972) when in charge of a navigational watch. CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Use of radar and ARPA to maintain safety of navigation KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY Radar Navigation Knowledge of the fundamentals of radar and automatic radar plotting aids (ARPA) Ability to operate and to interpret and analyse information obtained from radar, including the following: .1 factors affecting performance and accuracy Prepared by: RD .2 setting up and maintaining METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE Assessment of evidence obtained from approved radar simulator and ARPA simulator training plus inservice experience

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Maintain safe navigation through the use of radar and ARPA and modern navigation systems to assist command decisionmaking METHODS FOR KNOWLEDGE, DEMONSTRATING UNDERSTANDING & COMPETENCE PROFICIENCY Assessment of evidence An appreciation of system obtained from approved errors and thorough radar simulator and ARPA understanding of the simulator training operational aspects of modern navigational systems, includng radar and ARPA Blind pilotage techniques Evaluation of navigational information derived from all sources, including radar and ARPA, in order to make and implement command decisions for collision avoidance and for directing

Ref: D43 E NAV 1 Ref: D51 E NAV 2 Course Name; Electronic Navigation ARPA Course Description: The course includes the Plotting Techniques, principal ARPA system, IMO Performance Standards for Automatic RADAR Plotting Aids (ARPA), acquisition of targets, tracking capabilities and limitations, processing delays, setting up and

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
displays the safe navigation of the ship .3 detection and misrepresentation of information, false echoes, sea return, etc., racons and SARTs Use including: .1 range and bearing; course and speed of other ships; time and distance of closest approach of crossing, meeting overtaking ships .2 identification of critical echoes; detecting course and speed changes of other ships; effect of changes in own ship's course or speed or both .3 application of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea .4 plotting techniques and relative and true motion concepts Prepared by: RD The inter-relationship and optimum use of all navigational data available for conducting navigation.

maintaining displays, representation of target information, errors of interpretation, errors in displayed data, system operational tests, risks of over-reliance on ARPA, obtaining information from ARPA displays, application of COLREG and integrated navigation system. Course Objective: The student shall be able to use Radar and ARPA. He shall be able to choose the appropriate mode of display, select plotting and graphics controls suitable to the circumstances, make appropriate use of operational alarms, acquire and track targets which present a potential threat of collision, extract the information needed to establish the course, speed and nearest approach to enable early action to be taken to avoid close quarters situation and make use of ARPA to confirm and

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.5 parallel indexing

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

Principal types of ARPA, their display characteristics, performance standards and the dangers of over reliance on ARPA Ability to operate and to interpret and analyse information obtained from ARPA, including: .1 system performance and accuracy, tracking capabilities and limitations, and processing delays .2 use of operational warnings and system tests .3 methods of target acquisition and their limitations .4 true and relative vectors, graphic representation of target information and danger areas Prepared by: RD .5 deriving and analysing

monitor their actions. The student shall be able to state the dangers of over reliance on the automatic acquisition and tracking of targets and operational alarms and how these dangers can be counteracted. The student shall also explain the concepts of integrated navigation as needed for navigation and maneuvering system.

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information, critical echoes, exclusion areas and trial manoeuvres

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1)

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Forecast weather and oceanographic conditions KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Examination and assessment Ability to understand and of evidence obtained from interpret a synoptic chart one or more of the and to forecast area following: weather, taking into account local weather conditions and information received by .1 approved in-service weather fax experience Knowledge of the characteristics of various weather systems, including tropical revolving storms and avoidance of storm centres and the dangerous quadrants Knowledge of ocean current systems .2 approved laboratory equipment training

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE

CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D64 MET OCEAN Course Name: Meteorology & Oceanography Course Description: The course includes the Meteorological Elements, Atmospheric Pressure Systems, Weather Reports/Recording and Reporting Weather Observations, Weather Forecasting, Oceanography and Waves Course Objective: The student shall be able to state how the atmospheric

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
Ability to calculate tidal conditions Use all appropriate navigational publications on tides and currents

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Respond to emergencies KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY Emergency procedures Precautions for the protection and safety of passengers in emergency situations Initial action to be taken following a collision or a grounding; initial damage assessment and control Prepared by: RD Appreciation of the

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Respond to navigational emergencies KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Precautions when beaching a Examination and assessment ship of evidence obtained from practical instruction, inservice experience and Action to be taken if grounding is imminent, and practical drills in emergency procedures after grounding Refloating a grounded ship with and without assistance Action to be taken if collision is imminent and following a collision or impairment of

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from one or more of the following: .1 approved in-service experience .2 approved training ship experience .3 approved simulator

pressure is distributed around the earth and explain its effect on the prevailing winds and ocean surface currents, obtain relevant meteorological information from available sources, use shipborne meteorological instruments to make observations and forecast the weather. CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum

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procedures to be followed for rescuing persons from the sea, assisting a ship in distress, responding to emergencies which arise in port

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
training, where appropriate .4 practical training the watertight integrity of the hull by any cause Assessment of damage control Emergency steering Emergency towing arrangements and towing procedures

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Use the Standard Marine Navigational Vocabulary as replaced by the IMO Standard Marine Communication Phrases and use English in written and oral form KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE English language Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from Adequate knowledge of the practical instruction English language to enable the officer to use charts and other nautical publications, to understand meteorological information and messages concerning Prepared by: RD

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2)

CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: Engl 1 Course Name: Communication Skills 1 Ref: Engl 2 Course name: Communication Skills 2

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE

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ship's safety and operation, to communicate with other ships and coast stations and to perform the officer's duties also with a multilingual crew, including the ability to use and understand the Standard Marine Navigational Vocabulary as replaced by the IMO Standard Marine Communication Phrases

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
Ref: Engl 3 Course name: Marine Vocabulary & Terms (Maritime English) Ref: Engl 4 Course Name: Technical Writing w/ Oral Communication MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Manoeuvre and handle a ship in all conditions METHODS FOR KNOWLEDGE, DEMONSTRATING UNDERSTANDING & COMPETENCE PROFICIENCY Manoeuvring and handling a Examination and assessment ship in all conditions, of evidence obtained from including: one or more of the following: .1 manoeuvres when .1 approved in-service approaching pilot stations experience and embarking or disembarking pilots with due regard to weather, tide, .2 approved simulator headreach and stopping CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D63 SEAM 5 Course Name: Ship Handling and Maneuvering Course Description: The course includes the effects of changes in deadweights, draughts, trim, speed and under-keel clearance on

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Maneouvre the Ship KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY Ship manoeuvring and handling Knowledge of: .1 the effects of deadweight, draught, trim, speed and under-keel clearance on turning circles and stopping distances Prepared by: RD .2 the effects of wind and

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from one or more of the following: .1 approved in-service experience .2 approved training ship

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current on ship handling

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
experience distances training, where appropriate .3 approved manned scale ship model, where appropriate .3 approved simulator training, where appropriate .4 approved training on a manned scale ship model where appropriate .2 handling ship in rivers, estuaries and restricted waters, having regard to the effects of current, wind and restricted water on helm response .3 application of constant rate of turn techniques .4 manoeuvring in shallow water, including the reduction in under-keel clearance caused by squat, rolling and pitching .5 interaction between passing ships and between own ship and nearby banks (canal effect) .6 berthing and unberthing under various conditions of wind, tide and current with and without tugs

.3 manoeuvres and procedures for the rescue of person overboard .4 squat, shallow water and similar effects .5 proper procedures for anchoring and mooring

turning circles and stopping distances, Effect of wind and current on ship handling, Manouvres for the rescue of a man overboard, Squat and shallow-water and similar effects, Proper procedures for anchoring and mooring Course Objective: The student shall be able to explain the basic principles to be observed when maneuvering ships of various size, drafts and trim considering the effects of wind, current, squat and shallow water. He shall also be able to interpret the diagram of the Turning Circles and state proper procedures for anchoring and mooring.

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
.7 ship and tug interaction .8 use of propulsion and manoeuvring systems .9 choice of anchorage; anchoring with one or two anchors in limited anchorages and factors involved in determining the length of anchor cable to be used .10 dragging anchor; clearing fouled anchors .11 dry-docking, both with and without damage .12 management and handling of ships in heavy weather, including assisting a ship or aircraft in distress; towing operations; means of keeping an unmanageable ship out of trough of the sea, lessening drift and use of oil .13 precautions in manoeuvring to launch rescue boats or survival craft

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
in bad weather .14 methods of taking on board survivors from rescue boats and survival craft .15 ability to determine the manoeuvring and propulsion characterstics of common types of ships with special reference to stopping distances and turning circles at various draughts and speeds .16 importance of navigating at reduced speed to avoid damage caused by own ship's bow wave and stern wave .17 practical measures to be taken when navigating in or near ice or in conditions of ice accumulation on board .18 use of, and manoeuvring in and near, traffic separation schemes and in vessel traffic service(VTS) Prepared by: RD Page 19

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
areas OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Transmit and receive information by visual signalling KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Assessment of evidence Visual signalling obtained from practical instruction Ability to transmit and receive signals by Morse light Ability to use the International Code of Signals OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Operate remote controls of propulsion plant and engineering systems and services KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Operating principles of Examination and assessment marine power plants of evidence obtained from one or more of the CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D52 MAR POWER Course Name: Basic Marine Page 20 MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D22 D WATCH 1 Ref: D32 D Watch 2

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
following: Engineering Ships' auxiliary machinery General knowledge of marine engineering terms .1 approved in-service experience .2 approved simulator training where appropriate Course Description: The course include the Diesel Engine, Engine Systems, Engine Operation, Auxiliary System and Machineries and Maintenance and Safety Course Objective: The students shall be able to make a sketch of a general arrangement plan of the engine room and explain the function of the basic elements, machinery and equipment needed for efficient operation, monitoring, watchkeeping and maintenance. CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D23 SEAM 2 Page 21

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1)

FUNCTION: CARGO HANDLING AND STOWAGE


MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Plan and ensure safe loading, stowage, securing, care during the voyage and unloading of cargoes METHODS FOR KNOWLEDGE, DEMONSTRATING UNDERSTANDING & COMPETENCE PROFICIENCY Knowledge of and ability to Examination and assessment apply relevant international of evidence obtained from

Monitor the loading, stowage, securing and unloading of cargoes and their care during the voyage METHODS FOR KNOWLEDGE, DEMONSTRATING UNDERSTANDING & COMPETENCE PROFICIENCY Cargo handling and stowage Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from Prepared by: RD

Cargo handling, stowage and securing

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
one or more of the following: .1 approved in-service experience .2 approved training ship experience .3 approved simulator training, where appropriate regulations, codes and standards concerning the safe handling, stowage, securing and transport of cargoes one or more of the following: .1 approved in-service experience

Course Name: Cargo Handling and Stowage 1 Carriage of Non-Dangerous Goods

Knowledge of the effect of cargo including heavy lifts on the seaworthiness and stability of the ship Knowledge of safe handling, stowage and securing of cargoes including dangerous, hazardous and harmful cargoes and their effect on the safety of life and of the ship

Knowledge of the effect on trim and stability of cargoes and cargo operations Use of stability and trim diagrams and stress calculating equipment, including automatic databased (ADB) equipment and knowledge of loading cargoes and ballasting in order to keep hull stress within acceptable limits Stowage and securing of cargoes on board ships, including cargo handling gear and securing and lashing equipment Loading and unloading operations, with special regard to the transport of cargoes identified in the Code of Safe Practice for

Course Description: The course includes the Dry .2 approved simulator training, where appropriate Cargo, Reasons for General Inspection of Holds, Cargo Protection, Ventilation and using: stability, trim and stress tables, diagrams and Control of Sweat, Deck stress calculating equipment. Cargo, Refrigerated Cargo, Cargo Handling Equipment, Cargo Handling Safety, Care of Cargo during the Voyage, Inspection and Report defects and damage to cargo spaces and hatch covers and ballast tanks Course Objective: The student shall be able to take necessary actions regarding: Preparation of cargo gears and holds prior to loading/discharging operation; Control of the ballasting and deballasting when loading and/or discharging cargoes; care for the cargo during the voyage.; Control of the distribution of

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
Cargo Stowage and Securing General knowledge of tankers and tanker operations OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Carriage of dangerous cargoes KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY International regulations, standards, codes and recommendations on the carriage of dangerous cargoes, including the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and the Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes (BC Code) Carriage of dangerous, hazardous and harmful cargoes; precautions during loading and unloading and care during the voyage Prepared by: RD

cargo and supervise securing by proper shoring, dunnaging and lashing.; Inspection and report of defects and damage to cargo spaces hatch covers CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from one or more of the following: .1 approved in-service experience .2 approved simulator training where appropriate .3 approved specialist training

Ref: D33 SEAM 3 Course Name: Cargo Handling ans Stowage 2 Carriage of Dangerous Goods Course Description: The course includes the Cargo Protections, Container Cargo, Deep Tank Cargo, Dangerous, Hazardous and Harmful Cargoes, Bulk Cargo Except Grain, Cargo Handling Equipment, Cargo Handling Safety and Care of Cargo During the Voyage Page 23

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1)

FUNCTION: CONTROLLING THE OPERATION OF THE SHIP AND CARE FOR PERSONS ON BOARD
MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2)

Course Objective: The student shall be able to take necessary actions regarding: application of the necessary precautions in the carriage of dangerous, hazardous and harmful cargoes; identification of various dangerous cargoes and their respective separation in stowage in compliance with the requirements of IMDG Code; care of the cargo during the voyage

Maintain seaworthiness of the ship METHODS FOR KNOWLEDGE, DEMONSTRATING UNDERSTANDING & COMPETENCE PROFICIENCY Examination and assessment Ship stability of evidence obtained from one or more of the Working knowledge and following: application of stability, trim and stress tables, diagrams and stress calculating .1 approved in-service experience equipment Prepared by: RD Understanding of .2 approved training ship

Control trim, stability and stress METHODS FOR KNOWLEDGE, DEMONSTRATING UNDERSTANDING & COMPETENCE PROFICIENCY Examination and assessment Understanding of of evidence obtained from fundamental principles of one or more of the ship construction and following: theories and factors affecting trim and stability and measures necessary to .1 approved in-service preserve trim and stability experience Knowledge of the effect on .2 approved training ship

CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum

Ref: D11 SEAM 1 Course Name: Ships, Ship Routines and Construction Course Description: The course includes the Ship, Shipboard Organization, Shipboard Routines,

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fundamental actions to be taken in the event of partial loss of intact buoyancy Understanding of the fundamentals of watertight integrity Ship construction

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
experience .3 approved simulator training, where appropriate .4 approved laboratory equipment training trim and stability of a ship in the event of damage to and consequent flooding of a compartment and counter measures to be taken Knowledge of IMO recommendations concerning ship stability experience .3 approved simulator training, where appropriate

Statutory Regulations, Anchor, Anchorwork, and Cable, Rope and Ropeworks, and Wire and Wireropes, Blocks and Tackles and Compliance with SOLAS Convention Course Objective: The student shall be able to explain the normal shipboard organization and its function, and state the duties and responsibilities of the personnel on board. He shall be able to explain the basic principles for safe ship operation. He shall be able to identify the main types of merchant ships and explain the considerations that must be taken by the crew to ensure safe operation on board. He shall be able to know common knots and splices used on board merchant vessels. He shall be able to state the different types of ropes, wire ropes, and tackles and how they are maintained on board. He shall be able to explain how Page 25

General knowledge of the principal structural members of a ship and the proper names for the various parts

Prepared by: RD

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

to maintain seaworthiness of the ship. He shall be able to identify the principal structural members of a ship, and state the proper names for the various parts. Ref: D53 SEAM 4 Course Name: Stability and Trim Course Description: The course includes the Stability, Trim, Bouyancies, Movement of the Center of Gravity, Causes of List, Fresh Water Allowance, Initial Stability, Statical Stability, Angle of Loll, Effect of Slack Tank, Action to be Taken in the Event of Partial Loss of Intact Stability, Maintain Seaworthiness of the Ship Course Objective: The student shall be able to use table on diagrams of stability and trim data to calculate ships initial stability, draught and trim for any given disposition of cargo

Prepared by: RD

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Ensure compliance with pollution prevention requirements --------------------------------Monitor compliance with legislative requirements KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Examination and assessment Prevention of pollution of of evidence obtained from the marine environment and one or more of the anti-pollution procedures following: Knowledge of the .1 approved in-service precautions to be taken to experience prevent pollution of the marine environment .2 approved training ship experience Anti-pollution procedures and all associated equipment ------------------Prepared by: RD ---------------------------

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Monitor and control compliance with legislative requirements and measures to ensure safety of life at sea and the protection of the marine environment KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Knowledge of international Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from maritime law embodied in one or more of the international agreements following: and conventions Regard shall be paid especially to the following subjects: .1 certificates and other documents required to be carried on board ships by international conventions, how they may be obtained .1 approved in-service experience .2 approved training ship experience .3 approved simulator training, where appropriate

and other weights. The student will also be able to determine whether stresses on the ships are within tolerance by the use of stress data and take actions in the event of partial loss of intact buoyancy. CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum

Ref: D62 MARPOL Course Name: Maritime Pollution and Prevention Course Description: The course includes the MARPOL Convention 73/78 and their applications, Sources of Pollution, Prevent Pollution and Actions if Pollution is detected Course Objective: The Page 27

Basic working knowledge of the relevant IMO Conventions concerning safety of life at sea and protection of the marine environment

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
Assessment of evidence obtained from examination or approved training and their period of validity .2 responsibilities under the relevant requirements of the International Convention on Load Lines .3 responsibilities under the relevant requirements of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea .4 responsibilities under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships .5 maritime declarations of health and the requirements of the International Health Regulations .6 responsibilities under international instruments affecting the safety of the ship, passengers, crew and cargo .7 methods and aids to prevent pollution of the

student shall acquire a working knowledge of the provisions of MARPOL Convention 73/78 and their applications and be able to identify sources of pollution, prevent pollution and take appropriate actions if pollution is detected. Ref: D61- MAR LAW

Course Name: Maritime Law Course Description: The course includes the Ship Nationality and Registration of a Ship, Carriage of Goods by Sea, Contracts for the used of Ships, Ancillary Contracts and Legal Aspects of Marine Accidents and monitor compliance with legislative requirements. Course Objective: The students shall be able explain the basics of maritime laws as it pertains to authorities, rights, duties and responsibilities in the commercial operation of sea

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
marine environment by ships .8 national legislation for implementing international agreements and conventions

OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) Prevent, control and fight fires on board --------------------------Operate life-saving appliances --------------------------Apply medical first aid on board ship

MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Maintain safety and security of the ship's crew and passengers and the operational condition of life-saving, firefighting and other safety systems ---------------Develop emergency and damage control plans and handle emergency situations ----------------------------------Organize and manage the provision of medical care on board

going merchant ships. They will also be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of maritime laws and rules governing relationship incident to merchant shipping in transport activities. CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY Fire prevention and firefighting appliances Prepared by: RD

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE Assessment of evidence obtained from approved firefighting training and experience as set out in

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY A thorough knowledge of life-saving appliance regulations (International Convention for the Safety of

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from practical instruction and approved in-service training

Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D21 SAFETY Course name: Safety Page 29

Knowledge of fire prevention Ability to organize fire drills Knowledge of classes and chemistry of fire Knowledge of fire-fighting systems Knowledge of action to be taken in the event of fire, including fires involving oil systems

