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- R{ee Raman

"R aju, why do you


always get so dirty?" his
mother demanded.
"Well," answered Raju,
"I'm a lot closer to the ground
than you are."

The doctor was repeating
his instructions to the patient.
"The red pills are for your
heart, the blue ones are for
your liver, and the white ones
are for the swelling in your
feet. Have you understood
clearly?"
The patient answered, "It's
all clear to me, doctor. I only
hope the pills understand
where they're supposed to
go!"

At di nner, Nitin was
continually reaching out and
helping himself to the
dishes he wanted,
instead of
asking for
the dishes to be passed to him
as he had been taught to do
At last his mother, unable t
control herself any longe
snapped at him angrily, "Niti ,
stop reaching across the
tabl e! Haven' t you got a
tongue?"
"Of course have,
Mummy," answered the quick
witted boy, "but my arm is
longer."

The young lady confided
to her father, "Dad, I met a
horribl e, rude man this
morning. Right away, I saw
that he was a troublemaker.
He insulted me, using bad
l anguage. He even
threatened me!"
''That's terrible!" exclaimed
her father, concerned. "How
did you meet this fellow?"
"I hit him with the car,"
answered the
daughter.
Inside
Fun with Words

Fox
Places of Interest
@ Bekhoo
Crossword
Jatayu
A Leaf out
of Literature
A Nasruddin
Hodja Tale
Logimagic
Lines that Rhyme
Young Arists
How to Draw
Philately
W Points to Ponder
Stories from
World
Mythologies
Quiz of the
Month
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
3
R ASHTR
A D EEPIK A
(
VOL. ]D NO.8 AUGUST Z]]
Publishers: Rashtra Deepika Ltd. (Since 1887)
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4
aughI8ISIh8U8SIWayIu
HaK8 SuH8Uuuy`S h8aII
U8aI.
-R. Holden
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
Find the animal
Inside each of the popular idioms given
below lurks an animal (in the blanks).
with
WORDS
Use the clues given alongside
.
to fill in the blanks and identify
the idioms. __ _
1 ) A _ in the grass: One who injures furtively; a traitor
2) _ sense: Sound common sense
3) Keep the _ from the door: Keep away povery or
hunger
4) A _ in a china shop: Clumsy person; one who lacks
delicacy
5) To get one's _ : To make one very angry
6) The _ 's share: The larger or greater share
/) _ 's years: A very long time.
Parlez-vous francaise?
So you think you're good in French? Put your knowledge to
the test by checking the list of French phrases given below
and matching each to its correct meaning (from the list of
meanings given alongside).

1 ) Faux pas Treason
2) Carte blanche Goodbye till we meet again
3) Lese-majeste A false step; a mistake
4) Maitre d'hotel Reason for existence
5) Au revoir Newly rich person; an upstart
6) Nouveau riche Freedom of action; complete authority
/) Raison d'etre Head waiter

(See page 97)
O MOM WMOW
AilrcO!wulcrwciyhs1. U1
1
kiOQs.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
5
6

.
,.
Aman bought a
new pair of trousers for
his school reuni on
dinner. When he tried
it out at home, he
found that the trousers
were too long by 1 0 cm.
He asked his
mother to help him
shorten the pants. His
mother said she could
not do it as she was not
feeling well and would
like to rest early.
So the man
approached his wife to
shorten his pants. His
wife said she was very
tired and had a lot of
work to do that night,
so she could not help
him to shorten the
pants.
Then the man
asked hi s daughter.
Hi s daughter
apologized for not able
to do it that night
because she hadl
Rashtra DeepikaChildren's Digest August 2011
agreed to go dancing with her
boyfriend.
"Ah well!" The man thought
and decided he could wear
one of his old trousers to the
reunion.
Later that night, his
mother thought to herself,
"My son has been very nice
to me. I'll just help him to
shorten his pants before
going to rest . " So she
shortened the pants by 1 0
cm.
Then his wife finished her
work and thought," My
husband knows | am always
very busy and seldom asks
me to help hi m. I should
oblige him today. " So she
shortened the man's pants by
another 1 0 cm.
His daughter came home
from dancing, and thought,
"Papa loves me very much
and when I declined to
shorten his pants, he was not
angry at all! I should help him
to shorten his pants." So she
shortened her daddy's pants
yet another 1 0 cm.
The next day, the three
ladies told the man that his
pants were shortened. He
tried them on and found that
his pants had become shorter
by 30 cm!
His reaction:
He laughed heartily, and
said, "I must wear this pair of
pants to show my
schoolmates that my mum, my
wife and my daughter are
such loving people."
At the dinner, his old
classmates were very envious
of his loving family. His
mother, wife and daughter
were very happy to learn
about his classmates'
reaction.
What would you do if it
happened to you? Very often,
many would have lost their
temper. L
Id YOU
ILOV?
|n u 1UU-ycur
pcri Od, u wulcr
mOccucspcndsvb
ycurs in lhc Occun,
ZU mOnlhs us icc,
uDOul Z wccks in
ukcsundrivcrs,und
css lhun u wcck in
lhculmOsphcrc.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
7
.
- Santhini Govindan, Mumbai
Most people enjoy
hearing, or reading a good
story. But have you ever
wondered how the writer
who wrote a story that
captivated you, got his or
her ideas? And what was
the writer's style of working
when he or she was
actually creating a story?
It's interesting that stories
of how writers work are
sometimes just as
interesting as the yarns
they spin!
Charles Dickens, the
most famous novelist of the
Victorian era, and the
creator of some of English
literature' s most
memorable and iconic
characters, had a little
notebook in which he used
to jot down all the things
that caught his acutely
observant eye. Dickens
had very beautiful
handwri ti ng, and in his
book he noted plot ideas,
character sketches, lists of
titles and names, and other intriguing things that amused or
interested him. Dickens loved to walk, and he ofen did so for
twenty to thirty miles a day, both within London city and in the
countryside, observing people, places and ordinary things.
Dickens was an insomniac, and on nights when he just
couldn't sleep at all, he walked around London, observing
things and hunting for ideas for new story lines and plots.
One of Dickens's eccentricities when he was writing was
to place objects on his desk in exactly the same position! He
also always placed his bed to the north/south direction, and
touched certain objects three times for luck.
Charles Dickens had a very harsh and
H0uld uhl
unhappy childhood spent in poverty, and this
is clearly seen in several of his books like
' David Copperfield', where he recreates
brilliantly and realistically, the tragic
atmosphere of his own childhood.
Dickens was passionate about his writing
- when he wrote the famous story ' A
Christmas Carol', he worked like a man
possessed, and put all his other work aside.
Dickens himself said that during this time, he
was, "like a mad man, and wept and laughed,
and wept again, " while composing the story.
In Dickens's book, 'The Old Curiosity
Shop,' one of the characters, little Nell, dies.
Dickens wept as he wrote this scene, and said
that while he was writing it, he felt as though
he were experiencing the death of one of his
children. The Old Curiosity Shop was
serialized in a magazine when i t first
appeared, and the story goes that tearful
people awaited the arrival of ships carrying
the magazine to New York, to know if Little
Nell had died!
The well known British writer Roald Dahl
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
9
wrote stories for both children
and adults. Dahl, who was a
fighter pilot , served i n
Britain's Royal Ai r Force
during World War II. A tall man
who towered 6'6" in height,
Dahl wrote in a rather shabby
and small shack that he
affectionately called 'the
writing hut', situated at the
bottom of his garden. The
main piece of furniture in the
hut was an armchair in which
Dahl sat when he wrote in
long hand. He always wrote
on speci al yellow (his
favourite colour) paper,
ordered from America.
Dahl went into his writing
shed to write for four hours
every day. Interestingly, when
Dahl was a schoolboy, he
excelled at sports, and was
considered to be very poor at
Did You
Know?
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cOnlinuuy ucrOss lhc
pu_c. Jhcy mOVc in u
scHcs O!ums, cucd
`!ixuliOns`, rOm Onc
cump O!wOrds lO lhc
ncxl.
expressing himself in words.
One of his English teachers
wrote in his school report, "I
have never met anybody who
so persistently writes words
meaning the exact opposite
of what is intended."
When Dahl was studying
at Repton School Derbyshire,
Cadbury, the chocolate
company, would occasionally
send boxes of new chocolates
to the school to be tested by
JhcwOrdcncycO cdiuisdcrIVcd!OmlwOLrcckwOrds
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cncycOcdiuwuswrillcn)LrccccuDOulZ,UUUycursuyO.
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1 0
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
the pupi l s. Dahl, like most
schoolboys, was thrilled with this
exercise, and dreamt of inventing
a new chocolate bar that would win
the praise of Mr. Cad bury himself!
This inspired him to write his
famous book, 'Charlie and the
Chocolate Factory'.
Dahl filled up a red exercise
book with ideas that he got for
stories or characters. But if his
exercise book wasn't handy, he
would scribble a note on anything
to remind himself - even if he had
to write in crayon or lipstick! Dahl
died in 1 990, and was buried with,
among other things, some of his
precious HB pencils!
Though Charles Lutwidge
Dodgson did not set out to write
for young peopl e, it was his
children's stories that immortalized
him. You have never heard of him?
Well, that's because he is known
by his famous pen name Lewis
Carroll!
Dodgson had a special
afection for children, and since he
had none of his own, he became
very friendly with three little girls -
the Liddell sisters - Lorina, Edith
and Alice. He ofen made up and
told these girls stories to amuse
them, and one of the girls
appeared as a character in his now
famous book, 'Alice's Adventures
Rashtra Deep
l
ka Chi ldren's Digest August iOll
in Wonderland'.
Dodgson was a
brilliant mathematician
and taught the subject at
a college in Oxford. He
wrote several papers on
the subject as well,
Interestingly, this famous
author never publicly
acknowledged that he
was the writer of Alice in
Wo nderla nd, and he
rarely signed his books,
and never gave away his
Churlcv
Lulndgc
0dgv0n
1 1
photograph! Dodgson had a
severe stammer, but he had a
sense of humour too - he
caricatured himself as a 'dodo'
who has difficulty pronouncing
his name in Alice i n
Wo nderla nd!
The famous French author
Gustav Flaubert shut himself
away in solitude when he
worked. He was never satisfied
with the words that he wrote -
sometimes, he took one week
to finish one page, and
agonised for days over the
phrasing of a single sentence.
Emily Dickinson the famous
American poet, dressed
only in white, and spent
most of her time in her room,
writing! When visitors
arrived, she refused to see
them - she carried on her
friendships through letters
which she wrote
enthusiastically. Dickinson
was such a recluse that only
a dozen or so of her
eighteen hundred poems
were published in her
lifetime.
Al exander Dumas i s
known for hi s adventure
filled historical novels like
c0rgc
crnurJ
5hun
1 2
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
'The Three Musketeers.' But it's interesting that
this great French writer never wrote a complete
novel himself. He would usually think of the
plot or main characters, and write some of the
important scenes or dialogues, but the actual
writing was done by his group of assistants!
Dumas however started each day in exactly
the same way - he ate an apple under the
famous Parisian monument L'Arc de Triomphe.
The celebrated Irish playwright George
Bernard Shaw never wrote more than five
pages in one day. He was unconcerned ..
even if the sentence at the end of the fifth
page was incomplete. He would leave it
unfinished, and complete it only the next
. day!
Edgar Wallace, British playwright and
author of crime novels i s best
remembered as the co-creator of the
immortal King-Kong. This famous writer
would start work on a new book only on
Fridays. On Friday night, he would have
a hearty dinner and start writing. He
would continue to write non-stop till
around ni ne o'clock on Monday
morning, by which time the novel would
be completed! Wallace neither slept nor ate
while he worked. He survived on countless
cups of strong tea that he drank while he wrote
feverishly.
Another celebrated poet, Shelley, had to
continuously eat bread, his favourite food for
inspiration when he wrote. The statesman
writer Winston Churchill's writing day also
revolved around food and drink! He woke
up at 7:30 and stayed in bed until 1 1 :00 when he
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
1 3
would eat breakfast, read several
newspapers, and dictate to his
secretaries. When he finally
got out of bed, he would
bathe, take a walk outside,
then settle in to work with
a weak whisky and soda.
Lunch began at one
o'clock, and lasted until
half past three. Dinner at
6.30 pm was considered
the highlight of his day, with
much socializing, drinking,
and smoking that sometimes
went past midnight.
Truman Capote, author of
'Breakfast at Tifany's' , claimed to be
5hchcy
a 'horizontal writer'! He said he would start the day by writing,
lying down in bed or on a couch, with a cigarette and coffee.
The coffee would give way to tea, then to other drinks, as the
day went on. Capote wrote his first and second drafts in
longhand, in pencil. And even his third and final draft, done
1 4
on a typewriter, would be done in bed
- with the typewriter balanced on his
knees!
The writer Ernest Hemmingway
wrote at least five hundred words a day.
He woke early, and started writing so
that he would not be disturbed by the
heat and noise of the morning. James
Joyce, one of the greatest writers of the
twentieth century, did not believe in
setting himself such word limits for each
day. He prided himself on taking time
with his sentences. There's a famous
anecdote about this. A friend met Joyce
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August 2011
in the street, and asked him if he'd
had a good day writing.
'Yes,' Joyce replied.
'How much have you written?' the
friend asked.
'Three sentences, ' Joyce said
happily!
The writing sensation of our age
has undoubtedly been J. K. Rowling,
the creator of the magical Harry
Po tter series. When she started
writing the first Harry Potter book, JK
J K K0nhng
Rowling was so poor she could not afford a computer or even
a typewriter - she lived in a cold flat which had no heating
because she could not afford to pay for it.
Rowling wrote her first Harr Potter book in longhand in
her own writing, scribbling the story in restaurants, and even
on trains. In fact, she got the idea for the first book on a train
trip from Manchester to London in 1 990. Rowling has said
that she did not have a pen with her on that trip, and was too
shy to ask someone for one, so she just thought out the plot
of her story in her head. As a child, Rowling was short, squat,
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 201]
with very thick
spectacles that were
like bottle bottoms -
that's why her hero,
Harry Potter wears
spectacles. The first
Harry Potter book was
rejected by several
publishers before it
was accepted by
B l o o m s b u r y
Publishing. And the
rest, as they say, is
history. .. L
1 5
a

