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Punctuation T ips: Part 1

Using cue words and flip checks

Commas & Cue Words :

If you start a sentence with ANY of the following words, you will most likely need to use a comma in your sentence. With that said, you will typically need to place the comma after the CUE words below:

Yesterday

Mostly

I, (subjects name), Anyway

Today

Usually

Of course

Well

Tomorrow

Often

Nonetheless Occasionally

Monday (or any day ) Additionally

Furthermore

Sometimes

Nevertheless

Suddenly

Therefore

Also

Yet

First

In conclusion

However

Later

Lastly

Thus

One day

Somehow

Finally

Hence

So

Someday

Next

Subsequently

Thus far

Anyhow

Then

Afterward

Everyday

Example 1: Yesterday , a young boy found a lost puppy.

Commas & Cue Words ( that begin a dependent clause ) :

The words found in the following list will also “cue” a comma ; however, the comma will need to be placed after the dependent clause .

Every time

Unless

During

Given that

Wherever

Even though

Throughout

On

When

As

While

After

Whenever

B y

With

Because

If

To

Within

Although

Since

For

Rather

Seeing that

In

Instead

Once

At

Due to

However

From

Before

Following

Except

Apart from

Including

Example 1: Instead of writing a story, he wrote a short summary.

Commas & Flip Checks :

If you are unsure about where the comma is placed, try flipping the independent clause to the beginning.

Example: Whenever we watch television , my dad steals the remote control. Flip Check : My dad steals the remote control whenever we watch television .

Punctuation Tips: Part 2

Using Commas, Semi - Colons, and Conjunc tions

Commas with Coordinating Conjunctions

Use a comma after the independent clause when using one of the following coordinating conjunctions: and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet. For example:

I am going home, and I intend to stay there.

It rained heavily during the afternoon, but we managed to have our picnic anyway.

They couldn't make it to the summit and back before dark, so they decided to camp for the night.

Semicolons

Use a semicolon when you link two independent clauses without coordinating conjunctions. For example:

I am going home; I intend to stay there.

It rained heavily during the afternoon; we managed to have our picnic anyway.

They couldn't make it to the summit and back before dark; they decided to camp for the night.

Semicolons & Commas with Conjunctive Adverbs

You can also use a semicolon when you join two independent clauses together with one of the following conjunctive adverbs (adverbs that join independent clauses):

however, moreover, therefore, consequently, otherwise, nevertheless, thus.

I am going home; moreover, I intend to stay there.

It rained heavily during the afternoon; however, we managed to have our picnic anyway.

They couldn't make it to the summit and back before dark; therefore, they decided to camp for the night.