Você está na página 1de 353

-',r,i., -r:i,,.

OVERIIAT]L MANUAL
(Part No.tt8616)

Ucrqz /o.8, //aap,J/t


8,4qilrcrr I Serzip't J/urLlrcJ
EDITIOil SEGOI{D

PRATT AIRGRAFT & WHITilEY


Dipision of

TJNITED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

EAST HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT

kinted in Unit d Strtr

of Amcica

E
T

PREFACE This second edition of the Wasp Jr. B, Wasp Hl,and Hornet E Series Overhaul Manual incorporates only minor revisions to the January, 1941,edition and does not necessarily supersede it.

L)

\ \"\\'\\3

42* P83ld
TABLE OF CONTENTS

B t1\\

INTRODUCTION SERVICE SUGGESTED SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOR OVERHAUL SHOP REMOVAL OF ENGINE FROM AIRPLANE CIIAPTER I ENGINE DISASSEMBLY OF INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES Prellrnlnary Instructlons and Operatlons Oil Drain Plugs
Magnetos and Attaching Parts. Magneto Coupling Gear Screws. Page

Starter.
Starter Jaw Nut Gun Synchronizers or Accessory Pumps Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft. Tachometer Drive. Thrust Bearing Nut. Ignition Wires.

-..t

i
*(;
'.i I

Spark Plugs. PropellerShaft Run-out. Dlsmantllng Primer Lines. Cylinder Deflectors Intake Pipes. Push Rods and Covers Rocker Box Covers Radio Shielding Oil Suction Pipes. Oil Sump.
Cylinders and Pistons Front Section (Direct Drive Engines) Front Section (Geared Engines) Reduction Drive Gear. Bearing Support Plate. Cam Spacer and Cam (Wasp Jr.). . Cam Reduction Gear. Main Crankcase Section (Front Half). Front Main Bearing Inner Race. Crankshaft and Articulating Rod Assembly Main Crankcase Section (Rear Half). Starter Jaw and Shaft. Generator Drive Assembly Magneto Drive Shafts. Oil Pump Fuel Pump and Drive Side Vacuum Pump Drive Vertical Accessory Drive Shafts

101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 103 103 103 103 103 103 103 103 105 105 105 105 105 105 106 106 106 106 106 106 107 L07 L07 107

L.

n
\q

e
{ \-

CEAPTDR I (contlnued) DISASSEMBLY OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES (continued) Page Dlsmantllng (contlnued) Oil Drain Pipe. . CarburetorHotspot (If Provided). . . Relief Valve Oil Pressure
Separating Rear and Blower Sections. . Magneto Drive Gear (on Magneto). . . .

' t \._,/-'-

'-....-rJ

L07 108 108 108


108

Tool Llst CHAPTER II DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-A$SEMBLIES Front (Nose) Seatlon - Wasp Jr. Tappets and Rollers (WaspJr. B and 82) Rocker Oil Manifold (WaspJr. 83) Front Breather Assembly(If Provided). . . PropellerRegulator Valve Thrust Bearing Front (Nose) Seotlon - Wasp Hl and Hornet D (Dlreat Drlve) Propeller Oil Feed Pipe Assembty. Governor Drive Thrust Bearing

109

\-,

20L 201 201 20L 20L

201 20L 20L

Front Sectlon (Reductlon Gearlng and Eouslng Assembly) trrasp Hl-G, Eornet E-G and Ez-G '201 Reduction Gearing. Pinion Cage. 20L PropellerOil Feed Pipe. . 201 Fixed Gear 201 202 GovernorDrive (Hornet E-G and E2-G onty) Propeller Shaft. 202
Front Seotlon (Reductlon Gearlng and Eouslng Assembly) Hornet E8-G Reduction Gearing. Fixed Gear. Propeller Shaft. Governor Drive Bearlng Support Plate Governor Idler Gear Cam Reduction Gear Governor Oil Feed Pipe (Hotnet E-G Series Engines) Reduction Drive Gear Bearing. . . Maln Crankcese Seatlon lFront Ealf;Cam Reduction Gear. Wasp Jr.

202 202 202 202


203 203 203 203
\

203
203 203 203

Moln Crankcase Sectlon (Front Half) - Wasp Hl and Eornet E Serles Cam and Oil Feed Bracket Tappets and Rollers. Front Main Bearing Outer Race and Rollers.