t
'
'
".
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=

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0
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::
HurryApcrODDcduDunk.>yOckOxrccciVcduliplhulHurrycscupcdDyscu.>yOck
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lhclrickHurry Apcis lryinylOpu. OOyOu (See page 97)
..
-Prof George John Nidhir
To protect the City of Jerusalem,
walls and towers were built several
times, each time afer the destruction
of the city by some enemy. The wall
around the city, the citadel, has a
The Tower
of David
~Jerusalem
history of more than
two thousand years.
The walls were first
constructed d uring
the 2nd century BC,
by the Hasmonean
(Maccabee) kings.
When the western
side of the city was
expanded during this
period, this side had
no natural defense
facility. On the eastern
side there was the
Valley of Kidron which
acted as a natural
protection for the city.
So a tower and wall
were built to protect
the western side. In
due course this tower
came to be known as
the Tower of David,
after the legendary
King David. The Jaffa
Gate was the main
entrance to the city on
this side and the tower
was built near the gate
for observation
purposes.
Later Herod the
Great, the King
associated with the
cruel 'massacre of
innocents' built three
1 8
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August 2011
towers here (37 - 34 BC). The
towers were named Miriam,
Phatsael and Hippicus. Miriam
was the second wife of Herod,
buried in a cave to the west of the
towers. Phatsael (Phasaelus) was
his brother and Hippicus his friend.
\

The Romans destoyed the city


in '0 AD and used it as barracks
for soldiers. In the 4th century
Christianity became the official
religion of Rome and a community
of monks occupied the citadel. In
1948 the Arab Legion captured
Jerusalem, but in 1967 after the
Six Day War, Jerusalem came
under the control of Israel.
Now the Tower is known as
'Tower of David Museum of the
History of Jerusalem.' It was
opened in 1 989. The exhibits
depict four thousand years of the
history of Jerusalem. The
'permanent exhibition' illustrates
the City's history divided into
eleven sections starting from the
Canaanite period (roughly 3200
BC) to the British mandate of 1 91 7
AD. The site also provides
archaeological evidence of the
various stages of the long history
of Jerusalem.
The 'temporary exhibits'
include the invention and
development of alphabetic
writings, contemporary Israeli art,
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 201 1
Jerusalem after 100
years and an interesting
light and sound show.
From the heights of the
Tower; one can see the
Old City, the New City, the
Mount of Olives, the
Judean desert, the Dead
Sea and finally a 360
degree aerial view of all
these places. L

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tcud sO much` u
!ri cnd l uunl cd
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O! nO hc
|
IO yOu in
cuminyuVin

