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Nokia 1100 charge problem Diagram

Nokia 1100 Charge problems. This problem is a common problem for this mobile. Here
is the diagram for Nokia 1100 Charge problems.
Nokia N 90 Keypad Not working

Nokia N 90 Keypad Not working Diagram for


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Showing posts with label All Mobile Repairing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label All Mobile Repairing. Show all posts

Nokia 2300-rm4-Schematics

The Nokia 2300 is a very basic phone. The display is black and white with very
low resolution, and there are few features. A radio is included, but it is mono only.
One of the biggest problems with the 2300 is the weird keypad design that uses
joined-up and overlapping keys. Not easy to use, not very reliable, and not
recommended!
Actually the Nokia 2300 mobile phone is owned by my wife. I bought it as a
birthday present for her. The result, I got more time to get hold of the phone to
observed and have reviewed it. SMS upgrade has gone too far these days
especially with Nokia phones. Superb audio quality can be expected from this
phone. I like the way the polyphonic ringing tone sounds of this phone. They're
distinctive and clear. You can download or compose melodies as well. The FM
stereo radio is excellent. A stereo headset comes with the package, great for
hands-free calls and music listening! I have no problem with the reception; it's
always in full bars wherever I go. Just one or two keypresses and you can have
the function you need. Of course not all functions, menus, and sub-menus are
available in this feature. We all know that phones are getting smarter and smarter
these days. And someday the function we thought just another trash of today, will
one day just useful as technology advances and that would be also added in this
feature. Over-all, the phone is a great improvement intended for low-end-users. If
picture editor feature has been added in this phone, then it would surely surpass
the performance of Nokia 33XX series, 2100, and 1100 phones respectively.
Download Nokia 2300-rm4-Schematics
Click to Continue Reading.........

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repairing

Repair NOKIA 3510i / 3530 Circuit

Repair NOKIA 3510i / 3530 Circuit

Connecting a nokia 3510i / 3530 display to the


parallel port:
The wiring is based on the wiring of optrex 323 and pcd8544-based displays to the
parallel port. As i didn't know of any other projects like this (with nokia 3510i/3530
displays connected to the parallel port) i had to chose a wiring-'standard' for myself.
Wiring
Signals:
+------------------------+
12345678
# # # # # # # # 1 .. /RES
===#=#=#=#=#=#=#=#== 2 .. /CS
+--====================--+ 3 .. GND
4 .. SI (SDATA)
5 .. SCLK
rear view 6 .. Vio
connector is visible 7 .. Vflash
8 .. Vout
N3510i

+------------------------+

Signal name PC LCD Signal name


---------------------------------------------------------
Data 0 2 4 SI serial data input of LCD
Data 1 3 5 SCLK serial clock line of LCD
Data 2 4 2 /CS chip select
Data 5 7 1 /RES active low reset
Data 7 9 - Backlight (optional, not on display)
Ground 18 3 GND Ground for printer port and display voltages
-- 6 Vio 1.8V chip power
-- 7 Vflash 2.8V display power
-- 8 Vout output of display-internal dc/dc converter
(Vout -> capacitor -> GND to avoid noise)

circuits:
connecting n3510i/3530 displays to the parallel port

Part list: Part# Type Value Annotation


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
R1-R5 Resistor 1 kOhm
R6 Var.Resistor eg. 100 Ohm or higher value if needed;
or simply a resistor with fixed value
C1 Capacitor eg. 0.1 uF for stabilisation of display
(0.22 uF or other values are fine just as well)
T1 Transistor eg. BC547
D1 Diode eg. 1N4148

Remarks:
R5, R6, T1, D1 are needed in combination with LED background light only!be warned:
without background light the display is hardly readable!
Vio ought to be connected to 1.8V but I did quite well without even connecting it.as
always: just because it worked for me doesn't mean that it will work for you!
i used the original SMD-leds from the Nokia 3510i cellphone. they needed some value
around 3.1V.as i didn't like to generate two voltages, i also connected Vflash to 3.1V
(rather than connecting it to the recommended 2.8V)and one again: just because it
worked for me doesn't mean that it will work for you!if your display dies in flames don't
blame me.

Hardware reset vs. software reset:


to save one wire it is possible to replace the /RES-wire through a R/C-circuit.
part-list is the same as above with the following exceptions: Part# Type Value Annotation
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
R4 Resistor 10 kOhm
C2 Capacitor 10 uF
Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | All Nokia Repairing | nokia disassembly | Repair NOKIA
3510i / 3530 Circuit

Repair NOKIA 5300

Repair NOKIA 5300

Nokia 5300 xpress music disassembly


Tools required: Torx 6 screwdriver

1) Run your fingernail around the edge of the front cover to release the clips which hold
the cover in place

2) You can now remove the front cover and your phone will look like below. Remove the
four screws you can see

3) Once you've removed the four screws you can lift away the metal frame which sits on
top of the LCD

4) You can now lift the LCD from the phone. The LCD is attached by a connected which
connects like a plug and socket. Simply lift it upward to unplug. You can now remove the
LCD

5) You can now replace the LCD. Reverse the whole procedure for reassembly
Click to Continue Reading.........

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5300

Nokia N73 disassembly

Nokia N73 disassembly


NOKIA N73
N73 DISASSEMBLY:

You are required :

1) New screen
2) Phone cover
3)Screw drivers
4)Plastic shim

STEP1:
Remove battery cover,Battery, Memory Card and SIM card.

Step2:
You should nowhave the front cover removed as picture

Step3:
The LCD screen is held in place by a metal frame which need to be uncliped around its
edge for removal.
Step4:
The LCD screen will now be lose and can be removed.It will be attached to the phone by
a ribbon which attaches like a plug and socet.Simply lift it upwords to unplug it.

Step5:
You can now lift away the LCD and replace with new.Revers the whole procedure for
reassembly.

S ee picture bellow>>

Read Click to Continue Reading.........


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disassembly

Repair NOKIA N95 (Slide Fixing)

N-95 Slide Fixing

Wanna fixing your NOKIA N-95 slide by OWN:


FIRST OF ALL THIS PROCEDURE IS NOT VERY COMPICATED BUT YOU MUST
GIVE SO MUCH ATTENTION. YOUR HANDSET CAN COUSE DAMAGE.AND IF
YOUR HANDSET HAVE A GUARANTEE THIS WORKS CAN CANCEL YOUR
GUARANTEE. ( IF YOU TAKE EVERYTHINK BACK I GUESS NOBODY WILL
UNDERSTAND )

NOW WHAT WE NEED FOR:


- NOKIA N95 WITH JERKY SLIDER.
- Scissors
- Tweezers
- T5/T6 SCREW DRIVER
- TAPE ( 3M OR SCOTH WILL BE FINE )

AFTER SET ALL STUFF THAT WE NEED. NOW WE ARE STARTING.FIRST TAKE
BACK COVER AND BATTERY OFF..