\_

DISASSEMBLY

CHAPTER II (contlnued) OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES (continued)

Page

\-

Cyllnders Valve Springs and Valves Rocker Shafts Rocker Arm Bearings. . . Piston Rings Piston Pin Plugs. Crankshaft Asserrbly Spring Blower Drive Coupling Rear Crankshaft Gear Rear Main Bearing Crankshaft Front and Rear Sections Flyweights (Removable Type) Flyweights (Riveted Type)

204 204 204 204 204 205 205 205 205 205 205 205 205

Oil Plug SpringBlower Drive Bolt.


Master Rod and Artlculatlng Rod Assembly

Knuckle Pins
Blower Sectlon (Outboard Support Type) - Wasp El and Eornet E Serles 206 Breather Assembly 206 Oil Pressure Pipe and Bracket Assembly 206 Removal of Impeller 207 Rear Blower Bearing Cover 207 Intermediate Gear and Shaft Assemblv 207 Floating Gear. 208 Impeller Shaft Wasp Jr. Blower Seotlon (Steel Cage Type) 208 Breather Assembly 208 Oil Pressure Pipe 208 Removal of Impeller 208 Rear Blower Bearing Cover 209 Floating Gear Assembly 209 Impeller Shaft. 209 Intermediate Gear and Shaft Assembly Rear Sectlon 2L0 Generator Drive Assembly 2I0 Oil Pump 210 Valve Lubricator Pump (If Provided). . . . 2I0 Side Vacuum Pump Drive 210 Starter Shaft and Bearing Tool Llst. CHAPTER III CLEANING General Degreasing ........................ Decarbonizing. . . Cleaning Procedure {-

i--

2tL

301 301 301 301

CHAPTER TV INSPECTION
General Inforrratlon

Page General

Physlcal Inspectlon Procedure Fits and Clearances

40L

Studs.
Liners Bushings Crankcases,Brackets, Adapters, Sump, Cover Plates, Etc.. . Gears. Shafts Pipes. Rivets Oil Seal or Transfer Rings (Piston Ring Type) Oil Seal or Transfer Ring Bearing Surfaces Anti-Friction Bearings Physlcal Inspectlon Procedure - Detatl Front (Nose) Sectlon - \[asp Jr. General Oil Slinger Thrust Bearing Nut.. Valve Tappet Guide and Tappet Assembly. Front Breather (If Provided). . . . Propeller Regulator Valve Front (Nose) Sectlon - Wasp Hl and Eornet E (Dtreat Drlve) General Oil Slinger Thrust Bearing Nut. . Front Sectlon (Reductlon and Hornet E-G Serles General Thrust Bearing Nut. Pinion Cage Propeller Shaft. Reduction Drive Gear. Maln Crankcase Sectlon (Wasp Jr.) General Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Crankshaft Thrust Bearing Spacer Cam (Plate Type) Cam OiI Feed Bracket (Two Piece Type) . . Cam Oil Feed Bracket (One Piece Type) . . . . CamSpacer..... Maln Crankcase Sectlon - Wasp Hl and Hornet E Serles (Dlrect Drlve
and Geared)

40r
402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402

403 403 403 403 403 403 403 403 403

Gearlng and Houslng Assembly) Wasp Hf-G

Oil Slinger(Not on Hornet E3-G)

403 403 403 404 404 404 404 404 404 404 404 405 405

General Cam Drive Gear.

405 405
\

CEAPTER fV (contlnued) INSPECTION (continued) Wasp Hl and Hornet E Serles (Dtrect Drlve Page Maln Crankease Sectlon and Geared) (conttnued)

Cam (Shelf Type) Valve Tappet Guide and Tappet Assembly Sump Cyllnders - AII Models General Cylinder Heads Valve Guide Valve Seat Inserts. Exhaust Valves Inlet Valves. Valve Springs, Washers and Locks. Rocker Arms, Bearings and Adjusting Screws.

405 405 405 405 405 405 407 407 407 407 407 408 408 408 408 409 4t0 4L0 4L0

PushRods.
Push Rod Covers. Intake Pipes. . . Cvlinder Barrels. Plstons, Plston Plns and Plston Rlngs

Pistons. Piston Pins.