`
`!umnOIc

uculiny
mysc!lOOuViny,`
IincOnmudciIccut.
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whul IO dO wilh u
iVinyi!!cVctcunil.`
20
Oh yeah, there
is a cave where
once a sorcerer
tiger used to
live.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
Where's the cave?
There are only stones
here.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 201 1
21
22
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August 2011
GtDBBWDtM
- K.S. Geethavani, Coimbatorc
Across:
1 . Person employed to
drive a car or limou
sine (9)
5. Screen for a window (7)
6. Still waters run _ (4)
7. ' -and-shut':
obvious, easily decided
(4 )
10.Asia's longest river (7)
11.Lasting for or
happening every three
years (9)
Down:
1. Every _ has a silver
lining (5)
2. Red _ - largest
monument in Old Delhi (4)
3. e.g. (7)
4. Dilapidated:
_
- down,
neglected (3)
5. Capital of TamilNadu (7)
8. Relating to the organ of
smell (5)
9. Daze, shock, dumbfound,
astound (4)
(See page 97)
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
23
..
Zahir-ud-din Muhammad
Babur ( 1483 - 1530) i s
famous as the founder of the
mighty Mughal empire, which
controlled the destiny of India
for more than three centuries.
A military adventurer with
vision and audacity, he
clawed his way up from the
position of king of a remote
and small kingdom to that of
the monarch of a mighty realm
very far from his homeland.
He was no mere soldier, but
a man of imagination, a
scholar, and a writer of no
mean meri t. His
autobiography, Baburama,
is considered a literary
classic.
Babur was a descendent
of two legendary conquerors
- Timur-i-Iang and Geghis
Khan. His father, Omar Shaik,
was the king of Farghana (in
modern Turkey), a l i ttle
mountain kingdom. He
believed that he had a claim
on Samarkhand, the famous
city which had once been
ruled by Timur. He passed on
to Babur his dream of winning
the lost city.
Babur was only twelve
when he lost his father and
was crowned the king. He had
a difficult time, with many
enemies waiting to snatch the
kingdom from him. However,
he managed to foil their
attempts. Having
strengthened his position, he
thought of expanding hi s
The founder of
the Mughal empire
24
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August 2011
,kingdom by annexing Samarkhand.
In 1497, Babur attacked and conquered Samarkhand,
realising his childhood dream. However, his victory was short
lived. During his absence, Farghana was seized by some of
his own nobles in a rebellion. As he went to recover it, his
troops deserted him, and he ended up losing both
Samarkhand and Farghana.
Eventually, he managed to recover both the kingdoms.
But once again, misfortune was around the corner. In 1501,
his enemy, the Uzbek ruler Shaibani
Khan, defeated him and drove him
out of Samarkhand. For the next
three years, he was a
homeless wanderer.
At last, in 1504, Babur
gathered some troops,
and besieged and
captured the strong city
of Kabul. He thus gained a
new and wealthy kingdom,
and re-established his
fortunes. Over the next few
years, he made some
attempts to recover his
lost kingdoms, but
failed.
Finally, he
gave up all
hopes of
r ecover i ng
Samarkhand.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
25
li",[
r lh5 c\crmcnl.
hicsillinyulyOur
dcsk,iHyOuttiyhl!OOlOh
l hc ! OOr und mukc
cOckwisccitccs. POw,
whicdOinylhis,druwlhc
numDcro`inlhcuirwllh
yOurrlyhlhund.YOur!OOl
wichunycdirccliOnund
lhcrcsnOlhinyyOucundO
uDOulil. Amuzlny!
He then turned his attention
to the prosperous land of
India, which was then ruled by
the formidable
marched upon Delhi. The two
armies met on the plains of
Panipat. Here, on April 20,
1526 was fought the decisive
battle that has gone down in
history as the First Battle of
Panipat. In theory, the two
armies appeared ill-matched,
as Lodi's army was
considerably larger. However,
Babur was an able
commander; moreover, he
possessed firearms that the
Indians were unfamiliar with.
Twenty thousand men of
Ibrahim Lodi's army, including
Lodi himself, were slain. It was
a great victory for Babur, and
he was now the unchallenged
monarch of Delhi. On April
Sultan Ibrahim Lodi.
His chance came
when some of
I brahim Lodi's
kinsmen requested
his help to overthrow
the Sultan. He
mobilised his forces
and arrived in India
0HHt0 BHO 00D00
with his eldest son,
Humayun.
B a b u r
conquered the
Punjab without much
difficulty. He then
26
NCZ^ w/
N|(EjT
Y-'~F
= w~1F
I

Rashlra Oeepika Chi ldrens Di gest August 2011


27, 1526, he was anointed
the Padishah of Kabul and
Delhi.
But Babur's troubles were
not yet over; he had one more
formidable enemy left in the
valiant Rana Sanga of Mewar.
In 1527, the forces of Babur
met those of Rana Sanga in
the battlefield of Khanwa near
Agra. Although Rana Sanga
initially had the upper hand,
the tide turned in Babur's
favour when the Rana's
commander treacherously
entered into a deal with him.
The Rana's army was
defeated, and Babur was
now the master of northern
India.
However, Babur did not
have much time to enjoy
the fruits of his victory or to
set the affairs of state in
order. He died in 1530, at
the relatively young age of
47.
There is no doubt that
Babur was a worthy ruler who
laid the foundations of the
Mughal empire in India.
Though not as great as his
grandson Akbar who
consolidated the empire, he
definitely qualifies as one of
the greatest Mughal
emperors, whose magnetic
leadership spurred his
succeeding generations on to
greater heights. L
Rashtra Deepika Children's Di gest August :u:i
2
,
'
WIN
ATTRACTIVE
PRIZES!
TROPHY Game
M8llulIIl8I8nuS,
Hcrcisuninlcrcslinyyumc!OryOu-
u `un Lumc` lhul Drinys lO

Ou
wOndcrm yiUs.>O,yclslurlc

undwmyOuryiUs.
mdOulhOwmuny
smucr wOrds yOu
cun !Orm !rOm lhc
wOrd
28
LMX
TTEB0TVB EZBS
Two entries with the highest number of words will get a sur
prise gif. Besides, there are three consolation prizes, too!
So rush your answers on a postcard to:
The Editor, Fun Time, Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest,
P.B. No.7, Kottayam, Kerala.
NB.: Don't forget to put your address on the card Also please
don' repeat any letter more than the number of times it has
appeared in the word.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Di gest August :u:I
YnnCi8OI
8ADDLL Game
1.Anjunu KOruppulh,KOruppulhHOusc,PO.`1, LinlLunc,
Kunimunyuum!.,Jhrissur- obUUZ.
Z.LcclukJOsi,>ldNA,>l.JOscph`sNulricHr. 5cc.>chOO,
Juduumpuuyum,Ncllupuuyum,LOimDulOrc-o11JUZ.
J.AudyuPuyuk,ulPO. , slOOr,NrinduVunHuidiny
PO.1, HchindIdupiNihurHOlc,NumDui- 1UUUoJ.
1. Nunjimu Innikrishnun, !OOmimu`, KuruVisscry !!.,
KOzhikOdc-oJU 1U.
`.AnurujKrishnunK.>.,L/O>cVurujK.K.,!criyurNihur,
AmDuuppudy,P.O.A., Kuumusscry,Lmukuum-obJ`oJ.
Congratulations, dear young winners!
.......................................................
|
'I We invite you
to write/or
2 A 3 R 1 2 A 0 f f P | k A
Xour favourite magazine
the Children's Digest, invites
quality articles, features, sto
ries, poems, cartoons, etc. ,
from our young readers.
Please send in your pieces,
duly vetted by the Head of your
institution, along with your full
name, age, class and school.
Your stories should be typed
or neatly handwritten. We will
make all efforts to publish
your pieces.
Articles will be acknowl
edged only if accompanied by
a self-addressed stamped
envelope.
Write to:
The Editor,
Rashtra Deepika
Children's Digest,
PR. No. 7,
Kottayam-686001,
Kerala.
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Di gest August :u:i
29
JP1PYU
30
STORM SUBSIDED, AS SOON AS
THE BODY OF BIRDMAN WAS TURNED
INTO PIECES AND WERE SCATTERED.
THEN THE BATWING MAN TURNED TO
HIS ARMY OF BATS ..
31
BIRDMAN I YOUR EN! WILL
ARRIVE AS SOON AS I'M
RELEASE! FROM HERE I
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August 2011
33
`1
I _

