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Bosworth and Parker USTU3300 Who Am I?

Overview In this lesson, students will review the elements of a family and determine their role in their own family by drawing sketches as a way of organizing what they know. Students will also dramatize the book in order to review, reinforce, and evaluate their ability to understand the position and role in the family. Integrated Content Areas Social Studies and Theatre Connecting Concept(s) Relationships Essential Questions What are the similarities and difference between family members and their roles within the family? How can you portray the movements of characters in theater/drama? What are the similarities and differences between the families in the two stories that will be discussed? How does your role within your own family affect your familys daily lives? Social Studies Objectives Students will hear two stories with different family types, and identify the similarities and differences between them. Students will draw sketches of the similarities and differences, to help them determine their role in their family. Theatre Objectives Students will use their bodies, voices, and imagination to dramatize each story, reflecting on the differences and similarities between the two families in the books. Students will emphasize on the character that is most like them in each story. Lesson Assessments Formative: Students will Work cooperatively and safely to explore the elements of a family within each story that was introduced. Participate meaningfully and appropriately in think-pair-share to discuss the similarities and differences in the families. Participate meaningfully and appropriately in think-pair-share to discuss the roles of the family members within the stories. Use their bodies, voices, and imaginations to dramatize and reflect upon the roles of the family members within the one of the stories. National Theater Standard

Bosworth and Parker USTU3300 Standard 2 Acting by assuming roles and interacting in improvisations Experiment with sensory and emotional experiences to create a character. Use imagination to recreate a character. Practice improvisational skills to create characters. Develop awareness of movement as a means of expression. Develop awareness of the voice as a means of expression. Social Studies Standard K.1.01 Understand the diversity of human cultures. Identify personal attributes, such as physical characteristics, that are common to all People such as physical characteristics. Identify differences among people. Recognize how individuals learn to do skills and customs from their culture. Recognize all cultures have family units where decisions are made.

Lesson Procedures Introduction/Warm-Up 1. Explain that this lesson will build on their understanding of families from the previous lesson and introduce the concept that family members have different roles by looking at the similarities and differences found in two stories. 2. Model miming interactions with objects in the environment, and guide students in eating a hotdog and burger. 3. Share/Read aloud, Goldilocks and the Three Bears and The Three Little Pigs. Knowledge and Comprehension 1. Discuss the members of the family and their role in each story using think-pair-share partners. The teacher will select a few groups to share what they have discussed. The teacher will write what the students say on the whiteboard. 2. Introduce or review the use of a control device. 3. Explore the movements that can be used for each character in the story; ask students to use their imagination differently to create each character and their role within the family. 4. Explore the voices of each character; ask students how their voices and can be used differently to represent each character within the family. 5. Highlight think-pair-share groups that are demonstrating effectively the use of body, voice, and imagination. 6. Review the family members and the roles they had in each story. Create a table to show the similarities and differences. Ask select think-pair-share groups and display the answers on the overhead transparency. Application and Analysis 1. Select four students to dramatize Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Remind the remaining students that they will have the opportunity to work on the second story at another time. 2. Students will dramatize the story, using the technique of miming. Students will use cues from the story to dictate what they should be doing. 3. Guide students in evaluating their dramatization of the story and suggest any changes

Bosworth and Parker USTU3300 they could make. Students could assess: Whether or not the dramatization told the audience the role of the character Whether or not the student remained in their role throughout the whole story 4. Re-play the dramatization inviting a different set of students to assume the character roles. The second playing should reflect the suggestions made during the evaluation. Encourage students to try new and interesting ideas. 5. Evaluate the re-playing as before, focusing on the achievements of individual students and the success or difficulties they experienced in introducing their new ideas. Day Two Introduction/Warm-Up 1. Review miming from the previous day. Introduce the concept of exaggeration of gestures in order to make movements more visible to the audience. Discuss how the exaggerated movements or similar and different from the original. Knowledge and Comprehension 1. Review the elements of a family and the roles of the family members of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Uses a graphic organizer displayed on the overhead transparency, and have an open discussion with the students. 2. Explain that they will compare the first story to another story you will share/read aloud, entitled The Three Little Pigs. Ask students to be thinking about the similarities and differences within the two stories. 3. Discuss the story as before using think-pair-share partners. Select a few students to share what they discuss and write in on the whiteboard. Application and Analysis 1. Select a group of students to dramatize The Three Little Pigs. Remind the remaining students that they will have the opportunity to work on the second story at another time. 2. Students will dramatize the story, using the technique of miming, this time exaggerating their movements. Students will use cues from the story to dictate what they should be doing. 3. Guide students in evaluating their dramatization of the story and suggest any changes they could make. Students could assess: Whether or not the dramatization told the audience the role of the character Whether or not the student remained in their role throughout the whole story Whether or not the student exaggerated their movements 4. Re-play the dramatization inviting a different set of students to assume the character roles. The second playing should reflect the suggestions made during the evaluation. Encourage students to try new and interesting ideas. 5. Evaluate the re-playing as before, focusing on the achievements of individual students and the success or difficulties they experienced in introducing their new ideas. Evaluation 1. The students will discuss in think-pair-share the similarities and differences between the family members roles in each story. The teacher will write down observations, and note what students are discussing with their partner.

Bosworth and Parker USTU3300 2. The students will discuss in think-pair-share partners what their role in their family is. The teacher will write down observations, and note what students are discussing with their partners. 3. Within their think-pair-share partners, students will dramatize their role in their family using the technique of miming and exaggeration. The teacher will observe the students play. 4. Highlight partners that are demonstrating effectively their role within their family. Summary and Closure 1. In open discussion with the class, review the differences and similarities between family members. Using a table displayed on the overhead transparency. 2. Ask students to describe their role within their family, and how it impacts their familys daily lives. Instead of think-pair-share, use groups of three or four. Vocabulary Family - people that are related to one another Relationship a relation between people Mime a performance using gestures and body movements without words Exaggerate to enlarge beyond bounds of the truth Materials Brett, J. (1996). Goldilocks and the Three Bears. New York, NY: Dover Publications. Rounds, G. (1992). Three Little Pigs and the Big Bad Wolf. The Trumpet Club Overhead Transparency Overhead markers Table Charts Graphic organizers Whiteboard Dry erase markers Control Device