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
section A-VI/ ----------------Assessment of evidence obtained from approved training and experience as set out in section A-VI/2, paragraphs 1 to 4 -------------Assessment of evidence obtained from approved training as set out in section A-VI/4, paragraphs 1 to 3 Life at Sea) and experience ----------------Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from approved in-service training and experience ----------------Examination and assessment of evidence obtained from approved training Organization of fire and abandon ship drills Maintenance of operational condition of life-saving, firefighting and other safety systems Actions to be taken to protect and safeguard all persons on board in emergencies Actions to limit damage and salve the ship following a fire, explosion, collision or grounding ------------Preparation of contingency plans for response to emergencies Ship construction, including damage control Methods and aids for fire prevention, detection and

Course Description: The course includes the Basic safety training familiarization, prevent, control and fight fires on board, operate life saving appliances, apply medical first aid on board ship and personal safety and social responsibility. Course Objective: The student shall be able to.. Basic safety training familiarization: state immediate actions to be taken by anybody on board if: a person falls overboard, fire or smoke is detected, the fire or abandon ship alarm is sounded, the fire or abandon ship alarm is sounded. Prevent, control and fight fires on board (1.20): interpret the fire control plan on a ship; state conditions required for fire to occur and to cease and Page 30

--------------

Life-saving Ability to organize abandon ship drills and knowledge of the operation of survival craft and rescue boats, their launching appliances and

Prepared by: RD

arrangements, and their equipment including radio life-saving appliances, satellite EPIRBs, SARTs, immersion suits and thermal protective aids. Knowledge of survival at sea techniques

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
extinction Functions and use of lifesaving appliances -----------------A thorough knowledge* of the use and contents of the following publications: .1 International Medical Guide for Ships or equivalent national publications .2 Medical section of the International Code of Signals .3 Medical First Aid Guide for Use in Accidents Involving Dangerous Goods

-----------Medical aid Practical application of medical guides and advice by radio, including the ability to take effective action based on such knowledge in the case of accidents or illnesses that are likely to occur on board ship

Prepared by: RD

explain how a chain reaction can lead to a continuously burning fire, the fire tetrahedron; state the conditions for entering the fire zone; describe the purpose of the muster list and give examples of the duties and responsibilities of the crewmembers; demonstrate how a fire fighter shall be properly dressed; locate the fire plan of the school, participate actively in a fire drill conducted at the school and give constructive critics as to how the drill was conducted and how it can be improved; list the general requirements for a fixed fire fighting system and state the precautions to be taken before operating the system; explain for which kind of fires water, foam, powder or carbon dioxide should be used for extinguishing the fire; ex[lain how to minimize the risk of fires on board and take the appropriate actions when a fire is detected; Page 31

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

extinguish all sorts of fires in open air and in confined spaces with water fog or any other suitable fire-fighting agent; effect a rescue operation in a smoke-filled space wearing self-contained breathing apparatus. Operate life saving appliances (1.19): explain the basic features, the benefits and disadvantages of the most commonly used launching devices; state where a manual describing the maintenance and operational procedures for life saving appliances will be found on board and the basic content of this manual; state procedures to be followed when recovering a life boat in a rough sea; list at least 50% of the equipment required by SOLAS in a survival craft; list the main dangers to survivors and explain how to cope with these dangers; board a liferaft from the ship and from the water; assist Page 32

Prepared by: RD

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

Prepared by: RD

others on board; describe how to clear away from the ships; explain prudent use of fresh water and the need to avoid dehydration; explain the means to be used for survival in shark-infested waters; explain correct use of a drogue or sea anchor to reduce drift; explain precautions to be taken and routine maintenance to be carried out on the lifeboat engine, propeller, etc. to achieve problem free operations; explain the adequate timing of all actions and proper usage of all equipment and means to maximize the possibilities for being detected and rescued at an early stage; state preparations to be made and the issues to be considered before beaching a survival craft on a coast exposed to a heavy sea and surf; demonstrate ability to keep afloat without a lifejacket; demonstrate how to right a capsized liferaft; demonstrate how to Page 33

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

abandon a liferaft; demonstrate proper use of the equipment in the lifeboat; demonstrate ability to start and operate the lifeboat engine; operate the portable radio equipment for the survival craft and make sure communication is established; take charge as the second in command of a survival craft. Apply medical first aid on board ship (1.1.3): Personal safety and social responsibility (1.21): state proper actions to be taken on discovering fires, ingress of water or if the ship has collided or is foundering; state precautions to take to avoid pollution of the environment; state actions to take if pollution of the environment is discovered; state basic procedures to be followed before entering a confined space; demonstrate correct procedures to be followed before entering a Page 34

Prepared by: RD

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

Prepared by: RD

confined space; demonstrate ability to contribute to good human relationship among the classmates; demonstrate ability to communicate effectively with classmates to ensure that the message is understood and to avoid personal conflicts, misunderstanding and hurt feelings; set up an agenda for a short meeting and act as the chairman of the meeting; list factors that can contribute to alcoholism and addiction to drugs and the actions to take to prevent misuse and assisting those in the danger zone; state the fundamentals for achieving proper discipline in a 24hours society like a ship; state the purpose of on-the job training and explain how to ensure that all crewmembers will be properly trained for the tasks they are requested to perform; explain how the result of the on-the-job training shall be evaluated, and which actions may be Page 35

Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2
OPERATIONAL LEVEL (Table A-II/1) MANAGEMENT LEVEL (Table A-II/2) Organize and manage the crew KNOWLEDGE, METHODS FOR UNDERSTANDING & DEMONSTRATING PROFICIENCY COMPETENCE Examination and assessment A knowledge of personnel management, organization of evidence obtained from approved in-service training and training on board ship and experience A knowledge of related international maritime conventions and recommendations, and national legislation

taken if the results are unacceptable. CHED CMO 13, s. 2005, Annex I BSMT Course Specification COMPETENCE Current BSMT Curriculum Ref: D65 PERS MAN

KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING & PROFICIENCY

METHODS FOR DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCE

Course Name: Shipboard Personnel Management Course Description: The course includes the Personnel Management, Organization of Staff, Training on Board Ships, Protection and Safety of Passengers Course Objective: The student shall be capable of organizing and managing the crew for safe and efficient operation of the ship and apply ships contingency plans for emergencies. The student will also be able to

Prepared by: RD

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Assessment on CHED-BS Marine Transportation Curriculum compliance to STCW Table of Competence A-II/1 and A-II/2

chair meetings on board and implement shipboard training programs.

Prepared by: RD

Page 37

REFERENCE NO.: D11 SEAM 1


Common Courses for BSMT & BSMarE

1. COURSE NAME: Ships, Ship Routines and Construction 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Ship, Shipboard Organization, Shipboard Routines, Statutory Regulations, Anchor, Anchorwork, and Cable, Rope and Ropeworks, and Wire and Wireropes, Blocks and Tackles and Compliance with SOLAS Convention

3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE & LABORATORY: 2 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 3 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS/WEEK: 2 LECTURE, 3 LABORATORY = 5 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to explain the normal shipboard organization and its function, and state the duties and responsibilities of the personnel on board. He shall be able to explain the basic principles for safe ship operation. He shall be able to identify the main types of merchant ships and explain the considerations that must be taken by the crew to ensure safe operation on board. He shall be able to know common knots and splices used on board merchant vessels. He shall be able to state the different types of ropes, wire ropes, and tackles and how they are maintained on board. He shall be able to explain how to maintain seaworthiness of the ship. He shall be able to identify the principal structural members of a ship, and state the proper names for the various parts. FUNCTION: F2- Cargo Handling and Storage at the Operational Level F3 - Controlling the Operation of a Ship and Care for Persons on Board at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table A-II/I), (3.2.2/7.03), 3.6/7.03)

D11 SEAM 1

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7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . .

7.1 The Ship 7.1.1 Draw a sketch of a ship, insert the load lines and indicate or define as appropriate the following terms regarding ship dimensions and capacities: 7.1.1.1 length over-all (LOA) 7.1.1.2 length between perpendiculars (LBP) 7.1.1.3 moulded breadth 7.1.1.4 moulded depth 7.1.1.5 grain and pale capacity 7.1.1.6 displacement 7.1.1.7 deadweight 7.1.1.8 draft 7.1.1.9 freeboard 7.1.2 draw and label the basic structural parts of a ship; 7.1.3 state the function of each of the structural parts of the ship; 7.1.4 identify the principal structural members of a ship and state their proper names; 7.1.5 explain what causes the stresses and forces to which a ship is exposed and state what the ship officer/operator and the ship builder can do to avoid damages and/or accidents caused by: 7.1.5.1 vertical shear and longitudinal bending in still water 7.1.5.2 hogging and sagging 7.1.5.3 rolling 7.1.5.4 pitching 7.1.5.5 panting 7.1.5.6 pounding 7.1.5.7 heaving 7.1.6 identify and state the functions of the mooring equipment on board; 7.1.7 identify the mandatory safety appliances and equipment on board; 7.1.8 state briefly the criteria of seaworthiness of the vessel; 7.1.9 state the different types of vessels according to their: 7.1.9.1 construction and design; 7.1.9.2 cargoes that they can carry; 7.1.9.3 trade route (area of operation).

7.2 Shipboard Organization 7.2.1 state the relationship of the vessel, its owner and/or manager and the crew on board;

D11 SEAM 1

page 2 of 5

7.2.2 draw the organigram (organizational plan) of a vessel and state the function of each department, the duties and responsibilities of each person in each department; 7.2.3 state the statutory requirement for such shipboard organization; 7.2.4 explain the distinction between responsibility and authority.

7.3 Shipboard Routines 7.3.1 state the typical daily routine onboard a vessel and how they may differ on different types of vessels; 7.3.2 enumerate the different activities to be carried out on a vessel (from one port to another), typically; 7.3.2.1 preparation for departure and un-docking operation; 7.3.2.2 at sea (cargo care, ships maintenance, watchkeeping, etc.); 7.3.2.3 at anchor (radius of swing, change of tide and wind direction, etc.); 7.3.2.4 preparation for arrival in port and docking operation; 7.3.2.5 cargo and/or operation (commercial operation). 7.3.3 explain when and why there are various controls and inspection on board vessel (both by the vessels master and other authorities or organizations); 7.3.4 enumerate and explain briefly the different safety and emergency drills conducted on board vessel; 7.3.5 identify and explain the basic safety precautions to be taken on board and protective equipment to be used at work; 7.3.6 explain why there is a need for familiarization training for new crew members; 7.3.7 identify the different social activities on board and how fatigue is prevented on board.

7.4 Anchor, Anchorwork And Cable 7.4.1 draw a sketch and label the different parts of an anchor, and state their use and construction (and their required certification); 7.4.2 draw and label the different parts of an anchor chain, including the kenter shackle and the joining links; 7.4.3 explain how anchor chains are marked and measured; 7.4.4 describe the procedure in lying an anchor, including the necessary preparations; 7.4.5 explain the inspection and maintenance procedure for anchor and its chains.

D11 SEAM 1

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7.5 Rope and Ropeworks (Knots, Ties and Splices) 7.5.1 identify and explain the different types of ropes, their uses, and how they are preserved and maintained; 7.5.2 do the basic knots and splices normally used on board vessels; 7.5.3 do seizing, whippings, worming, parceling and serving ropes; 7.5.4 measure properly the diameter of a rope and calculate the strength of the material.

7.6 Wire And Wireropes 7.6.1 identify and explain the different types of wireropes, their uses and how they are constructed and preserved; 7.6.2 identify and use properly the different wirerope fittings (end-hooks, clips, thimble. Shackles, etc.); 7.6.3 measure correctly the diameter of a wirerope and find the strength of the wire by using adequate tables.

7.7 Blocks and Tackles 7.7.1 draw and state the use of the different types of blocks; 7.7.2 draw a sketch of different purchases (blocks and tackles) and enumerate their advantages and disadvantages; 7.7.3 calculate and explain how purchase reduces the weight of its load.

7.8 Compliance with SOLAS Convention 7.8.1 State briefly the basic requirements of Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) convention. 8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 Ships Organigram 8.2 Rope, Diameter 12mm x 2 mtrs (for making knots and splices) 8.3 Ship model showing cross sectional parts or large scale drawings 8.4 Various types of blocks and tackles 8.5 Various types (makes) of ropes and ropeworks 8.6 Various types of wire (according to material and design) 8.7 Tabular Chart for the strength of ropes and wires 8.8 Sample of ships certificates, documents and clearance papers 8.9 Anchor and Cable (Drawing) 8.10 Ships training certificates, e.g. SOLAS, etc. 8.11 Ship model showing cross sectional parts or large scale drawings

D11 SEAM 1

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9. REFERENCES: 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 Crockcroft, A. N. Nicholls Seamanship and Nautical Knowledge. Branch, A.E. Elements of Shipping. House, D.J. Seamanship Techniques 1 Shipboard Practice. OCIMF. Effective Mooring published by Witherby & co. Ltd. London. Eyres, D.J. Ship Construction. IMO Model Course 7.03 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. Dela Calzada, Linic, Hilario, Andres, Quenkiol, Rafael. Ship and Ship Routines.

D11 SEAM 1

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REFERENCE NO: D12 - NAV 1 1. COURSE NAME: Terrestrial Navigation I 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Coordinate system of the earth, Charts, Corrections to compass courses and bearings, Position and position lines, and the Bridge logbook. 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 4 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 HOURS, 3 HOURS = 6 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to plan a safe passage in coastal waters stating courses, distances and estimated time of arrival (ETA), and determine the position by terrestrial observations taking into account particulars of the ship and the prevailing weather conditions, winds, etc. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table AII/1) at the operational level 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 The coordinate system of the earth 7.1.1 describe the coordinate system of the earth and set out positions stated by latitude and longitude and by true bearing and distance from a given point, both in meters and in nautical miles; 7.1.2 explain the advantages and disadvantages of using Mercator and Gnomonic charts for navigational purposes

7.2 Charts 7.2.1 state the different chart use in terrestrial navigation and explain all particulars given in a chart and how proper utilization of this information will contribute to safe navigation; 7.2.2 carry out chart corrections based on Notices to Mariners;
D12- NAV 1 page 1 of 3

7.2.3 use a chart catalogue to select the suitable charts for coastal passages.

7.3 Corrections to compass courses and bearings 7.3.1 considering the particulars of the ship and the coastal waters, set courses safely off hazards to navigation and, as far as practicable, utilize available navigational aids and conspicuous objects for controlling the ships position; 7.3.2 find variation and deviation from charts and tables and apply the corrections to calculate compass and true courses and bearings.

7.4 Position and position lines 7.4.1 Methods of obtaining fixed position 7.4.1.1 Latitude and Longitude 7.4.1.2 simultaneous cross bearing 7.4.1.3 two or more ranges 7.4.1.4 combination of bearings and ranges 7.4.2 determining position by running fix plot positions given bearings; taking consideration on ship course and speed. 7.4.3 determining position by running fix, dead reckoning, estimated, and fixed positions and explain the difference between these terms; 7.4.4 determine position by cross bearings, bearings transferred the sailed distance and combined with a new bearing (a running fix) by using horizontal and vertical sextant angles.

7.5 The logbook 7.5.1 explain the purpose of the bridge logbook; 7.5.2 state at least five types of information to be entered daily in the logbook while the ship is underway and, at anchor, 7.5.3 when the facts or incidents shall be entered and by whom.

7.6 Passage planning 7.61 Plan a passage of at least 24 hours duration utilizing relevant nautical publications

D12- NAV 1

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8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 Protractor, 8.2 Parallel ruler, two triangles or other functional equipment for chart work, 8.3 Dividers, 8.4 Electronic calculator with trigonometric functions; (For celestial navigation: Including sufficient memory capacity to calculate altitude using the cosine formula) 8.5 Navigational Chart for Exercises 8.5.1 Harbor charts 8.5.2 Coastal charts 8.5.3 General charts 8.5.4 Sailing charts 8.5.5 Chart projections 8.5.5.1 Gnomonic 8.5.5.2 Mercator 8.5.6 Chart catalogue 8.6 Notices to Mariners; 8.7 List of Lights; 8.8 List of Radio Signals, Radio Navigational Aids, 8.9 List of Radio Signals, Radio Time Signals Aids, Radio Navigational Warnings, 8.10 Tide Tables 8.11 Pilot Book 8.12 Illustrations and drawings of IALA Maritime Buoyage System 8.13 Tidal Stream Atlas 8.14 Charts Symbols and Abbreviations 8.15 Chart Tables 8.16 Navigational Charts for Exercises (original in good condition) 9. REFERENCES: 9.1 Frost. Practical Navigation for Second Mates. ISBN 0-85174-397-8. 9.2 An Introduction to coastal Navigation. ISBN 0-948254-02-5. 9.3 Frost. The principles and Practice of Navigation. ISBN 0-85174-444-3. 9.4 IMO Model Course 7.03. 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.5 Ynion, Eugenio J. Terrestrial Navigation I.

D12- NAV 1

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1. COURSE NAME: D21 - SAFETY


*Common Courses for BSMT & BSMarE

2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Basic safety training familiarization, prevent, control and fight fires on board, operate life saving appliances, apply medical first aid on board ship and personal safety and social responsibility. 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY 1 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 2 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS 1 LECTURE, 3 LABORATORY = 4 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: Must be taken during the last year level before the shipboard training

6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The student shall be able to . . . . . . 1. Basic safety training familiarization 1.1 state immediate actions to be taken by anybody on board if: 1.1.1 a person falls overboard, 1.1.2 fire or smoke is detected, 1.1.3 the fire or abandon ship alarm is sounded, 1.1.4 the fire or abandon ship alarm is sounded, state how to: 1.2.1 a person falls overboard,

1.2

2.

Prevent, control and fight fires on board (1.20) 2.1 2.2 interpret the fire control plan on a ship; state conditions required for fire to occur and to cease and explain how a chain reaction can lead to a continuously burning fire, the fire tetrahedron; state the conditions for entering the fire zone; describe the purpose of the muster list and give examples of the duties and responsibilities of the crewmembers; demonstrate how a fire fighter shall be properly dressed; locate the fire plan of the school, participate actively in a fire drill conducted at the school and give constructive critics as to how the drill was conducted and how it can be improved;
page 1 of 4

2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6

D21-SAFETY 1

2.7

2.8 2.9 2.10

2.11

list the general requirements for a fixed fire fighting system and state the precautions to be taken before operating the system; explain for which kind of fires water, foam, powder or carbon dioxide should be used for extinguishing the fire; ex[lain how to minimize the risk of fires on board and take the appropriate actions when a fire is detected; extinguish all sorts of fires in open air and in confined spaces with water fog or any other suitable fire-fighting agent; effect a rescue operation in a smoke-filled space wearing self-contained breathing apparatus.

3.

Operate life saving appliances (1.19) 3.1 3.2 explain the basic features, the benefits and disadvantages of the most commonly used launching devices; state where a manual describing the maintenance and operational procedures for life saving appliances will be found on board and the basic content of this manual; state procedures to be followed when recovering a life boat in a rough sea; list at least 50% of the equipment required by SOLAS in a survival craft; list the main dangers to survivors and explain how to cope with these dangers; board a liferaft from the ship and from the water; assist others on board; describe how to clear away from the ships; explain prudent use of fresh water and the need to avoid dehydration; explain the means to be used for survival in shark-infested waters; explain correct use of a drogue or sea anchor to reduce drift; explain precautions to be taken and routine maintenance to be carried out on the lifeboat engine, propeller, etc. to achieve problem free operations; explain the adequate timing of all actions and proper usage of all equipment and means to maximize the possibilities for being detected and rescued at an early stage; state preparations to be made and the issues to be considered before beaching a survival craft on a coast exposed to a heavy sea and surf; demonstrate ability to keep afloat without a lifejacket; demonstrate how to right a capsized liferaft; demonstrate how to abandon a liferaft; demonstrate proper use of the equipment in the lifeboat;
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3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.10 3.11 3.12

3.13

3.14

3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18


D21-SAFETY 1

3.19 3.20 3.21

demonstrate ability to start and operate the lifeboat engine; operate the portable radio equipment for the survival craft and make sure communication is established; take charge as the second in command of a survival craft.