P madcap
farce
Mrs. Horace Hignett, the famous
British theosophical writer on a lecture
tour in the USA, is an iron-willed
woman. Fearing a rival to her
supremacy, she i s determined that her
only son, Eustace, should not get
married. So far she has accomplished
this by keeping Eustace permanently
under her eye and not giving him the
opportunity to meet any eligible girl .
Consequently, Mrs . Hi gnett i s
shocked when an acquaintance
named Bream Mortimer visits her one
morning and informs her that her son
is going to get married within a few
hours to Bream's father's fri end's
daughter, Wilhelmina Bennett.
In bringing her this information,
Bream has his own axe to grind - he
is in love with the girl himsel f, and
hopes that Eustace's mother will
somehow prevent the wedding. And
she does not disappoint him!
Mrs. Hignett does not hesitate to
stoop to foul means to achieve her end.
She raids Eustace's wardrobe as he
lies asleep, takes away all his trousers
and sends them to the laundry, so that
he cannot go out, having no clothes to
wear! After waiting in vain, the furious
bride cancels the wedding.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August :u::
A chain of hilarious events
is thus set in motion. Shortly
a f terwards, Wilhelmi na
(Billie") Bennett, sailing to
England on the Atlantic, finds
herself in the company of no
less than three co
passengers who desire to
marry her. The first is Bream
Mortimer; the second, her ex
f i ance Eust ace Hi gnett,
coincidentally sailing on the
same ship, and the thi rd,
Eustace's cousi n Sam
Marlowe, who has fallen in
love with her at first sight!
What happens next? To
find out, read Three Men and
a Maid, the ri b-tickling
comedy by the master
humorist, P.G. Wodehouse.
Written in 1921, it retains its
freshness to this day.
V11 m1
P1 P mP11
.L.LLLMLLbL
35
[ 1 .
.
Ior once, Nasruddin
in his remote village,
struggling to make ends
meet. But now and then,
the Sultan would remember
him and send for him,
usually when he had
distinguished guests whom
he wanted to impress by
showing off Hodja's
erudition and wisdom. This
was one such occasion,
and he was a guest at the
Sultan's palace.
As the Sul tan's
Hodja's lucky star was on the
ascendant. For the greater part
of his days, he lived in obscurity
honoured guest, Nasruddin
Hodja spent his days in
grand style. His faded,
threadbare clothes had
36
o
V
been replaced by robes of
One Tick at a Time
ThcrcwusOnccucOckpcnuuumwuiliny
lODcHxcd.|lDcyun lOcucuulchOw Ony il
wOud Dc cxpcclcdlO lickduy undniyhl, sO
munylimcsuminulc,sixlylimcscvcryhOur,
lwcnly-!Ourlimcscvcryduy,undlhrcc1undrcd
undsixly-vccvcryycur.It wusuwm!LnOuyhlO
sluyycrlhcmind.NiiOnsO! l|cks!
`|cunncvcr dO il,`su|dlhcpOOr pcnduum.Hullhc
cOck-muslcrcncOuruycdil.
`OOjuslOnclickululimc,`hcsuid.`Jhulisulhulwi
DcrcquIrcdO!yOu.`
>OlhcpcnduumwcnllOwOrk,Onclickululimc,und
ilislickinyycl.
Rashtra Oeepika Children's Digest August :u::
the finest silk. He was provided an opulently furnished,
,uxurious chamber - a far cry from his decrepit village
house - where servants waited upon him hand and foot
all day long. At mealtimes, he got to partake of the choicest
delicacies, sharing the table
with the most eminent men
of the kingdom. In court, the
Sultan lost no opportunity
to praise him for his
accomplishments. Titles and
honours were heaped on him.
Seeing that he was favoured
by the Sultan, the courtiers
fawned upon him. They
flocked to him, seeking
his advice, and
l aughed heartily
even at his
feeblest jokes.
H o w e v e r ,
Nasruddin Hodja
did not let all this
attention go to his
head. He was fully
aware of the
transient nature of
his glory, and so
remained his usual
level-headed self.
A young
prince - one of
the Sultan's
relatives - was
observing all the fuss
that was being made of
Nasruddin Hodja. Was
Rashtra Deepika Chi l dren's Digest August 2011
37
this man really as great a
scholar as he was being
made out t
o
be, he wondered.
He decided to find out.
He summoned Hodja and
said, L Seeker of the Truth,
I would like you to clarify a
doubt for me. Tell me, why is
the water of the ocean salty,
while that of the lakes and
rivers is not so?"
He looked eagerly at
Nasruddin Hodja, awaiting his
answer.
Nasruddin Hodja calmly
[ 1 ..
PAINTING
PUZZLE
Mr. Ravishankar, the
wealthy industrialist, has
picked up four expensive
paintings at an art auction.
Each is by a different artist,
has a different theme and
is in diferent colours. Mr.
Ravishankar, who is in the
answered, "I am sorry, noble
prince, but I do not know."
The prince now shot off
another question. "All right.
Then tell me this, holy
m
an -
why is it that when you look in
the mirror, you can see your
right and left eye and ear
reversed in the reflection, but
not your face upside down?"
For a moment, Nasruddin
Hodja paused to take in the
question. Then, he politely
answered, "I do not know,
gracious lord!"
process of furnishing his new
bungalow, hangs up the
paintings in four different
rooms. From the clues given
below, find out the artist, the
room in which it hangs, the
theme of the painting, and its
colours.
1 . The painting depicting
a flower hangs in the
bedroom. The famous artist
Deepankar's painting does
not have blue and purple as
its main colours.
2. The painting of a forest
does not adorn the study. The
ship is not the theme of
upcoming artist Mayadevi's
38
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
"Very well, sir," said the
pri nce. "Let me ask you
something else. Answer me
this at least -why are we born
onl y to die? What is the
meaning of life?"
Nasruddin Hodja did not
hesitate. With a smile, he
replied, "I only know that | do
not know, Your Highness!"
On hearing this, the prince
lost his patience and burst
out:
"Whatever I ask you, you
say that you do not know!
Why then are you, an
ignorant old man, feted and
honoured and fed at the royal
tables as if you were the
wisest of all people?"
Nasruddin Hodja humbly
answered:
"My noble master, I am
dressed in silk and fed with
good food only for the little
that I know. For, if I were to be
rewarded for what I do not
know, all the wealth of the
whole world put together
would not be sufficient!" L
painting.
I
3. The library has a painting in black and white. The
painting in the bedroom was not done by artist Subhash.
4. Blue and purple were the colours used in the ship
painting.
5. Deepankar has a fetish for horses and this painting
of his, too, has a horse for its subject. Mayadevi's painting
is not the one in the library. Subhash did not follow a colour
scheme of green and yellow for his
work.
6. Artist Vidyapati's painting
is in brown and orange. The
ship painting does not hang
in the living room.
Vidyapati never
draws flowers.
(See page 97)
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
39
ArmA)
rtr
40
Rashtra Deepika Children' s Digest August :ui i
42
Rashtra Deepika C'lildren's Digest August :uii
.
c
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
43
44
Rashtra Deepika Chi l dren's Digest August :u| i
Annual
Subscription
Fon
Yes, | would like to subscribe to Children's Digest.
1 year (12 issues) an 275/-. (Rates and ofer valid in India only)*
e Code No. DG (if renewal): .................................... .
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Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
45

*^/~'//^*
Once upon a time, in donkey protested.
Shillangere village lived a "Master, isn't it unfair that
merchant who had a horse I should always carry the
and a donkey. One day he heavier load while my friend
went to a nearby town to buy carries only you, who are
some things which he very light. Afer all we both are
needed. On the way back, he your servants, and must be
placed the bag containing treated equally."
the purchases on the The horse disagreed.
donkey, and he rode the "Why do people call an
horse. They had travelled unintelligent and stupid
some distance when the person as 'ass' or a
46
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011

Y0UD@ 3CDS
'donkey'?" snorted the horse. "We are not equal! I won't
carry the load of merchandise." The merchant agreed with
the horse.
"As the horse refused to carry the bag," he said to the
donkey, "I shall carry the bag on my head, and sit on you.
You carry me to the village."
The foolish donkey agreed happily. He was not aware
that he was carrying the weight of both the master and the
bag.
- Georgekutty AloshillS, Std X MOllnl
Carmel High School. Jellipara, Palakkad.
!nIhciny^any^Ony
WhcrclhccOwsyOHOny!
AndlhcmOnkcysasayDOO!
Jhcrc`sa^Ony^anylny
WhcrclhcItccsyO|iny!
AndlhclcapOlsyiDDcrjaDDcrjOO
!nlhc^Ony^iny^any
AIlhcmiccyOcany
AndyOujusIcan`l
calch`cmwhcnlhcydO!
>OiI`siny^any^Ony
LOwsyOHOny!
^Ony^anyPlny
JrccsyOpiny
POny^inyPany
JhcmiccyOcany
WhalanOisypacclODcOny
Islhc^iny^any^Ony! !
Rashtra
D
eep
T
ka Chi l dren's Digest August z0I I
Nln
Nan
Non
-P Gayathri Pooja,
Sid lX D, Etasi Timpany
Senior Secondary School,
Visakhapatnam.
47
48
Hcuulimillc|y
IndcrlhcDucsky
JuklOlhcillcchidrcn
JukcuOOkullhcHOwcrs
LumsOmchOncy
Kcux!Oruillcwhic
uccyOur!icndsinlhcsky
LikcuDcuulim
I YcOwOwcr.
- Alina M. Jehouse, SId VB,
SH eM Public School,
Thevara, Koch
Lhidrcn,cOmcuOnyundsccmc,
HOwnicc,hOw!unluDuOus,hOwuuriny|um
nsidcmc urc
OlsO!inlcrcslinylhinyswhichyOu` 11OVc..
Ucurkiddics,
Hcud mc,
njOymc,
^cVcrmissmc,us|um
ScnsuliOnu.
Uuzzinyinuppcuruncc,
nlcmuliOnuyuccuimcd
Luzcmc
mDruccmc
SuDscriDcmcundcum
1hunkinyyOu,Lhlu|cnS1gc5l.
- K. Shrinidhi, Std V J, Al Wadi Al Kabir Indian School,
Muscat, Oman.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 20
Pen Pals
1. Johnish Wilson(16), Std XI B, Jawahar
Navodaya Vidyalaya, Shivalik House,
Peri ye P.O., Kasargode, Kerala -
67131 6 . H&I: Reading, surfing on
Internet and playing football.
2. Utkarsh Bajpai(12), Std VIII, 41, U.N.!.
Apartment, Sec-11, Vasundara,
Ghaziabad - 201012, U. P.
3. Hansa C. Hameed(12), Std VII, Jai Rani
Public School, Thodupuzha, Idukki,
Kerala . H&I: Cycling, dancing and
watching cartoons.
4. Purbachal(19), C/o Hemendra Kumar
Chakroborty, Belun P.O., Pandua,
Hooghly, West Bengal - 712156. H&I:
Watchi ng movi es, travelling and
friendship.
5. Akshitha Mariam Varghese(11), Jithin
Nivas, Convent Lane, CNRA-10 2,
Anupama Nagar, Nalanchira P.O.,
Trivandrum, Kerala. H&I: Painting,
colouring and reading.
Lines that Rhyme
One two buckle my shoe
Three, four, knock at the door
Five, six, pick up sticks
Seven, eight, lay them straight
hclcomcto
Pen Pals
CLUU
Send us particulars re
garding your name and
address, age, the stan
dard you study, your
hobbies and interests,
to the following ad
dress
Co-ordinator,
Pen Pals Cub,
Children's Digest,
P B. No. 7,
Kotayam-68600 I,
Kerala, India.
One fwo
buck|e my
shoe
Nine, ten, a big fat hen
Eleven, twelve, dig and delve
Thirteen, fourteen, maids a-courting
Fifteen, sixteen, maids in the kitchen
Seventeen, eighteen, maids in waiting
Nineteen, twenty, my plate's empty.
Rashtra Decpika Chi ldren's Digest August 2011
49
YOVN6 ARTiSTS
Sneha Suresh, VI I I ,
Ithithanam HSS, Malakunnam
P. O. , Changanachery.
R. Jayalakshmi, IV A,
Elamkavu LPS,
Mal akunnam P O. ,
Changanachery.
M. Mahesh, 282 Nagaraj Coil Cross Street, Nagercoil-
629001 .
50
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August zui i
Y0UD@ 3CDS
Vaishnavi, VI , Kanyashala,
Satara, Maharashtra .