AS SHOWN IN PICTURE GO RIGHT DOWN SIDE OF THE PHONE AND SLOWLY


TAKE OUT THE WHOLE BACK COVER.
AS SHOWN IN PICTURE

AND TAKE ALL CAREFULLY,


NOW WE NEED TO TAKE OUR 3 SCEWS THAT SHOWN IN PICTURE AT THIS

TIME PLEASE BECAREFULL MORE, DOWN PART OF THIS SIDE HAVE A


IMPORTANT AND SENSITIVE PARTS.
AFTER TAKE 3 SCREWS OUT.

WE YOU OUR TWEEZERS TO TAKE BLACK METAL PART OF SLIDER ( AS


SHOWN ON PICTURE ) ( SLIDE PROBLEM COMES FROM THIS METAL PART
AND THE PLASTIC PART. YOU WILL SEE AFTER TAKE IT )
NOW GIVE ATTENTION WHAT YOU WILL DO NEXT, !!!!!!

NOW HOLD YOU PHONE LIKE IN PICTURE AND GENTLY PUSH UP, DONT
PUSH IT SO MUCH YOU CAN COUSE SLIDER BROKE ( OTHER PART IS ALSO
SCREWED AT THIS TIME !!! )
NOW YOU WILL SEE A SMALL SPACE AT THE MIDDLE OF THE PHONE

NOW WE WILL CUT A SMALL PIECE OF TAPE ( AS SHOWN IN PICTURE ) JUST


A SMALL ONE WILL ENOUGH. IF YOU USE TOO MUCH IT WILL NOT WORK
EASLY.

WITH THE TWEEZERS WE PUT CUTTED TAPE IN THE PLASTIC PART, BUT IN
PICTURE I HAVE MADE A MISTAKE THAT I FIX MINE YOU HAVE TO PUT TAPE
TOP OF THE SCREW HOLE NOT ON THE HOLE. AND PUSH THE UPPER PART
OF THE TAPE INSIDE OF THE SPACE.

THAN WE PUT THE UPPER PART OF THE PHONE AGAIN IN THE HOLE AND
PUT BLACK METAL PART .

WE PUT 3 SCEWS AGAIN AND PUT BACK COVER AND NOW WE HAVE
BETTER N95 SLIDER. Click to Continue Reading.........

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Repair NOKIA N-95

Motorola A1000 disassembly

Motorola A1000 disassembly


If you require a new screen, phone cover and screwdrivers, they can be purchased in any
Motorola Customer Service Center.

Tools required: T5 screwdriver

• Turn your phone over so the camera is facing you and remove the battery cover and
battery. Then remove the 8 screws (circled below). You can now separate the back of the
housing from the rest of the phone.

• Once you have removed the back of the housing, you'll see 2 more screws. Remove
these. You can now remove the front part of the housing from the main body of the
phone.
• Your phone should now look like the image below.

• Carefully remove the keyboard interface from he main board of the phone.
• Your phone should now look like the image below. Carefully unclip the connector (circled
below) from the main board. You should now be able to lift the screen from the main
board.

• With the screen removed, the job is nearly finished. There are five clips around the
screen which need to be removed (two of them are circled below)
• You should now have the screen separated, as below

Reverse the procedure for disassembly and it's finished. Click to Continue Reading.........

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Motorola C200 Exploded View


Motorola C200 Exploded View
When dismantling any phone, great care should be taken to ensure that no damage
is caused to any of the parts. Rough handling may result in severe damage of many
parts, and if proper anti-static procedures are not followed, electrostatic damage
may result in any electronic component.

Before commencing, it is recommended that the correct tools are purchased for the
job in hand - at the very least, you will require a Torx T6 screwdriver.

Please remember that this is an exploded view, and not a step by step guide -
however, so long as you're careful, take your time and follow the diagram carefully
you shouldn't have too many problems.

Click to Continue Reading.........

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Repairing | Repairing Motorola C200 | Repairing Motorolla

MOTOROLA-i450 FULL HOUSING INSTALLATION

MOTOROLA-i450 FULL HOUSING INSTALLATION

For example
1

2
3
4
5

6
7

8
9

10
11

12
Cheers !

Click to Continue Reading.........

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Repairing | Other Mobile Repairing | Repairing Motorola C200

Motorola L6 disassembly
Motorola L6 disassembly

Tools required: Torx 5 screwdriver, tweezers, plastic shim such as a guitar plectrum

• Removing the antenna cover:


1. Remove the battery cover, battery and SIM
2. Use the screwdriver or tweezers to gently pry off the RF grommet located on the
antenna cap (below)
• Removing the antenna cover:
3. Carefully use the flat end of the tweezers to release two latches on the top end of the
antenna cover, then carefully lift the antenna cover away from the phone.
• Removing the transceiver PC board shield:
4.Using the T5 screwdriver, remove the 6 housing screws from the phone. Set the screws
aside for re-use (see Figure 10).
5.Lift the metal shield away from the phone.

• Removing the housing:


6. Insert the plastic shim between the front housing and the chassis assembly. Slide the
plastic shim around the phone between the front housing and the phone to release the
housing catches along the sides of the front housing
• Removing the housing:
7. Carefully lift the bottom end of the front housing over the phone. The earpiece will still
be connecting the front cover to the rest of the phone at the top of the phone so be
careful

• Removing the earpiece speaker from the front housing:


8. Use the plastic shim or tweezers to separate the earpiece speaker from the front
housing
• Removing the LCD screen:
9. Use the tweezers to release the display module assembly latch located at the side of
the display module

• Removing the LCD screen:


10. Lift up the top edge of the display module
11. Carefully thread the display flex cable through the slot in the chassis assembly and lift
the display module away from the chassis

Replace the old screen with new and reverse the whole procedure for reassembly Click to
Continue Reading.........

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Mobile Repairing

Motorola MPX-200 Exploded View

Motorola MPX-200 Exploded View


When dismantling any phone, great care should be taken to ensure that no damage
is caused to any of the parts. Rough handling may result in severe damage of many
parts, and if proper anti-static procedures are not followed, electrostatic damage
may result in any electronic component.

Before commencing, it is recommended that the correct tools are purchased for the
job in hand - at the very least, you will require a Torx T6 screwdriver.

Please remember that this is an exploded view, and not a step by step guide -
however, so long as you're careful, take your time and follow the diagram carefully
you shouldn't have too many problems.
Click to Continue Reading.........

