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YOUTH TOBACCO EDUCATION AND THE SCIPP PROJECT

OVERVIEW
Traditional tobacco
Commercial tobacco Common Types of Tobacco Tobacco & Cancer Tobacco & Diabetes

Children and Tobacco


Teens and Tobacco African Americans and Tobacco Targeted Tobacco Marketing

Tobacco & Secondhand SCIPP program info smoke

Programs to Help

TRADITIONAL TOBACCO
Many indigenous nations have traditional stories of how tobacco was introduced to their communities. Many stories talk about the sacredness of the plant and its powers to both heal if used properly and to harm us if used improperly Some say the original tobacco was discovered about 18,000 years ago.

TRADITIONAL VS. COMMERCIAL


TRADITIONAL
Smoked in a pipe for ceremonial purposes Used as an offering to a healer, elder or other person as a sign of respect or thanks Medicinal tobacco was often used as a painkiller

COMMERCIAL
Deliberate targeting of specific consumer groups Premeditated and conscious addition of chemicals that lead to addiction

Scarcely contains actual tobacco


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COMMERCIAL TOBACCO CONTENTS

4000 Chemicals

40 Cancer causing agents 500 Poisons

Amyl Formate Amyl Octanoate

AlphaAmylcinnamaldehyde

Amyris Oil trans-Anethole Angelica Root Extract, Oil and Seed Oil Anise Anise Star, Extract and Oils Anisyl Acetate Anisyl Alcohol Anisyl Formate Anisyl Phenylacetate

Apple Juice Concentrate, Extract, and Skins Apricot Extract and Juice Concentrate 1-Arginine Asafetida Fluid Extract And Oil Ascorbic Acid 1-Asparagine Monohydrate 1-Aspartic Acid Balsam Peru and Oil Basil Oil Bay Leaf, Oil and Sweet Oil

Beeswax White Beet Juice Concentrate Benzaldehyde Benzaldehyde Glyceryl Acetal Benzoic Acid, Benzoin Benzoin Resin Benzophenone Benzyl Alcohol Benzyl Benzoate Benzyl Butyrate

Benzyl Cinnamate Benzyl Propionate Benzyl Salicylate Bergamot Oil Bisabolene Black Currant Buds Absolute Borneol Bornyl Acetate Buchu Leaf Oil 1,3-Butanediol 2,3-Butanedione 1-Butanol 2-Butanone 4(2-Butenylidene)-3,5,5-Trimethyl- 2-Cyclohexen-1-One Butter, Butter Esters, and Butter Oil Butyl Acetate

Butyl Butyrate Butyl Butyryl Lactate Butyl Isovalerate Butyl Phenylacetate Butyl Undecylenate 3-Butylidenephthalide Butyric Acid] Cadinene Caffeine Calcium Carbonate Camphene Cananga Oil Capsicum Oleoresin Caramel Color Caraway Oil Carbon Dioxide

COMMON TOBACCO PRODUCTS


Cigarettes (Newport, Marlboro, Camel, Kool, Winston, Pall Mall) Cigars (CAO Gold, Camacho, Diamond Crown)
Little Cigars (Swisher Sweets, Captain Black, Black n Mild)

Smokeless tobacco products


Chewing tobacco (Skoal, Copenhagen) Snuff (Wilsons, McChrystals) Snus, including Snus pouches (Camel, Marlboro, Skoal, Ettan)

NICOTINE

Poisonous More addictive than cocaine and heroine


It is sold commercially as a pesticide Use results in emotional dependence Mood leveler Users rely on it to control emotional responses to everyday life

Legal addiction
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CARBON MONOXIDE
The compound in car exhaust that causes death
Causes shortness of breath

Reduces the amount of oxygen blood can carry

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TAR
Sticky Residue that stains the fingers and teeth. Contains benzopyrene, one of the deadliest cancer causing agents known.

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CHEMICALS
Acetone: fingernail polish remover Ammonia: floor/toilet cleaner

Cadmium: batteries Arsenic: rat poison Methane: cow manure fumes Formaldehyde: preserver of dead bodies
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METALS

Aluminum
Magnesium Zinc Silicon Titanium

Silver
Lead Copper Mercury Heavy metals

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NICOTINE: HARD HABIT TO QUIT


On a milligram for milligram basis, is 10 times more potent than heroin as an addictive substance
Pack/day smoker estimates 6 doses /cigarette

20 cigarettes per day = 43,800 doses per year!


Breathing Blinking
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Few behaviors occur more often. . .