Amal Krishna 5. ,
Vishwajyothi GMI
Public School ,
Angamaly.
M. Subhashi ni , I IA,
Vedaval l i Vidyalaya Sr.
Sec. School,
Walajapet-632513.
IOvIOLrava goat
M. N.V. Gowrish, I I I B,
Vedavalli Vidyalaya,
Ranipet, Tami l nadu-
632403.
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August zu i
Alina M. Jehouse, V
B, S. H. GMI Publ i c
School , Thevara,
Gochin-68201 3.
51

...
The breadfruit, a native of New
Guinea, has been an important
staple crop in the central and south
Pacific islands for more than 3000
years. In the late 1 8
th
century,
European plantation owners,
seeking cheap and nutritious food
for their slaves, sent expeditions to
the South Pacific for breadfruit
plants.
The tree is a handsome one,
reaching a height of 60 to 85 feet.
Latex is present all over the tree.
The leaves are ovate, bright green
and glossy. The fruit is globose to
oblong, about 1 2 cm long an
,
d 1 2
to 20 cm wide, with a thin, rough
rind that is initially green and turns
to yellow as the fruit matures. The
flesh is white and starchy in the
unripe stage and becomes light
yellow and sweet on ripening. The
seeds are 1 to 2 cm
thick, shiny, brown and
thin-walled , and are
embedded in the pulp.
A single fruit weighs an
average of 2 kg.
The breadfruit is rich
in potassium, vitamin C,
and vitamin 83, which
helps l ower bad
cholesterol. It is also
high in fibre.
The breadfruit is a
most versatile food that
can be cooked and
Do You
Know?
AlhOuyh il is sli
dcbulcd,ilisurycy
rccOynizcdlhullhc
wOrd `chcmislry`
cOmcs !rOm un
Lyypl i un wOrd
mcuniny ` curlh` .
52
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August zui i
eaten at all stages of its
development. It is treated
more as a vegetable than
as a fruit, and forms the
basis for numerous dishes.
Mature breadfruit can be
boiled and substituted for
potatoes in many dishes.
The ripe, sweet fruit is used
to make pies, cakes and
other desserts. I n the
South Pacific islands, the
breadfruit is devoured in
various forms - boiled,
baked on hot stones, fried
with syrup and palm sugar,
pickled, candied,
fermented and as soup. It
is pounded into flour, which
is more nutritious than
wheat flour, and used as a
base for bread or porridge.
The seeds are roasted,
boiled or steamed, salted,
and eaten as a popular
snack. In Polynesia, the
fruit is preserved by being
wrapped in banana leaves
and buried until it dries and
ferments, afer which it is
cooked with coconut
cream. This storage
method provides a food
reserve in times of
emergency, and also
enables excess fruit to be
preserved in a period of food
glut.
Like the coconut tree, the
breadfruit tree is also highly
valued as all its parts are used
in various ways. The wood is
strong and termite-resistant,
and is used in construction and
furniture-making. It is also used
to make boats and traditional
Hawaiian drums. The leaves are
used to feed cattle, and the latex
is used for caulking boats.
Further, the various parts of the
tree have many medicinal uses.
I n the Pacific islands, the
crushed leaves are used as a
folk remedy for mouth ulcers. In
the Caribbean, the roasted
flowers and the leaf juice are
used to treat sore gums. The
latex is also used as a remedy
for skin infections.
M0 30U W0%
Yulcr cOnsisls
O! rcculOms,Z
O! HydrOycn
und Onc O!
!xyycn,lhulaIc
DOundlOyclhcr
duclOcIcclricuI
chaycs.
L
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
Rashtra Deepika Children b Digest August :ui i
55
QUICK .. !NOT
A MINUTE
56
Rashtra Deepik: Children's Digest August 201 1
YES, UNCLE
58
Rashtra Deepi ka Children' s Di gest August zui i
DO YOU HAVE ANY
NO S/R DON'T
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August zuI
59
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August :u | |
61

- Prof George John Nilhir


Chi nese
Lunar
Calendar
- Bhutan
According to the Chinese
calendar the years are named
after animals. It has a cycle
of 60 years divided into five
groups of twelve years each.
The five groups depend on
the five universal elements
in Chinese Philosophy;
Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal
and Water. These five
groups are also associated
with the five planets of
ancient times namely,
Jupiter, Mars, Saturn,
Venus and Mercury. Five
colours are also associated
with this group. They are
Green, Red, Brown, White
and Black respectively. The
twelve animals associated
with the twelve years in
each group are the Rat, Ox,
Tiger, Rabbi t , Dragon
Snake, Horse, Sheep,
Monkey, Rooster,
Dog and Boar. This
year 201 1 is the Year
of the Rabbit. The
year 1 993 was the
Year of the Rooster.
Bhutan issued a
Souvenir Sh eet to
commemorate that
year. All the twelve
animal signs can be
seen on the Sheet.
The next year 201 2
N1< |H1JN
will be the Year of the
Dragon.
62
Rashtra Deepika Chi l dren's Di gest August zui
5tte fg5~ Unlted 5tte5
In 1 869 the United States Postal
Service issued the first US Flag
stamp. It depicted the Eagle, Shield
and two fl ags. In 1 957 the USPS
issued a stamp with 48 state flags. In
1 959 Hawaii joined the United States
as the 50th member, and a fify-star
flag was issued on July 4, 1 960. In
the US, June 1 4 is celebrated as the
National Flag Day, and the week
beginning June 1 4 as the National
Flag Week, when American citizens
are urged to fly the US flag. In 2008
the USPS started the issue of US State flags on US postage
stamps. During 2008 - 1 1 the USPS were to issue 60 stamps
under this series. The set will include 50 state flags, flags
of District of Columbia and territories, and the US flag. The
first set of ten stamps was issued on June 1 4, 2008.
Juden Com5~ I5re
During the Nazi occupation of Germany,
the Government attempted a systematic
extermination of the Jews. At the end of the
20th century thousands of Jews returned to
Pal estine and demanded their own nation.
Thus the Israel Nation was born in 1 948. The
first set of stamps issued by
Israel were on the coins of
ancient Judea. The nine
stamps issued on May 1 6,
1 948, depicted many ancient
Judean coins including the
half shekel of 67 AD. L
Rashtra Deepika Chi l dren's Digesl August zu| |
63
64
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August zu::
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren' s Jigest August zui i
65