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Repairing | Motorola Repairing | Other Mobile Repairing

Motorola L7 Housing
How to Change Your L7 Housing
You will need a small flathead screwdriver or old sim card,
a Torx T6 screwdriver, (I found one at my local sears), your
L7, and the new housing.
So first we take our phone and our new housing.
Turn off the phone and remove the battery and
sim card. (It is a good idea to put on a semi-soft
work surface. I used news papers so as not to
scratch my slvr.)
Now take a small flathead screw driver and be very carefull
. . . or something flat and plastic so as not to chip the paint
(old sim card), and pry the antenna cover off starting at the
side.
After removing antenna cover, we will take our Torx T6
screw driver and remove the six screws holding the front
faceplate on?
After removing the six screws, carefully lift off
the camera cover and set aside?..turn the phone
over and either use the sim card or your
fingernails to pull the front faceplate off. It will
resist a little but try to pull where you removed
the six screws and it will be ok. This is what it
looks like when you get the front faceplate off.
?..Mine was kind of dusty so I used a can of air to remove
some of the dust?..Now just snap on your new front
faceplate, replace the camera cover, making sure you line
up the holes for the screws, and replace the six screws.
VERY IMPORTANT>>>>DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN OR
YOU WILL CRACK YOUR NEW FACEPLATE!!! Snap
the new antenna cover back on and replace the battery and
sim card, and then the battery cover and you are done.
Congrats because you now have a fresh new SLVR. Cheers !
Click to Continue Reading.........

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Repairing

Motorola Z8 disassembly

Motorola Z8 disassembly
If you require a new screen, phone cover and screwdrivers, they can be purchased from
Motorola Service Center.

Tools required: Torx 5 screwdriver

• Remove the battery cover, battery and the two rubber stoppers above the battery
compartment to reveal two screws. Remove these two screws

• Unclip the microphone cover (just lever it out with fingernail) to reveal two more
screws. Remove these screws
• With the two screws removed in the above step you can now remove the mic
• Pull the battery compartment away from the rest of the phone and you phone will
now be in three main parts, like below, attached by ribbons. The ribbons connect
like a plug and socket. Simply lift pull them out to unplug them
• With the ribbon from the battery compartment removed your phone will look like
the picture below
• Now unplug the other three ribbons which are attached to the green circuit board.
Your phone will now look like below
• Now remove the two black screws at the top of the phone
• Run your fingernail around the edge of the front cover where the silver metal part
meets it, shown below, to release the front cover
• The front cover will still be connected but will be loose enough to allow you to
twist it round slightly and access two more screws on either side of the phone. Pay
careful attention to these screws before removing them. They hold two brass
coloured metal clips in place which will pop out when you remove the screws.
Just make a mental note of their position for when you put the phone back
together
• You can now remove the ribbons which are attached to the top half of the
phone/LCD screen
• You'll now have the front part of the phone removed. If you are replacing the
LCD we advise you to buy a screen which comes with the entire front part of the
phone (sold here http://www.formymobile.co.uk/proddetail.php?prod=z8lcd) as
the LCD is glued into the front cover. It can be removed, as you'll see below, but
you'll need to glue it back in when you put the phone back together, which will be
messy.
• To remove the LCD from the front cover gently pry it away. It's glued down so
will peel away from the front cover
• The LCD is held in by clips around the edge of the metal frame. Bend the clips
back slightly to remove the LCD. Reverse the whole procedure for reassembly
Click to Continue Reading.........

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Motorolla | Other Mobile Repairing

HACKING YOUR MOTOROLA GSM


HACKING YOUR MOTOROLA GSM

Please notice: Information provided here may cause your phone to malfunction. Modifying the software of your
GSM Phone is only a personal choice and shown for amateur purposes only. Commercial attempts based on these
hardware and software may be possibly illegal. So take the risk yourself.
I always had a sympathy in Motorola products,
since my first computer Commodore64 were based
upon a Motorola CPU, and it is still assumed as the
best computer of all times. Although everyone who's
in favour of Motorola GSM accepts that these
phones are not physically as strong as Motorola
states (when you try to drop it on the floor), they are
really stable in electronics and software and have a
menu system which is 'engineer kind'. So I'm happy
with my Motorola and do not have at least a bit of
feeling that I'm gonna change my mind in the future.
Only wish that if there were much more features on
them, such as calculator, message sender identity,
counter of characters left in message editor etc. I
used to have a d460, which was much comfortable
for me, and now a V3690, which is even more
comfortable. Also my girlfriend has a V2288, we
preferred it for it's built-in FM Radio and elegant
design.

As I complain about some functional lacking of my


d460, was unaware that something I could take out
were already lying in my phone. We already know
that most of the GSM phones are came in different
models which have different functions, in fact
having the same hardware and even the same
software inside it. If there could be a way to modify
the software of the phone, then it may be possible to
have some features which were not included in the
original purchased version.

As I've searched the web to find something interesting about the phone I had (formerly
d460), came across many of the rumours saying that it is possible to modify the phone
software and enable some features which are hidden from the user. Traces lead me to the
Janus's web site, completely dedicated to the Motorola GSM. There I found information
and links to hardware and software required to modify my phone's memory. That's where
you should look for information, if you gonna do something like I did. It's the practical
information provided here on this page, so you should read through Janus's Motorola
pages to get familiar with concepts like 'Test and Clone Cards', 'Transfer Frames', 'Test
and Clone Modes' etc. Site has a link to a discussion list on Motorola GSM too, which is
useful if you are in search of a particular thing.

What I've found was that it only needed a simple adapter which would connect the phone
to the PC, and a software acts as Test and Clone SIM Cards to enable the editing and
transferring of the phone memory contents through the PC. When I had the chance,
brought the pieces of the interface circuit together, etched a SIM adapter to be inserted
into the phone, connected everything right and ran the emulator. All went right and first I
enabled the Engineering Field Options menu, permanent test mode, and then removed the
SP-Lock from my phone.

Although new phones are protected against such kind of attempts, I managed to enable
permanent test mode and keypad code entry feature on my V3690. Thus it became
possible to enable Engineering Field Options menu and others through the keypad of the
phone. But unfortunately SP-Lock could not be removed. I found some
software/hardware promising this
can be done on the web, but either
their software or hardware were
missing in their ZIP files. So the
following instructions are only
covers the modifications I've done
successfully. Again, these are
provided for informational purposes
and personal amateur use only. You
are taking the risk yourself.
Tweaking a memory content may
cause the phone malfunction, which
may only be recovered at a qualified
service, and even an electrical
problem (such as a short circuit,
wrong connection or surge voltage)
may lead to an unrecoverable failure
requiring a part change.