4.

Apply medical first aid on board ship (1.1.3) 4.1 4.2 explain what to do immediately if you witness a person: 4.1.1_______ demonstrate abilities to: 4.2.1 apply resuscitation

5.

Personal safety and social responsibility (1.21) state proper actions to be taken on discovering fires, ingress of water or if the ship has collided or is foundering; 5.2 state precautions to take to avoid pollution of the environment; 5.3 state actions to take if pollution of the environment is discovered; 5.4 state basic procedures to be followed before entering a confined space; 5.5 demonstrate correct procedures to be followed before entering a confined space; 5.6 demonstrate ability to contribute to good human relationship among the classmates; 5.7 demonstrate ability to communicate effectively with classmates to ensure that the message is understood and to avoid personal conflicts, misunderstanding and hurt feelings; 5.8 set up an agenda for a short meeting and act as the chairman of the meeting; 5.9 list factors that can contribute to alcoholism and addiction to drugs and the actions to take to prevent misuse and assisting those in the danger zone; 5.10 state the fundamentals for achieving proper discipline in a 24-hours society like a ship; 5.11 state the purpose of on-the job training and explain how to ensure that all crewmembers will be properly trained for the tasks they are requested to perform; 5.12 explain how the result of the on-the-job training shall be evaluated, and which actions may be taken if the results are unacceptable. FUNCTION: F3 Controlling the Operation of the Ship and Care for Persons on Board at the Operational Level 5.1

D21-SAFETY 1

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7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Comply with all the requirements of the following IMO Model Courses: 7.1.1 1.13 Elementary First Aid (IMO Model Course 1.13) 7.1.2 1.19 Personal Survival Techniques (IMO Model Course 1.19) 7.1.3 1.20 Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting (IMO Model Course 1.20) 7.1.4 1.21 Personal Safety and Social Responsibility (IMO Model Course 1.21)

8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: (See attached Basic Safety Courses Equipment requirement) 9. REFERENCES: 9.1 IMO Model Course 1.13 Elementary First Aid/1.19 Personal Survival Techniques/1.20 Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting/1.21 Personal Safety and Social Responsibility. IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. Caunca, Teodoro H. Basic Safety.

9.2 9.3

D21-SAFETY 1

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REFERENCE NO: D22 - D WATCH 1 1. COURSE NAME: Watchkeeping, Deck Officers, STCW Chapter VIII 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Keeping a safe navigational watch, while underway at anchor and in port. 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 2 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 2 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS 2 LECTURES, 0 LABORATORIES = 2 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to apply proper watchkeeping arrangements and procedures, and keep a safe navigational watch at sea and an efficient watch in port, including ability to detect and act appropriately on possible hazards to life and environment. The student shall also be able to identify, interpret and display, as appropriate, internationally agreed lights and shapes and sound- and light signals. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table AII/1) at the operational level 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Keeping a safe navigational watch 7.1.1 state the duties and responsibilities of the officer in charge of a navigational watch, in particular with respect to his responsibility in the presence and non-presence of the master and/or the pilot on the bridge; 7.1.2 describe the principles to be observed in keeping a navigational watch (Ref. The STCW Code and Chapter VIII, Part 3-1) regarding: 7.1.2.1 navigation 7.1.2.2 navigational equipment 7.1.2.3 navigational duties and responsibilities; 7.1.2.4 handing over and taking over the watch; 7.1.2.5 navigation with a pilot on board;
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7.1.3 7.1.4 7.1.5

7.1.6

7.1.2.6 protection of the marine environment; 7.1.2.7 maintaining an efficient look-out; 7.1.2.8 using the engine, the rudder and signaling apparatus; 7.1.2.9 periodic checks of navigational equipment; 7.1.2.10 compliance with SOLAS Chapter V/19 regarding the use of automatic pilot, and operating and testing the steering gear; 7.1.2.11 navigation in coastal waters; 7.1.2.12 conduct of the watch in clear weather; 7.1.2.13 actions to take in restricted visibility; 7.1.2.14 the circumstances in which the officer on watch should call the master; 7.1.2.15 briefing of watchkeeping personnel. state a safe composition of the bridge team under various conditions; explain the basic principles for effective bridge teamwork procedures; (1,2 & 3) describe the normal assignment of duties for the bridge team and the procedures established to ensure that bridge team personnel will work as an effective team; describe how the bridge team shall work together both within a particular watch and between the watches to ensure that decisions made on one watch are properly communicated to another watch.

7.2 Lights and shapes to be displayed by ships 7.2.1 state the light of arc of the horizon and the minimum visibility for: 7.2.1.1 the masthead light; 7.2.1.2 the side lights; 7.2.1.3 the sternlight; 7.2.1.4 the towing light; 7.2.1.5 an all-round light; 7.2.1.6 a flashing light. 7.2.2 describe which lights/shapes shall be exhibited by: 7.2.1 a power-driven vessel underway; 7.2.2 a power-driven vessel when towing or pushing; 7.2.3 a sailing vessel underway and a vessel under oars; 7.2.4 a vessel engaged in fishing; 7.2.5 a vessel not under command or restricted in its ability to maneuver; 7.2.6 a vessel constrained by its draught; 7.2.7 a pilot vessel; 7.2.8 anchored vessels and vessels aground; 7.2.9 seaplanes.
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7.2.10 interpret displayed lights/shapes and explain which type of ship was displayed and in what activity the ship was engaged in.

7.3 Sound and light signals 7.3.1 identify which kind of equipment shall be used for sound and visual signals; 7.3.2 give the correct maneuvering and warning signals for given situations: 7.3.3 when in sight of each other; and 7.3.4 in restricted visibility. 7.3.5 identify which signals can be used to attract attention; 7.3.6 enumerate or perform at least ten (10) distress signals that may be used to indicate distress and the need for assistance.

7.4 Keeping a deck watch in port 7.4.1 7.4.2 7.4.3 7.4.4 7.4.5 state the purpose for keeping watch in port, including: ensuring the safety of life, ship, cargo and port; observing international, national and local rules; maintaining order and normal conditions on the ship. describe how to take over the watch and list the information which the officer being relieved should pass to the relieving officer; list the matters on which the receiving officer should satisfy himself before assuming charge of the watch; describe how the watch should be kept and list the points which shall be paid attention to; describe the action to take on receiving a storm warning or otherwise believing that an emergency is threatening the safety of the ship; list the entries that should be made in the logbook.

7.4.6 7.4.7 7.4.8

7.4.9

7.5 Keeping a safe deck watch in port, when carrying hazardous cargo 7.5.1 give examples of hazardous cargo; 7.5.2 state what could be regarded as sufficient readily available personnel on board when carrying hazardous cargo in bulk; 7.5.3 explain why special requirements may be necessary for special types of ships, particularly with respect to: 7.5.4 the number of crew required on board;
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7.5.5 the state of readiness of fire-fighting appliances and other safety equipment; 7.5.6 special port regulations; 7.5.7 communications with shore in the event of an emergency situation; 7.5.8 special precautions to prevent pollution on the environment. 7.5.9 explain how to obtain information of the hazards and any special precautions necessary for safe handling of the cargo and the appropriate action to take in the event of a spillage or fire; 7.5.10 describe the procedures for entry into enclosed spaces using a permit to work and the monitoring work in progress.

7.6 Ship at Anchor 7.6.1 If the master considers it necessary, a continuous navigational watch shall be maintained at anchor. While at anchor, the officer in charge of the navigational watch shall: 7.6.1.1 determine and plot the ships position on the appropriate chart as soon as practicable; 7.6.1.2 when circumstances permit, check at sufficiently frequent intervals whether the ship is remaining securely at anchor by taking bearings of fixed navigation marks or readily identifiable shore objects; 7.6.1.3 ensure that proper look-out is maintained; 7.6.1.4 ensure that inspection rounds of the ship are made periodically; 7.6.1.5 observe meteorological and tidal conditions and the state of the sea; 7.6.1.6 notify the master and undertake all necessary measures if the ship drags anchor; 7.6.1.7 ensure that the state of readiness of the main engines and other machinery is in accordance with the masters instructions; 7.6.1.8 if visibility deteriorates, notify the masters; 7.6.1.9 ensure that the ship exhibits the appropriate lights and shapes and that appropriate sound signals are made in accordance with all applicable regulations; and 7.6.1.10 take measures to protect the environment from pollution by the ship and comply with applicable pollution regulations.
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8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 Adequate and appropriate equipment for giving light and sound signals (CBT or audible equipment) 8.2 Pictures/Illustrations or models of light and shapes (CBT or Audible and Visual equipment)

9. REFERENCES: 9.1 International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea. IMO 904E, ISBN 92-801-1263-5. 9.2 Extract of the STCW Code, Chapter VIII. 9.3 The Nautical Institute: Bridge Watchkeeping. 9.4 ICS. Bridge Procedures Guide, 3rd edition 1998. 9.5 Crockcroft, A.N. and Lameijer, J.F.N. A Guide to the Collision Avoidance Rules, 4th Edition. Oxford Newnes, 1990. ISBN 0-43490274-8. 9.6 Extract of SOLAS, Chapter V 9.7 Manual on Oil Pollution, Sect. 1, Prevention, 1983 Revise Edition IMO Sales No. 557-83.01E. 9.8 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.9 Ynion, Eugenio J. Workbook in Terrestrial Navigation I.

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REFERENCE NO: D24 - NAV 2 1. COURSE NAME: Terrestrial Navigation 2 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Deviation and compass errors, Tides and tidal streams, parallel plane and mercator sailing, great circle sailing, planning and conducting a safe passage. 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 4 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURE, 3 LABORATORIES = 6 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: Nav 1 - Terrestrial Navigation 1 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to plan and explain how to conduct a safe passage in coastal waters, stating true and compass courses, distances and estimated time of arrival (ETA), and determine the position by Dead Reckoning (DR) and terrestrial observations taking into account particulars of the ship, winds, tides, tidal streams, currents and estimated speed. He shall be able to establish courses and distances through great circle sailing. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table A II/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Deviations and compass errors 7.1.1 establish the deviation of the magnetic compass and the gyro error by terrestrial observations; 7.1.2 apply all corrections, including adjustments for wind and current and to calculate compass courses to be steered from true courses and vice verse.

7.2 Tides and tidal streams 7.2.1 explain the main factors causing tides and tidal streams; 7.2.2 draw a sketch/diagram showing the following principle levels for reference in a chart:
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7.2.2.1 Seabed; 7.2.2.2 Chart datum; 7.2.2.3 Mean Low Water Spring (MLWS); 7.2.2.4 Mean High Water Spring (MHWS); 7.2.2.5 Mean Low Water Neap (MLWN); 7.2.2.6 Mean High Water Neap (MHWN); 7.2.2.7 Chartered and actual depth; 7.2.2.8 Chartered clearance for overhead obstructions; 7.2.2.9 Chartered elevation of lighthouses, etc. 7.2.2.10 Height of tide at a given time; 7.2.2.11 Neap and spring range of tide; and 7.2.3 using Admiralty Tide Tables and a Tidal Stream Atlas, calculate Tidal Heights at a given time and lowest low water 7.2.4 calculate the clearance between the highest point of the ship (usually the mast) and a given overhead obstruction, like a bridge, a cable, etc; 7.2.5 Determine ship position given the course to steer or course made good and speed and direction of current.

7.3 Parallel, plane and mercator sailing 7.3.1 state the use and limitations of plane sailing. 7.3.2 state the conditions under which the mercator sailing must be used; 7.3.3 calculate the course and distance between two positions using parallel, plane and middle latitude mercator sailings 7.3.4 calculate the arrival position from a position of departure by parallel, plane, middle latitude and mercator sailings

7.4 Great circle sailing 7.4.1 explain the advantages and disadvantages when using a great circle sailing; 7.4.2 define the Vertex of a great circle and explain why composite great circle sailing is sometimes preferred; 7.4.3 calculate the initial and final course and the total distance of a great circle track; 7.4.4 calculate the distance and course to steer per 5o or 10 o change of longitude.

7.5 Plan and discuss a safe passage 7.5.1 plan a passage of at least 300 nautical miles using relevant nautical publications 7.5.1.1 how to use Ocean passages for the world
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7.5.1.2 how to use pilot charts and other publications such as sailing directions, Notices to the Mariners and the like to determine areas of ice and iceberg danger 7.5.1.3 how to use pilot charts and other information sources to determine areas in which the visibility is like to be reduced. 7.5.1.4 steering control system 7.5.2 explain how to conduct the planned passage, stating all relevant actions and observations to be taken from departure to arrival, inter alia: 7.5.2.1 true and compass courses to steer, considering the effect of tidal streams, wind, currents and the distance/track for each course; 7.5.2.2 when the various courses are likely be altered 7.5.2.3 When fixing ship position using conspicuous objects and other aids to navigation. 7.5.2.4 estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) at the port of destination. 7.5.3 Enter all correct and relevant information in the logbook during the passage.

8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 Protractor Parallel ruler, two triangles or other functional equipment for chart work, Dividers Electronic calculator with trigonometric function Chart Catalogue Chart Tables Navigational chart for exercises 8.7.1 Harbor charts 8.7.2 Coastal charts 8.7.3 General charts 8.7.4 Sailing charts 8.7.5 Chart projections 8.7.5.1 Gnomonic 8.7.5.2 Mercator 8.7.6 Chart catalogue 8.8 Notices to Mariners 8.9 List of Radio Signals 8.10 Radio Signals, Radio Navigational Aids 8.11 Radio Signals, Radio Time Signals Aids and Radio Navigational Warnings 8.12 Tide Tables 8.13 Pilot Book 8.14 Tidal Stream Atlas
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D24-NAV 2

8.15 Chart Symbols and Abbreviations 8.16 List of Radio Signals, Radio Time Signals Aids, Radio Navigational Warnings, 8.17 Steering Control System Drawings, Illustration, etc. General Requirement: (Must be under working conditions): 8.18 Magnetic Compass 8.19 Gyro Compass 8.20 Azimuth Circle 8.21 Pelorous 9. REFERENCES: 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 Frost. Practical Navigation for Second Mates. ISBN 0-85174-397-8. An Introduction to Coastal Navigation. ISBN 0-948254-02-5 Frost: The Principles and Practice of Navigation. ISBN 0-85174-444-3 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition ISBN 92-801-6105-9. Ynion, Eugenio J. Terrestrial Navigation 2.

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REFERENCE NO: D23 SEAM 2 1. COURSE NAME: Cargo Handling and Stowage 1 - Carriage of NonDangerous Goods 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Dry Cargo, Reasons for General Inspection of Holds, Cargo Protection, Ventilation and Control of Sweat, Deck Cargo, Refrigerated Cargo, Cargo Handling Equipment, Cargo Handling Safety, Care of Cargo during the Voyage, Inspection and Report defects and damage to cargo spaces and hatch covers and ballast tanks 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 2 LECTURES, 0 LABORATORY = 2 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 2 LECTURES, 0 LABORATORY = 2 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: Seam 1 - Ship Routines and Construction 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to take necessary actions regarding: 6.1 Preparation of cargo gears and holds prior to loading/discharging operation; 6.2 Control of the ballasting and deballasting when loading and/or discharging cargoes; 6.3 care for the cargo during the voyage. 6.4 Control of the distribution of cargo and supervise securing by proper shoring, dunnaging and lashing. 6.5 Inspection and report of defects and damage to cargo spaces hatch covers FUNCTION: F2 - Cargo handling and storage at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table A-II/1)

7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES The student shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Dry Cargo 7.1.1 state how a general inspection of holds is done prior to loading and discharging operation; 7.1.2 explain why cleaning of holds must be carried out prior to loading of cargoes;
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7.1.3 state the reasons for using dunnage; 7.1.4 describe how proper dunnaging on various cargoes is being done and how to dispose useless dunnage; 7.1.5 state the consequences of using dirty dunnage and the possibility of contaminating the cargo.

7.2 Reasons for General Inspection of Holds 7.2.1 explain how bilge suctions should be checked for efficient working; 7.2.2 explain why ballast line should be blanked in preparation to loading deep tank with dry cargoes; 7.2.3 explain the various functions of cargo surveyors.

7.3 Cargo Protection 7.3.1 explain how a solid stow and securing of all cargoes may be achieved; 7.3.2 describe the methods of blocking, lashing and shoring of cargoes; 7.3.3 illustrate lashing methods for general cargoes.

7.4 Ventilation and Control of Sweat 7.4.1 explain how proper ventilation may be achieved in order to avoid sweat; 7.4.2 state the difference between ship sweat and cargo sweat; 7.4.3 explain the difference between natural ventilation to that of forced ventilation

7.5 Deck Cargo 7.5.1 enumerate which cargoes are commonly loaded on deck; 7.5.2 describe how deck cargo can be efficiently secured; 7.5.3 explain why deck cargo should clear the following: 7.5.4 sounding pipes to tanks and bilges 7.5.5 device for remoted control of valves 7.5.6 mooring arrangement 7.5.7 firefighting and life saving appliances 7.5.8 crew accomodation and working spaces 7.5.9 bridge view 7.5.10 explain how the permissible load on deck and hatches may be ascertained
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7.5.11 explain the effect of deck cargo on stability of ship; 7.5.12 describe the proper stowage and lashing of timber cargo on deck; 7.5.13 describe the means of safe access from deck to top of stow; and 7.5.14 describe how to stow containers on deck for ships not designated to carry containers.

7.6 Refrigerated Cargo 7.6.1 explain how cargo holds and lockers are prepared prior to loading; 7.6.2 explain the reason for pre-cooling and proper dunnaging of spaces prior to loading; 7.6.3 give examples of chilled and frozen cargoes; 7.6.4 describe the use of Brine Traps in compartment drains; and 7.6.5 explain the purpose of temperature recording in the compartment.

7.7 Cargo Handling Equipment 7.7.1 differentiate between cranes and derricks including their advantages and disadvantages; 7.7.2 explain the SWL of block, wire ropes, derricks, boom, crane jibs, hooks and lifting beams; 7.7.3 describe how to rig a union purchase and a single swing derrick; 7.7.4 explain why gears should be rigged in accordance with the ships rigging plans; 7.7.5 explain why it is the ships responsibility to cover or fence hatches when stevedores knock off and how it shall be done; 7.7.6 describe the meaning of sufficient lighting of working space; and 7.7.7 explain why portable lights should be removed as soon as they are no longer needed.

7.8 Cargo Handling Safety 7.8.1 state why cargo gears should be inspected visually before the start of cargo operation; 7.8.2 explain why SWL of equipment should never be exceeded; 7.8.3 explain the importance of frequently checking cargo gears during cargo operations; and 7.8.4 explain why a mechanically or hydraulically operated hatch should be closed or opened by ships crew under the supervision of a responsible officer.

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7.9 Care of Cargo During the Voyage 7.9.1 explain why lashing of cargoes shall be checked and tightened everyday; 7.9.2 explain the proper action to take to prevent condensation; 7.9.3 explain how proper ventilation shall be exercised when sailing from cold to hot areas and vice versa; and 7.9.4 explain which checks shall be carried out when carrying frozen or refrigerated cargoes.