NICOTINE: HARD HABIT TO QUIT


Withdrawal Symptoms
Anxiety 87% * Irritability 80% *

Difficulty Concentrating 73% * Tobacco Cravings 62%

Restlessness 71% Gastrointestinal Problems 33%

Headaches 24%

Drowsiness 22%

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TOBACCO HEALTH EFFECTS

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TOBACCO FACTS & STATS


More than 45.3 million American adults (20.8%) are smokers. Teens are 3 times more likely to smoke if parent or sibling smokes

~438,000 Americans die each year as a result of smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.

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TOBACCO INDIVIDUAL COST$


Pack-a-day habit 1 Year = $1,680 10 Years = $16,800 20 Years = $33,600

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TOBACCO & CANCER

About 90% of all lung cancer deaths are attributable to smoking


Chewing tobacco and snuff contain 28 different carcinogens

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, and cigarette smoking causes most cases.

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TOBACCO & CANCER


Cancer-causing agents (carcinogens) in tobacco smoke damage important genes that control the growth of cells, causing them to grow abnormally or to reproduce too rapidly. Smoking cigarettes that have a lower yield of tar does not substantially reduce the risk for lung cancer.
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TOBACCO & CANCER

Compared to nonsmokers, men who smoke are about 23 times more likely to develop lung cancer and women who smoke are about 13 times more likely. Smoking causes about 90% of lung cancer deaths in men and almost 80% in women.

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TOBACCO & CANCER


Healthy lungs

Small cell cancer in Smokers lung

Cancerous tumor in the lung


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TOBACCO & DIABETES


Smoking and Diabetes both reduce the amount of oxygen reaching your bodily tissues, resulting in poor circulation.
Smoking raises your blood sugar level making it harder to control your diabetes.

Of people with diabetes who need amputations, 95% are smokers.


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TOBACCO & DIABETES


Together, diabetes and tobacco use make it twice as likely that you will develop heart and blood vessel disease. People with diabetes who smoke are 3 times more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than are other people with diabetes.

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SECONDHAND SMOKE

Smoke breathed out by a smoker and smoke from the burning end of cigarettes, cigars, pipes
Composed of nearly 4,000 different chemicals and over 150 toxins including carbon monoxide

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THIRDHAND SMOKE
The residue of nicotine and other chemicals that tobacco smoke leaves on different indoor surfaces Third-hand smoke clings to hair, skin, clothes, furniture, drapes, walls, bedding, carpets, dust, vehicles and other surfaces, even long after smoking has stopped.
The Mayo Clinic, What is thirdhand smoke, and why is it a concern?, http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/third-hand-smoke/AN01985

THIRDHAND SMOKE
Infants, children and nonsmoking adults may be at risk of tobacco-related health problems when they inhale, ingest or touch substances containing third-hand smoke. Third-hand smoke residue builds up on surfaces over time and resists normal cleaning. It can't be eliminated by airing out rooms, opening windows, using fans or air conditioners, or confining smoking to only certain areas of a home.
The Mayo Clinic, What is thirdhand smoke, and why is it a concern? , http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/third-handsmoke/AN01985

PREGNANCY & SECONDHAND SMOKE

Pregnant women exposed to it 6 hours a day pass carcinogens to the blood of unborn
2 hours a day causes 2 times risk of low birth weight

Miscarriage
Prematurity Low birth weight Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

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CHILDREN & SECONDHAND SMOKE

38% of children aged 2 months to 5 years are exposed to SHS in the home
54% of children ages 3 to 11 are exposed to secondhand smoke in the United States Up to 2,000,000 ear infections each year Nearly 530,000 doctor visits for asthma Up to 436,000 episodes of bronchitis in children under five

Up to 190,000 cases of pneumonia in children under five


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CHILDREN & SECONDHAND SMOKE

Coughing and wheezing Asthma Sore throats and colds Eye irritation Hoarseness
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WHY CHILDREN & TEENS SMOKE


Family members use tobacco or have before They think theyre cool They want to act like adults they see in ads They think everyone is doing it Theyre asked by friends to try it Famous people do it It wont hurt them or make them sick

FACTS ABOUT YOUTH & TOBACCO


Every day about 4,100 youth age 12 to 17 try a cigarette for the first time. Each year more than 700,000 young people aged 11-17 become regular smokers. Thats about 2,000 a day. Nearly a third of them will die prematurely from a smoking-related disease. More than a third of all kids who ever try smoking a cigarette become regular, daily smokers before leaving high school.
Legacy, Fact Clipboard, http://www.legacyforhealth.org/44.aspx Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, The Path to Smoking Addiction Starts At Very Young Ages , http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0127.pdf

