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Crisis and Absolutism in Europe

1550-1715
A Traditional Unit Plan Model
PRE-INSTRUCTIONAL PHASE

Developed by Molly A. McCollum, Department of Teacher Education, Samford University, 2013.

Pre-Instructional Phase
I. UNIT OBJECTIVE AND SUB-OBJECTIVES
Given a teacher-developed test following direct instruction from the teacher, opportunities for class discussion, small group work, and individual practice, upon the completion of a twelve-day unit entitled Crisis and Absolutism in Europe: 1550 to 1715, ninth grade World History students will be able to correctly judge and distinguish which were the key people, critical ideas, movements, and themes, as well as what the causes and effects were of the various wars and revolutions in Europe from 1550 to 1715 which made it an era of crisis and absolutism. 1. Define- militant, Armada. (Knowledge) 2. Identify- Huguenots, Henry of Navarre, King Philip II, William the Silent, and Elizabeth Tudor. (Knowledge) 3. Describe the causes of the French Wars of Religion and explain how they were resolved. (Knowledge) 4. Define- inflation, witchcraft, divine right of kings, commonwealth. (Knowledge) 5. Identify- James I, Puritans, Charles I, Cavaliers, Roundheads, Oliver Cromwell, James II, and Holy Roman Empire. (Knowledge) 6. List the causes and results of the Thirty Years War. (Knowledge) 7. Define- Absolutism, czar, boyar. (Knowledge) 8. Identify- Louis XIV, Cardinal Richelieu, Frederick William the Great Elector, Ivan IV, Michael Romanov, Peter the Great. (Knowledge) 9. Describe life at Louis XIVs court at the Palace of Versailles. (Knowledge) 10. Describe the rise of absolutism and constitutionalism and their impact on European nations. (Knowledge) 11. Identify major provisions of the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights. (Knowledge) 12. Define- Mannerism, baroque, natural rights. (Knowledge) 13. Identify- El Greco, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, William Shakespeare, Lope de Vega, Miguel de Cervantes, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke. (Knowledge) 14. Describe the artistic movements of Mannerism and the baroque, which began in Italy and reflected the spiritual perceptions of the time. (Knowledge) 15. Explain the militant Catholicism of Philip II and its effects on Europe. (Comprehension) 16. Explain causes of the Reformation and its impact, including tensions between religious and secular authorities, reformers and doctrines, the Counter-Reformation, and the English Reformation, and wars of religion. (Comprehension) 17. Explain how the English civil war and the Revolution of 1688 affected government, religion, economy, and society in that country. (Comprehension) 18. Explain the impact of the English Revolution on political institutions and attitudes in the North American colonies and on the outbreak of the American Revolution. (Comprehension) 19. Explain the significant movements in art, literature, and philosophy during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. (Comprehension) 20. Summarize the mutual obligations between people and government as understood by John Locke. (Comprehension) 21. Analyze causes of religious wars in 16th- and 17th-century Europe and account for the rise of religious pluralism. (Analysis) 22. Discuss the situation in many European nations in which Protestants and Catholics fought for political and religious control. (Analysis)

23. Discuss the significance of the English Revolution and the Glorious Revolution. (Analysis) 24. Distinguish between an absolute monarchy and a constitutional monarchy. (Analysis) 25. Discuss how Prussia, Austria, and Russia emerged as great European powers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. (Analysis) 26. Account for the growth of bureaucratic monarchy in Russia and analyze the significance of Peter the Greats westernizing reforms. (Analysis) 27. Infer how Mannerism masterpieces reflected the political and social life of the period in which it was created. (Analysis) 28. Relate how democratic ideals were strengthened as a result of the English and Glorious Revolution. (Synthesis) 29. Comparing absolutism as it developed in France, Russia, and Prussia, including the reigns of Louis XIV, Peter the Great, and Frederick the Great. (Evaluate) 30. Compare the philosophies of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and the belief in the divine right of kings. (Evaluate)