7.10

Inspect and report defects and damage to cargo spaces and hatch covers and ballast tanks 7.10.1 knowledge and ability to explain where to look for damage and defects most commonly encountered due to: 7.10.1 loading and unloading operations 7.10.2 corrosion 7.10.3 severe weather conditions 7. 10.2 ability to state which parts of the ship shall be inspected each time in order to cover all parts within a given period of time 7. 10.3 identify those elements of the ship structure which are critical to the safety of the ship 7.10.4 state the causes of corrosion in cargo spaces and ballasts tanks and how corrosion can be identified and prevented 7.10.5 knowledge of procedures on how the inspections shall be carried out 7.10.6 ability to explain how to ensure reliable detection of defects and damages 7.10.7 understanding of the purpose of the enhanced survey programme 7.10.8 ability to establish and maintain effective communication during loading and unloading

8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 Drawings or illustration or video of: 8.1.1 Derricks and cranes 8.1.2 Various hatch covers 8.1.3 Head and heel blocks (Models/Drawings) 8.1.4 Types of vessels (Models/Drawings) 8.1.5 Rope, Diameter 12mm/10 mtrs (for making knots and splices) 8.1.6 Ship model showing cross sectional parts or large scale drawings 8.1.7 Ships Organigram 8.1.8 Tabular Chart for the strength of ropes and wires 8.1.9 Various types of blocks
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8.1.10 8.1.11 8.1.12 8.1.13 8.1.14 8.1.15 8.1.16

Various types of wire (according to material and design) Derricks and cranes (Models/Drawings/Video Head and heel blocks (Model/Drawings/Video Samples of cargo plans on different types of ships Types of vessels (Models/Drawings/Video) IMDG Code: Labels, marks and signs (SN: IMO-220E) Drawing of various tanker ships showing tanks, pipes and pumping arrangement (oil, chemical and gas) 8.1.17 Drawings/Illustration of measuring device gas and oxygen device 8.1.18 Copy of actual Ships Capacity Plan/Dead Weight Plan 8.1.19 Trim and Stability Table 8.1.20 International Loadline Chart (Seasonal Chart) 8.1.21 Computer based software on Trim and Stability 8.1.22 Diagrams of Ships Maneuvering Characteristics of a vessel 8.1.23 Posters of River Bends Locks Port Facilities, Navigate canals, rivers, etc. 8.1.24 Posters of various types of propellers and bow-thruster 8.1.25 Ship handling and maneuvering (CBT)

9. REFERENCES: 9.1 Immer J.R. Cargo Handling. 9.2 Cockroft, A.N. Nicholls Seamanship and Nautical Knowledge. 9.3 Taylor, L.G. Cargo Work: The Care, Handling and Carriage of Cargoes. 9.4 Rankin, KS. Thomas Stowage, 3rd Ed. 9.5 International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG), 1994 Edition, IMO220E. 9.6 Sauerbier, Charles. Marine Cargo Operation. 9.7 Flere, WA. Handy Guide to Stowage. 9.8 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.9 Cosare, Florencio D. Cargo Handling and Stowage.

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REFERENCE NO: D31 - NAV 3 1. COURSE NAME: Celestial Navigation 1 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the solar systems, celestial sphere and equinoctial system of coordinates, hour angle, daily motion and horizontal system of coordinates, sextant and altitude corrections, amplitude, time and equation of time, nautical of almanac and merdian observations. 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 4 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURES, 3 LABORATORY = 6 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: College Algebra, Plane & Spherical Trigonometry, NAV 2 Terrestrial Navigation 2 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to find the time when the sun, the planets and selected stars pass the meridian and establish the latitude of the ship by celestial observations. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code Table A-II/1)

7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Solar systems 7.1.1 describe the motions of bodies in the solar system; 7.1.2 describe the earth's elliptical orbit, and state approximate perihelion and aphelion distances and dates; 7.1.3 explain the eccentricity of the earth's orbit; 7.1.4 describe the inclination of the earth's axis to the plane of the orbit and the stability of the axis (ignoring precession) and show how it causes the seasons; 7.1.5 state the dates of the solstices and equinoxes; 7.1.6 explain the concept of the earth's axial rotation causing day and night; 7.1.7 explain what causes the varying length of daylight through the year;
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7.1.8 describe daylight and darkness conditions in various latitudes at the solstices and equinoxes; 7.1.9 state the significance of the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn and the Arctic and Antarctic Circles; 7.1.10 identify planets and at least 10 stars to be used for navigational purposes.

7.2 Celestial sphere and equinoctial system of coordinates 7.2.1 define celestial sphere; 7.2.2 explain the apparent annual motion of the sun and the concept of the ecliptic; 7.2.3 define celestial poles, celestial meridians, equinoctial and the obliquity of the ecliptic; 7.2.4 explain the purpose of using the equinoctial as a fixed reference plane and the direction of the First Point of Aries as a reference direction (ignoring the effect of precession); 7.2.5 describe the equinoctial system of co-ordinates and define sidereal hour angle, declination and polar distance; 7.2.6 extract information from the star diagrams in the Nautical Almanac.

7.3 Hour angle 7.3.1 describe the concept of the earth's axial rotation causing change in the hour angle of bodies; 7.3.2 define Greenwhich Hour Angle (GHA), Local Hour Angle (LHA) and longitude and explain their relationships; 7.3.3 state the rate of change of GHA of the sun and Aries; 7.3.4 estimate the geographical position of a body for any given GMT.

7.4 Daily motion and horizontal system of coordinates 7.4.1 7.4.2 7.4.3 7.4.4 7.4.5 7.4.6 7.4.7 7.4.8 7.4.9 define rational horizon, zenith and nadir; define vertical circle and prime vertical circle; define elevated pole and depressed pole; prove that altitude of the elevated pole is equal to the observer's latitude; define the observer's upper and lower celestial meridian; trace the apparent daily path of all bodies; define true altitude, azimuth and true zenith distance; discuss rising and setting points and define amplitude; explain the meaning of the term circumpolar and describe the conditions necessary for a body to be circumpolar;
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D31- NAV 3

7.4.10 describe the condition necessary for a body to cross the prime vertical; 7.4.11 draw figures on the plane of the rational horizon and of the observer's celestial meridian, using the equidistant projection to illustrate navigational problems and principles; 7.4.12 draw a horizon system of coordinates showing zenith, nadir, north/south horizon, declination, and altitude and observers latitude.

7.5 Sextant and altitude corrections 7.5.1 7.5.2 7.5.3 7.5.4 7.5.5 7.5.6 7.5.7 7.5.8 7.5.9 7.5.10 7.5.11 7.5.12 define sextant altitude; demonstrate ability to read the angle of the sextant; demonstrate ability to correct a sextant with one or more errors of perpendicularity, side error or index error; demonstrate how to find and correct the index error of the sextant by using the horizon; use the sextant for taking vertical and horizontal angles; explain the purpose of altitude correction; define visible, sensible and rational horizons and explain their practical applications; define observed altitude and true altitude; apply the corrections for dip, refraction, semi-diameter and parallax and explain their causes; apply index error; illustrate the effect of terrestrial refraction on the dip and distance of the sea horizon; use the altitude correction tables in the Nautical Almanac, including reference to critical tables, interpolation tables and low-altitude correction tables; obtain the true zenith distance from the true altitude of the body.

7.5.13

7.6 Amplitude 7.6.1 7.6.2 7.6.3 determine the observed altitude of the sun when the true altitude is zero; explain the effect of latitude on the accuracy of amplitude observations; calculate the latitude and local mean time (LMT) of the theoretical and visible rising and setting of the sun.

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7.7 Time and equation of time 7.7.1 7.7.2 7.7.3 define the apparent solar day and state the relationship between local hour angle (LHA) of the sun and the latitude; define the sidereal day and explain why it is a fixed time interval; explain the reasons for the sun's irregular rate of change of sidereal hour angle (SHA) and hence the necessity to adopt the astronomical mean sun for timekeeping purposes; define the equation of time (ET) and its components; determine the ET from the Almanac and its sign of application; define GMT, LMT and longitude; define zone times and standard times; calculate the ship's time when a celestial body will pass the meridian and the ship is sailing in an easterly or westerly direction; use time signals to find the correct time of a watch.

7.7.4 7.7.5 7.7.6 7.7.7 7.7.8

7.7.9

7.8 Nautical almanac 7.8.1 7.8.2 7.8.3 7.8.4 7.8.5 7.8.6 7.8.7 7.8.8 7.8.9 demonstrate ability to find relevant information contained in the Nautical Almanac; use correctly the tables of corrections and incremental corrections in the Nautical Almanac; find the LHA of a body, given the date, GMT and longitude of the observer; explain the use of the First Point of Aries; find the LHA of Aries, given the date, GMT and longitude of the observer; explain what is meant by the sidereal hour angle (SHA) of a star and obtain it from the Nautical Almanac; derive the LHA of a star from the LHA of Aries and the SHA of the star; extract information from the tabulation of the rising and setting of the sun in the Nautical Almanac; use the Nautical Almanac to obtain the local mean time (LMT) of the meridian passage of a body to the nearest minute.

7.9 Meridian observations 7.9.1 find the ships time when a celestial body will pass the meridian the next day when the ship is sailing at a constant speed on an easterly or westerly course; establish the appropriate time for observing planets and stars in the meridian on a given day in a given position;
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7.9.2

D31- NAV 3

7.9.3 7.9.4

establish the latitude of the ship by observing celestial bodies in the meridian; identify at least 10 stars and planets use as reference for navigation.

8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 protractor; parallel ruler/nautical triangle; dividers; electronic calculator with trigonometric functions; Nautical tables (e.g. HO publications or useful tables); Nautical Almanac; Position plotting celestial sheets Sextants (at least 2 units) Star charts/star finder;

9. REFERENCES: 9.1 Bowditch. American Practical Navigation, Vol. 1 & 11, 1997 Edition. 9.2 Maloney, Elbert. Naval Institute Press. Navigation and Piloting. 9.3 Frost. Practical Navigation for Second Mates, 6th Edition. 1985. ISBN 0-85174-397-8. 9.4 Frost. The Principles and Practice of Navigation. 1983. ISBN 085174-444-3. 9.5 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.6 Ynion, Eugenio J. Celestial Navigation I.

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REFERENCE NO: D32 - D Watch 2 1. COURSE NAME: Collision Regulations, Deck Officers 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the International Regulations for Preventing Collissions at Sea (COLREG 1972) when in charge of a navigational watch 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 4 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURES, 3 LABORATORY = 6 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: D - Watch 1 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to interpret properly the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREG 1972) when in charge of a navigational watch. FUNCTION: F1 - Navigation at the operational level (STCW Code, Table A-II/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . explain the application of the COLREG Rules; explain the purpose of Traffic Separation Schemes; state the responsibility to comply with the COLREG Rules and give examples of circumstances which may make a departure from the Rules necessary; 7.1.4 explain the term Vessel Constrained by her Draught; 7.1.5 differentiate between under way and making way; 7.1.6 explain the use of radar and other available means in the context of look-out; 7.1.7 explain what is meant by Safe Speed; 7.1.8 state the factors to be taken into account in determining a safe speed; 7.1.9 explain what is meant by risk of collision and how it can be ascertained with and without the aid of a radar; describe stroke, list the proper keeping of different kinds of log during ocean passages coastal navigation and during docking; 7.1.10 define Traffic Lane, Separation Lane, Separation Zone, Inshore Traffic Zones;
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7.1.1 7.1.2 7.1.3

7.1.11 describe how to navigate in a traffic separation scheme with reference to the following: 7.1.11.1 entering and leaving the traffic separation scheme; 7.1.11.2 entering and leaving traffic lanes; 7.1.11.3 crossing lanes; 7.1.11.4 the use of inshore traffic zones; 7.1.11.5 crossing separation lines or entering separation zones. 7.1.12 state the requirements for vessels: 7.1.12.1 navigating in areas near the terminations of traffic separation schemes; 7.1.12.2 anchoring; 7.1.12.3 not using a traffic separation scheme; 7.1.12.4 engaged in fishing. 7.1.13 state why a vessel of less than 20 meters in length or a sailing vessel must not impede the safe passage of a power-driven vessel following a traffic zone; 7.1.14 explain the meaning of precautionary area; 7.1.15 define deep water route and state for which each route is intended; 7.1.16 explain what vessels in sight of one another mean; 7.1.17 demonstrate by using ship models and lights in various positions and courses, by displaying proper signals or lights ability to take the proper actions to avoid collision with other vessel in sight and refer to the relevant COLREG Rules; 7.1.18 demonstrate the various avoidance actions to be taken by an overtaking vessel; 7.1.19 explain why the give-way vessel in a crossing situation shall, if circumstances admit, avoid crossing ahead of the other vessel; 7.1.20 explain the application of Rule 15 when crossing narrow channels and traffic lanes; 7.1.21 explain how to decide when to take avoidance action as standon vessel; 7.1.22 describe the actions that may be taken by the stand-on vessel; 7.1.23 state the avoidance action that must be taken by the stand-on vessel; 7.1.24 explain the responsibilities between vessels with reference to Rule 18 and 3; 7.1.25 explain the conduct of vessels in restricted visibility; 7.1.26 determine risk of collision in restricted visibility and take appropriate actions to avoid collision; 7.1.27 interpret lights and shapes, sound and lights signal, and decide whether there is a risk of collision and take the correct actions; 7.1.28 give the sound signals to be used by vessels in sight of one another; 7.1.29 give the sound signals to be used by vessels in or near an area or restricted visibility;
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7.1.30 list the distress signals set out in Annex IV of COLREG 1972; 7.1.31 demonstrate ability to act correctly when there is risk of collision to avoid collision. 7.1.32 describe the proper use of radar equipment in determining whether a risk of collision exists 7.1.33 explain the danger of making assumptions on the basis of scanty information, citing examples from clear wheatear as well as the use of radar 7.1.34 demonstrate an understanding of Rule 9 by: 7.1.34.1 defining the terms narrow channel and fairway 7.1.34.2 describing how to proceed along the course of a narrow channel 7.1.34.3 describing the navigation of small craft and sailing vessels in a narrow channel 7.1.34.4 stating the restrictions on crossing the channel or fairway 7.1.35 describing the conduct of vessel engaged in fishing 7.1.35.1 stating the procedure for overtaking in a narrow channel 7.1.35.1 describing the actions to be taken on nearing a bend in a narrow channel or fairway 7.1.36 states the exemptions for vessels restricted in their ability to maneuver when engaged in an operation for the: 7.1.36.1 maintenance of safety of navigation 7.1.36.2 laying, servicing or picking up of a submarine cable 7.1.37 explains the applications of Rule 14, Head-on situation 7.1.38 explains how Rules 16 and Rule 8 applies to the action by the give-way vessel 7.1.39 explain that the potential collision situation may be divided into the following four stages: 7.1.39.1 at long range, before risk of collision exists and both vessels are free to take any action 7.1.39.2 risk of collision applies, the give-way vessel is required to take action and the other vessel must keep her course and speed 7.1.39.3 the give way vessel is not taking appropriate action 7.1.39.4 collision cannot be avoided by the action of give way vessel 7.1.40 demonstrate, using a maneuvering board or radar simulator, how to determine the risk of collision and the proper action to take to avoid collision in restricted visibility 8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 8.2 8.3 Equipment for displaying signals, lights and shapes (CBT or audible equipment) Maneuvering board ownship/targetship markers RADAR plotting sheet
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9. REFERENCES: 9.1 Crockcroft, A.N. and Lameijer, J.F.N. A Guide to the Collision Avoidance Rules, 4th Edition. Oxford Newness, 1990. ISBN 0-43490274-8. Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (COLREG, 1972) as amended, 4 November 1995. IMO Sales No. 904E. ISBN 92-801-1263-5. STCW 78 Convention, as amended IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. Dela Calzada, Linic, Hilario, Andres, Quenkiol, Rafael and Templo, Aaron. Workbook in Collision Regulations. SOLAS Convention, Chapter V

9.2

9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6

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REFERENCE NO: D44 - MAR COM 1. COURSE NAME: Radio Communication, INMARSAT/GMDSS 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes communication without the use of Radio, Morse Signaling, International Code of Signals, Handling of Flags and Penants and Radiocommunications. 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 2 Laboratory = 5 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURES, 6 LABORATORY = 9 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: 6.1 Communication Without the use of Radio The student shall be able to transmit and receive light and sound signals by Morse Code and use the International Code of Signals to code and decode messages. Radiocommunications The student shall satisfy the international requirements for achieving a General Operator Certificate (GOC).

6.2

FUNCTION: F7 Radio Communications Communication Without the use of Radio Navigation and Radio communication (STCW Code, Tables All/1 and A-IV/2) Radiocommunications Radio communication for General Operator Certificate (GOC) (STCW Code, Tables A-ll/1 and A-IV/2) COMPETENCE: Transmit and receive information using GMDSS subsystems and equipment and fulfilling the functional requirements of GMDSS. 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . .

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WITHOUT RADIO 7.1 Morse Signaling 7.1.1 transmit and receive Morse signals by light and sound at a speed of at least 5 characters per minute; 7.1.2 demonstrate the use of correct procedures for sending and receiving short messages.

7.2 International Code Of Signals 7.2.1 use the International Code of Signals to code and decode medical messages as well as One-letter, Two-letter and Threeletter signals; 7.2.2 identify all International Code of Flags and Pennants and state their meaning; 7.2.3 transmit and receive signals used in the SOLAS Poster No. 1 (Table of Life Savings Signals); 7.2.4 use the Phonetic Alphabet and Figures to assure correct reception of spoken messages.