FACTS ABOUT YOUTH & TOBACCO


34% of teens begin smoking as a result of tobacco company promotional activities. Across the U.S. in 2009, 5.2% of middle school students and 17.2% of high school students reported current use of cigarettes. Specifically in Missouri in 2009, 5.7% of middle school students and 19.4% of high school students reported current use of cigarettes. 39.2% of high school students report seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tobacco Use Among Middle and High School Students --- United States, 2000 2009, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5933a2.htm Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System: Detailed Report, http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/statesystem/DetailedReport/DetailedReports.aspx

SMOKING AMONG AFRICAN AMERICANS


19.8 percent of African American adults are current smokers (24.8 percent of men and 15.8 percent of women) -National African American Tobacco Prevention Network Tobacco companies target their marketing of menthol cigarettes to African Americans -American Lung Association Menthol smokers are less likely to attempt cessation, more likely to relapse after successfully quitting, and less likely to report sustained smoking cessation than nonmenthol smokers. -National African American Tobacco
Prevention Network

SMOKING AMONG AFRICAN AMERICANS


African Americans absorb more toxins and nicotine than Whites: Menthol cigarettes may increase nicotine and toxin absorption as smokers often take in more smoke and hold it in longer due to the numbing effect of menthol.
National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, African Americans & the Signs of Tobacco Addiction, http://www.naatpn.org/resources/2011/African%20Americans%20&%20the%20Signs%20 of%20Tobacco%20Addiction.pdf

WAYS THE TOBACCCO INDUSTRY TARGETS AFRICAN AMERICANS


(Facts from the National African American Tobacco Prevention Network)
Intense Case Studies & Research: The tobacco industry has invested a great deal of time and money into the study of African Americans. Their research assists in their marketing tactics and development of products. Cigarette Brands with Group-Specific Messages: Tobacco industry products and advertisements use symbols, names, and events that are held in high esteem by African Americans.

WAYS THE TOBACCCO INDUSTRY TARGETS AFRICAN AMERICANS


Product Placement: Higher quantities of mentholated products are placed in retail stores located in African American communities. Price: The tobacco industry offers higher discount rates on mentholated cigarettes in African American retail stores, thus making them much more attractive to the residents who reside in African American communities. Presence (Retail Advertising): The tobacco industry places a higher quantity of interior and exterior signs in retail stores located in African American communities.

WAYS THE TOBACCCO INDUSTRY TARGETS AFRICAN AMERICANS


Secret Enhancement of Nicotine: We should continue to pursue the concept of nicotine enhancement, Lorillard Tobacco Company (1977). Higher nicotine content makes cigarettes more addictive and smoking harder to quit. The Tobacco industry has frequently and secretly increased nicotine and menthol levels in brands like KOOL and Newport.

WAYS THE TOBACCCO INDUSTRY TARGETS AFRICAN AMERICANS


Tobacco Sponsorships: The tobacco industry offers tobacco sponsorships to African American organizations in order to heighten the sale of cigarettes in African American communities. They know that they have a product that kills, so they try to maintain a positive image.

WAYS THE TOBACCCO INDUSTRY TARGETS YOUTH (Facts from the National
African American Tobacco Prevention Network)

Sex Appeal: Like most industries, the tobacco industry uses sex appeal to sell its product. However, the tobacco industrys use of sex appeal is often targeted at youth. Color Association: Tobacco companies use color association (without brand-names and logos) to attract youth and subliminally remind people of their brands.

WAYS THE TOBACCCO INDUSTRY TARGETS YOUTH


Product Flavoring: Since the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement (that prohibits the tobacco industry from developing products that appeal to youth), the tobacco industry has developed candy, fruit, and alcohol flavors with high youth appeal. (Packaging for flavored products have had youth-oriented graphics, colors, and themes.)
Reward Programs. Tobacco companies offer smokers prizes (free gifts with pack purchase) as incentives to promote youth smoking.

WAYS THE TOBACCCO INDUSTRY TARGETS YOUTH


Exploitation of Hip Hop: Music is a common marketing tool used by the tobacco industry. It is considered to be a very effective marketing tool because it helps consumers make emotional connections with brands, and it has potential to appeal widely to young audiences. Brand Websites: Brand websites feature juvenile games and prizes that appeal to youth.
National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Top 20 Ways the Tobacco Industry Preys, http://www.naatpn.org/resources/2011/Top%2020%20Ways%20the%20Tobacco%20Industry%20Preys%20Fact Sheet.pdf

AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION (ALA) PROGRAMS & SERVICES