Piston Pin Plugs Piston Rings

Crankshalt and Artlculatlng Rod Assembly General 470 Front and Rear Main Bearings. . . 410 Master Rod. . 4t0 Master Rod Bearing. , . . 4rl Bronze Alloy Bearings. . . 4L1 Leaded Silver Master Rod Bearings. . . . 4Lt Articulating Rods. 418 Knuckle Pins. . 4r9 Spring Coupling Blower Drive 419 Crankshaft Gear. 419 Determination of Crankshaft Run-out. 4t9 Measurement of Crankpin. . . 419 Blower Seotlon General 4Lg Blowe C ra s e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. i .t .g. . . . . ' . Impeller and Impeller Shaft. . . 420 Floating Gear Bearing.. . . 420 Rear Sectlon General Rear Case Fuel Pump Drive Bracket Oil Pump ] 420 420 420 420

CEAPTER fV (contlnued)

INSPECTION (continued) Rear Sectlon (contlnued) Oil PressureRelief Valve Oil Screen Hot Spot (If Provided).. . . Magneto Rubber Coupling. Magnaflux Inspeotlon General Description Table of Magnaflux Data Engine InspectionForms Tool Ltst CHAPTER V REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES Repalr General Etc.. . CoverPlates,Crankcase Section, Housings, Studs Rivets and Bushings. . . . BearingSurfaces Plating of Parts by Heat. Expansion Chromic Acid Treatment. . . .

Page

420 420 420 420 420 420 424 429 496

........:

501 501 501 501 501 501 501 501


502 502

Painting Metallized Cylinders. Detall Instructlons Front (Nose) Sectlon - Wasp Jr. Thrust Bearing Liner. Valve Tappet Sockets Valve Tappet Guides. Propeller Regulator Valve Front Breather Assembly Front (Nose) Sectlon - Wasp El and Hornet E (Dlrect Drlve) Thrust Bearing Liner. Governor Drive Gear Bushing (Wasp Hl) . Intermediate Governor Driven Gear Bushing (Wasp H1) . Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Front Seotlon (Reductlon Gearlng and Houstng Assembly) - Wasp Hl-G Eornet E-G, E2-G and E8-G

504 505 505 506 506 506 506 506 507

Thrust Bearing Cover Assembly(Hornet E3-G) Thrust Bearing Liner. GovernorDrive Gear Bushing (Hornet only).
Fixed Gear Pinion Cage. Pinion Gear Bushings. . . . Reduction Drive Gear. . Propeller Shaft and Threads Propeller Shaft Rear Bearing

507 507 507 507 509 509 509 509 509

CHAPTER V (contlnued) REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES


Maln Crankcase Sectlons Plate Type Cam (Wasp Jr.)

(continued)

Page 510 511 511 511 511 511 511 5L2 5L2 513 513 5t4 5L4 515 515 516 5L7 5L7 5L7 5L7 518 518 518 519 519 519 519 519

Cam Adjustment rPlate Type) Shelf Type Cam (Wasp H1 and Hornet E Series) Cam Oil Feed Bracket (Wasp Jr.). . Cam Reduction Gear Bushing (Wasp Jr.). . . Cam Reduction Gear Bushing (Wasp and Hornet) Reduction Drive Gear Bearing Liner Front and Rear Main Bearing Liners Valve Tappet Guides. Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing (Hornet Engines) Improved Oil Transfer - Blower to Main Case (Wasp Jr.). . . Installing Mounting Disc for Name Plate. Cyllnders Cylinder Barrel Reconditioning. Valve Guides Bronze Valve Inserts Exhaust Valve Seat-Replacing. Valve Refacing Valve Lapping

SparkPlug Bushings. RockerShaft Inserts. RockerArm Ball End Socket Push Rod Tube PackingGlands

ffill*:X?lt,'r*ffi'snacerl Push Rod CoverTubes.


RockerBox Covers(Wasp Jr.,B2, 83, Wasp and Hornet) Inter-Cylinderand Inter-Ear Drain Pipes. Intake Pipesand Push Rod CoverTubes Exhaust Port Liner Replacement (Waspand Hornet). . . . . SpareCylinders.
Plstons and Plston Rlngs

;13

Pistons Piston Rings Lapping Piston Rings in Cylinders. . . . .