7.3 Handling of Flags and Pennants 7.3.1 state how the national flag of the country visited shall be displayed; 7.3.2 state when, how and why own ensign flag is placed at the dip; 7.3.3 demonstrate proper maintenance and handling of flags and pennants; 7.3.4 state the proper procedure for hoisting and lowering the country flag, the company flag and the national flag, including the correct time for these activities while underway, firmly moored, at anchor and in dry dock. RADIOCOMMUNICATIONS The student shall be able to 7.4 state the basic differences between the radio communication system based on SOLAS 1992 Chapter VI including the ITU Radio Regulations and the new Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS); 7.5 explain the details stated in a given ships license and radio safety certificate; 7.6 use the Radio Regulations to find: 7.6.1 the required radio equipment to be carried on a tanker vessel of 100,000 tons dead weight operating in worldwide trade; 7.6.2 the frequencies for distress, urgency and safety communications for GMDSS purposes;
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7.6.3 what shall be entered in the radio log book; 7.6.4 the various categories of messages to be transmitted; 7.6.5 which bands and frequencies shall be used for various transmissions; 7.6.6 the various types of stations in the maritime mobile service. 7.7 use Digital Selective Calling (DSC) facilities; 7.8 compose examples of various categories of messages and list the correct priority of the following categories of calls; 7.8.1 ship business call; 7.8.2 urgency calls; 7.8.3 routine calls; 7.8.4 safety calls; 7.8.5 distress calls. 7.9 use Digital Selective Calling (DSC) facilities; 7.10 demonstrate proper usage of MF/HF installations; 7.11 demonstrate use of survival craft radio equipment, including EPIRB; 7.12 use Inmarsat Systems; 7.13 operate Search and Rescue Transponder (SART); 7.14 describe the role of: 7.14.1 the Rescue Co-ordination Center (RCC); 7.14.2 the Search and Rescue (SAR) units. 7.15 perform SAR radio communication in accordance with the MERSAR procedures; 7.16 provide radio services in emergencies such as abandon ship, fire on board and partial or full breakdown in radio installation; 7.17 describe methods of preventing/minimizing: 7.17.1 false distress alerts; 7.17.2 the effect of false distress alerts. 7.18 carry out testing procedures for GMDSS equipment; 7.19 describe the role and method of use of ship reporting systems, such as AMVER, JASREP, AUSREP, etc. 7.20 select the appropriate communication method using: 7.20.1 propagation tables; 7.20.2 documentation for determining frequencies. 7.21 use relevant documentation for receiving traffic lists and meteorological information; 7.22 make a radiotelephone call using correct procedures; 7.22.1 under a normal situation; 7.22.2 under an emergency situation. 7.23 use an approved format and describe the components of a radiotelegram; 7.24 describe methods of charging. 8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 WITHOUT RADIO

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8.1.1 Extracts of the International Code Signals, including special flags and pennants and their meaning as one letter signals. 8.1.3 One set of International Flags and Pennants 8.1.4 One Morse key with light and sound signaling equipment. The light/sound shall be visible/audible from all points in the classroom. A computer-based Morse signaling program may be used as substitute for the above. 8.1.5 One battery inverter power supply, and 8.1.6 One dedicated MF/HF Watch receiver for the DSC distress frequencies 8.1.8 One dummy satellite EPIRB
8.2 RADIOCOMMUNICATIONS

8.2.1 At least one (1) instructor station and two (2) work stations for any type of simulator equipment (RADAR, ARPA, GMDSS) The ratio of the minimum requirements herein listed shall be proportionate to the total number of maritime students enrolled for the particular subject requiring simulator training that less than 500 students is required to have 2 student station, 501 to 1000 students is required to have 3 work stations, 1001 to 1500 students is required to have 4 student stations and 1501 to 2000 is required to have 5 student stations. 8.2.2 One fully operational MF/HF Transmitter/Receiver sets for radiotelephony, NBDP and DSC 8.2.3 One two-way portable VHF Radiotelephone with charging equipment 8.2.4 One Morse key with light and sound signalling equipment. The light/sound shall be visible/audible from all points in the classroom. A computer-based Morse signalling program may be used as substitute for the above 8.2.5 One NAVTEC receiver 8.2.6 Signs and markings in accordance with the requirements of NTC for ship stations 8.2.3 GMDSS simulator capable of simulating the following: DSC, NAVTEX, EPIRB. Simulators should be used as much as possible to enhance economic education and operations and to avoid unintended transmissions of radio signals.
9. REFERENCES: 9.1 International Code of Signals. 9.2 Cockroft, Nicholls. Seamanship and Nautical Knowledge. 9.3 House, D. J. Seamanship Techniques 1 Shipboard Practice. 9.4 GOC Model Course Compendium. 9.5 Smith, P. C. and Seaton, J. J. GMDSS for Navigators. ISBN 07506 2177. 9.6 Olsen, Jan M. and Kristensen, R. An Introduction to GMDSS.
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9.7 User Manuals for all installed GMDSS equipment 9.8 Standard Marine Communication Phrases 9.9 Master Plan of the Shore-based facilities for the GMDSS 9.10 MERSAR Manual 9.11 ITU Manual for Use by the Maritime Mobile and Maritime Mobile-Satellite Services 9.12 ITU List of Coast Stations 9.13 ITU Lists of Ship Stations 9.14 GMDSS Logbook 9.15 List of call signs and numerical identities 9.16 List of service and special determinations stations 9.17 Admiralty list of Radio Signals, vol. 5 (NB 285) 9.18 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.19 AspiIlaga Rodolfo and Cosare, Florencio. Communication without Radio.

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REFERENCE NO: D41 - NAV 4 1. COURSE NAME: Celestial Navigation 2 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Pole Star Observations, Position Fixing and Errors of Compasses and Azimuth 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 4 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURE, 3 LABORATORY = 6 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: NAV. - 3 - Celestial Navigation 1 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to fix the ships position and check errors on magnetic compasses and gyro-compasses by celestial observations. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table A-II/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Pole Star Observations 7.1.1 identify certain major stellar constellations and navigational stars, describe their movement relative to Polaris and the movement of Polaris with change of latitude; 7.1.2 identify Polaris; 7.1.3 describe the relationship between the altitude of Polaris and the observers latitude; 7.1.4 use the corrections in the Polar Star tables in the Nautical Almanac and apply them to the altitude of Polaris to find the latitude of the observer; 7.1.5 find the errors of the compasses by comparing the compass bearings of the Pole star with its true azimuth at the time of observation.

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7.2 Position Fixing 7.2.1 combine the equinoctial and horizon system of coordinates to determine the centre and radius of a position circle and its direction in the vicinity of a selected position; 7.2.2 apply the principles of a method of enabling the navigator to draw a small part of the position circle in his vicinity to a practical problem; 7.2.3 state the assumptions made when plotting celestial position lines and the circumstances in which they may become significant; 7.2.4 determine the direction of a position line through an observer and a position through which it passes; 7.2.5 define and calculate/compute the co-latitude, polar distance and zenith distance; 7.2.6 solve the PZX triangle to find the calculated zenith distance of the body when it is out of the meridian; 7.2.7 apply this calculated zenith distance of the body to find the intercept and the intercept terminal point through which to draw the position line (Marq St. Hilaire method); 7.2.8 determine the true azimuth of the body from tables and determine the direction of the position line; 7.2.9 find the position of the observer at the time of the final observation, given two or more position lines with the courses and distances run between the observations.

7.3 Errors Of Compasses and Azimuth 7.3.1 obtain the azimuth of the celestial body from tables, using GMT of observation, information from the Nautical Almanac, LHA of the body and the observers DR position; 7.3.2 obtain from tables or by calculation, using the observers DR position and information from the Nautical Almanac, the true bearing of a heavenly body on rising or setting, i.e. solves an amplitude problem; 7.3.3 obtain the magnetic variation for the observers position using isogonal lines or other information of the chart; 7.3.4 establish the error of the magnetic compass or gyrocompass by comparing the compass bearing of the body with the true azimuth of the body obtained at the time of observation. 7.3.5 apply variations to the error of the magnetic compass to find the deviations for the direction of the ships head 7.3.6 calculate compass error and gyro error from transit bearings and bearings to distant fixed objects.

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8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 Protractor parallel ruler/nautical triangle dividers electronic calculator with trigonometric functions nautical tables Nautical Almanac Charts Appropriate for exercises Position plotting celestial sheets

General Requirements: 8.9 binnacle with magnetic compass and sighting device (pelorous) 8.10 gyro compass and sighting device 8.11 sextants 8.12 star charts/finders 8.13 altitude azimuth tables 9. REFERENCES: 9.1 Bowditch. American Practical Navigation, Vol. 1 & 11. 1997 Edition. 9.2 Maloney, Elbert. Navigation and Piloting. Naval Institute Press. 9.3 Frost. Practical Navigation for Second Mates, 6th Ed. 1985. ISBN 085174-397-8. 9.4 Frost. The Principles and Practice of Navigation. 1983. ISBN 0-85174444-3. 9.5 International Convention on Standards of Training Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, (STCW 95) IMO Sales No. 938.78.15.E. 9.6 IMO/ILO Document for Guidance, 1985. IMO Sales No. 935.87.08E. 9.7 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.8 Ynion, Eugenio J. Celestial Navigation I.

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REFERENCE NO: D42 - MERSAR 1. COURSE NAME: Merchant Ships Search & Rescue 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Search and Rescue Organizations, Search and Rescue Operations, SAR equipment 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 2 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 3 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 2 LECTURE, 3 LABORATORY = 5 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to explain how Search and Rescue Operations are Organized Globally and Use the Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual (MERSAR) to assist effectively in FUNCTION: F1 - Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table AII/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Search and rescue organizations 7.1.1 explain the purpose and functions of national and international SAR organizations and state how the SAR operations shall be coordinated; state the purpose of GMDSS and its nine functions; explain the main difference between the old radio communication system and the GMDSS; explain the main purpose of Digital Selective Calling (DSC); explain how to call assistance from a SAR organization and explain the difference between the following calls and when to use them: 7.1.5.1 distress calls; 7.1.5.2 urgency calls; 7.1.5.3 safety calls; and 7.1.5.4 routine calls.

7.1.2 7.1.3 7.1.4 7.1.5

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7.2 Search and rescue operations 7.2.1 explain the main functions of: 7.2.1.1 the Rescue Co-ordination Center (RCC); 7.2.1.2 the On-Scene Commander (OIC). 7.2.2 state the main elements, which should be included in the Standards of Operation (SOP); 7.2.3 explain the general procedures to be followed for communication during SAR operations; 7.2.4 demonstrate correct lookout procedures during search; 7.2.5 explain adequate methods of counteracting fatigue among lookout personnel; 7.2.6 describe in general terms the patterns and techniques used in conducting search and rescue operations.

7.3 SAR equipment 7.3.1 control, test and operate Emergency Positioning Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs); 7.3.2 control, test and operate Search and Rescue Radar Transponder (SART); 7.3.3 explain the purpose of EPIRBs and SARTs;

8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 EPIRB and SART (Models or equipment or pictures) 8.2 Distress Signals (Illustration) 9. REFERENCES: 9.1 Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual. IMO 7.03, MERSAR. Latest Edition. 9.2 Model Course 2.02: Maritime Search and Rescue Coordinator Surface Search. 9.3 GMDSS Handbook, 2nd Edition 1995. IMO 970E/971E. 9.4 Campbell, John. Understanding the GMDSS. ISBN 1 84037 010 6. 9.5 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.6 Dela Calzada, Linic, Hilario, Andres, Quenkiol, Rafael and Templo, Aaron. Workbook in Merchant Ship Search and Rescue (IAMSAR). 9.7 International Aeronautics and Maritime Search and Rescue Manual. 9.8 IMO Model Course

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REFERENCE NO.: D43 - E NAV 1 1. COURSE NAME: Electronic Navigation and RADAR 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Basic navigational instruments, radio direction finders, echo-sounders and speed measurement, speed logs, radar navigation, basic radar and plotting, open water exercise in the application of COLREG 1972, exercises in navigation and collision avoidance in confined and congested waters and exercises in and near traffic separation schemes. 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 2 LECTURES, 2 LABORATORY = 4 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 2 LECTURES, 6 LABORATORY = 8 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: Nav 2 - Terrestrial Navigation 2 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The student shall acquire sufficient knowledge on the basic principles of the most commonly used electronic navigational aids and to select the best suitable navigational system on board in a given situation and effectively use the instruments. The student shall also be able to handle the instruments properly and apply correctly the information obtained to fix the ships position. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code Table AII/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES The students shall be able to 7.1 ELECTRONIC NAVIGATIONAL INSTRUMENTS 7.1.1 Satellite Navigation System 7.1.1.1 describe the principles of operation of satellite navigation system aboard ship 7.1.1.2 state that the system will provide continuous world-wide positioning-fixing capabilities 7.1.1.3 state the intended level of the accuracy of the system 7.1.2 Global Positioning System (GPS) 7.1.2.1 explain the principles of operation of GPS navigational system;
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7.1.2.2 discuss the overall operation of the GPS receiver; 7.1.2.3 enumerate potential sources of error, e.g. single frequency reception, ship motion, aerial height, angle of elevation; 7.1.2.4 explain how the system provides continuous worldwide position-fixing capabilities; 7.1.2.5 state intended level of accuracy of the system; 7.1.2.6 operate the GPS receiver.

7.1.3 Radio direction finders and Automatic Identification System (A.I.S) 7.1.3.1 state the basic principles of RDF 7.1.3.2 state the basic principles of A.I.S 7.1.2.1 describe the various symbols FAIS

7.1.4 Echo-sounders and speed measurement 7.1.4.1 7.1.4.2 7.1.4.3 7.1.4.4 7.1.4.5 describe the basic principles of marine echo-sounding equipment; identify the main components on a simple block diagram of echo sounders, and the function of each; state the accepted value of the velocity of sound in seawater and the limits within which the true value may lie; enumerate the physical factors that affect the velocity of sound in seawater; operate a typical echo-sounder and carry out basic user maintenance, e.g. clean plate, change paper, change and adjust stylus; distinguish between the range and phase, and state the dangers of using the wrong phase; distinguish between inaccuracies caused by instrument and scale error and those caused by false echoes; explain the causes of inaccuracies due to instrument and scale error and the likely magnitude and measures that may be taken to eliminate them; distinguish the various types of "false" echoes that may be observed, describe their formation and the possible action to remove them from the trace; discuss the potential errors due to trim, heel and transducer separation.

7.1.4.6 7.1.4.7 7.1.4.8

7.1.4.9

7.1.4.10

7.1.5 Electronic Speed logs 7.1.5.1 differentiate between ground reference-speed and waterreference speed;
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D43-E NAV 1

7.1.5.2 7.1.5.3 7.1.5.4 7.1.5.5 7.1.5.6 7.1.5.7 7.1.5.8 7.1.5.9 7.1.5.10 7.1.5.11 7.1.5.12 7.1.5.13

describe the basic principles of the Electro-magnetic speed log; state the basic principles of the pressure-tube log; explain the necessity of withdrawal of the tube before entering port; explain the basic principles of the acoustic-correlation log; discuss the basic principles of the Doppler speed log; explain the "Janus" configuration to counteract the effect of the ship's trim; explain the dual-axis configuration and its use during docking operations; list the main error sources on the various types of electronic speed logs; state the accuracy of the various systems; explain calibration of the log; describe how ship's speed is transmitted to remote displays; draw a schematic diagram showing how an indication of distance run is derived from a speed log.

7.1.6 Electronic Chart Display (ECDIS) 7.1.6.1 7.1.6.2 7.1.6.3 enumerate the various devices used in ECDIS; state the different stages in using ECDIS; explain the use of ECDIS in navigation.

7.2

RADAR NAVIGATION 7.2.1 Familiarization with the simulator's "own ship" characteristics and controls 7.2.1.1 7.2.1.2 7.2.1.3 7.2.1.4 7.2.1.5 use of "own Ship's" course and speed controls; carry out maneuvers to determine "own ship's" responsible to controls; read correctly display of course and speed information; check display of ordered and actual rudder angles; read accurately displays of other navigational information, where provided, such as rate of turn, soundings, Decca, D.F.; demonstrate radar operational procedures and controls.

7.2.1.6

7.2.2 Basic radar and plotting 7.2.2.1


D43-E NAV 1

state factors affecting the detection of targets;


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7.2.2.2

describe the effect of meteorological conditions on the detection range; 7.2.2.3 describe how sea and rain clutter affects the detection of targets, and explain the use of anti-clutter controls; 7.2.2.4 identify blind and shadow areas and explain how to counteract these effects; 7.2.2.5 discuss methods of suppressing unwanted echoes; 7.2.2.6 set up the radar display in: 7.2.2.6.1 unstabilized ship's-head-up relative-motion mode; 7.2.2.6.2 ship's head-up-stabilized relative-motion mode; 7.2.2.6.3 north-up stabilized relative-motion mode; 7.2.2.6.4 true-motion mode. 7.2.2.7 enumerate the advantages and disadvantages of each mode of display; 7.2.2.8 choose between modes of display and explain the reasons for such choice; 7.2.2.9 derive course, speed, CPA, TCPA and aspect from relative or true plots; 7.2.2.10 use a reflection plotter to derive course, speed, CPA and TCPA.

7.2.3 Open water exercise in the application of COLREG 1972 7.2.3.1 7.2.3.2 derive course, speed, CPA and TCPA for each target by means of a plot and identify critical targets; determine the alteration of course required to achieve a minimum CPA in meeting, crossing and overtaking situations; determine the time at which the original course may be resumed; execute maneuvers, including change of speed where appropriate, to avoid close-quarters situations in multi-ship encounters; detect alteration in the course or speed of target ships from a plot; verify the effectiveness of action taken to avoid collision.

7.2.3.3 7.2.3.4

7.2.3.5 7.2.3.6

7.2.4 Exercises in navigation and collision avoidance in confined and congested waters 7.2.4.1 7.2.4.2 draw correctly a parallel index line on the reflection plotter to pass a given distance off a fixed point; draw accurately parallel index lines for track keeping with change of course;
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D43-E NAV 1

7.2.4.3 7.2.4.4 7.2.4.5 7.2.4.6 7.2.4.7 7.2.4.8

draw correctly parallel index line and marks dead range for approaching an anchorage position; use the parallel index lines with and without tidal set; identify radar-conspicuous objects and fix the ship's position using radar ranges and bearings; check the ship's position by any other means available; monitor the ship's track during a coastal passage, making allowance for current or tide; execute a passage through waters with navigational obstructions and heavy traffic.

7.2.5 Exercises in and near traffic separation schemes 7.2.5.1 execute and monitor correctly a passage in a traffic separation scheme involving: 7.2.5.1 entering and leaving lanes; 7.2.5.2 crossing lanes; 7.2.5.3 crossing one lane to enter the other; 7.2.5.4 leaving one lane to cross the other.

8.

EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 Echo-sounder GPS receiver Electronic Speed log (Illustration or Drawing) A RADAR simulator which includes two or more own ship stations, each with separate helm and engine controls, and capable of simulating 20 or more target ships. The equipment shall comply with IMO Assembly Resolutions A.574 (14) General requirements for electronic navigation aids and A.477 (XII) Performance standards for radar equipment. Each own ship display, together with its control panel, should be installed in a room or cubicle provided with a plotting table. Plotting charts and instruments, and reflection plotter. Each station should be provided with charts of the areas, maneuvering book and pilot card in compliance with the provisions of IMO Assembly Resolution A.601 (15) Provision display of maneuvering information on board ships. Reference is made to E NAV 2, Reference No. D52, for further guidance. 8.5 A.I.S Drawing 8.6 Speed log or Marine Tachometer 8.7 Plotting charts and equipment shall be available for each set

9. REFERENCES: 9.1 Lownsborough and Calcutt D. Electronic Aids to Navigation. ISBN 0-34059258-3.
D43-E NAV 1 page 5 of 6

9.2 Burger, W. Radar Observers Handbook for Merchant Navy Officers. ISBN 0-85174-443-5. 9.3 Gylden, S. G. and Petterson B. Plotting and Parallel Index and Constant Radius Turns. Published by Micronav Consultants, Sweden. 9.4 Model Course 7.03, Officer In Charge of a Navigational Watch. 9.5 List of Radio Signals, vol. 5. 9.6 Notices to Mariners. 9.7 Assembly Resolution A477 (XII): Performance Standards for Radar Equipment. 9.8 SOLAS Chapter V & XI 1 9.9 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.10 Torrechilla, Lau S. and Marquez III, Angel. Electronics Navigation I including Radar Simulation.

D43-E NAV 1

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REFERENCE NO.: D33 - SEAM 3 1. COURSE NAME: Cargo Handling and Stowage 2 - Carriage of Dangerous Goods 2. COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course includes the Cargo Protections, Container Cargo, Deep Tank Cargo, Dangerous, Hazardous and Harmful Cargoes, Bulk Cargo Except Grain, Cargo Handling Equipment, Cargo Handling Safety and Care of Cargo During the Voyage

3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURES, 0 LABORATORY = 3 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURES, 0 LABORATORY = 3 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: Seam 2 - Cargo Handling & Stowage 1 - Carriage of NonDangerous Goods 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The student shall be able to regarding: 6.1 application of the necessary precautions in the hazardous and harmful cargoes; 6.2 identification of various dangerous cargoes separation in stowage in compliance with the Code; 6.3 care of the cargo during the voyage take necessary actions carriage of dangerous, and their respective requirements of IMDG

FUNCTION: F2 - Cargo Handling and Storage at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table II) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES The student shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Cargo Protections 7.1.1 7.1.2 7.1.3 7.1.4
D33 SEAM 3

state the preparations to be made in cargo holds/tanks prior to loading; state the precautionary measures to be taken when cleaning cargo holds/tanks; explain how proper stowage and securing of dangerous/hazardous harmful cargoes may be achieved; describe the method of securing heavy loads like locomotives; and
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7.1.5

illustrate the lashing method for vehicles and trailers.