Aligning National & State Standards


The following NATIONAL STANDARDS related to the lesson objectives are found at http://www.nchs.ucla.edu/Standards/world-history-standards/world-era-6 : Era 6 Standard 2: How European society experienced political, economic, and cultural transformations in an age of global intercommunication, 1450-1750.
Standard 2B: The student understands the Renaissance, Reformation, and Catholic Reformation. VI. Analyze causes of religious wars in 16th- and 17th-century Europe and account for the rise of religious pluralism. Standard 2C: The student understands the rising military and bureaucratic power of European states between the 16th and 18th centuries.

III. Explain how the English civil war and the Revolution of 1688 affected government, religion, economy, and society in that country. IV. Explain the impact of the English Revolution on political institutions and attitudes in the North American colonies and on the outbreak of the American Revolution. V. Account for the growth of bureaucratic monarchy in Russia and analyze the significance of Peter the Greats westernizing reforms.
The following STATE STANDARD related to the lesson objectives can be found by accessing the Social Studies Alabama Course of Study at http://www.alsde.edu/Home/Sections/SectionDocuments.aspx?SectionID=54&Subsection=5 :

Ninth Grade, World History 1500 to Present: 3. Explain causes of the Reformation and its impact, including tensions between religious and secular authorities, reformers and doctrines, the CounterReformation, and the English Reformation, and wars of religion. 5. Describe the rise of absolutism and constitutionalism and their impact on European nations. - Contrasting philosophies of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and the belief in the divine right of kings. - Comparing absolutism as it developed in France, Russia, and Prussia, including the reigns of Louis XIV, Peter the Great, and Frederick the Great. - Identifying major provisions of the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights.

Arranging Sub-Objectives in Mini-Units


Mini-Unit #1: Europe in Crisis: The Wars of Religion 1. Define- militant, Armada. (Knowledge) 2. Identify- Huguenots, Henry of Navarre, King Philip II, William the Silent, and Elizabeth Tudor. (Knowledge) 3. Describe the causes of the French Wars of Religion and explain how they were resolved. (Knowledge) 4. Explain the militant Catholicism of Philip II and its effects on Europe. (Comprehension) 5. Explain causes of the Reformation and its impact, including tensions between religious and secular authorities, reformers and doctrines, the Counter-Reformation, and the English Reformation, and wars of religion. (Comprehension) 6. Analyze causes of religious wars in 16th- and 17th-century Europe and account for the rise of religious pluralism. (Analysis) 7. Discuss the situation in many European nations in which Protestants and Catholics fought for political and religious control. (Analysis) Mini-Unit #2: Social Crises, War, and Revolution 1. Define- inflation, witchcraft, divine right of kings, commonwealth. (Knowledge) 2. Identify- James I, Puritans, Charles I, Cavaliers, Roundheads, Oliver Cromwell, James II, and Holy Roman Empire. (Knowledge) 3. List the causes and results of the Thirty Years War. (Knowledge) 4. Explain how the English civil war and the Revolution of 1688 affected government, religion, economy, and society in that country. (Comprehension)