Here is the hardware layout of the operation. Interface circuit consists of three transistors
and six resistors and so simple to build. It prevents direct connection of the TTL
interfaces of both computer and the phone. Computer's serial COM1 port (usually where
a serial mouse is connected to) is used to connect interface with a female connector.
Phone's SIM socket is where the other end of the interface is connected to. A small SIM
adapter is used to ease this. It's a PCB board cut as the size of a regular SIM module and
contact points are etched on the copper side of it. I've used it as is on V3690 and V2288
and placed in it's credit card size SIM Card frame to be inserted in d460. Since the cables
won't fit in, I had to open the d460 and fix the card manually inside it. Lets start with the
preparation of the SIM adapter. First you need to have a 300 DPI printout of the sim.tif to
be copied onto a PCB. If you want a credit card size version to be used on a d460 like
phone, may use this one. After the etching process, drill the holes on it and solder the four
wires on it to be connected to the interface PCB. Using a thin ribbon wire makes it easy
to install into the phone. Taking care while soldering wires to the adapter PCB is
important, since a rough soldering may cause short circuits between the contacts of the
SIM socket of the phone. Just take a look at the illustration below to get an idea. First, tin
the copper layer with a thin coating of solder (do not overheat the copper, otherwise it
may be detached from the PCB). Insert the pre soldered wire into the hole while it's tip is
aligned with the surface of the copper layer. Then repeat the soldering to fix the wire into
the thin solder layer. If you do it right, there should be formed a smooth contact surface.

This is the SIM adapter PCB

Preventing a rough soldering

Interface PCB is more easy to create. Print out the pcb.tif at 300DPI. Etch the PCB and
drill the holes, then solder the components on. Transistors are not critical, as long as their
specifications are close to each other. Take attention to the lead order of them. You may
refer to my PCB Design Page for more details on how to create your own PCB's
PBC design for ASIM interface
Here is the completed interface and SIM adapter
You'll probably have to open d460 to insert the thick adapter with the card
Placing adapter in V3690 and connecting interface to COM1

With the basic skills of amateur electronic, upon completion of the parts (Adapter and
Interface) now you may be able to connect your phone to your PC. Insert SIM adapter
into the phone, connect Interface to the PC and run the SIM card emulator ASIM 3.1
written by the ANDROID. Notice that there are wrong PCB designs in the ASIM
package. So use the one I gave above. Apply +5V to the Interface (in fact it runs without
this external +5V, I tested this on d460, V2288 and V3690 successfully) and load a SIM
file into the emulator (preferably sim.dat) and start emulation. Turn on your phone and
enter the pin stated in the sim.dat file. By holding the # key for three seconds, your phone
will be in the 'Test Mode'. Note that if your phone is locked to a specific service provider,
it will ask for a special code. In this case, you may try to remove it (only on older phones)
or jump directly to the step: enabling permanent test mode. Now you can use test mode
commands described on the Janus's pages. Here you can find a copy of the list. With
clone.dat, you may enter into the Clone Mode and transfer frames from the phone
memory into your computer. I've backed up all five frames this way before making any
changes to my d460. But V3690 and V2288 only permits the transfer of first two frames
and even they are incomplete, so making any changes on new phones have much risk.
With the Medit software, you have the chance to translate the contents of the frames into
the human readable text. Here are some features added to my V3690, which were not on
the original state. It is also strange that V2288 has a Clock with Date, just like in V3690
and it is easily enabled by the keypad command ppp123p1p (letter p stands for the square
character displayed by holding down the * key)

V3690 in Clone Mode

After Permanent Test Mode is enabled, it becomes easy to use pppXXXpXp type
commands whenever wanted. For example use ppp278p1p to enable EDIT MUSIC
RINGTONE ... Please remember that enabling a function that does not actually
implemented on your phone may lock it.
Some of the enabled hidden features on my V3690, of course internet access is not
possible
Yes! V2288 not only have FM Radio, it also has the clock with date ...

If you carefully read through the user manual of the ASIM, you may try to transfer
factflag.bin frame into your phone to enable 'Permanent Test Mode' which makes it
possible to enter Test Mode by holding down the # key for about three seconds, whenever
wanted, without the need of the special Test Card or the emulator. Also you can remove
the SP-Lock from the phone (only worked on the d460, not on the V3690 and V2288 so
do not try) with the spunlock.bin frame.

Once the Permanent Test Mode enabled, you can shut the phone off, remove the adapter
and exit the emulator. Turn the phone on (with your own SIM Card inside) then use it's
keypad to enter the codes essential to enable Engineering Field Options menu:
ppp000p1p ppp001p1p ppp070p0p ppp113p1p . Now there should be a new menu item in
your phone's tree, 'Eng Field Options'. There you can found many parameters belongs to
the network, active and passive mode operating status of your phone. Parameters are
explained in detail on the Janus's web site so I do not include them here. Only a few of
them are interesting to mention here: While a call is active (it is determined by the timer
displayed on the screen, set by the 'Show time per call' menu option) enter the
engineering menu (you may call a toll free service to do this, but check if the timer is
displayed, otherwise a 'Busy, try later' message appears). Find the item 'TimeAdv' and
note the displayed value near it (for example: TimeAdv 08). Since the GSM system
works on a very high frequency, it is needed to adjust the delay of the signals travel
between the radio station's antenna and your mobile unit. Thus this parameter exists
which is obtained by dividing a proposed maximum communication distance of 35
kilometers into 64 units. It results in 546.875 meters per unit (practically accepted as 550
meters). With the example above it corresponds to 8 x 550 = 4400 meters and this gives
the minimum distance to the radio station's antenna from the point you are at. Since the
next step is 9 x 550 = 4950 meters, you can predict that you are at somewhere between
4400 and 4950 meters distance to the antenna.

Active cell parameters belongs to the current cell your phone is listening to. RxLevel
indicates the received signal strength of the active channel in dB. Cell ID parameter can
also be read from the System Parameters menu. This way you may have an idea on how
many active cells are commonly listened by your phone where you are living.

Active channel and Cell ID numbers

You may trace the six most powerful adjacent cells, which are candidate for a cell switch,
in case your current signal loses it's strength. There may not be six cells in the list all the
time, only detectable channels will be displayed. These may also not strong enough, for
example a message 'Not Synched' tells that the channel is detectable but the digital signal
cannot be decoded properly yet.

'Not Synchronized' and 'Broadcast Control Channel Decoding' conditions

Do not hesitate to e-mail me for questions that their answers cannot be found here or in
mentioned source pages. If you have more data on the subject, or achieve improvements
in modifications, I will be glad to receive information from you.

Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | HACKING YOUR MOTOROLA GSM | Motorola


Repairing | Other Mobile Repairing | Repair iPhone

Repair Motorola T-720i 2


The $25 package included ALL the plastic pieces for the phone (no screws or electronic
components of any kind) and express shipping from China. The fit and molding of the
pieces were very clean... a good sign that the piece we needed would fit :-)

For this repair, we needed to remove the frame with the broken hinge. This was the frame
surrounding the keypad. The only way to remove the frame was to disassemble the unit
from the rear. We were pretty sure the phone would come apart easily... we just had to go
slow and not force anything.

Once all the obvious pieces (back cover, battery, screws) were removed, we started
looking for catches and other things that "clicked" into place. There was one on each side
that held the frame in position. A gentle wedge using a flathead screwdriver freed the rear
frame from the main body... and access to the guts was granted.

The most important connector we had to locate was the one connecting the LCD to the
electronics (red arrows). Once disconnected, all of the circuit boards were easily removed
from the casing.

The keypad was in one piece and was easily lifted from the frame. We just had to be
careful not to rip the LCD connector when removing the kepad frame from the main unit.
The photo below shows a closeup of the broken hinge. It was now clear that the hinge
broke due a stress fracture resulting from years of use... we saw a hairline fracture on the
opposite hinge in the same location.
To re-attach the new keypad frame... we first threaded in the LCD connector, then slid the
hinge into place. We had to push down the pin using a screwdriver, maneuver the hinge
into position, and wiggle the frame until we heard the pin click into place.
We reassembled all of the components, replaced the battery, hit the power button, and
held our breath. We then heard the familiar T-Mobile tone as the phone came to life...
project completed.

Like any project... we did end up losing something along the way. If you look closely,
you will see something missing...

We have gone through a lot of cell phones here at RainyDayMagazine. Some because we
switched carriers. Some because we wanted the newer technology (built-in camera, web
access, etc...). Some because we just got tired of them.

A few years ago, we got a few of the Motorola T720i phones with our T-Mobile service
(...somebody here had a crush on Catherine Zeta-Jones) and have been pretty happy with
them.

A few weeks ago, for no apparent reason, the joint (see red arrow) on one of the phones
totally disintegrated.

T-mobile was no help... they suggested we upgrade to the new RAZR phone (which
amazingly enough, there was a one day special... how lucky for us!)

We thought it was excessive to toss a completely good phone just because of a bit of
broken plastic. So we did what any geek would do... got onto EBay to see what we could
find.

Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | Mobile Repairing - Motorola | Motorola Repairing | Other
Mobile Repairing | Repair Motorola T-720i

Repair Nokia 918p

• HammerPhone
• The Hammer Phone was part experiment, part product of bordom gone out of
control, part imitation.

• The experimentation part is with Rust-Oleum Hammered Black Spray Paint that
my brother had been using for one of his refinishing projectm and it so happened
that he had some left over when he was finished. The part of boredom gone bad is
a few weeks when saying I had nothing to do would be an understatement. I've
been living in a painfuly small, overpriced rental house in a fairly crumby part of
town after my move (that will be remedied soon after I post this). The miitation is
because of one of Dr. Bob's superhuman like mods, a Nokia Cell Phone (usualy a
fellow Mac Hacker like myself). In the mod he takes his phone and swaps out
every one of the SMT LEDs, which he said is like "soldering grains of sand", that
mod can be found here. Unfortunatly I haven't gotten around to ordering any 0603
packege LEDs to put into this mod (they will be blue, what else goes well with
techno black?)
• As is needed for any truly good paint job, I opted for a total dissesembly, which
was supprisingly easy. I shouldn't even bother with illustraiting the take apart for
such an old phone (Nokia 918p) but since I shot the film I'll go ahead and post it.
• First off is remove the battery. If you can't do this, put down the phone and never
touch a cell phone again, better yet don't touch any electronics with a battery
again. But if your like me and that just inspired you push down on the button and
slid it out.

• Now that the battery is out you're going to have to remove 6 screws, all of them a
with a small torx head (6 I think, maybe 8) I got a set of small plastic handled
screw drivers from wallmart with small torx heads and it works fine for these
small electronics. But anyways, 2 are holding the small piece of plastic with
"nokia" engraved on it the other 4 are holding the electronics in place. To paint the
phone plastics these are the only screws you have to remove so put them aside,
perferably somewhere where you won't loose them.


• Now remove the electronics. They are attached to the speaker, so you need to fold
it out to the right (looking from the battery side of the phone). Then pry the
connector out carefuly. This will free the electronics and you can set them aside.
You'll also want to remove the plastic buttons, the white sheet that are the
numerical pad and the power button. Again set these aside unless you want to
paint them.

• Remember that these are delicate electronics, with ICs. So make sure you store
them in an antistatic materal, I just used a memory storage bag I had laying
around.


• Now you've finished take apart, and you should have a thin faceplate, the battery,
and a small piece with "NOKIA" engraved on it that you want to paint. Some
people won't want to paint the battery but I'll deal with this in a moment.

• Unless you have x-ray vision you don't want that screen being painted, and to be
brutaly honest with you I don't have xray vision. I also did this at the spur of the
moment and didn't have a ton of painting supplies on me. No problem, I just used
some clear tape. two or three strips on the screen and a little egding with a sharp
knife and I was ready to paint the main part, how ever this still left the battery,
and I wasn't in the mood to do a partial mod.


• This wasn't even needed, but to quoite a wise individual "better safe than sorry"
and if the paint did slip down to the contacts I didn't want to deal with it. A couple
pieces of clear tape worked fine here as well.

• I don't have any painting photos, but what ever you use make sure it works with
plastics and RTFM. Easy enough, and cheaper, to do it right rather than twice. I
laid down two coats if I remember right, and then let it sit overnight. Then I came
back to reassemble, but first I had to take off the masking.


• I used a thin, nearly knife like flat head screw drive to probe for the tape edges
then just pealed it off. And it looked fine.

• With the masking removed, and the paint dried all I had to do was reassemble,
basicaly take apart in revece, just make sure the keys are in. The power button is
small and doesn't attach to anything and the key pad can come up on its own.
Nothing major tho'. Also make sure you reconnect the speaker. Just as a side note
I did come back later and hit it with a glossy clear coat for extra protection, but I
didn't mask anything off. The plus to this is that it got rid of a few of the nasty
scratches the phone had in the beginning.

• Now that its reassembled and looking great make sure you didn't kill it. I didn't
care about the phone in the first place as it was from an old service and most
places probably won't service it anyways.
• The next step for this phone is changing the LEDs to blue, and then seeing about
service for it. Still its a fun little project that helped save my sanity.

Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | Nokia 918p | nokia disassembly | Repair Nokia 918p

Repair-Nokia 3210

Nokia 3210 opening manual - just see how


it is simple and do it by your self.
Nokia 3210 is a cellphone that is very simple to desolder. Sometimes when we want to
install for example vibramotor, we must open it. In case if you got problem with it we
have prepared short instruction how to make this operation faster and without any
suprise.

Needed tools:

• Torx T6 screwdriver - you may buy full pack in our Store

• Pointer - you may use a small screwdriver too. Full pack ot TORX an pointer may
be available in our Store

How to do this:

• deatach battery
• remove two screw with screwdriver TORX-6 that are in bottom part of phone
(one in left and second in right corner of phone)

• desolder antenna with pointer (you may pull it form right of left side but be cerfull
to not demage clips)
• remove next two screws that were under antena and use pointer to pull up metal
cover (pull it up near SIM slot). Remove it.

• you may now see PCB (Printed Circuit Board) of phone.

Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | Nokia 3210 | nokia disassembly | Repair Nokia 3210

Repair Nokia 3210

DISCLAIMER:
THIS IS EXPERIMENTAL SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE. USE AT YOUR OWN
RISK. THE MAINTAINER(S) OF THESE PAGES AND THE DEVELOPER(S) OF
SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE PRESENTED ON THESE PAGES CAN NOT BE
HELD LIABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES FOR DAMAGE TO HARDWARE
OR SOFTWARE, LOST DATA, OR OTHER DIRECT OR INDIRECT DAMAGE
RESULTING FROM THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE OR HARDWARE. IF YOU DO
NOT AGREE TO THESE CONDITIONS, YOU ARE NOT PERMITTED TO USE OR
FURTHER DISTRIBUTE THIS SOFTWARE OR TO USE ANY TEMPLATES FOR
BUILDING HARDWARE PRESENTED HERE.

• this page deals with connecting an pcd8544-based display to a parallel port and
drive it using serdisplib
• i'm not responsible for the content of external web pages
• external web pages will generally open in separate browser windows or tabs
• english is not my native language. please keep that in mind (corrections of english
grammar and formulations are very welcome!)
• email: mrwastl at users.sourceforge.net

pcd8544-based displays (+ compliant ones):

description

pcd8544-based displays can be found in some monochrome nokia-cellphones. with


some technical skills, an independant, small display with background light can be gained
out of these phones at hardly any costs.
specifications
resolution 84x48
colours monochrome
controller pcd8544
no, but with some skills the background light (4 to 6 LEDs, green) laying
backlight
on the cellphone board can be used
adjustable
yes, programmable
contrast
LPH7366: module: 38.4 x 33 mm, display area: 29 x 19.5 mm (datasheet)
dimensions
LPH7779: module: 38.5 x 35 mm, display area: 30 x 22 mm (measured)
names in PCD8544 ... generic for LPH7366, LPH7677, and LPH7779; no backlight
serdisplib ("WIRING=1")
LPH7366 ... LPH7366 only, with backlight support ("WIRING=0")
examples:

serdisp_init(sdcd, "PCD8544", "");


serdisp_init(sdcd, "LPH7366", "");
specifications LPH7690
resolution 90x60
colours monochrome
controller pcd8544 compliant commands
backlight no
adjustable contrast yes, programmable
dimensions
name in serdisplib LPH7690 (example: serdisp_init(sdcd, "LPH7690", ""); )

different display connector and board types

at least two different types of displays and circuit boards exist (i called them "type 1"
and "type 2", maybe there are even more).
different display models
model name (of display) type nokia cellphones
LPH 7366 2 Nokia 5110, 5120, 5130, 5160, 6110, 6150
LPH 7677 1 Nokia 3210
LPH 7779 1 Nokia 3310, 3315, 3330, 3350, 3410
LPH 7690 1 Nokia 6210
further ones (list will be updated) ...
(digits in brackets show the marks in the
following pictures)

• type 1:
o the display is connected
to the circuit board [2]
using metallic pins [1]
o leds are soldered on the
other side of the circuit
board [3]
o they enlight the display
through holes in the
circuit board [3]
o the display has 8 pins
o pin #1 is rightmost (rear
view of display,
connectors at the bottom
line)
o tiny cables could be
soldered directly onto the
metallic pins
o recommentation: design a
circuit board for leds and
display connector on your
own because the circuit
board can hardly be
recycled
o update: some displays
use a different method to
connect the display
module to the circuit
board: contact pads and a
separate "transmitter". it
should be possible to
solder wires directly onto
the contact pads or to use
an elastomer

• type 2:
o the display is connected
to the circuit board [2]
using an elastomer ('lcd-
connector' or 'rubber pad
with conducting joints')
[1]
o leds are soldered on the
same side of the circuit
board [3] underneath the
position of the display
o on the other side of the
circuit board there are no
electronic parts
o the display itself is
"clipped" [4] onto the
circuit board
o the display has 9 pins
(additional possibility to
connect an external
oscillator)
o pin #1 is rightmost (rear
view of display, elastomer
at the bottom line)
o the circuit board of the
cellphone can be
'recycled' by simply
cutting out the interesting
part (see picture below)

different display types in bigger view + pin 1 positions


ad type 2: recycling the circuit board using a 'dremel' (or similar). red lines indicate where
to cut through

ad type 2: i used a flex cable because i damaged the connector pad. as all leds are wired
together, you only have to find two positions where to solder the wires so that the leds can
be connected. i drilled two tiny holes through the circuit board (red arrows) and soldered a
wire directly to a cathode and the other wire to an anode

some images

type 2 display finished and working output generated by graphlcd


top ^

connecting a pcd8544-based display to the parallel port:

intro

the initial wiring is based on the wiring of an optrex 323 to the parallel port. as i didn't
know of any other projects like this (with pcd8544-displays connected to the parallel
port) i had to chose a wiring-'standard' for myself.
updates
2004-04-29
a severe mistake is now corrected: the pin-order was swapped in the photos (and
at two positions in the description)!
when you look at the display in rear view with connectors at the bottom-line, pin
1 is rightmost (not leftmost)!

but: ascii arts in the source code of the library (serdisp_specific_pcd8544.h)


did not contain this mistake!