7.2 Container Cargo 7.2.1 7.2.2 7.2.3 7.2.4 7.2.5 differentiate between pure container carrier and a container feeder; describe the arrangement of a container ship and how loading of containers are planned and stowed; describe the method of securing containers on deck; and describe the class and type of containers commonly used. state the precautions to be observed when carrying hazardous cargoes containers.

7.3 Deep Tank by Cargo 7.3.1 7.3.2 7.3.3 describe the preparation of deep tanks prior to loading cargo; state the heating arrangements and precautions to take with heated cargo; and explain the reason for allowing sufficient ullage for expansion.

7.4 Dangerous, Hazardous and Harmful Cargoes 7.4.1 7.4.2 7.4.3 7.4.4 7.4.5 7.4.6 cite dangerous goods in packaged form; describe the different classes of dangerous cargoes; state how the duty officer can acquire sufficient information relevant to the loading of dangerous cargoes; state what action to be taken in the event of accident; explain why the IMDG code should appear in the packaging label; and state the appropriate actions to take in case of doubts concerning loading of discharging.

7.5 Bulk Cargo Except Grain 7.5.1 7.5.2 7.5.3 explain the purpose of the angle of repose; give examples of cargoes which are liable to liquefying; give examples of cargoes with transportable moisture limit; and

D33 SEAM 3

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7.6

Cargo Handling Equipment 7.6.1 enumerate and describe the different cargo handling equipment used in vessels carrying dangerous, hazardous and/or harmful cargoes; state the necessary precautions when rigging cargo gears prior to loading/discharging of cargoes; state the maintenance procedures for cargo handling equipment.

7.6.2 7.6.3

7.7

Cargo Handling Safety 7.7.1 7.7.2 explain the preparations prior to loading and/or discharging of dangerous/hazardous/harmful cargoes; explain the necessary precautions to be observed before/during/after loading and/or discharging operations.

7.8

Care of Cargo During the Voyage 7.8.1 7.8.2 7.8.3 explain why lashing of containers/vehicles shall be checked and tightened everyday; state the necessary points to consider when transporting dangerous hazardous and/or harmful cargoes; and explain the routine checks/inspection to be made during the voyage

8.

EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 Samples of cargo plans on different types of ships 8.2 IMDG Code: Labels, marks and signs (SN: IMO-220E) 8.3 Drawing of various tanker ships showing tanks and piping arrangements (oil, chemicals and gas) 8.4 Drawings/Illustartion of measuring device gas and oxygen device

9.

REFERENCES: 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 Rankin, KS. Thomas Stowage, 3rd Edition. Flere, W.A. Handy Guide to Stowage. Cockroft, A.N. Nicholls Seamanship and Nautical Knowledge. International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG), 1994 Cons. Edition, IMO-220E. Sauebier, Charles. Marine Cargo Operation. IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition ISBN 92-801-6105-9.
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D33 SEAM 3

REFERENCE NO.: D51 - E NAV 2 1. COURSE NAME: Electronic Navigation - ARPA 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Plotting Techniques, principal ARPA system, IMO Performance Standards for Automatic RADAR Plotting Aids (ARPA), acquisition of targets, tracking capabilities and limitations, processing delays, setting up and maintaining displays, representation of target information, errors of interpretation, errors in displayed data, system operational tests, risks of over-reliance on ARPA, obtaining information from ARPA displays, application of COLREG and integrated navigation system.

3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 2 LABORATORY = 5 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURE, 6 LABORATORY = 9 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: E NAV 1 Electronic Navigation 1 and RADAR 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The student shall be able to use Radar and ARPA. He shall be able to choose the appropriate mode of display, select plotting and graphics controls suitable to the circumstances, make appropriate use of operational alarms, acquire and track targets which present a potential threat of collision, extract the information needed to establish the course, speed and nearest approach to enable early action to be taken to avoid close quarters situation and make use of ARPA to confirm and monitor their actions. The student shall be able to state the dangers of over reliance on the automatic acquisition and tracking of targets and operational alarms and how these dangers can be counteracted. The student shall also explain the concepts of integrated navigation as needed for navigation and maneuvering system. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table All/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The students shall be able to . . . . . .

D51 E NAV 2

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7.1

Plotting Techniques 7.1.1 use plotting sheet and reflection plotter to construct the relative motion triangle, and identify course, speed and aspect of other ships from true and relative plots; calculate Closest Point of Approach (CPA) and Time of Closest Point of Approach (TCPA) from true and relative plots; state changes in CPA and TCPA resulting from alteration of course or speed of own or target ship; use a relative plot to determine the alteration of course or speed needed to achieve a required CPA; detect alteration of course of a target and find the alteration from a plot.

7.1.2 7.1.3 7.1.4 7.1.5

7.2

Principal ARPA Systems 7.2.1 describe the different methods of displaying information: 7.2.1.1 vectors; 7.2.1.2 graphics; 7.2.1.3 digital read-out; 7.2.1.4 potential points of collision (PPC); 7.2.1.5 predicted areas of danger (PAD); describe the different ways in which targets may be acquired.

7.2.2

7.3

IMO Performance Standards for Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA) 7.3.1 7.3.2 7.3.3 7.3.4 7.3.5 outline the IMO performance standards for ARPA; describe the requirements for acquisition and tracking of targets; describe the operational warnings required; list the data which should be available in alphanumeric form; state performance standards for range and bearing accuracy and discrimination of radar.

7.4

Acquisition of Targets 7.4.1 7.4.2 7.4.3 7.4.4 7.4.5 explain how ARPA acquires a target; state the criteria for automatic acquisition of targets; describe the criteria to be used for manual acquisition of targets; state the optimum number of targets; explain why targets not posing a potential threat should be deleted from the tracker register if the limit on the number of acquired targets has been reached;

D51 E NAV 2

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7.4.6

7.4.7

explain under which circumstances target acquisitions may be suppressed over certain areas and how this situation shall be handled; explain why targets first appearing closer than the preset guard ring do not actuate alarms.

7.5

Tracking Capabilities and Limitations 7.5.1 7.5.2 7.5.3 7.5.4 describe how a target is tracked by ARPA; explain how an acquired target may be lost if its echo fades temporarily; describe the circumstances leading to target swop; describe the effect of target swop on displayed data.

7.6

Processing Delays 7.6.1 7.6.2 7.6.3 explain the reasons for a delay in the display or processed ARPA data after target acquisition; explain the delay in the display of new data when the target ship maneuvers; state why full accuracy of derived information may not be attained.

7.7

Setting Up and Maintaining Displays 7.7.1 7.7.2 7.7.3 7.7.4 7.7.5 7.7.6 7.7.7 7.7.8 select an appropriate display presentation having regard to the required task and current situation; correctly adjust the radar controls for optimum display of echoes; use manual acquisition and exclusion areas; use automatic acquisition and exclusion areas; select an appropriate time scale for vectors or graphics to produce information required; explain how derived information differs, depending on whether the sea stabilized mode or the ground stabilized mode is used; select the appropriate mode for the circumstances; explain the use of echo referencing in the true motion mode.

7.8

Representation of Target Information 7.8.1 7.8.2 7.8.3 use display in true and relative modes and demonstrate the use of true and relative vectors in each mode; demonstrate the benefits of switching between true and relative vectors; explain the graphic display of PPCs and PADs;
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D51 E NAV 2

7.8.4 7.8.5 7.8.6

7.8.7 7.8.8 7.8.9 7.8.10

assess the threat of collision by-forward extrapolation of vectors and by the use of PADs; explain how past positions of tracked targets are displayed; explain how the results of trial maneuvers are approximations depending on the model of own ships maneuvering characteristics; state the need to refer to the equipment manual for description of the maneuvering characteristics model used, if any; demonstrate the setting and acknowledgment of operational warning; describe the benefits and limitations of operational warnings; use area rejection boundaries where appropriate to avoid spurious interference.

7.9

Errors Of Interpretation 7.9.1 7.9.2 7.9.3 state how the use of vectors in the wrong mode is a common error; check information from vectors with numeric display; explain how a lost target which is subsequently reacquired may temporarily show a course and speed suggesting an alteration when none has occurred; explain how the PADs and PPCs displayed apply only to own ship and targets and do not indicate mutual threats between targets; state how the length of line from target to PAD or PPC is not an indicator of target speed; use history display in the same mode as vectors; explain how a change of direction in the relative history display does not necessarily imply that the target has altered course; explain how the incorrect interpretation of ARPA can lead to a dangerous misunderstanding of the traffic situation.

7.9.4

7.9.5 7.9.6 7.9.7 7.9.8

7.10

Errors In Displayed Data 7.10.1 state how errors in bearing are generated in the radar installation by: 7.10.1.1 backlash; 7.10.1.2 ship motion; 7.10.1.3 asymmetrical antenna beam; 7.10.1.4 azimuth quantization. state the factors that may cause errors in range; explain how the smoothing filter in the tracker combined with alterations in own ships course may temporarily produce unreliable indications;
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7.10.2 7.10.3

D51 E NAV 2

7.10.4 7.10.5 7.10.6

state how errors will be introduced by inputs from compass and log; describe the effects of heading and speed errors on derived information; state how the smoothness of the displayed true history track gives some indication of satisfactory tracking by ARPA.

7.11

System Operational Tests 7.11.1 7.11.2 7.11.3 7.11.4 use system of self-diagnostic routines; use test programs to check performance against known solutions; check performance, including trial maneuver by manual plotting; state action to take after malfunction of ARPA.

7.12

Risks of Over-Reliance on ARPA 7.12.1 state why the use of ARPA does not relieve the officer of the watch from the need to comply with basic principles in keeping a navigational watch; explain the dangers of relying on operational alarms to warn of the presence of other vessels or impending close-quarters situation; explain why small predicted passing distances must not be relied upon; state how sensor input alarms only operate on failure of input and do not respond to inaccurate inputs.

7.12.2

7.12.3 7.12.4

7.13

Obtaining Information from ARPA Displays 7.13.1 7.13.2 7.13.3 7.13.4 7.13.5 7.13.6 demonstrate ability to obtain information in both true and relative modes; identify critical targets; determine relative course and speed of target; determine true course and speed of target; interpret displays of past positions for detecting changes in course of speed of target; operate trial maneuver facility to check validity of intended alteration of course or speed.

7.14

Application of COLREG 7.14.1 analyze displayed situations, determine and execute actions to avoid close-quarters situations;
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D51 E NAV 2

7.14.2

monitor subsequent situation and resumes original course and speed when safe to do so.

7.15

Integrated Navigation System 7.15.1 7.15.2 7.15.3 7.15.4 7.15.5 explain the concept of integrated navigation on-board of modern vessels; identify and describe data emanating from navigational sensors; explain the total integration system in navigation; describe the function of a navigation unit; identify and describe route tracking subsystem; explain the performance function of optimum steering.

8.

EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 RADAR simulator capable of simulating the operational capabilities of navigational radar equipment, which meets all applicable performance standards, adopted by CHED and incorporate facilities to: 8.1.1 operate in the stabilized relative motion mode and sea and ground stabilized true motion modes; 8.1.2 model weather, tidal streams, current, shadow sectors, spurious echoes and other propagation effects, and generate coastlines, navigational buoys and search and rescue transponders; and 8.1.3 create a real-time operating environment incorporating at least two own ship stations with ability to change own ships course and speed, and include parameters for at least 20 target ships and appropriate communication facilities. 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 Plotting charts and equipment shall be available for each set Instructors Manual Video-cassette player Cassettes: 8.5.1 Automatic RADAR Plotting Aids Video On (Catalogue No. R1 Code No. 154) Navigation Training Unit 1 RADAR Collision Avoidance: 8.6.1 RADAR Theory; 8.6.2 RADAR Plotting (with student workbooks). PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR SIMULATORS: Any simulator used for simulator-based training shall: 8.7.1 The performance standards and other provisions set forth in section A-I/12 and such other requirements as are prescribed in part A of the STCW Code for any certificate concerned shall be complied with in respect of: 8.7.1.1 all mandatory simulator-based training

8.6

8.7

D51 E NAV 2

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8.7.1.2 any assessment of competency required by part A of the STCW Code which is carried out by means of a simulator; and 8.7.1.3 any demonstration, by means of a simulator, of continued proficiency required by part A of the STCW Code.

8.7.2 Simulators installed or brought into use prior to 1 February 2002 may be exempted from full compliance with the performance standards reffered to in paragraph 1, at the discretion of the Party concerned. 8.7.3 be suitable for the selected objectives and training tasks; 8.7.4 be capable of simulating the operating capabilities of shipboard equipment concerned, to a level of physical realism appropriate to training objectives, and include the capabilities, limitations and possible errors of such equipment; 8.7.5 have sufficient behavioral realism to allow a trainee to acquire skills appropriate to the training objectives; 8.7.6 provide a controlled operating environment, capable of producing a variety of conditions, which may include emergency, hazardous or unusual situations relevant to the training objectives; 8.7.7 provide an interface through which a trainee can interact with the equipment, the simulated environment and, as appropriate, the instructor; 8.7.8 permit an instructor to control, monitor and record exercises for the effective debriefing of trainees. 8.8 Any simulator used for the assessment of competence or for any demonstration of continued proficiency shall: 8.8.1 be capable of satisfying the specified assessment objectives; 8.8.2 be capable of simulating the operational capabilities of the shipboard equipment concerned to a level of physical realism appropriate to the assessment objectives, and include the capabilities, limitations and possible errors of such equipment; 8.8.3 have sufficient behavioral realism to allow a candidate to exhibit the skills appropriate to the assessment objectives; 8.8.4 provide an interface through which a candidate can interact with the equipment and simulated environment; 8.8.5 provide a controlled operating environment, capable of producing a variety of conditions, which may include emergency, hazardous or unusual situations relevant to assessment objectives; and 8.8.6 permit an assessor to control, monitor and record exercises for the effective assessment of the performance of candidates. ARPA simulators capable of simulating the operational capabilities of ARPAs which meet all applicable performance standards adopted by CHED shall incorporate the facilities for:
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8.9

D51 E NAV 2

8.9.1 RADAR simulator which meets all applicable performance standards, adopted by CHED 8.9.2 manual and automatic target acquisition; 8.9.3 past track information; 8.9.4 use of exclusion areas; 8.9.5 vector/graphic time-scale and data display; and 8.9.6 trial maneuvers. 9. 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 9.9 9.10 REFERENCES: IMO Model Course 1.07. Radar Observation and Plotting. IMO Model Course 1.08: The Operational Use of ARPA/BRM/SAR. IMO Assembly Resolution A.482 (XII) Training in the Use of Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA). IMO Assembly Resolution A.482 (XII) Training in Radar Observation and Plotting. Assembly Resolution A.422 (XI) Performance Standards for Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA). The IMO/ILO document for Guidance, 1985. IMO Sales No. 935 87.08E. International Regulations for Preventing Collision at Sea (COLREG), as amended. IMO Sales No. 904 85.01.E. IMO Model Course 1.09 RADAR Simulator. IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. Torrechilla, Lauro S., Marquez III, Angel A. and Payde, John Mark M. Electronics Navigation 2 including RADAR and ARPA.

D51 E NAV 2

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REFERENCE No.: D52 - MAR POWER 1. COURSE NAME: Basic Marine Engineering 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course include the Diesel Engine, Engine Systems, Engine Operation, Auxiliary System and Machineries and Maintenance and Safety 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 3 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 3 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The students shall be able to make a sketch of a general arrangement plan of the engine room and explain the function of the basic elements, machinery and equipment needed for efficient operation, monitoring, watchkeeping and maintenance. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (Steering Gear) 3 Controlling the operation of the ship and care for persons on board. 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Diesel Engine 7.1.1 Identify the different structural parts of a diesel engine; 7.1.2 explain the function/s of the following: 7.1.1.1 7.1.1.2 7.1.1.3 7.1.1.4 7.1.1.5 7.1.1.6 7.1.1.7 7.1.1.8
D52 MAR POWER

cylinder head liner piston connecting rod crankshaft camshaft exhaust valve air intake valve manifold
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7.1.1.9 7.1.1.10 7.1.1.11 7.1.1.12 7.1.1.13 7.1.1.14 7.1.1.15 7.1.1.16 7.1.1.17

exhaust gas manifold bed plate turbocharger air cooler thrust block fly wheel propeller propeller shaft explain the basic differences between the four stroke and the two stroke diesel engine;

7.2

Engine Systems 7.2.1 explain the following engine systems: 7.2.1.1 fuel oil system 7.2.1.2 lubricating oil system 7.2.1.3 piston cooling system 7.2.1.4 jacket cooling water 7.2.1.5 starting system

7.3

Engine Operation 7.3.1 describe how an engine operation is: 7.3.1.1 prepared for starting; 7.3.1.2 started; and 7.3.1.3 stopped. 7.3.2 state the emergency situations that may occur while the engine is in operation; 7.3.3 explain possible consequences of inadequate operation during: 7.3.3.1 emergency slow down; 7.3.3.2 emergency stop; 7.3.3.3 critical speed (barred speed range); 7.3.3.4 over speed; 7.3.3.5 over load.

7.4 Auxiliary System and Machineries 7.4.1 state what auxiliary systems and machineries are needed for the main power plant operation; 7.4.2 explain the functions of the following: 7.4.2.1 auxiliary engine and generator set; 7.4.2.2 auxiliary boiler; 7.4.2.3 air compressors; 7.4.2.4 purifiers (F.O. and L.O.);
D52 MAR POWER page 2 of 4

7.4.2.5 engine blowers/fans; 7.4.2.6 evaporator; 7.4.2.7 cooling pumps; 7.4.2.8 condensers; 7.4.2.9 heat exchangers; 7.4.2.10 steering gear. 7.4.3 state how the above-mentioned auxiliary machineries affect the performance of the main power plant.

7.5 Maintenance and Safety 7.5.1 explain what safety measures should be taken with regards to the main propulsion system during: 7.5.1.1 rough seas reducing speed; 7.5.1.2 changing course; 7.5.1.3 providing additional power supply; 7.5.1.4 auxiliary steering on standby; 7.5.1.5 check operational level of both M.E./A.E. L.O. sump and F.O./D.O. service tanks; 7.5.1.6 all operating parameters should be checked. 7.5.2 state the safety measures to be carried out on the steering system before departure; 7.5.3 state what safety measures are taken in the engine room during rough seas/normal operation; 7.5.4 explain what routine check/maintenance are carried out on the main propulsion system during normal operation; 7.5.5 state how the periodic checking shall be carried out on the following emergency machineries: 7.5.5.1 emergency generator; 7.5.5.2 emergency fire pump; 7.5.5.3 emergency compressors; 7.5.5.4 lifeboat engines. 8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 8.2 8.3 Illustration and drawings of a main engine, machinery and equipment needed for operation General arrangement plans of the engine room Steering gear system (Illustration and drawing)

D52 MAR POWER

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9.

REFERENCES: 9.1. Morton, T.D. Motor Engineering Knowledge for Marine Engineers, Third Edition 1994. London, Thomas Reed Publication. ISBN 0901281-107. Joel, R. Basic Engineering Thermodynamics in S.I. Units. Harlow, Longman. ISBN 0-7506-25629-1. D.A. Taylor. Introduction to Marine Engineering. London, Butterworth, Second Edition. ISBN 0-7506-2530-9. L. Jackson and T.D. Morton. General Engineering Knowledge for Marine Engineers. London, Thomas Reed Publications, Ltd. ISBN 0947637-76-1.