SIGNATURE PROGRAMS
Freedom From Smoking Freedom From Smoking Online Lung Helpline Better Breathers Club Asthma Educator Course

FREEDOM FROM SMOKING


Adult smoking cessation In-person clinics 8 sessions Trained facilitator Hosted by ALA and facilitators around region Price varies, typically free

FREEDOM FROM SMOKING ONLINE


Adaptation of in-person clinics Complete adult cessation program Convenient for certain populations Two memberships:
Basic: Free Premium: More modules, interactive
$15 for 3 months $40 for 1 year

LUNG HELPLINE
1-800-LUNGUSA Free information from Registered Nurses, Respiratory Therapists, & Quit Smoking Specialists Answers Lung Health Questions Smoking Cessation available at cost Connects callers to local ALA

BETTER BREATHERS CLUB


Adult support group for individuals who have difficulty breathing
Lung disease, COPD

Monthly meetings Trained facilitator Gives participants tools to increase quality of life

ASTHMA EDUCATOR INSTITUTE


Educates professionals who provide asthma education and care
Two-day training Serves as preparatory course for Asthma Educator Exam

OTHER PROGRAMS & SERVICES

ADULT LUNG DISEASE


Breathe Well, Live Well Adult asthma management program

Breathe Smart from the Start Secondhand smoke awareness program for pregnant women Asthma 101 Asthma education for adults, childcare providers

CHILDHOOD LUNG DISEASE


Not on Tobacco (NOT)
Teen smoking cessation program Teens Against Tobacco Use (TATU) Youth tobacco prevention program

Open Airways for Schools (OAS) Youth asthma management program

IAQ Tools for Schools


To help schools maintain a healthy environment in school buildings Asthma-Friendly Schools Initiative (AFSI) Provides tools to assist communities plan and implement asthma management programs within schools.

OUTREACH SERVICES
Presentations Health Fairs & Community Events
Literature & Supplies Distribution Asthma Awareness Asthma Camps & Carnivals Kids with Asthma Can! Events Responding to phone and email inquiries from the public Partnership building, coalitions, collaborations

INTERESTED IN PROGRAMS?
Laura Frick, American Lung Association
LFrick@BreatheHealthy.org (314) 645-5505 x 1014

REFERENCES
http://quitsmoking.about.com/cs/nicotineinhaler/a/cigingredien ts.htm Northewest Portland Area Indian Health Board. Indian Leadership for Indian Health.
www.npaihb.org/images/resources_docs/Tobacco%20101.ppt

http://www.brainsource.com/brain_on_drugs.htm http://www.yic.gov/drugfree/drugeffects.html Legacy, Fact Clipboard, http://www.legacyforhealth.org/44.aspx Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, The Path to Smoking Addiction Starts At Very Young Ages, http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0127. pdf

REFERENCES (Contd)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tobacco Use Among Middle and High School Students --- United States, 2000 2009, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5933a2.htm Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System: Detailed Report, http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/statesystem/DetailedReport/DetailedReport s.aspx The Mayo Clinic, What is thirdhand smoke, and why is it a concern?, http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/third-hand-smoke/AN01985

REFERENCES (Contd)
National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, African Americans & the Signs of Tobacco Addiction, http://www.naatpn.org/resources/2011/African%20Americans%20& %20the%20Signs%20of%20Tobacco%20Addiction.pdf National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, Top 20 Ways the Tobacco Industry Preys, http://www.naatpn.org/resources/2011/Top%2020%20Ways%20the %20Tobacco%20Industry%20Preys%20Fact-Sheet.pdf American Lung Association (2010).Too Many Cases, Too Many Deaths: Lung Cancer in African Americans, http://www.lungusa.org/assets/documents/publications/lung-diseasedata/ala-lung-cancer-in-african.pdf

OUR CREDO

We will breathe easier when the air in every


American community is clean and healthy.

We will breathe easier when people are free from the addictive
grip of cigarettes and the debilitating effects of lung disease.

We will breathe easier when the air in our public spaces and
workplaces is clear of secondhand smoke.

We will breathe easier when children no longer


battle airborne poisons or fear an asthma attack. Until then, we are fighting for air.

Tobacco Jeopardy!!!

SCIPP PROJECT & THE AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION


American Lung Associations involvement with the SCIPP project:
Key Staff: Erin Mooney and Laura Frick Key areas of focus:
Tobacco education curriculum for students Connecting parents to tobacco cessation resources

How school district will be involved with the SCIPP Project


Developing an effective tobacco curriculum that will be integrated into the existing curriculum Partnering to empower students and parents to be tobacco-free

THANK YOU! QUESTIONS COMMENTS STORIES


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