5. Explain the impact of the English Revolution on political institutions and attitudes in the North American colonies and on the outbreak of the American Revolution. (Comprehension) 6. Discuss the significance of the English Revolution and the Glorious Revolution. (Analysis) 7. Relate how democratic ideals were strengthened as a result of the English and Glorious Revolution. (Synthesis) Mini-Unit #3: Response to Crisis: Absolutism 1. Define- Absolutism, czar, boyar. (Knowledge) 2. Identify- Louis XIV, Cardinal Richelieu, Frederick William the Great Elector, Ivan IV, Michael Romanov, Peter the Great. (Knowledge) 3. Describe life at Louis XIVs court at the Palace of Versailles. (Knowledge) 4. Describe the rise of absolutism and constitutionalism and their impact on European nations. (Knowledge) 5. Identify major provisions of the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights. (Knowledge) 6. Distinguish between an absolute monarchy and a constitutional monarchy. (Analysis) 7. Discuss how Prussia, Austria, and Russia emerged as great European powers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. (Analysis) 8. Account for the growth of bureaucratic monarchy in Russia and analyze the significance of Peter the Greats westernizing reforms. (Analysis) 9. Comparing absolutism as it developed in France, Russia, and Prussia, including the reigns of Louis XIV, Peter the Great, and Frederick the Great. (Evaluate) Mini-Unit #4: The World and European Culture 1. Define- Mannerism, baroque, natural rights. (Knowledge) 2. Identify- El Greco, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, William Shakespeare, Lope de Vega, Miguel de Cervantes, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke. (Knowledge) 3. Describe the artistic movements of Mannerism and the baroque, which began in Italy and reflected the spiritual perceptions of the time. (Knowledge) 4. Explain the significant movements in art, literature, and philosophy during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. (Comprehension) 5. Summarize the mutual obligations between people and government as understood by John Locke. (Comprehension) 6. Infer how Mannerism masterpieces reflected the political and social life of the period in which it was created. (Analysis) 7. Compare the philosophies of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and the belief in the divine right of kings. (Evaluate)

Each mini-unit above will take at least two days or instructional time or class time, in some cases they will be three days. The mini-units should be presented in this thematically arranged order. The first mini-unit introduces the students to the key players of the crises that set the stage for the era of conflict that would eventually develop from the tensions of the Wars of Religion. There is a chronological justification for placing this mini-unit first but it the reasoning goes deeper. The understanding that the European countries were already in a climate for crisis as they experienced internal discord in the political and religious arena will give students context for understanding why there were then social crises, how absolutism could have developed, and why the art and literary culture was so religiously charged. The second mini-unit explains to students what some of the social consequences of the preceding mini-unit were and essentially uses England as a case study to display the ideological and social consequences of internal discord. By looking at the Stuarts of England, the English Revolution and the Glorious Revolution, students will begin to make connections to the causes and effects of these independent crises and how these social circumstances, monarchs ruling by divine right, and these revolutions, led to the prominence of absolutist rulers in Europe. The third mini-unit takes all of the information learned in the previous two mini-units about the leaders, movements, and crises throughout Europe, and traces how these all rise to the emergence of Absolutism as a response to the crises happening on the Continent. This mini-unit will again take a case-study approach by focusing primarily on France and the absolute rule of Louis XIV and Russia with the absolute rule of Peter the Great and Frederick the Great. An era of religious, political, social, and economic crises culminate in this mini-unit where the students will describe the rise of absolutism and constitutionalism and their impact on European nations in a post-crisis environment. The fourth mini-unit will take a step back from the crises of 1550 to 1715 and put a spotlight on the cultural developments of the time to give students a complete picture of a multi-level society. Though these crises would have been dominant in each of the countries discussed, there was still a flourishing part of culture that existed outside of the crisis. While it is important that students understand the religious ideology, rulers, economic crises, and wars, students will need to understand the art and emerging political thought coming from this time and how the impacts of these emerging movements and schools of thought affected governments and culture outside of Europe. This arrangement of mini-units was designed and arranged thematically and takes in to account the skills and understanding of the previous mini-unit to build experiential background for the next miniunit. Each mini-unit incorporates several different levels of learning. Each of the mini- units are arranged to follow the natural process of student learning by first introducing basic information to the students in a method of direct instruction by the teacher. As the students become acclimated to the material, group work, discussion, and individual practice are employed to help them investigate the content. The unit ends with an individual assessment of the content through a teacher-developed choice test.