2004-11-28
when reviewing the source code i noticed that signal 'CS' is never used and may
be safely connected to GND. i updated circuits and descriptions to reflect this (CS
slipped in from optrex323 when i adapted it's driver for pcd8544).

note: the functionality of serdisplib is NOT affected through this update (because
CS wasn't used anyway)

2005-02-12
some pcd8544-based displays (especially newer ones) run unstable if Vout is not
connected. inserting a capacitor avoids this. thanks to Michael Bülte for
explaining this problem to me

added circuits using hardware reset (R/C-circuit) instead of /RES-wire

wiring

signals:

Type 1 displays

+-------------------------+
| 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 |
| # # # # # # # # |
| ===#=#=#=#=#=#=#=#=== | 1 .. VDD
+--=====================--+ 2 .. SCLK
| | 3 .. SI
| | 4 .. D/C
| rear view | 5 .. /CS
| connector is visible | 6 .. GND
| | 7 .. Vout
| LPH7779 | 8 .. /RES
| |
+-------------------------+

Signal name PC LCD Signal name


---------------------------------------------------------
Data 0 2 3 SI serial data input of LCD
Data 1 3 2 SCLK serial clock line of LCD
Data 2 4 4 D/C (or sometimes named A0)
command/data switch
Data 5 7 8 /RES active low reset
Data 7 9 - Backlight (optional, not on
display)
Ground 18 6 GND Ground for printer port and VDD
-- 1 VDD +V (? mA) Chip power supply
-- 5 /CS active low chip select
(connected to GND)
-- 7 Vout output of display-internal
dc/dc converter

Type 2 displays

+--------------------------+
| 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 |
| # # # # # # # # # | 1 .. VDD
| ===#=#=#=#=#=#=#=#=#== | 2 .. SCLK
+--======================--+ 3 .. SI
| | 4 .. D/C
| | 5 .. /CS
| rear view | 6 .. Osc
| connector is visible | 7 .. GND
| | 8 .. Vout
| LPH7366 | 9 .. /RES
| |
+--------------------------+

Signal name PC LCD Signal name


---------------------------------------------------------
Data 0 2 3 SI serial data input of LCD
Data 1 3 2 SCLK serial clock line of LCD
Data 2 4 4 D/C (or sometimes labelled A0)
command/data switch
Data 5 7 9 /RES active low reset
Data 7 9 - Backlight (optional, not on
display)
Ground 18 7 GND Ground for printer port and VDD
-- 1 VDD +V (up to 7.4 mA) Chip power
supply
-- 5 /CS active low chip select
(connected to GND)
-- 6 Osc external clock (connected to
VDD)
-- 8 Vout output of display-internal
dc/dc converter

circuits:
power supply for generating V+ needed by the following circuits

connecting 8-pin displays ('type 1') to the parallel port


connecting 9-pin displays ('type 2') to the parallel port

part list:

Part# Type Value Annotation


----------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------
R1 Resistor eg. 270 Ohm
R2 Resistor eg. 330 Ohm
C1, C2 Capacitor some uF not mandatory, for
smoothing input voltage
IC1 Var. Voltage Reg. LM317 (or similar) Vout should result
in > 2.7V and <>

remarks:

type 2 displays (lph 7366) have 9 pins, type 1 displays (lph


7677, 7779) only have 8 pins. both circuits are illustrated above.

R7, R8, T1, D1 are needed in combination with LED background light
only!

C1 and C2 are not mandatory, but at least C1 is recommended for


smooth power supply.

C3 is only needed if the display runs unstable (possible


erraneous effect: only every 2nd row is shown). thanks to Michael
Bülte for this hint

R1 and R2 affect Vout of IC1 and are calculated using the following
formula:
Vout = 1.25 * (1 + (R2 / R1))
usually (according to the data sheet of LM317) R1 should be 240
Ohm. i did not have such a resistor so i chose 270 Ohm. together
with R2 = 330 Ohm i get Vout = 2.7777777 V.
that is at the lower limit of the specification of pcd8544. so maybe
you should chose better values for R1 and R2.

i also tested a PJ 1084 (smd lowdrop adj. voltage reg.) as a


replacement for the LM317 and it worked fine.
attention: different order of pins!

hardware reset vs. software reset:

to save one wire it is possible to replace the /RES-wire through


a R/C-circuit.

part-list is the same as above with the following exceptions:

Part# Type Value Annotation


----------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------
R3-R6 Resistor 1 kOhm
R7 Resistor 10 kOhm
C4 Capacitor 10 uF

8-pin displays ('type 1') with hardware reset


9-pin displays ('type 2') with hardware reset

pro
one wire less
contra
display can no longer be reset by software

addressing
pages vs. rows:

the display is organised in colums and pages: 8 pixel-rows are combined to a so called
page.
as only whole bytes can be transferred to the display, a single pixel cannot be changed
without knowing its 7 'neighbour' pixels.
so a display buffer was introduced in the library. pixel changes are all done in this buffer
and in a separate step only changed 'page bytes' are transferred (using an optimising
algorithm) to the display.
Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | nokia disassembly | Repair Nokia 3210

Repair Nokia 3310

Nokia 3310
Needed tools:

• One T6X50mm or A5 screwdriver,


• one straight plier.

• Press the battery button of lower back cover, push out the battery back cover.

• Take apart battery button with your thumb pushing hardly and take out battery.
• Remove front cover.

• Unscrew six pieces fixed bolt of front panel with T6 X 50mm or A5 screwdriver.

• Remove six pieces plastic button of front panel with plier.


• Take out front panel.

• Take out man PWB.

• Push out shield cover.


• The operation is over

Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | Mobile Repairing | Nokia 3310 | nokia disassembly |
Repair Nokia 3310

Repair Nokia 3310 Strobo Phone

Strobo-phone

I was bored one day so I opened my mobile-phone, looked at it and then I thought for myself: where's the
vibrator? I look at the top-part of the phone and I decided that I would try to open that little lid. To my
surprise there wasn't any vibrator there, as I thought there would be. Ok...it must be at the lower-part of the
mobile...No idea to open the whole mobile just to see it so, I didn't bother to do that. Instead I look at the
surprisingly huge free space in the phone. I looked at the insides-side and thought: a LED would fit there
and it isn't far from a power-source. Said and done, I started to make a mod.
Here you can get inspiration and, I hope, instructions how to make this mod or a similar.
Here you can see my mobile-phone, a 3310, opened. This mode probably will work on the 3330 too. I
haven't tried. If you have, send me an email about it.

That piece of plastic with "NOKIA" written on is a lid. As I said earlier I opened it. The best way to open it
is to take a screwdriver and open it under the "NOKIA"-text (marked green). But I warn you, there are two
hooks (marked red) that can easily break if you bend the lid up instead of lifting the lid up. I made that
mistake and broke one of them.