- Rajee Raman
Ior many years, Britain
had been in anarchy after the
death of the able monarch,
Uther Pendragon. With the
help of Merlin, the great
enchanter, the Archbishop of
Canterbury had devised a
contest to find Uther
Pend ragon's successor. He
had announced that whoever
could pull out a magnificent
sword thrust deep inside a
massive anvil (conjured up
magically by Merlin) would be
crowned the next king. All the
nobles of the land were invited
to try their luck. This caused
great excitement all over the
land, as kings, chieftains,
knights and warriors flocked
to London to participate in
the contest.
To commemorate the
occasion, a grand
tournament was being held
before the contest. Among
the participants in the
tournament was Sir Kay, a
promising young knight and
son of a renowned nobleman
named Sir Ector of
Bonmaison. His squire was
his younger brother Arthur, a
boy of eighteen.
The tournament began. It
was watched by an immense
crowd of distinguished
spectators, including the
Archbishop himself. There
were two teams - one
comprising 93 men (including
Sir Kay) on the northern side,
and the other comprising 96,
on the southern side.
The first round of the
tournament was a battle using
lances and spears. All the
knights fought valiantly, but it
was Sir Kay whose
performance was the most
splendid. The crowd cheered
loudly for him.
The second round
was a battle using only
swords. Once
more, Sir Kay was
the cynosure of
all eyes for his
valour and
marvellous dexterity
with the sword. He
fought and
defeated five
rivals in rapid
succession, and
s uc c ess f ul l y
kept at bay
several others
who tried to fell
him. On seeing
t his, Sir
Balamorgineas
- a giant of a
man and the
Rashtra Deepika Childrens Digest August zu| |
WaIcrrcyuaIcsIhc
IcmpcraIurcO! Ihchuman
DOdy. !yOuhaVccauyhIa
!cVcr,yOushOuddrink
OIsO!waIcr.
most dreaded combatant on
the opponen ts' side -
challenged him to a fight. Sir
Kay readily accepted the
challenge.
In the fierce d uel that
ensued, Sir Kay delivered a
sword-thrust that would have
beheaded his opponent, had
it not been for the latter's
helmet. Unfortunately, his
sword was broken i n the
impact. Sir Balamorgineas,
who had been momentarily
stunned by the blow, saw his
opponent standing unarmed
and defenceless, and took
the opportunity to attack him
savagely. But Sir Kay was
saved by three of his friends,
who threw themselves
between the d uo. Sir
Balamorgineas's attention
was then diverted to them,
and Sir Kay could slip away
to safety.
Sir Kay dragged himself to
the barricade that separated
the audi ence from the
participants. His alert squire,
young Arthur, who had been
anxiously watching the scene,
came run ni ng up with a
goblet of wine.
Sir Kay gratefully accepted
the wine. He was indeed in
bad shape. Blood and sweat
were trickling down his face
in equal measure, and he was
in an agony of thirst, so much
so that he could not speak.
But after draining the goblet,
he recovered some of his
strength and loudly ordered,
"Brother, go quickly and get
me another sword, so that I
may do battle and bring glory
to our house!"
"But where can I get one?"
asked Arthur in confusion.
'! Hasten to our father' s
pavilion; you'll surely find one
there, " instructed his brother.
Arthur swiftly leapt over
the barricade and i nto the
meadow beyond. He raced
towards the pavilion set up by
his father. But when he
reached there, he found it
empty, for, his father and all
the attendants were by the
arena, watchi n g the
68
Rashtra Deepika Chi l dren's Di gest August 201 1
tournament.
Undeterred, Arthur rushed
inside and began rummaging
among the weapons stocked
there. However, he could not
find any sword.
Now Arthur was in a real
dilemma. His brother was
waiting for him to return with
a sword; what should he do
now?
Suddenly, a picture of the
sword that stood thrust into
the anvi l in front of the
cathedral rose to his mind.
"Why not?" he said to himself
excitedly. "If my brother could
get to wield such a fine sword,
he could certainly win a
decisive victory over his
opponent! Let me go and see
if I am able to pul l it out."
Without a moment's delay,
he turned and sprinted
towards the cathedral. On
reaching there, he found the
place deserted. The
attendants who had been
posted on guard duty had
forsaken their posts and gone
Tr It ...
hth St8n8 S SlghIly u8I8nI Ium Ih8uIh8I IhI88`
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 201 1
69
[ .
G0NS0l0N00
lS1N0 WlPP0P
5teve Jobs is a great inventor. He was a college dropout.
His adoptive parents sent him to college, but when he found
that they were spending all their savings for his college
studies, he discontinued. Following the voi ce of his
conscience, he took a few courses in some
special subjects. He did a lot of original
research work and went on to found Apple
Computers, which soon made history. It
became a multi million dollar company, with
thousands of employees. But through a quirk
of fate, his hired manager dismissed Jobs
from his own company!
But Jobs' conscience was a mine of
courage and determination. He
took the dismissal as a
challenge to start anew. Within
to watch the grand
tournament. The anvil and
the sword within st ood
unguarded, within his reach.
There was no one to question
or stop him.
clutched the hilt of the sword
with both hands. Then, he
bent and pulled with all his
might.
Lo and behold! The next
moment, the sword slid out of
the anvil smoothly and easily,
and came into his hands.
Thus was a great miracle
Young Arthur did not
hesitate. He jumped up on to
the bl ock of marble and
70
Rashtra Deepika Children's Di gest August 2011
.
a short time he developed a
new and more advanced
computer called NeXT.
Meantime, he was
diagnosed as suffering from
pancreatic cancer, and given
three to six months to live.
Later tests showed that the
cancer was curable. Jobs
survived to prove to his own
conscience that life is a
precious gift, and it should not
be wasted. I n short, all the
difficulties and struggles he
had to go through made him
not only a great scientist but
also a man of values, more
precious than all his scientific
inventions.
To prove this, when he was
addressing the graduating
students of the prestigious
Stanford University in
America, he recal l ed hi s
experience of being
performed, with no one to
witness it.
As Arthur looked at the
sword, his eyes were dazzled
by its flashing brightness. But
he had no time to admire its
splendor or to reflect over the
feat he had performed; duty
awaited him. Swiftly, he
dismissed from the company
he had founded, and said,
"That was the best thing that
happened to me." And Jobs
gave his parting message to
the students, " Now you are
young, and you may think you
will remain that way. But soon,
others will take your place. So
when you look into the mirror,
ask your self: If today were the
last day of my life, am I doing
what I really want to do with
my life? If, for a few days, the
answer is 'No', you'd better do
something about it."
We all know that the mirror
Jobs is inviting us to look
into is our own conscience.
Our conscience is 'the seat of
the Supreme '. And therefore,
its voice is the voice of God,
the Supreme. And to follow it
will be the best thing we can
do. Perhaps, this is how Jobs
became what he was.
wrapped it in his cloak, so
that no one might see it and
reprimand him for having
taken it without permission.
Then, he leapt down from
the block of marble and ran
towards the arena, carrying
the prized sword thus
concealed. - To continue
Rashtra Deepika Children's Di gest August 2011
71
[ 1 .
....
- talc[romthcJatakax
Concluding par
Story so far: A young man is
tring to unearth a treasure
that had been hidden in a
wood many years ago by his
late father The location of the
treasure is known only to their
faithful old servant, Nanda,
who promises all
cooperation. However when
they reach the wood, the
young man is baffled by
Nanda: bizarre behaviour
The young man was
stupefied. Was this the same
respectful , soft-spoken
Do You Know?
Al usku, in I>A, wus
DOuylUOmKussiui n bo
!Or lwO ccnls un ucrc.
JOduylhcslulcisrichinOi
undOlhcrnulururcsOurccs.
Nanda he had known since
his childhood? He would
never have thought that
servile man to be capable of
ranting and shouting abuses
like this. What had come over
the old man? Had he
suddenly gone mad?
The young man had no
option but to return home
without retrieving the
treasure. After a moment's
hesitation, Nanda followed
him. Back home, his
behaviour was absolutely
normal, much to his master's
bewilderment. Over the next
few days, he was once more
his usual quiet, deferential
self. It was as if that day's
events had never happened!
Finally, the young man
concluded that Nanda's
conduct of that day mustj
72
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Di gest August 2011
have been a temporary aberration.
He decided to ask him about the treasure
again.
It was with trepidation that the young man
reopened the topic, a few days later. However,
Nanda's response was as encouraging as it had
been earlier. Eagerly, he said, "Let's go and
dig out the treasure right away, young master!
It's unwise to delay any further. After all I'm
an old man, and i f something
happens to me, your l ate
father's wealth will be lost to
Rashtra Deepika Children's DIgest August 2011
73
you forever. That shouldn't
happen. He cared so much
for you!"
Cheered by this positive
response, the young man set
out for the wood agai n,
accompanied by Nanda. But
what followed was a repetition
of the events of the previous
occasion. Nanda's behaviour
suddenly became aggressive;
at one point he stopped, and
when questioned, he glared
at his master and shouted,
"Shut up, you insolent knave!
What do you think of
yourself? Who are you to
order meT
The crestfallen young man
quietly returned home. As
before, the old servant
followed him.
Now the master was really
worried. Without Nanda's
cooperation, he could never
retrieve his ancestral wealth.
Why was the old man
behaving in such a bizarre
manner? Had it been anyone
else in his place, one could
have concluded that he was
greedy and wanted the
treasure for himself. But that
was not the case with Nanda,
who had a reputation for
scrupulous honesty. Indeed,
that was the reason his father
had entrusted the secret of
the treasure to him in the first
place. So, what was he to do
now?
For many days, the young
man worried over the
problem. Then, he had an
idea. In the same town, there
lived a landlord who was
famous for his wisdom and
who, as he had learnt from his
mother, had been his father's
friend. Why not ask him for
Do You Know?
JhcunucOnduislhcwOrd`s
hcuVicsl snukc, und cun
wciyhulOZJdky.
74
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August 1u
his advice?
The young man called
upon the landlord and told
him the whole story. He
concluded by asking,
" Uncle, you were my
father's friend, and only
you can help me now. Tell
me, what should I do? All my
attempts to retrieve my
father's treasure have
failed. Is my ancestral
wealth lost to me forever?"
The landlord, who had
been listening intently to
the story, smiled and
answered, "Not at all, my
boy! On the contrary, I
believe you' ve almost
found it."
He paused, looked
earnestly at the anxious
young man, and went on,
"Just do as I say. Ask Nanda
to take you to the wood
once again. This time,
when he starts shouting at
you, firmly push him away
and start digging at the
spot where he was
standing. He will come
back to normal, and you will
find the treasure!"
The young man decided
to follow the advice. He
returned home and
immediately took Nanda to the
wood. As before, on reaching a
particular spot, Nanda stopped.
"Why have you stopped,
Uncle Nanda?" asked the young
man politely.
With an ugly scowl on his
face, Nanda exploded, "You
rascal! How dare you ... "
But this time, the master was
prepared for this kind of
reaction. He roughly shoved the
old man aside. Then, grabbing
his spade, he swiftly began
digging on the spot where he
had stood.
For a moment, the old
servant stood as if in a daze,
watching him. Then
he slowly picked
up the other
00T00
k00w7
Whcn l Ons
Drccdwilhliycrs
lhcrcsulinyhyDrids
urc knOwn us | iycrs
und llgOns. 1hcrc urc
usO l i On und cOpurd
hyDrl ds knOwn us
cOpOns und l iOn und
juyuurhyDridsknOwnus
juyiOns.
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August 1u i
75
spade and helped him to dig.
Under their combined efforts,
two trunks' soon came into
view. The young man opened
them, and found them to be
full of gold coins.
expressing his gratitude, he
asked, "Uncle, why did Uncle
Nanda behave in such an odd
manner? And how did you
know the treasure was
there?"
Without making any fuss,
Nanda voluntarily carried the
trunks home for his young
master. Freed of his financial
worries, the young man
began administering his
property with a relieved mind.
Later, he called on the old
landlord to thank him for his
useful advice. After
The l andlord expl ained,
" From your description, I
could guess what had
happened. Nanda is a good
man, but basically weak
minded. He was not tempted
to steal the money, but the
awareness that only he knew
its location gave him a feeling
of power. When he actually
76
NOrclhunu
miiOndOurs
DcOngnlO
AdO ilcrund
OlhcrprOmincnl
Puzisissli
uncuimcdin
AmcticunDunks.
JhcmOncywus
dcpOsilcd
scVcruycurs
Dc!OrcAmcricu
cnlcrcdWOrd
Wur | undnO
OncknOwswhuI
lOdOwilhil
lOduy.
stood over the buried
treasure, the treasure
sent negative vibes
that turned his head
and made
arrogant.
hi m
This
a r r o g a n c e
disappeared the
moment he moved
away from the spot.
Such is the power of
wealth! So, my son,
use it wisely and
cautiously."
The young man
followed the advice. He
took care not to hoard
or misuse the money,
but to use it in works
that benefited many. L
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August zu | i
/sn'ffhere
anodWhocan
deeafChangLee
78
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August :u::
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August :u| |
79
[ l .Story
- Ahana Lakshmi, Chennai
"H ey Bhagwa n, Rome
ko Eng/and ki raajdhani bana
de. "
" Hey Arjun, what
happened?" asked Chaya as
sh e walked into the
classroom. The class was
trickling back after the lunch
break. She went to her place
and pulled out her pencil box
and a book.
"What else do you think? I
don' t understand why we
need to study history at all. It
is all mugging of dates and
names of people and places. "
"Oh, this morning's history
test! Don't tell me! I am sure
my fill-in-the-blanks are all'
wrong. But how did you
manage to write that Rome is
the capital of England?"
"Blame it on Maya if you
want. It is all because of her
that | got confused."
Maya was Arjun's sister in
the fifth. But how and why
could she h ave confused
Arjun?
"Maya? What has she
done?"
"Just a sec, I'll tell you.
Meanwhile, can you lend me
your lab manual please?"
Chaya pulled out a book
from her bag and gave it to
Arjun. She began to draw a
hydra in her biology record.
Why did they have to learn
about all sorts of strange
creatures anyway? And their
even stranger,
unpronounceable names?
As Arjun took out his
chemistry record book, he
continued, "Well, Papa was
watching some Asterix movie
last night. And of course Maya
watched with him because
she is a big fan of Obelix, you
know. | had to complete my
maths assignment - I just
wasn' t able to get this problem
80
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren' s Digest August zu
in trigonometry and was
trying all sorts of combos to
get i t. And then in the
morning, before breakfast, |
tried to study for the history
test. Maya was chattering
away at breakfast about
the Asterix movie. And I was
trying to recall what I had just
been studying in history. I
must have unconsciously
been listening to her and . .. "
81
"Ha ha. Now I understand.
It must have been A st erx in
Britain, " laughed Chaya. She
too was an Asterix fan.
"Anyway | am sure I have
mixed up Iran and Iraq as
usual."
As she cycled home that
evening with her classmates,
she saw that the maidan on
the way to the school was full
of colourful tents.
"Ah! The annual fair.
Auntie Mona told me that she
is baking a fab cake for her
stall. Let's all go together, "
said Neeti.
There was a chorus of
yeses and they agreed to
meet at four next evening.
The next day being a
second Saturday, Chaya
finished her homework,
polishing her shoes and
ironing her clothes
by three. At four, she
was outside her
house when Neeti
and Vi dya came
down the block they
lived in.
There was music
playing at the
entrance and a line
of stalls. The girls
headed straight to
Mona auntie's stall
hoping to get some
cake and cookies.
They were in luck
and the cake was
yumm! Neeti decided
to stay back and
help Auntie Mona
while the other two
with lollipops in hand,
wandered around the
other stalls, looking
82
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August zui
at some handwork done by
some of their seniors. There
were games too - the usual
'burst the balloon and win a
prize' and ' throw the ring and
win a prize'. It was getting to
be quite crowded and Chaya
and Vidya decided to head
towards the far end where
there were some stalls but not
many people.
"Ah, here is the surprise
tent," said Vidya. "Every year
they have one and last year,
they had an " Exchange
Anything" stall.
"Oh, that would have been
good. I would have
exchanged my nose for one
that does not sneeze when it
is chill weather, " said Chaya
who had moved to that town
only in summer.
They entered the tent. It
was a l ittle dark inside but
they could make out some
booths. Three or four boys
from their class were
clustered around a sort of
exhibit inside a glass. A plane
was coming down a wire and
a ship was moving on the
floor below. The press of a
button would release the
bombs being carried by the
plane. Try as they might, no
one was able to hit the ship!
"A matter of hand-eye
coordination and an
understanding of trajectories,
not as easy as you think. You
have to take into account the
fact that both the plane and
the ship are moving, and
things like drag and gravity as
well. Sorry, only two chances
per person!" said the person
in charge.
Whcn >uinl Auyuslinc
wus uskcd, ` Whul dOcs
OVc OOk i kc` hi s
unswctwussi mpc.
LOVc hus hunds IO
hclpOIhcts.|lhus!ccIIO
husIcnIOlhcpOOtundIhc
nccdy. Il huscycsIOscc
misctyundvunl.|l hus
curslOhcurlhcsiyhsund
sOtrOwsO!Olhcrs.1hul`s
whullOVcOOksikc.`
Rashtra Deepika Children's Di gest August zui i
83
As they moved to the next booth, Chaya thought she heard
Neeti say, "Shellfish? You mean some fish have shells? I
thought they only had bones."
"Shh. Sit down, sit down. Why are you all standing?" said
a voice behind them and since it sounded like the principal,
their reaction was an automatic scramble for seats.
There could hear laughter and singing in the background:
Do You
Know?
>nuisprOducc
ucOOrcss,
slicky
dischuryclhul
!Ormsu
prOlccliVc
curpclundcr
lhcmuslhcy
lruVcuOny.
Jhcdischuryc
issOcHccliVc
lhullhccun
cruwuOnylhc
cdyc O!uruzOr
wiuOulculliny
lhcmscVcs.
84
Sh ellfish on a china dish
A n ame used for many
An outer s kel eton th ey possess
Isn't th at absolutely zany?
"Shellfish. It is just a word used to
describe a variety of animals that are not
fish. You know crabs, prawns, cuttlefish ... "
hissed Arjun who always topped biology.
" I am sure that cuttlefish is a fish. " That
sounded like Arvind.
More singing from the background:
Cuttl efish is not a fish
Th eir bone is no true bon e
Very much marine, n ever in b etween
Like snails and slugs not ston e.
"Certainly not. It is like an octopus. Like
Paul you know, " Chaya could not help
remarking.
"Paul who?" said Arvind.
"Shh. Boys, don' t be so loud."
"I am not loud. It's just that my pitch is
high, " said Arvind plaintively.
And in the background:
Paul th e octo pus was a shellfish too
But no rel ative of a crab was h e
Only to slugs and snails
and oyst ers in a p ail
Too b ad he is RIP!
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Di gest August zui i
"How can you forget Paul? Of ourse he is dead now but
he was the octopus who forecast all those football wins, " said
Arjun, who, as you can guess, was a football fan.
"Nuts! Who cares for football! Now, if you start talking
about hockey - India's national game ... "
"You are digressing as usual, " said Arjun.
"Ladaai, ladaai. Hamesha ladaai. Maaf karo, Gandhii ki
yaad kar ... " As usual Chaya found herself trying to break
an unnecessary argument while simultaneously trying to
understand what those crazy rhymes in the background were.
She was sure they made sense.
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August zu i
8 5
What were snails and slugs and octopus?
"Molluscs, " said Arjun helpfully.
And the
n
-
In fresh water but more at sea
Slender of form and branching
Fans and spines and pattered like brains
What loo ks like a seal entering?
Chaya heard herself joining and saying the last line loudly.
"What looks like a seal entering?"
What in heaven's name was happening now?
A group of kids dressed in browns and greens could be
seen. Where was the seal? That surely was Maya leading
the group - and they surely did not look like seals entering!
They were doing cartwheels in slow motion and Chaya almost
shouted out 1-2-3-4 just like PT Sir. They wore tubular suits
and on their head sprouted tentacles like ...
"Hydra, " she heard herself say.
'The Lernean Hydra you know, in Greek mythology, was
an ancient serpent-like creature . . . " That voice was definitely
Arvind. Mythology was his favourite subject and he loved
lecturing about it. At least he had got off arguing with Arjun.
86
"Ugh. I know, I have seen it in The Twelve Ta sks of A sterix.
But what connection has a hydra with
a seal entering?"
Abcrl Linslcin uscd lO suy, A
hundrcdlimcsuduy|rcmindmysc!
lhulmy inncrundOulcri!cdcpcnd
OnlhcubOursO!Olhcrmcn, hViny
unddcud,undlhul|muslcxcrlmysc!
inOrdcrlOyiVcinlhcsumcmcusurc
us | huVc rccc Vcd und um
rccciViny. `
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Di gest August ze
I n fre sh water but more at sea
Slender of form a nd b ranching
Fans and spine s
and pattered like b rains
What loo ks like a seal ente ring?
Say it aloud, say it again
Tll you get an understa nding
Hydra is no seal but ha s a coelom
Ca n you guess a seal entering?
Seal entering, seal entering . ..
" Oh Co8| 8Dl 8|t - that's the
Note : "Hydra,
Jel ly fish, corals,
Sea anemones -
al l belong to the
s ame ' phyl u m'
o r large group of
rel at ed l i vi ng
a ni mal s cal l ed
Cnidaria, earlier
known as
Coel enterata".
phylum that hydra belongs to! " said Chaya loudly. "And of
course fans and spines and patterned like brains in the sea
are the corals!"
"The phylum is called Cnidaria now, but that's ok. for you
cracked the riddle
and won a prize!
Here is a voucher
for a cake from the
cake stall. Go and
enjoy. "
That was Bio
ma'am who came
out from the
shadows and
handed her a slip
of paper. And
before she could
say 'see you later
coelenterata' , the
whole gang was in
front of Mona
auntie's stall
munching away at
the special cake. L
00 Y0u
K0w?
chanl
lussyrOw
lhrOuyhOulan
ccphanl`siIc
andcanwciyh
mOrclhanZUU
pOunds.
AmOny Asian
ccphanls,Ony
lhcmacs
haVclusks.
HOlhscxcs
O!Anican
cc hanlshaVc
luss.
Rashlra Deepika Chi ldren's DigpSl August zu | |
87