Crankshaft and Artleulatlng Rod Assembly

520 520 520 523 524 525 526

Crankpin Master Rod Bearings. . . . Knuckle Pins . Plating Knuckle Pins. Articulating Rod Bushings Piston Pins and Plugs. Flyweights (Wasp and Hornet)

528 529 529

Blower and Rear Sectlons Impeller Shaft Bearing Cage (Steel Cage) (Wasp Jr.). Impeller Shaft Bearing Cage Lock

530 531

"
CHAPTER V (contlnued) REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES (continued)
Blower and Rear Sectlons (contlnued) Impeller Shaft Bearing Cage (Outboard Bearing) (Wasp and Hornet). . . . . Intermediate Shaft Rear Bearing Liner Starter Shaft Bearing Liner. Blower Intermediate Bearing Bolt Blower Bearing Cover Oil PressurePipe. . . Magneto Shaft Bushings. Starter Shaft Bushing. . Installation of a New Blower Section on an Old Rear Section lnstalling a New Rear Section on an OId Blower Section Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft Bushing. Vacuum Pump Drive Liner. Intake Air Temperature Thermometer Interference. . . . OiI Pump Pratt and Whitney Valve Lubricator (Wasp Jr. B and B2) Assernbly of Major Sub-Assernblles General Detall fnstructlons Front (Nose) Sectlon - Wasp Jr. Tappets and Rollers Front Breather Assembly (If Provided) Propeller Regulator Valve (If Provided) . . . . Front (Nose) Sectlon - Wasp Hl and Hornet E (Dlrect Drlve) Propeller Oil Feed Pipe Governor Drive Gear (Wasp Hl only) Intermediate Governor Drive Gear (Wasp Hl only) Front Sectlon (Reductlon Gearlng and Houslng Assernbly) Wasp Hl-G, Hornet E-G and E2-G Fixed Gear.. Propeller OiI Feed Pipe lHornet Engines) Pinion Cage (Wasp H1-G) Pinion Cage (Hornet E-G and E2-G) Propeller Shaft. Page

531 531 532 532 532 532 533 533 534 534 534 535 535 535 535 535

536 536 536 536 536 536


{-'

CheckingPinch Fit of Thrust Bearing Cover Assemblyof PropellerShaft and Reduction Gear Housing.. . . Front Sectlon (Reductlon Gearlng and Ilouslng Asserrbly) Eornet E8-G
Propeller Shaft Pinion Cage. Assembly of Reduction Gear Housing Bearlng Support Plate Cam Reduction Gear. Propeller Governor Idler Gear (Hornet E-G, E2-G and E3-G) Governor Oil Feed Pipe (Hornet E-G, E2-G and E3-G)
Maln Crankcase Sectlon Wasp Jr.

536 536 536 537 537 Eg7 bgz 538 538 538 539 539 539 539

Cam Reduction Gear

CHAPTER V (contlnued) REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES (continued) Maln Crankcase Sectlon - Wasp Hl and Ilornet E Serles
Front Main Bearing Outer Race and Rollers Tappets and Rollers Cam and Oil Feed Bracket Cyllnders Rocker Arm Bearings Rocker Arms and Shafts lWasp Jr.) Rocker Arms (Wasp and Hornet). . Valves and Valve Springs Artlculatlng Rod Assernbly Assembly of Articulating Rods. . . . Crankshaft Assembly

Page

539 539 539 539 540 540 540 541 542 542 542 542 543
543 543 Wasp and Ilornet 544 544 544

Articulating Rod Assembly


Flyweights Crankshaft Plug . Front and Rear Main BearingInner Races.... .
Blower Sectlon Intermediate (Steel Cage Type) Wasp Jr. Gear Assemblv. . .

Floating Gear. Impeller Shaft Assembly. . . Blower Sectlon (Outboard Support Type) Intermediate Gear Assemblv. Floating Gear. Impeller Shaft.

Rear Sectlon (WaspJr., WaspH1, H1-G and Hornet E, E-G) . . . Generator Drive Assembly Drive Assembly(Hornet E2-G and E3-G) Generator Oil Pump Assembly
Pratt and Whitney Valve Lubricator Side Vacuum Pump Drive. Starter Shaft and Bearing. Oil Screenand Check Valve Assemblv. Tool Llst. CHAPTER VI

546 546 546 546


547 547

547 548

FINAL ASSEMBLY
General Inlorrnatlon Flnal Assernbly Blower and Rear Sections

60r.
601 601 601 601 602

Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft. Tachometer Shafts Starter Jaw and Shaft. Starter Shaft End Clearance Starter or Starter Cover

CHAPTER VI (contlnued) FINAL ASSEMBLY (continued)


Flnal Assernbly (contlnued)