Structured Overview of the Unit

Wars of Religion

European Culture

Social Crises, War, and Revolution

Absolutism

Inflation, witchcraft, divine right of kings, The Stuarts, The Thirty Years War, English Civil War and Glorious Revolution

Militant, Spanish Armada, The Huguenots, Henry of Navarre, King Philip II, William the Silent, Elizabeth Tudor, causes and effects of the French Wars of Religion, European extension of borders and power

Czar, Louis XIV, Frederick the Great, Peter the Great, Michael Romanov, The Court of Versailles, constitutionalism
Mannerism, Natural Rights, El Greco, Bernini, Shakespeare, Hobbes, and Locke

Table of Content Specifications


Information/Facts:

Vocabulary: -Militant- Combative -Armada- A fleet of war ships -Inflation- A rapid increase in prices -Witchcraft- The practice of magic by people supposedly in league with the devil -Divine right of kings-The belief that kings receive their power from God and are responsible only to God. - Commonwealth- a republic - Absolutism- A political system in which a ruler holds total power -Czar- Russian for Caesar, the title used by Russian emperors -Boyar-A Russian noble -Mannerism- An artistic movement that emerged in Italy in the 1520s and 1530s; it marked the end of the Renaissance by breaking down the principles of balance, harmony, and moderation. -Baroque- An artistic style of the seventeenth century characterized by complex forms, bold ornamentation, and contrasting elements. - Natural Rights- Rights with which all humans are supposedly born, including the right to life, liberty, and property. Dates, People, and Related Information and Facts: -By 1560, Calvinism and Catholicism had become highly militant religions and they were both aggressive in their efforts to win converts and eliminate each others authority. - The French Wars of Religion lasted from 1562 to 1598 when the French kings persecuted Protestants. - Huguenots- French Protestants influenced by John Calvin. - Only 7% percent of the French population were Huguenots, but 40-50% of the nobility converted. (Which made them a powerful threat to the Crown.) - In 1589, Henry of Navarre, the political leader of the Huguenots and a member of the Bourbon dynasty, succeeded to the throne as Henry IV. He converted to Catholicism to be accepted by Catholic France, and was crowned king in 1594. -Edict of Nantes- issued by Henry IV in 1598, the edict recognized Catholicism as the official religion of France, but gave the Huguenots the right to worship and hold political privileges. - King Philip II of Spain was the greatest supporter of militant Catholicism. - Philip aimed to maintain strict control over Spain, the Netherlands, and possessions in Italy and the Americas by insisting on strict conformity to Catholicism and strong monarchical authority. -Philip II was also called, The Most Catholic King for all of the Catholic causes he would champion. - Philip II tried to crush Calvinism in his Netherlands holdings and violence erupted in 1566 when

Calvinists began to destroy statues in Catholic churches. - Though Philip II sent thousands of troops, the Dutch leader William the Silent led a powerful resistance which was only ended by a truce 12 years later. - Philip II ran Spain in to bankruptcy with his wars and his successor did as well by spending too much on his court which contributed to the shift of power from Spain to England and France. - Elizabeth Tudor ascended the throne of England in 1588 and during her reign, England became the leader of the Protestant nations of Europe and laid the groundwork for a world empire. - Elizabeth repealed the laws favoring Catholics in England but followed it with a moderate Protestantism. - Elizabeth I was also moderate in her foreign policy and she tried to keep Spain and France from becoming too powerful by supporting whichever was the weaker nation. -Philip II resented Englands tolerance of Protestants and sent an armada to invade England. -The Spanish Armada was defeated in 1588 and England remained Protestant. - The Thirty Years War- Began in 1618. Holy Roman Empire vs. Bohemia. Religious and territorial. - James I- Monarch of England after Elizabeth, King of Scotland, believed in the divine right of kings. - Puritans- Protestants in England inspired by Calvinist ideas. -Charles I- Son of James I, seen as trying to make Church of England more Catholic, trouble with Parliament, led to Civil War. - Cavaliers- In the English Civil War, they were Royalists or supporters of the king. -Roundheads- In the Eng. Civil War, they were with the parliamentary forces. Names for hairstyle. -Oliver Cromwell- In charge of parliamentary forces, the New Model Army. Charles I executed, Cromwell rules as head of a republic. -James II-an open and devout Catholic who became king of England after death of Charles II. This caused religion to be an issue between king and parliament once more. - Glorious Revolution- When William and Mary of Orange come and takeover England. Relatively bloodless= glorious. -Bill of Rights- Accepted by William and Mary by Parliament that said Parliament had the right to make laws and levy taxes (among other provisions) and laid the foundation for a constitutional monarchy. -1642- Civil war in England begins. -1649- Charles I is executed. Shocks the monarchs of Europe. -1688- The year of the Glorious Revolution. -Louis XIV- Absolute monarch of France whose extravagant lifestyle and military campaigns weakened France. - Versailles- The palace built under the specifications of Louis XIV as a personal residence, where offices of state were located, and where people came to seek favors or offices for themselves. -Cardinal Richelieu- Louis XIIIs chief minister who had strengthened the power of the monarchy. -Frederick William the Great Elector- leader of one of the Germanies after the Thirty Years War, Prussia. Created a new bureaucratic machine to support the military and govern the state. -Ivan IV- The first Russian leader to take the title czar. Ivan the Terrible. Expanded eastward. -Michael Romanov- First of the Romanov dynasty that lasted from 1613 to 1917.