Here you can see the phone with the lid opened. The lids backside is covered by a metal-plate, this is
actually a part of the antenna. The plate make the antenna bigger, well you probably understand how it all
works. You can also see the hole and the "surprisingly huge free space". The metal-plate with holes are
connected with the battery in some way, so be careful that no wires or other things touch the plate, it might
short circuit your phone and destroy it, and we don't want that to happen.
Here's the phone from the side. I have drilled and filed the hole so it would fit the LED. Remember to do
the hole smaller then the LED so that you don't need to glue the LED. Make also sure that you don't drill or
file in any of the phones components.

Time for the electronic-part! I'm using a blinking LED with a build-in resistor plus an external resistor. The
external resistor is at 180 ohm. I take power directly from the battery. The correct way to do this is by
connecting the LED with the outer pins. The + pole to the left and the - pole to the right. The battery gives
~4 Volts when it's fully loaded. Remember to calculate how much resistance you must have, so that you
don't burn up your LED!
NOTE: I noticed that if you don't connect the LED the way I have done it the phone goes nuts! The phone
thinks that the battery is full and won't let it get recharged when the batteries finally are empty.

When you're done with the wiring you should put a piece of tape over the hole so that the wires don't touch
the metal-plate on the lid and disturb or damage the phones antenna or worse: the whole phone.
The lid is in place and the battery is in place.

NOTE: if you do this mod exactly as I have done it the LED will ALWAYS be on, even if the phone is
shutdown. This will affect the battery's standby-time. The only thing you can do to shut it off is to
disconnect it under the lid or remove the battery.

Now it's time to do a window so that you and others can see the LED even with the
covers on. I just filed a window, taped both sides and then filled the space between
the tapes with Epoxy, which dries totally clean.

Well, here it is:


THE FINAL PRODUCT

When I had the Epoxy already finish-mixed I took the opportunity to add a thing to
the backside of my phone. Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | Mobile Repairing | Nokia 3310 Strobo Phone | nokia
disassembly | Repair Nokia 3310 | Strobo Phone

Repair Nokia 3510i / 3530

disclaimer / info:
DISCLAIMER:
THIS IS EXPERIMENTAL SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE. USE AT YOUR OWN
RISK. THE MAINTAINER(S) OF THESE PAGES AND THE DEVELOPER(S) OF
SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE PRESENTED ON THESE PAGES CAN NOT BE
HELD LIABLE UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES FOR DAMAGE TO HARDWARE
OR SOFTWARE, LOST DATA, OR OTHER DIRECT OR INDIRECT DAMAGE
RESULTING FROM THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE OR HARDWARE. IF YOU DO
NOT AGREE TO THESE CONDITIONS, YOU ARE NOT PERMITTED TO USE OR
FURTHER DISTRIBUTE THIS SOFTWARE OR TO USE ANY TEMPLATES FOR
BUILDING HARDWARE PRESENTED HERE.

• this page deals with connecting an s1d 15g14-based display (found in nokia
3510i/3530 cellphones) to a parallel port and drive it using serdisplib
• i'm not responsible for the content of external web pages
• external web pages will generally open in separate browser windows or tabs
• english is not my native language. please keep that in mind (corrections of english
grammar and formulations are very welcome!)
• email: mrwastl at users.sourceforge.net

s1d 15g14:

nota bene

colour-mode displays require a rather high throughput which isn't provided by parallel
ports. because of this the update speed is not very fast!

description

s1d15g14-based displays used in nokia 3510i / 3530 cellphones.


specifications
resolution 97x65
colours 256, 4096
controller S1D15G14
adjustable contrast yes
"N3510I" , "N3530" (example: serdisp_init(sdcd, "N3510I",
name in serdisplib
""); )

some images
output generated by graphlcd output generated by graphlcd
(standard settings: white background, (inverted, drawing colour yellow results in
black drawing colour) light blue when inverted)

shadow man (© by redhat) rendered by daggett from angry beavers (© by


multidisplay nickelodeon), rendered using multidisplay

image (gwen stefani) displayed using test output generated by multidisplay on a


multidisplay solaris 10 box
top ^

connecting a nokia 3510i / 3530 display to the parallel port:

intro
the wiring is based on the wiring of optrex 323 and pcd8544-based displays to the
parallel port. as i didn't know of any other projects like this (with nokia 3510i/3530
displays connected to the parallel port) i had to chose a wiring-'standard' for myself.

wiring

signals:

+------------------------+
| 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 |
| # # # # # # # # | 1 .. /RES
| ===#=#=#=#=#=#=#=#== | 2 .. /CS
+--====================--+ 3 .. GND
| | 4 .. SI
(SDATA)
| | 5 .. SCLK
| rear view | 6 .. Vio
| connector is visible | 7 .. Vflash
| | 8 .. Vout
| N3510i |
| |
+------------------------+

Signal name PC LCD Signal name


---------------------------------------------------------
Data 0 2 4 SI serial data input of LCD
Data 1 3 5 SCLK serial clock line of LCD
Data 2 4 2 /CS chip select
Data 5 7 1 /RES active low reset
Data 7 9 - Backlight (optional, not on
display)
Ground 18 3 GND Ground for printer port and
display voltages
-- 6 Vio 1.8V chip power
-- 7 Vflash 2.8V display power
-- 8 Vout output of display-internal
dc/dc converter
(Vout -> capacitor -> GND
to avoid noise)

circuits:
connecting n3510i/3530 displays to the parallel port

part list:

Part# Type Value Annotation


----------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------
R1-R5 Resistor 1 kOhm
R6 Var.Resistor eg. 100 Ohm or higher value if
needed;
or simply a
resistor with fixed value
C1 Capacitor eg. 0.1 uF for stabilisation
of display
(0.22 uF or other
values are fine just as well)
T1 Transistor eg. BC547
D1 Diode eg. 1N4148

remarks:

R5, R6, T1, D1 are needed in combination with LED background light only!
be warned: without background light the display is hardly readable!
Vio ought to be connected to 1.8V but I did quite well without even connecting it.
as always: just because it worked for me doesn't mean that it will work for you!
i used the original SMD-leds from the Nokia 3510i cellphone. they needed some value
around 3.1V.
as i didn't like to generate two voltages, i also connected Vflash to 3.1V (rather than
connecting it to the recommended 2.8V)

and one again: just because it worked for me doesn't mean that it will work for you!
if your display dies in flames don't blame me.
hardware reset vs. software reset:

to save one wire it is possible to replace the /RES-wire through a R/C-circuit.

part-list is the same as above with the following exceptions:

Part# Type Value Annotation


----------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------
R4 Resistor 10 kOhm
C2 Capacitor 10 uF

connecting n3510i/3530 displays using hardware reset

pro
one wire less
contra
display can no longer be reset by software
Click to Continue Reading.........

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Labels: All Mobile Repairing | Mobile Repairing | nokia disassembly | Repair Nokia
3510i / 3530

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