9.2. 9.3. 9.4. 9.5.

IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9.

D52 MAR POWER

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REFERENCE NO.: D53 - SEAM 4 1. COURSE NAME: Stability and Trim 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Stability, Trim, Bouyancies, Movement of the Center of Gravity, Causes of List, Fresh Water Allowance, Initial Stability, Statical Stability, Angle of Loll, Effect of Slack Tank, Action to be Taken in the Event of Partial Loss of Intact Stability, Maintain Seaworthiness of the Ship 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 1 LABORATORY = 4 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURE, 3 LABORATORY = 6 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: Cargo Handling & Stowage 2 - Carriage of Dangerous Goods 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The student shall be able to use table on diagrams of stability and trim data to calculate ships initial stability, draught and trim for any given disposition of cargo and other weights. The student will also be able to determine whether stresses on the ships are within tolerance by the use of stress data and take actions in the event of partial loss of intact buoyancy. FUNCTION: F2 Cargo Handling and Storage at the Operational Level F3 - Controlling the Operation of the Ship and Care for Persons on Board at the Operational Level (STCW Code A-II/1) 2 and 3 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Stability 7.1.1 7.1.2 7.1.3 7.1.4 illustrate a graph on scale that show the relationship between the displacement and mean draught of a ship ; calculate the deadweight and displacement of ship at various draughts in seawater using deadweight scale; using deadweight scale and obtain TPC at a given draught; using TPC scale, calculate the following: 7.1.4.1 change of mean draught as a given weight are loaded or discharged; 7.1.4.2 weight of cargo to be loaded or discharged in various hatches/tanks to produce a required change of draught.
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D55 SEAM 4

7.1.5 7.1.6

explain the purpose of stability, trim and stress tables; and explain why tons per centimeter (TPC) immersion varies with different drafts.

7.2 Trim 7.2.1 7.2.2 7.2.3 define trim; define center of floatation; describe how trim may change by moving weight or masses forward or aft or by adding a weight at a position forward or abaft the center of floatation; explain the uses of hydrostatic data to find the center of floatation on various draught; explain the trimming moment and moment to change trim; find the new draft, given the value of initial draught and the position of the center of floatation; explain how to use the trimming curves or trimming table to determine the change of draught, resulting from loading, discharging or moving weights; state in which cases, calculation to change trim, by taking moment about the center of floatation or by means of trimming tables should not be used; calculate final draught and trim for a planned loading.

7.2.4 7.2.5 7.2.6 7.2.7

7.2.8

7.2.9

7.3 Buoyancies 7.3.1 7.3.2 explain the meaning of buoyancy; and the displacement of a floating object; explain the meaning of reserve buoyancy and its relation to freeboard.

7.4 Movement of the Center of Gravity 7.4.1 7.4.2 7.4.3 explain the meaning of center of gravity; describe how the center of gravity (G) of a ship can move only when weights are moved within the ship; illustrate the following: 7.4.3.1 G moves directly towards the center of gravity of added weight; 7.4.3.2 G moves directly away from the center of gravity of removed weight; 7.4.3.3 G moves vertically from the initial center of gravity. calculate the movement of G (GG1) from: GG1 = Mass added or removed x distance of mass from G
D55 SEAM 4 page 2 of 5

7.4.4

New displacement of the ship GG1 = Mass moved x distance of weight is moved Displacement of the ship 7.4.5 7.4.6 state where the weight is transferred to the point of suspension if a load is lifted by using ship gears; calculate the change in KG during passage resulting from: 7.4.6.1 consumption of fuel and stores; 7.4.6.2 absorption of water by a deck cargo; 7.4.6.3 accumulation of ice on deck and superstructures.

7.5 Causes of List 7.5.1 7.5.2 7.5.3 illustrate by diagram the forces that causes a ship to list; state the listing moment; illustrate on a diagram how the angle of list () can be calculated during the transverse shift of G from the centerline.

7.6 Fresh Water Allowance 7.6.1 7.6.2 explain why and how the draught of a ship changes when it passes from fresh water to seawater and vice-versa; calculate with the weight that can be loaded after reaching the summer load line when loading in fresh water before sailing to sea water given the value of FWA and TPC; find the density of dock water by using hydrometer; calculate the TPC of dock water given the value of the density of dock water and FWA; calculate given the value of dock water density and FWA, the amount which appropriate load may submerge; calculate the amount of load to bring the ship to an appropriate load line in seawater given the present draught amidships and the density of dock water;

7.6.3 7.6.4 7.6.5 7.6.6

7.7 Initial Stability 7.7.1 7.7.2 7.7.3 7.7.4 7.7.5


D55 SEAM 4

describe the stability of a ship by its reaction to (a heeling on) small angle of heel; explain the transverse metacenter (M) and its limitation for practical usage; illustrate the diagram of the ship heeled to small angle and indicate G, B, Z and M; show that small angle of heel () = GZ = GM x Sin ; describe the effect on a ships behavior towards the following:
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7.7.6 7.7.7

7.7.5.1 a large GM (stiff ship) 7.7.5.2 a small GM (tender ship). state KM is only dependent on the draught of a given ship; find the metacentric height (GM) obtained from hydrostatic curve given the value of KG and KM.

7.8 Statical Stability 7.8.1 7.8.2 7.8.3 7.8.4 7.8.5 7.8.6 7.8.7 state that for any draught the length of GZ at various angle of heel can be drawn and graphed; state that the graph described is called curve of statical stability; state that different curves are obtained for different draught with same initial GM; identify cross curves (KN curves); explain the formula Gz = KN Kg Sin ; explain how lowering the position of G increases all values of the righting arms lever and vice versa; state that angle of heel beyond approximately 400 is not normally of practical because of the probability of water entering the ship.

7.9 Angle of Loll 7.9.1 7.9.2 7.9.3 7.9.4 7.9.5 7.9.6 explain that if G is raised to M, the couple formed by the weight and buoyancy will turn the ship further from upright; state that in this condition, GM is said to be negative and x Gz is called the upsetting moment or capsizing moment; explain B may move sufficiently to reduce the capsizing moment to zero; state that the angle at which the ship becomes stable is known as the angle of loll; state that the ship will roll about the angle of loll instead of the upright; state that an unstable ship may loll to either side.

7.10 Effect of Slack Tank 7.10.1 state the effect of tank, full of liquid to the position of the ship center of gravity; 7.10.2 show by means of a diagram how the center of gravity of liquid in a partially filled tank moves during rolling; 7.10.3 state the result of GM when the surface of liquid is free to move with virtual increase of Kg; 7.10.4 explain why the tank is often constructed with longitudinal subdivision;
D55 SEAM 4 page 4 of 5

7.11 Action to be Taken in the Event of Partial Loss of Intact Stability 7.11.1 describe the action to take in order to prevent flooding of the adjacent compartment; 7.11.2 state the cross-flooding arrangement must be put into operation; state that any action relevant to the operation that could reduce the inflow of water should be taken into account.

7.12 Maintain seaworthiness of the Ship 7.12.1 working knowledge and application of stability, trim and stress tables, diagrams and stress calculating equipment. 8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 Copy of actual Ship Capacity Plan/Dead Weight Plan Trim and Stability Table International Loadline (Seasonal) Chart Computer based software on Trim and Stability

9. REFERENCES: 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 Derret, D. R. Ship Stability for Masters and Mates, 4th Edition. ISBN 07506-0380-1. George, William E. Stability and Trim for the Ships Officer. ISBN 087033-297-X. Pursey, H.J. Merchant Ship Stability. ISBN 0-85174-442-7. IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. Dela Calzada, Limic, Hilario, Andres, Quenkiol, Rafael and Templo, Aaron. Stability and trim.

D55 SEAM 4

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REFERENCE NO.: D61 MAR LAW 1. COURSE NAME: Maritime Law 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Ship Nationality and Registration of a Ship, Carriage of Goods by Sea, Contracts for the used of Ships, Ancillary Contracts and Legal Aspects of Marine Accidents and monitor compliance with legislative requirements. 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 3 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 3 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The students shall be able explain the basics of maritime laws as it pertains to authorities, rights, duties and responsibilities in the commercial operation of sea going merchant ships. They will also be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of maritime laws and rules governing relationship incident to merchant shipping in transport activities. FUNCTION: F3 Controlling the Operation of the Ship and Care for Persons on Board at the Operational Level 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to.. 7.1 A Ship 7.1.1 7.1.2 7.1.3 state the most legal definition of a ship; describe a ship in relation to registration, carriage, pollution, salvage and labour relations; list the criteria used to decide whether a floating structure is a ship.

7.2

Nationality and Registration of a Ship 7.2.1 7.2.2 explain the concept of the nationality of a ship as the relationship between a ship and her flag state; explain the need for ships to have nationality to indicate which state exercises the flag state jurisdiction and diplomatic
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D61 MARLAW

7.2.3 7.2.4

7.2.5

protections, what rights a ship enjoys and what obligations she is subjected to when navigating on the high seas; state international limits for the state's right to grant nationality to a ship; describe the purpose of registration of the ship and the consequence of being not accepted as an act of granting the nationality; explain the idea of the "open and second registry".

7.3

Carriage of Goods by Sea 7.3.1 describe the parties to the contract of carriage of cargo (shipowner/carrier and charterer/shippers) and the legal position of a consignee of the cargo; explain the application of Hague-Visby rules with reference to types of contract and the cargoes excluded; describe the functions of the Bill of Lading ; compare and contrast the following types of B/L: 7.3.4.1 shipped; 7.3.4.2 received for shipment; 7.3.4.3 liner; 7.3.4.4 tramp; 7.3.4.5 through. explain the commercial background and the main reason for the use of B/L to: 7.3.5.1 sell the cargo while at sea; 7.3.5.2 secure commercial credit taken from the bank; 7.3.5.3 protect the parties to international sale against the increased risk of transaction. outline the carrier's duties and responsibilities before and at the beginning of a voyage including that at the port of discharge; list the exceptions to the carrier's liability for loss or damage to the cargo and explain that these exceptions are subject to the ship leaving the port of loading in a seaworthy condition; explain the practice of the shippers issuing a "letter of indemnity" in return for a clean bill of lading; state the obligations of the shipowner/carrier under a voyage charter party; explain how the cargo is described in a charter party; escribe the laycan clause in a charter party; explain the concept of an arrived ship in cases of Berth, Dock and Port charter-parties; explain the purpose of free time as laytime is paid through the freight; explain when laytime starts to count; explain the exceptions, when the effects of laytime is interrupted;
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7.3.2 7.3.3 7.3.4

7.3.5

7.3.6 7.3.8

7.3.9 7.3.10 7.3.11 7.3.12 7.3.13 7.3.14 7.3.15 7.3.16


D61 MARLAW

7.3.17 7.3.18 7.3.19 7.3.20

explain the concepts of demurrage; explain the concept of dispatch money; describe unreasonable deviation; state why the shipowner/carrier may have a lien on the cargo until the freight is fully paid.

7.4 Contract for the Use of Ships 7.4.1 7.4.2 describe the contract for a time charter; explain how the ship is described in the charter party in respect to identification, cargo-carrying capacity, speed and consumption for fuel and seaworthiness; state that the master must comply with the charterers orders and instructions regarding the employment of the ship, agency or other arrangements; state that the charterer has the option to issue bills of lading that the master is required to sign; explain the ship owners obligations to maintain the ship in thoroughly efficient state and to pay all provisions, wages, ships insurance and deck/engine stores; explain when a ship is considered to be on hire and off hire; explain the right of the charterer to sub-let a ship (sub-charter); define the following: 7.4.8.1 time charter contract; 7.4.8.2 voyage charter contract; 7.4.8.3 bareboat charter contract.

7.4.3

7.4.4 7.4.5

7.4.6 7.4.7 7.4.8

7.5 Ancillary Contracts 7.5.1 7.5.2 7.5.3 describe the legal implication of a master-pilot relationship; explain the liability for damages done by a pilot to the ship and to a third party; describe a contract of towage in regards to remuneration to perform towage services such as pushing, shifting, moving, docking/undocking of a ship and stand-by near a ship for the purpose of assisting by towing; explain the difference between towage and salvage services; explain why under a towage contract the tug owner is exonerated from all liabilities except when damage is caused by negligence on his part; explain how the stevedores employer is fully liable for damages to the cargo or ship caused by stevedores.

7.5.4 7.5.5

7.5.6

7.6 Legal Aspects of Marine Accidents


D61 MARLAW page 3 of 5

7.6.1 7.6.2

7.6.3 7.6.4 7.6.5 7.6.6

7.6.7 7.6.8 7.6.9

define collision and allision; state that in case of collision, there are three types of possible liabilities: 7.6.2.1 Criminal; 7.6.2.2 Disciplinary; 7.6.2.3 Civil. outline the rules of liability for personal injury and for damage to cargo; define salvage operation; list and describe the three basic factors that are necessary for a salvage operation to be rewarded; explain salvage contract no cure-no pay principle, performance of salvage operations, duties of the salvor and of the shipowner and master, criteria fixing the reward and special compensation; describe the features of the 1990 Lloyds Standard Form of salvage agreement; explain the basic principles of general average; state the procedures for release of cargo to the consignee before the general average contribution has been assessed.

7.7 Monitor Compliance with Legislative Requirements 7.7.1 state briefly the basic statutory regulations such as; load line convention, international convention and prevention of pollution at sea, STCW convention, ILO convention, SOLAS Convention, ISM code, ISPS code, GENEVA Conventions of 1958 and the United Nation Convention (UNCLOS) on the Law of the Sea, PMMRR, R.A. 8544, etc. how compliance is controlled and consequences of their non-compliance; enumerate the different organizations, offices and authorities engaged in various controlled activities on vessels (classification societies, flag and port state, inspections, etc.); enumerate at least ten (10) different mandatory certificates, documents and records required of a commercial vessel, and the implications of their absence.

7.7.2

7.7.3

8.

EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 Sample forms of appropriate legal documents such as: 8.1.1 Bill of lading, Charter parties, COGSA, LOF, etc.

9.

REFERENCES:
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D61 MARLAW

9.1 Business and Law for the Ship Master by Capt. F.N. Hopkins M.R. Naval Institute (Extra Master) 9.2 Maritime Law for Ship's Officers Course + Compendium 9.3 IMO Model Course 7.03 (1999 Edition) ISBN 92-801-6105-9 9.4 Workbook in Maritime Law by San Diego, Teresita Obleplas, Dabi, Lina, Melad, William and Selino Benedicto Jr. 9.5 SOLAS 9.6 STCW

D61 MARLAW

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REFERENCE NO.: D65 - PERS MAN 1. COURSE NAME: Shipboard Personnel Management 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Personnel Management, Organization of Staff, Training on Board Ships, Protection and Safety of Passengers 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 3 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 3 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The student shall be capable of organizing and managing the crew for safe and efficient operation of the ship and apply ships contingency plans for emergencies. The student will also be able to chair meetings on board and implement shipboard training programs. FUNCTION: F3 - Controlling the Operation of the Ship and Care for Persons on Board at the Operational Level 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES The student shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Personnel Management 7.1.1 Principles of controlling subordinates and maintaining good relationship 7.1.1.1 state the basic principles for personnel management; 7.1.1.2 demonstrate how personnel can be managed by: 7.1.1.2.1 democratic leadership 7.1.1.2.2 autocratic leadership 7.1.1.3 explain when the various roles of leaderships will be most effective; 7.1.1.4 demonstrate various ways of motivating the crew for an unpleasant task; 7.1.1.5 explain how appraisal and/or criticism shall be done to achieve desired results; 7.1.1.6 explain the principles for Management By Objectives (MBO).

D65 PERSMAN

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7.1.2 Staff attitudes 7.1.2.1 explain the elements of Maslows Hierarchy of needs. 7.1.3 Condition of employment 7.1.3.1 state the basic conditions to be written in a contract of employment; 7.1.3.2 list the benefits and disadvantages by obtaining officers and crew through: 7.1.3.2.1 direct employment by a shipping company 7.1.3.2.2 employment through a national organization 7.1.3.2.3 employment through a trade union 7.1.3.2.4 employment through an agency 7.1.3.3 suggest an efficient system for employing Filipino seafarers; 7.1.3.4 state why conditions of service can vary between countries and between companies; 7.1.3.5 state how officers and crew can obtain the necessary training appropriate to their duties and who is responsible for the competence of the seafarers.

7.2

Organization of Staff

7.2.1 Manning arrangements 7.2.2 state the basic principles upon which the safe manning document is based and the conditions for changes. 7.2.3 Organizing for safety and emergencies 7.2.3.1 evaluate the contingency plan of the schools and suggest if necessary, appropriate changes; 7.2.3.2 explain how the Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan (SOPEP) is functioning. 7.2.4 Organizing for operation and maintenance 7.2.4.1 state the main functions of the personnel required in the ships Safe Manning Document; 7.2.4.2 explain the purpose, benefits, disadvantages and problems encountered of dual-purpose officers and general-purpose ratings. 7.2.5 Communication on board 7.2.5.1 explain the considerations to be given to the following elements of a meeting: 7.2.5.1.1 the purpose 7.2.5.1.2 the agenda 7.2.5.1.3 preparations 7.2.5.1.4 chairing 7.2.5.1.5 voting 7.2.5.1.6 decisions 7.2.5.1.7 minutes 7.2.5.2 conduct a meeting for his/her classmates.
D65 PERSMAN page 2 of 4

7.3

Training on Board Ships

7.3.1 Training methods 7.3.1.1 explain the purpose of on-board training; 7.3.1.2 describe the preparation needed before the start of a training session; 7.3.1.3 conduct a training session to other members of the class; 7.3.1.4 explain how the shipboard training can be integrated in the ships work plan; 7.3.2 Familiarization training 7.3.2.1 explain the purpose of familiarization training and how this training shall be conducted. 7.3.3 Organizing shipboard training 7.3.3.1 state the measures to be taken by the school to ensure that the shipboard training will be properly conducted and approved; 7.3.3.2 explain how the ISFs Training Record Book, approved by CHED, shall be used; 7.3.3.3 state considerations to be taken to ensure that competence evaluation will be based on the criteria for proper performance without any kind of face-like/ dislike aspects.

7.4 Protection and Safety of Passengers 7.4.1 states that some crew members will be assigned specific studies for the mustering and control of passengers 7.4.2 lists the duties as: 7.4.3 warning the passengers 7.4.4 ensuring that all passengers spaces are evaluated 7.4.5 guiding passengers spaces, stairs and doorways 7.4.6 maintaining discipline in passage ways stairs and doorways 7.4.7 checking that passengers are suitably clothed and that life jackets are correctly donned 7.4.8 taking roll call of passengers 7.4.9 instructing passengers on the procedure for boarding survival craft or jumping on the sea 7.4.10 directing them to embarkation stations 7.4.11 instructing passengers during drills 7.4.12 ensuring that a supply of blankets is taken to the survival craft

D65 PERSMAN

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8.

EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 Various videos on Personnel Management Shipboard Organizational Charts Fire Control Plans ISFs Training Record Book for Deck or Engineer Cadets, as appropriate.

9. REFERENCES: 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 IMO Model Course 5.04: Human Resources Management. IMO Model Course 2.05: Ships Administration. IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. Dela Calzada, Linic, Hilario, Andres, Quenkiol, Rafael and Templo, Aaron. Personnel Management.