-Peter the Great- One of the most prominent of the Romanov dynasty. Became czar in 1689, was an absolutist. Traveled to the West and brought back technology to modernize Russias army and navy. Russia became a great military power under him. -1643- Louis XIV comes to the throne at the age of four. -1715- Louis XIV dies. -El Greco- Or, The Greek. Painter who symbolizes the height of Mannerism. The moods depicted in his paintings reflect the tensions created by religious upheavals of the Reformation. - Gian Lorenzo Bernini- Sculptor and architect who, associated with baroque, who finished St. Peters Basilica in Rome. - William Shakespeare- British dramatist and poet who worked in the Elizabethan Era where theater and the arts flourished. Built the Globe Theatre. - Lope de Vega- Spanish playwright who wrote some 1500 plays. -Miguel de Cervantes- Author of Don Quixote, one of the crowing works of the golden age of Spanish literature. -Thomas Hobbes-English author of Leviathan, humans guided by struggle for self-preservation. Believed absolute power was needed to preserve order in society. - John Locke- Wrote The Treatises of Government (1690) and argued against the absolute rule of one person. Believed humans had natural rights. -1651-Leviathan is published. Concepts: Inflation natural rights Absolutism social contract Restoration Bill of Rights Constitutionalism Puritanism divine right of kings baroque religious tolerance Wars of Religion mercantilism Glorious Revolution Westernize Golden Age

Relationships/Generalizations: -Militant Catholicism and Calvinism led to the Wars of Religion - Unity of the Holy Roman Empire was a result of the division caused in the Thirty Years War -Democratic ideals were strengthened as a result of the English Civil war and Glorious Revolution - Eastern European powers thrived under absolutism and led to their emergence as great European powers in the 17th and 18th centuries - Mannerism and the baroque reflected the spiritual perceptions of the time - Both Hobbes and Locke were influenced by the divine right of kings - The economic thought of mercantilism, war, and expansion hurt France and Spain domestically -The westernization of Russia led to the rise in its status in Europe - The English Bill of Rights and the political rhetoric of John Locke greatly influenced the revolutions and formations of new governments in the New World and France

Processes/Procedures: -Listening to short lectures on Crisis and Absolutism in Europe from 1550-1715 - Deciding what is important and recording key people, ideas, wars, movements, etc. of this particular time period - Analyzing primary documents such as speeches made by Elizabeth Tudor and James I, excerpts of work from John Locke, The Bill of Rights, and other primary sources like baroque art -Investigating what court life would have been like at Versailles by virtually visiting the palace via Google Art Project - Discussing natural rights and how they tie in to absolutism and constitutionalism, then applying those discussion points to a modern day example -Working with new teaching/learning strategies to dissect texts and take notes