Olthc MOnth
- ProfNGJ
1 . Name the person who said: "Joy and sorrow are
inseparable; together they come and when one sits alone
with you, remember that the other is asleep upon your
bed."
2. Give the full title of the book: "May You be the Mother of a
Hundred Sons: . . . " Name the author of the book.
3. 'Archie Comics' will soon be published in Malayalam. Who
founded Archie Comics and when?
4. Katchatheeva island was a part of I ndia. When was this
property transferred to Sri Lanka?
5. What is Gibson Les Paul ?
6. Give the full form of GAGAN, a j oint effort of ISRO (Indian
Space Research Organization) and AAI (Airports Authority
of India).
7. What is the common name of the eight-day Jewish holiday
Hanukkah?
8. In Hindu mythology who died from an arrow in the heel?
9. Name the famous political leader associated with the dictum:
88
' Let Hundred Flowers Bloom."
1 0. Name the Greek runner who ran
26 miles and 385 yards to Athens
with the news of the Greek victory
at Marathon in 490 BC.
1 1 . Why are the Rare Earth elements
Yttrium and Ytterbium so called?
1 2. Name the Egyptian King who
establ ished the worship of the Sun
god.
1 3. Identify the painting and its painter.
(Sccagc/1
Rashtra Deepib. Chi l dren's Digest August zei i
[ l .
.
Wh0 0f '
whotiso
Iridoy7
The dictionary defines ' Man Friday' as 'an efficient and
devoted aide or employee; a right-hand man/woman.' The
female equivalent of the term is 'Girl Friday'. The term has
its origin in Daniel Defoe's classic novel, The Life and
Strange Surpri si ng Adve nture s of
Robi nso n Crusoe, of Yor k, Mari ner,
published in 1 719.
In the story, a young seaman
named Robinson Crusoe finds himself
shipwrecked on a small island, where
he is the lone human being. He begins
a new life on the island, keeping
himself busy in agriculture and in
raising a menagerie. After twenty-
!
.
four years of solitude, he comes
across a gang of visiting cannibals
about to kill a prisoner. He
92
Lrus0c unJ hs mun
rJuy.
Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August zuII
rescues the prisoner and
calls him Friday, afer the day
on which they first met. Friday
proves to be a most loyal and
efficient servant to Crusoe. In
due course, Crusoe and
Friday are rescued by a ship
and taken to England.
From this book came the
term 'Man Friday' , standing
for a devoted, reliable
assistant. ' Girl Friday' ,
representing a resourceful
female assistant, is of a
somewhat later origin and was
popularised by the 1 940
American comedy, 'His Girl
Friday', starring Cary Grant
and Rosalind Russell.
WhBt5B t0fBt00
Alliteration is a literary
device involving the repetition
of the initial consonant or
vowel sounds in neighbouring
words. For instance, if you
say that someone 'told a
tragic tale of torment' , you are
using alliteration.
The function of alliteration,
like rhyme, might be to
accentuate the beauty of
language in a given context,
or to unite words or concepts
through a kind of
repetition.
Alliteration, like rhyme,
can fol l ow specific
patterns. Sometimes the
consonants are not always
the initial ones, but they
are generally the stressed
syllables. Alliteration is
used to call our attention
to a word or line in a poem
that might not have the
same emphasis otherwise.
Famous alliterative lines in
poetry include Full
fathoms five thy father lies,
from Ariel's song in The
Temp est and Over t he
cobbl es he clatt ered a nd
cla shed i n t he dark i nn
yard in the poem, The
Highwayma n by Alfred
Noyes.
Alliteration is widely
used in clicMs. 1t is the
alliteration which makes us
remember such phrases
as 'sink or swim', 'do or
die', 'as good as gold', 'as
dead as a doornail', 'the
more the merrier', 'wait and
watch', 'hale and hearty',
and 'fit as a fiddle'.
L
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Di gest August zu I
93
0JJI
94
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August :ui I
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<

'' Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
' Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S
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.
Pin: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

]
_ Nate: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pi n: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pin: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pi
n
: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August :u::
95
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pin: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pin: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pin: . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pin: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pin: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pin: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 hereby enclose D. D.lMO.for lJ/J/-/ ./J0/-. Kind(v send me the
eligible incentive.
Signature: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Canvassed by(name): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-mail: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
Rashtra Deepika Chi ldren's Digest August :u
PDSWCIS
FUN WITH
WORDS
Fi nd the ani mal
1) Snake;
2) Horse;
3) Wolf; 4) Bul l ;
5) Goat; 6) Li on; 7) Donkey
Parlez-vous francaise?
1) A fal se step; a mi stake; 2)
Freedom of acti on; compl ete
authority; 3) Treason; 4) Head
waiter; 5) Good-bye ti l l we meet
agai n; 6) Newly rich person; an
upstart; 7) Reason for existence
SLYLOCKFOX
Sol ution: Harry
beached t he
boat and walked
away from i t
backwards!
CROSSWORD
Across: 1. Chauffeur 5. Curtai n
6 . Deep 7. Open 10. Yange
11. Tri enni al
Down: 1 . Cl oud 2. Fort 3.
Exampl e 4. Run 5. Chennai 8.
Nasal 9. Stun
LOGIMAGIC Solution
Artist Room
Deepankar Li brary
Mayadevi Bedroom
Subhash Study
Vidyapati Living reom
TRY IT ...
Page 69
The l ast scene.
Page 85
Bubbl e, dog's mouth, drop, ear,
soap and boy's hai r.
QUIZ OF THE MONTH
1. Kahl i l Gi bran
2. ' May You be the Mother of a
Hundred Sons: A Journey
Among the Women
of I ndi a' by El i sabeth
Bumi l l er.
3. John L. Goldwater, 1939.
4. 1974
5. One of the most well known
electric guitars.
6. GPS (Gl obal Positional
System) Aided Geo
Augmented Navi gati on.
7. Festival of Li ghts/Feast of
Dedi cati on.
8. Lord Kri shna
9. Mao-Tse-Tung
10. Phei di ppi des
11 . They were first di scovered i n
the vi l l age Ytterby, Sweden
12. Amenhotep IV (Akhenaton)
13. ' I ndi an Vi l l age Fami ly' by
Sai l oz Mukherjee
Theme Col ours
Horse Bl ack and white
Fl ower Green and yellow
Shi p Bl ue and purpl e
Forest Brown and orange
Rashtra Oeepika Children's Digest August zuII
97
98
Son, tr to be a
good boy. Else, you
wilbe a bad boy


Rashtra Deepika Children's Digest August 2011
JyJ.
1'C V;VC Cc|C
\u8lOHct I8Ic. 98468 1 779
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