D65 PERSMAN

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REFERENCE NO: D63 - SEAM 5 1. COURSE NAME: Ship Handling and Maneuvering 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the effects of changes in deadweights, draughts, trim, speed and under-keel clearance on turning circles and stopping distances, Effect of wind and current on ship handling, Manouvres for the rescue of a man overboard, Squat and shallow-water and similar effects, Proper procedures for anchoring and mooring 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 1 LECTURES, 1 LABORATORY = 2 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 1 LECTURE, 3 LABORATORY = 4 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: Seam 4 - Stability and Trim 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to explain the basic principles to be observed when maneuvering ships of various size, drafts and trim considering the effects of wind, current, squat and shallow water. He shall also be able to interpret the diagram of the Turning Circles and state proper procedures for anchoring and mooring. FUNCTION: F1 Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table AII/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES / OUTCOMES: The students shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 explain how a turning circle and stopping distance is affected by ship deadweight, draft, trim, speed and keel clearance; 7.2 explain the effects of wind and current on ship handling; 7.3 explain the purpose of using the Williamson Turn, the Single Delayed Turn and the Scharnow Turn and state how these maneuvers shall be carried out; 7.4 define shallow water and state how shallow water may be detected or experience on board; 7.5 explain the effect of squat and shallow-water during maneuvering and explain how these effects may be minimized; 7.6 state proper procedure for anchoring and mooring; 7.6.1 state proper procedure for dropping and heaving the anchor;
D63 SEAM 5 page 1 of 2

7.6.2 identify the different parts of a stockless anchor, anchor windlass and mooring windlass; 7.6.3 describe how to ascertain whether a ship at anchor is dragging her anchor or not; 7.6.4 calculate the amount of scope (radius of swing) available for the ship as the wind and stream changes direction; 7.6.5 draw a sketch showing the mooring arrangements of a ship alongside; 7.6.6 illustrate a vessel being secured to a buoy using an anchor chain and slipwire; 7.7 explain the effects of a right-handed screw and left-handed screw with reference to the forward and astern motion of the ship; 7.8 explain how a bow-thruster shall be used to assist in maneuvering a ship particularly when going alongside and rounding bends at slow speed; 7.9 explain the effects on a ship when maneuvering in narrow canals, rivers and restricted channels and how to maintain maneuverability; 7.10 explain how the rudder works in turning the ship towards a desired direction; 7.11 describe the techniques that are applied in handling the ship during heavy weather; 7.12 state the purpose of a lock and precautions to take when maneuvering near or in lock. 8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 Ship handling and maneuvering programs/software with appropriate hardware 8.2 Posters of River Bends Locks, Port Facilities Navigable canals, rivers, etc. 8.3 Diagrams of Ships Maneuvering Characteristics of a vessel; 8.4 Anchor and Cables 8.5 Drawing, Posters of Propellers and Thrusters 8.6 Ship handling maneuvering (CBT) 9. REFERENCES: 9.1 Danton, Graham. The Theory and Practice of Seamanship. ISBN 07102-418-3. 9.2 Mac Elrevey, D.H. Ship Handling for Mariner 2nd Edition. ISBN 087033-383-6. 9.3 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.4 Ship Handling and Maneuvering

D63 SEAM 5

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REFERENCE NO.: D64 - MET OCEAN 1. COURSE NAME: Meteorology & Oceanography 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the Meteorological Elements, Atmospheric Pressure Systems, Weather Reports/Recording and Reporting Weather Observations, Weather Forecasting, Oceanography and Waves 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 2 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 2 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 2 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 2 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITE: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The student shall be able to state how the atmospheric pressure is distributed around the earth and explain its effect on the prevailing winds and ocean surface currents, obtain relevant meteorological information from available sources, use shipborne meteorological instruments to make observations and forecast the weather. FUNCTION: F1 - Navigation at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table AII/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES The student shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 Shipborne Meteorological Instruments 7.1.1 7.1.2 7.1.3 7.1.4 7.1.5 7.1.6 state the basic principle of a mercurial barometer state the basic principles of an aneroid barometer read the atmospheric pressure from an ordinary aneroid barometer read the temperature from a thermometer state the function of a hygrometer state the basic principles of wind sensors, take and log ordinary readings of wind speed

D64 MET OCEAN

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7.2

The Atmosphere, its Composition and Physical Properties 7.2.1 describe the composition of the earths atmosphere, mentioning dry air and its constituents, water vapour and aerosols 7.2.2 draw and label a typical vertical temperature profile through the lower 100 km of the earths atmosphere 7.2.3 define troposphere, tropopause, stratosphere, stratopause, mesosphere, mesopause, and thermosphere 7.2.4 describe the main features of the troposphere 7.2.5 state the importance of the sun as the principal energy source for atmospheric processes 7.2.6 describe the nature of solar radiation, (scattering, reflection and absorption) 7.2.7 explain the effect on insolation of a variation in latitude 7.2.8 explain the effect on insolation of a variation in the suns declination 7.2.9 explain the effect on insolation of a variation in the length of daylight 7.2.10 define water vapour 7.2.11 describe the properties of water vapour in the atmosphere 7.2.12 define evaporation, condensation, latent heat of vaporization 7.2.13 define saturated air 7.2.14 describe the processes of mixing, cooling and the evaporation of water vapour, by which a sample of air may be brought to saturation 7.2.15 define dewpoint, absolute humidity, relative humidity vapour pressure

7.3 Atmospheric Pressure 7.3.1 state that pressure equals force per unit area 7.3.2 state that the atmosphere exerts a pressure on any surface placed within it 7.3.3 state that the atmosphere pressure on a unit area of a surface is equal to the weight of the air column extending from that surface to the outer fringes of the atmosphere 7.3.4 explain that atmospheric pressure decreases with height above sea level 7.3.5 state that atmospheric pressure acts in all directions 7.3.6 state that the basic unit of pressure is N/m2 2 2 7.3.7 state that 1 millibar = 10-3bar = 10 N/m 7.3.8 state that 1 hectoPascal (hPa) - 1 millibar 7.3.9 state that the atmospheric pressure at sea level normally varies between about 940 hPa and 1050 hPa 7.3.10 state that the average pressure at sea level is 1013.2 hPa
D64 MET OCEAN page 2 of 8

7.3.11 explain that the surface pressure rises if air is added to the column above the surface, and vice versa 7.3.12 define isobar

7.4 Wind 7.4.1 7.4.2 7.4.3 7.4.4 7.4.5 7.4.6 define wind describe the Beaufort scale of wind force explain qualitatively the pressure gradient force explain qualitatively the Coriolis (geostrophic) force explain the surface wind circulation around high and lowpressure centres insert surface wind directions on a map showing pressure circulation around high and low pressure distribution and indicates relative wind speeds at various places within thepressure field state Buys-Ballots law explain the method of estimating the strenght of the wind from the appearance of the sea surface, using the Beaufort wind scale state the factors, other than the wind speed, which affect the appearance of the sea surface explain the difference between apparent and true wind determine the true wind velocity by using a vector diagram, given the apparent wind and the ships course and speed describe the method of estimating the wind direction from the appearance of the sea surface demonstrate the use of a geostrophic wind scale

7.4.7 7.4.8 7.4.9 7.4.10 7.4.11 7.4.12 7.4.13

7.5

Cloud and Precipitation 7.5.1 explain that clouds form when air containing water vapour rises, cools adiabatically and becomes saturated 7.5.2 state the need for and define condensation nuclei 7.5.3 states that a cloud can consist of ice crystals, supercooled water droplets, water droplets or any combination of these 7.5.4 name and describe the ten basic cloud types 7.5.5 state the probable base heights of the ten principal cloud types 7.5.6 define precipitation 7.5.7 define rain, drizzle, hail snow and sleet

7.6

Visibility 7.6.1 7.6.2 state the visibility is reduced by the presence of particles in the atmosphere, near the earths surface define fog, mist, haze
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D64 MET OCEAN

7.6.3 7.6.4 7.6.5 7.6.6 7.6.7 7.6.8

apply the concept of processes leading to supersaturation to a classification of fogs as mixing, cooling or evaporation fogs explain qualitatively the formation of radiation fog, mentioning areas, seasons and reasons for dispersal state the effect of pollution on the formation of radiation fog explain qualitatively the formation of advection fog, mentioning areas, seasons and reasons for dispersal explain qualitatively the conditions leading to the formation of sea smoke, and typical areas where a smoke may be encountered describe methods of estimating the visibility at sea, by day and by night, and the difficulties involved

7.7

The Wind and Pressure Systems Over the Oceans explain qualitatively, with the aid of sketches, the circulation cells which would exist on a rotating earth, not inclined to its orbit of rotation around the sun, and with homogenous surface 7.7.2 draw the mean surface pressure and wind distribution over the earths surface in January and July 7.7.3 describe the characteristics and location of the doldrums, intertropical convergence zone, trade winds, sub-tropical oceanic highs, westerlies and polar easterlies 7.7.4 describe a monsoon regime 7.7.5 state the areas which experience a true monsoon regime 7.7.6 apply previous concepts to a qualitative explanation of the causes of monsoon regimes 7.7.7 apply previous concepts to a qualitative explanation of the weather associated with the January and July monsoons of the Indian Ocean, China Sea. north coast of Australia and west coast of Africa 7.7.8 explain qualitatively the monsoon-type weather along the northeast coast of Brazil 7.7.9 apply the concept of horizontal temperature differences to a qualitative explanation of the formation of land and sea breezes 7.7.10 explain the formation of anabatic and katabatic winds 7.7.11 state the regions of occurrence of anabatic and katabic winds 7.7.12 state examples of local winds 7.7.1

7.8

Structure of Depressions 7.8.1 7.8.2 7.8.3 7.8.4 define air mass explain the formation of an air mass define source region describe the characteristics required of a source region
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D64 MET OCEAN

7.8.5 7.8.6 7.8.7 7.8.8 7.8.9 7.8.10 7.8.11 7.8.12 7.8.13 7.8.14

7.8.15

7.8.16 7.8.17

7.8.18 7.8.19 7.8.20

describe the source-region characteristics of arctic, polar, tropical and equatorial air-mass types define warm front, cold front recognize the symbols for warm and cold fronts and identifies them drawn on a weather map describe, with the aid of a diagram, the weather experienced during the passage of an idealized warm front describe, with the aid of a diagram, the weather experienced during the passage of an idealized cold front define depression identify the depression on a surface synoptic or prognostic chart describe the stages in the life cycle of a polar front depression describe a family of depressions draw a diagram of a polar front depression, for both northern and southern hemispheres, showing isobars, warm and cold fronts, with circulation and warm sector draw a cross-section through a polar front depression, on the poleward and equatorial side of the centre, showing fronts, cloud and precipitation areas describe the usual movement of a polar front depression apply previous concepts to an explanation of the weather changes experienced when a frontal depression passes with its centre on the poleward side of an observer in the northern hemisphere and in the southern hemisphere describe the process leading to the occlusion of a polar front depression identify a tough of low pressure on a surface synoptic or prognostic chart describe the weather associated with the passage of a trough

7.9

Anticyclones and Other Pressure Systems define anticyclone draw a synoptic pattern of an anticyclone, for both northern and southern hemispheres, showing isobars and wind circulation 7.9.3 identify an anticyclone on a surface synoptic or prognostic chart 7.9.4 describe the weather associated with anticyclones 7.9.5 define a ridge of high pressure 7.9.6 draw a ridge of high pressure 7.9.7 draw a synoptic pattern for a ridge showing isobars and wind directions 7.9.8 describe a typical weather sequence during the passage of a ridge between depressions across the observers position 7.9.9 define a col 7.9.10 draw a synoptic pattern for a col, showing isobars and wind directions 7.9.11 describe the weather associated with a col 7.9.1 7.9.2

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7.9.12 identify ridges and cols on a surface synoptic or prognostic chart

7.10 Weather Reports/Recording And Reporting Weather Observations 7.10.1 describe the source of weather information available to shipping; 7.10.2 describe the information generally needed from ships to meteorological offices; 7.10.3 state the basic services provided for ships by meteorological offices and demonstrate ability to utilize this service to obtain relevant information; 7.10.4 describe the type of information received by facsimile machine; 7.10.5 describe the services provided for storm warnings; 7.10.6 use the ships code and decode book to decode a reduced report from a shore station and vice versa; 7.10.7 use Beaufort abbreviations for present and past weather including clouds.

7.11 Weather Forecasting 7.11.1 apply previous concepts to the interpretation of symbols and isobaric patterns on weather charts and facsimile charts; 7.11.2 apply previous concept to the interpretation of synoptic and prognostic chart to ascertain wind direction, areas of strong winds, clouds and precipitation areas; 7.11.3 explain how weather observations from a ship can be used to improve the forecast derived from synoptic and prognostic charts.

7.12 Oceanography 7.12.1 Ocean currents 7.12.1.1 explain the interrelation between the global wind systems and the current systems of the ocean; 7.12.1.2 explain the main causes of ocean currents, wind-drift currents and gradient currents; 7.12.1.3 explain the effect of evaporation and the effect of a wind blowing a coastline and how these effects influence the current; 7.12.1.4 explain the characteristics of ocean currents; 7.12.1.5 describe how to observe ocean current; 7.12.1.6 use available information and estimate the speed and direction of the ocean current for a given position at a given time; 7.12.1.7 explain the various methods of charting the currents;
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7.12.1.8

describe the main current system of North Atlantic Ocean, North Indian Ocean, south Indian Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and South Pacific Ocean.

7.12.2 Waves 7.12.2.1

explain the formation of waves; 7.12.2.1.1 explain why waves travel in group and describe the variation in wave height within a group; 7.12.2.1.2 describe how duration and fetch influence the significant wave height; 7.12.2.1.3 illustrate the difference between waves and swell; 7.12.2.1.4 explain wave refraction in shallow water; 7.12.2.1.5 explain how the decreasing depth in shallow water causes an increasing wave height and eventually breaking waves.

7.12.3

Ice on the Sea 7.12.3.1 state areas where fast ice is expected; 7.12.3.2 show the limits and movements of arctic and Antarctic icebergs; 7.12.3.3 explain the danger of sailing in ice and iceberg areas; 7.12.3.4 state the normal signs of being in an iceberg area; 7.12.3.5 describe the conditions in which accumulation of ice on ship occurs.

8.

EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: Aneroid Barometer Barograph Hygrometer/Psychrometer Anemometer Drawings/pictures of cloud formations Various drawings/pictures of the condition of the sea under various wind forces related to the Beaufort Scale 8.7 Maps showing predominant currents, and seasonal changes in different areas of the world (Pilot charts) 8.8 Facsimile receiver 8.9 Admiralty list of radio signals - Vol. 3 8.10 At least one fully operational VHF Transmitter/Receiver for radiotelephony and DSC, but preferably two sets 8.11 International Code Signals, including special flags and pennants and their meaning as one letter signals 8.12 One dedicated MF/HF Watch Receiver for the DSC distress frequencies 8.13 One dummy SART 8.14 One dummy satellite EPIRB 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6

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9.

REFERENCES: 9.1 Meteorological office: Meteorology for Mariners. London HMSO, 3rd Edition. 9.2 Meteorological office: Mariners Observers Handbook. London HMSO, 10th Edition. 9.3 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.4 Ahustin, Anthony S. and Antojado, Danilo S. Meteorology and Oceanography.

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REFERENCE NO.: D62 - MARPOL 1. COURSE NAME: Maritime Pollution and Prevention 2. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS: The course includes the MARPOL Convention 73/78 and their applications, Sources of Pollution, Prevent Pollution and Actions if Pollution is detected 3. NUMBER OF UNITS FOR LECTURE AND LABORATORY: 3 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 3 UNITS 4. NUMBER OF CONTACT HOURS: 3 LECTURE, 0 LABORATORY = 3 HOURS 5. PREREQUISITES: NONE 6. COURSE OBJECTIVE: The student shall acquire a working knowledge of the provisions of MARPOL Convention 73/78 and their applications and be able to identify sources of pollution, prevent pollution and take appropriate actions if pollution is detected. FUNCTION: F3 Controlling the Operation of the Ship and Care for Persons on Board at the Operational Level (STCW Code, Table A-II/1 and A-III/1) 7. COURSE OUTLINE: LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The student shall be able to . . . . . . 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 state basic principles on marine pollution prevention; list types and characteristics of pollutants and their effects; list common sources of pollution and describe measures for prevention; describe precautions to be taken to prevent pollution of the marine environment; 7.5 state the hazards of pollution to human life and marine environment; 7.6 describe anti-pollution procedures and list all associated equipment; 7.7 state the most important International Rules on pollution prevention (applicable to machinery spaces, cargo, ballast tanks and bilges); 7.8 state the purpose of the oil record book and make proper entries; 7.9 state the basic content of International Convention on Marine Pollution 73/78 and its Technical Annexes; (Marpol Annexes I VI) 7.10 numerate sewage and treatment plans; 7.11 classify oily water separators and oil filtering system; 7.12 state how to avoid and control the existence of any excessive oil in machinery spaces;
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D62 MARPOL

7.13 state the hazards involved from improper handling of petroleum products; 7.14 numerate safety precautions to observe when handling petroleum products and actions to take in emergency situations; 7.15 explain the consequences of OPA 90 for ship operation; 7.16 state considerations to be made and actions to take before any waste is disposed of, i.e. in special areas if dumped or pumped into the sea; 7.17 explain the purpose of Regional Cooperation on Pollution Prevention, Preparedness and appropriate responses to an incident of pollution; 7.18 state the most common sources of oil wastes, chemicals and other sources of pollutants and explain how these wastes shall be dealt with; 7.19 state the principal aims of the Shipboard Oil Pollution and Emergency Plan (SOPEP) and give a brief description of the basic elements to be included in SOPEP (Regulation 26 of Annex I of MARPOL). 8. EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, CHEMICALS, TEACHING AIDS: 8.1 Video on: 8.1.1 Prevention and Reaction to Marine Oil Spills The Seafarers Role 8.1.2 Drawings on MARPOL Equipment on Board 8.1.3 Oil Record Book and Ballast Record Book 8.2 Video on: Fighting Pollution Prevention of Pollution At Sea 8.3 Video on: Response Options 9. REFERENCES: 9.1 ICS/OCIMF. Clean Seas Guide for Oil Tankers. London: Witherby & Co. Ltd. ISBN 0-948691-15-8. 9.2 Instructions for the Keeping of Oil Record Books on Board Ships (MEPC/Circ. 111) 9.3 Gold, Edgar. Gard Handbook on Marine Pollution, Assuranceforeningen Gard, Arendal. Norway 1998. ISBN 82-90344-11-2. 9.4 Regulation for the Prevention of Pollution by Oil (IMO Sales No. 525 86.01.E). 9.5 International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). 1973, IMO Sales No. 516.86.14E. 9.6 International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Cooperation. 1990. 9.7 Protocol 1 of MARPOL 73/78 as amended: Provisions Concerning the Reporting of Incidents Involving Harmful Substances under MARPOL 73/78. IMO Sales No. 516.86.14E. 9.8 Oily Water Separators and Monitoring Equipment IMO Sales No. 608 87.10E. 9.9 Crude Oil Washing Systems. IMO Sales No. 617 83.08E. 9.10 Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks. IMO Sales No. 619 82.11E. 9.11 Format for Reporting Alleged Inadequacy of Oily Wastes Reception Facilities (MREOC/Circ. 160).
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9.12 Marine Environment Protection Committee Resolution MEPC 30(25) Guidelines for Reporting Incidents Involving Harmful Substances. 9.13 Assembly Resolution A. 598 (15) - General Principles for Reporting Systems and Ship Reporting Requirements. 9.14 IMO Model Course 7.03, 1999 Edition. ISBN 92-801-6105-9. 9.15 San Diego, Teresita, Obleplas, Lino Dabi. Workbook in Maritime Pollution and Prevention.

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