II. DETERMINING ENTRY SKILLS


Cognitive: 1. Has an understanding that the aftermath of the Protestant Reformation saw Europe as a battleground for Catholic and Protestant powers fighting for control and influence in Europe. 2. Recognizes the impact and domestic strain that initiatives for exploration and expansion have caused the European powers. 3. Understands how European monarchies and governments are structured up to this point in the rise of constitutional monarchies. 4. Can incorporate comprehensive reading skills to engage and understand primary and secondary documents. Affective: 1. Shows appreciation and sensitivity to religious diversity when engaging in discussions on religious tension in Europe in this period. 2. Appreciates that the mini-unit on art and literature has cultural and historical significance even if the student cannot personally relate to it. 3. Shares opinions and analysis about the content with the class. 4. Shows appreciation and respect for the student teacher- developed lessons and activities by actively engaging with the lectures and activities. Social: 1. Respects the opinions and ideas of classmates and teacher to help create a classroom environment conducive to question-asking, application, connection, and learning. 2. Focuses on learning despite social and behavioral distractions of peers in the classroom. 3. Accepts responsibility for ones own work when working independently, and accepts responsibility to contribute to group work.

III. PRE-INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES


Telling Students What They Will Be Learning The teacher will create a handout which will be made available to the students electronically via access on their Moodle account. This document will provide an overview of the unit and the expectations that will accompany this new unit. The teacher will review and explain this document in class. The teacher goes over the structure of the unit: it has four mini-units, and they are all then named, with the teacher briefly commenting on the content of each. Students will be told that their mastery of the content will be measured with a traditional, summative exam. (See Appendix A-1 for document put on Moodle.) Giving Students a Rationale for the Unit As the unit addresses how Absolutism came to be a solution to the crises of Europe, the students will be given a rationale for the unit through a discussion led after the viewing of a video on Louis XIV from biography.com. The video highlights the life of this particular absolute monarch, but also provides some extra information and context for the crises occurring, in this case in France, that will be discussed in following mini-units. The discussion that follows the video will lead students to predict or define what crises were occurring in France, what made Louis XIV an absolutist, etc. Explain what the other response was, constitutionalism and then get students to make connections to the modern day. Do we have any more absolute monarchs or rulers? What about constitutional monarchies? Which do they think is better? Get them to explain their answer. It is important to point out to the students that the tensions that arose in this time and in response to these leaders, led to the political philosophy that inspired our own American Revolution and that many modern governments are still influenced by the absolutism and constitutionalism made popular in this time. This will point out the significance that absolutism has on our own history as well as help them understand how other countries may continue to govern, pointing out that democracy does not flourish in every culture and that these events may explain why. (See Appendix A-2 for a list of countries with absolute and constitutional monarchies in the present day and A-3 for how to access the video.)

Reviewing Entry Behaviors The teacher will remind the students of the significance of participating, creating a safe learning environment, and applying the knowledge and skills they have learned in the past in order to understand the new content. The teacher will comment on the extreme ease at which history provides us the ability to be interdisciplinary and talk about things like religion art, and literature, in addition to traditional understandings of history. The teacher will also call students attention to the importance of sharing their opinions and contributions to discussion on all of the topics brought up in the unit and responding to peers in a way that makes them feel comfortable to participate equally.

Providing a Structured Overview of the Unit A hardcopy of the Structured Overview of the unit will be provided for the students to paste in to a back page of their Interactive Student Notebooks. This paper will also include important dates like when the exam is and when their Interactive Student Notebook is due (See Appendix A-4 for a copy of the Structured Overview and Classwork Policies for the Unit that students will put in their notebook.) This sheet will also provide an overview on classwork policy for the unit, including: - a reminder that homework from the student teacher is still homework and should be done. It will continue to be evaluated under the same INS rubric as they have for their regular units. - an explanation of the exit slips. 10 completed exit slips worth .5 points apiece could earn points toward test grade, up to 5 points. - We will create a table of contents for this section as we go. We may not have notes every day, but there will be another activity. We will indicate whatever that was in our Table of Contents. - SO, you are keeping up your notebooks- will be giving notebook grades like normal in addition to the test grade in addition to adding graded homework checks for days homework is assigned. Building in Experiential Background The teacher will ask that as they are creating a new section in their Interactive Student Notebooks that the students do two things: On the first new back page available, paste in the Structured overview of the unit. The second thing to do would be on the next new front page available do the following and accompany with this prompt: As I will be teaching this unit and not ____________, lets make it a distinctive new section in our notebooks. Have you ever traveled to Europe? If the answer is yes, great!!!you can make this a little more personal. If not, do not worry, you can still do this activity. For homework, print out a picture of you in front of a European landmark or monument (or just a famous landmark you would like to visit if you have not been yourself yet.) Preferably, from one of the countries we will talk about in this unit: England, France, Spain, Germany, or Russia. On your first new front page, paste that picture in. Look to the board for an example. The teacher will have an example page already made up and will display it to the class by using the Elmo projector. Remark that this IS a grade/will be checked tomorrow. (See example Appendix A-5) As the discussion of the crises of Europe essentially leads to a discussion on absolutism and the ideal example of an absolutist ruler was King Louis XIV of France, the students will then be taken on an online gallery tour of some of the art collection at the Palace of Versailles that depicts Louis XIV. The teacher will read the descriptions and ask how they think the paintings depict Louis XIV as an absolute monarch, and what IS an absolute monarch?

End that after we journey through some of what leads to the emergence of absolutism as a solution, we will journey back to France and back to the Palace of Versailles to tour the palace and learn more about the absolutism and this monarchs life. (For instructions on how to access this virtual collection and to be shown, see Appendix A-6) Reassuring Students The teacher will reassure their students of their ability to learn the content well; both for the sake of school and for their own personal knowledge outside of the classroom and a test, especially since some of the ideas directly relate to our modern-day lives. The teacher will point out to the students how much they have accomplished (or improved) from the first unit to the next. The teacher will remind the students that their expectations for achievement will be made clear and that the teacher is more than willing to help students who want to learn. There will be an emphasis on the teachers interest and dedication to keeping the students organized and participating throughout this unit!

Appendix A
Resources for Pre-Instructional Phase A-1 Information About Unit: Student Handout put on Moodle A-2 Present Day Absolute and Constitutional Monarchies A-3 Directions for Accessing and Showing Louis XIV Video A-4 Structured Unit Overview and Copy of Class Policies for Unit A-5 Example of Cover to Unit Notes A-6 Directions for Accessing the Google Art Project Versailles Collection

A-1

Introduction to Crisis and Absolutism in Europe: 1550 to 1715 Unit


Unit Objective: Given a teacher-developed test following direct instruction from the teacher, opportunities for class discussion, small group work, and individual practice, upon the completion of a twelve-day unit entitled Crisis and Absolutism in Europe: 1550 to 1715, ninth grade World History students will be able to correctly judge and distinguish which were the key people, critical ideas, movements, and themes, as well as what the causes and effects were of the various wars and revolutions in Europe from 1550 to 1715 which made it an era of crisis and absolutism.
Mini-Units: Mini-Unit #1: Europe in Crisis: The Wars of Religion Mini-Unit #2: Social Crises, War, and Revolution Mini-Unit #3: Response to Crisis: Absolutism Mini-Unit #4: The World and European Culture Sub-Objectives: There are 30 sub-objectives for this 12 day unit. If you would like to have a comprehensive list of all of your sub-objectives, ask the teacher and one may be provided for you. Summative Assessment: There will be a traditional, teacher-developed test at the end of this unit. OCTOBER 11th. Interactive Student Notebooks will be collected and graded. Due after test, OCTOBER 11th. Other Grades: Homework, Activities, and Updated Table of Contents will be checked daily. The teacher will indicate and keep track of your work. This affects your participation grade.

Bonus Points: Students can receive up to 5 BONUS POINTS on their exam by completing their daily exit slips and signing their names to them. The teacher will keep track of these points to add to the final test grade.

A-2

LASTING EFFECTS OF ABSOLUTISM AND CONSTITUTIONALISM Constitutional Monarchies:


These are systems in which the head of state is a constitutional monarch; the existence of their office and their ability to exercise their authority is established and restrained or held back by constitutional law.

Constitutional monarchies with ceremonial monarchs


Systems in which a prime minister is the active head of the executive branch of government. The head of state is a constitutional monarch who only exercises his or her powers with the consent of the government, the people or their representatives.

Andorra Antigua and Barbuda Australia Bahamas Barbados Belgium Belize Cambodia Canada Denmark Grenada Jamaica Japan Lesotho Malaysia

Netherlands New Zealand Norway Papua New Guinea Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Solomon Islands Spain Sweden Thailand Tuvalu United Kingdom

Constitutional monarchies with active monarchs


The prime minister is the nation's active executive but the monarch still has considerable political powers that can be used at their own discretion. Bahrain Bhutan Jordan Kuwait Liechtenstein Monaco Morocco Tonga United Arab Emirates

Absolute monarchies: Specifically, monarchies in which the monarch's exercise of power is


unconstrained by any substantive constitutional law. Brunei Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia Swaziland Vatican City

A-3

Directions for Accessing and Showing Louis XIV Video: - Open up internet browser, and copy and paste this url in to the address bar:
http://www.biography.com/people/louis-xiv-9386885/videos/louis-xiv-full-episode-2073406805 - If this does not work, go to Google and search for biography.com Louis XIV full

episode and hit enter to begin search. - Click the first video search result. - Make sure that volume is turned up and play video. - Show Times: Show full episode (42min 54sec) or plays clips. ______ to _______, _______ to ________, _________ to ________, _______ to ______

A- 4

Structured Unit Overview and Class Policies for Unit:

Wars of Religion Militant, Spanish Armada, The Huguenots, Henry of Navarre, King Philip II, William the Silent, Elizabeth Tudor, causes and effects of the French Wars of Religion, European extension of borders and power

European Culture

Social Crises, War, and Revolution Inflation, witchcraft, divine right of kings, The Stuarts, The Thirty Years War, English Civil War and Glorious Revolution

Absolutism

Mannerism, Natural Rights, El Greco, Bernini, Shakespeare, Hobbes, and Locke

Czar, Louis XIV, Frederick the Great, Peter the Great, Michael Romanov, The Court of Versailles, constitutionalism

CLASSWORK POLICIES FOR THIS UNIT: -Homework from the student teacher is still homework and should be done. It will continue to be evaluated under the same INS rubric as they have for you regular units. If homework was assigned, it will be checked the next class period it is due and will be stamped.
- Every day you will have an exit slip that you must answer and write your name on. For every correct response on your exit slip, you get points towards your test. For example, 10 completed exit slips worth .5 points apiece could earn points toward test grade, up to 5 points. - We will create a table of contents for this section as we go. I will check daily to make sure you keep up with your T.O.C.

A-5

CRISIS AND ABSOLUTISM: 1500- 1715 UNIT

Rationale for photo: This is a picture of me (and friends) in front of the Notre Dame in Paris, France. This picture applies to our unit because it is a prominent French cathedral, or Catholic house of worship. We will discuss France and Catholicism in this unit. If no photograph with you in it: Describe what your picture is of, where it is, and how it ties in to the content of this unit.

A-6

Directions for Accessing the Google Art Project Versailles Collection:


Open up web browser and type into the url bar the following address:
http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/collection/palace-of-versailles?projectId=art-project

If that does not work, type into the Google Search bar, Google Art Project, Palace of Versailles Collection and click the first result. Discuss, The King Governs By Himself (1661)