Page

Generator Drive Assembly Magneto Drive Shafts. . . . Oil Pump. Fuel Pump Drive and FueI Pump... Pratt and Whitney Lubricator Pump lWasp Jr. B and82;. Gun Drive or AccessorvDrive Covers. Vacuum Pump Drive Oil Drain Pipe Oil Pressure Relief Valve Carburetor Hotspot or Adapter (If Provided). . . . Main CrankcaseSection (Rear HaIf). . . . . . Crankshaft and Articulating Rod Assembly Main CrankcaseSection (Front Half). . . Cam Drive Gear Wasp Hl and Hornet E. . Cam Drive Gear (Wasp Jr. Engines) Cam Oil Feed Bracket (Wasp Jr. Engines) Cam and Cam Spacer (Wasp Jr. Engines) Cam Reduction Gear (Wasp and Hornet). Bearing Support Plate (Geared Engines). . Reduction Drive Gear (GearedEngines). . Checking Pinch Fit of Thrust Bearing Cover (Direct Drive Engines) Front Section (Direct Drive Engines) Thrust Bearing and Slinger (Direct Drive Engines) Thrust Nut (Direct Drive Engines) Pistons and Cylinders

602 603 603 603 603 603 603 604 604 604 604 605 605 605
605 606 606 606

Oil Sump
Oil Suction Pipe. . Cylinder Deflectors Ignition Manifold Intake Pipes. Push Rods and Covers Primer Lines and Cylinder Oil Feed Pipes. Checking Valve Timing Adjustment of Valve Clearances Timing and Synchronizing Magnetos to Engine. Magnetos with Steel Couplings Flnal Operatlons Magnetos. Ignition Wiring. Rocker Box Covers Reduction Gear Housing (Geared Engines) Propeller Oil Feed Pipe. . Spark Plugs Inspection of Assembled Engine Tool Llst.

606 606 606 607 607 607 607 608 608 609 609 609 609 609 609
609 610 611

6L2 6t2

6L2 612 6L2 6t2 6L2 613

CHAPTER VII RUN-IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL


General

Page 701 70t 70I 703 703

Test Ilouse. . . . . Mounting Stand Engine Compartment.... fntake and Exhaust Alr Stacks. Control Roorn. Tachometer..... 1..... StopWatch FueI Pressure Gage. Oil Pressure Gages. Oil Inlet and Oil Outlet Temperature Gages. Air Inlet Temperature Gage. Manometers.... Clock. Potentiometer-pyrometer, or Pyromillivoltmeter, and Thermocouple Switch. . Barometer and Chart. Psychrometer and Chart (Optional) Manual Controls for Engine. Fuel Flowmeter or Equivalent
- ----r FueI Wobble Pump Priming Pump

Oil Weight Tank. Oil Wobble Pump Ignition Switch Fire Extinguishers Llst of Manufacturers of fnstruments, Carburetor Alr Intake Systern. Englne Exhaust System. Teet Propellers. . Coollng Shrouds Fuel System... . Oll Systern Controls Installatlon of Englne for Test. General . Test Prooedure Controls andEqulpment... ......

703 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 705 707 707 708 708 708 7tL 7LL 7LL 7L2 7t2 7t5 7L7 717 7L7 717

Startlng the Englne. . . . . Oil Pressure... . . Fuel Pressure Engine Run-In Schedule. Checking Operation of Carburetors having Pratt & Whitney

Automatic

Mixture and Power Control Unit..

7L7

CEAPTDR VII (contlnued) RUN-IN OF ENGINE AFTER OVERHAUL (continued) 719 7Lg 719 7Lg 7tg Eorsepower Deterrrlnatlon. Absolute Blower Rim Pressure.. . . . Corrected Barometer. True Barometer. . Wet and Dry Bulb Temperatures. . . . . E. P. Correctlon Factors. Checking Fuel Flow. Fuel Flow.

(lbs./H.P./hr.), Fuel Consumption Specific


Checking Oil Consumption. Final Engine Check.

720 720 720 720 720 721

CIIAPTER VIII PREPARATION OF ENGINE AFTER RUN-IN General


Cleaning Engine Oil Drain Plugs.

Spark Plugs.
Valve Clearances. Preperatlon for Installatlon ln Alrplane Greasing Rocker Arm Fittings (Grease Lubricated Checking Magnetos Waterproofing Magnetos Checking Nuts and Screws. Cylinder Deflectors. Preparatlon ol Englnes lor Storage General. Preliminary Treatment. Wasp Jr. B Engines). .

801 801 801 801 801 801 801 801 801 802 802 802 802 802 802 802 802 802 803 803 803 803 803

Rocker Box Covers


Rocker Boxes.

Thrust Bearing Generatorand Vacuum Pump Drives. ExhaustPorts.

i,nxi''i:ffiH:::i"iol" Lf
Painted Surfaces and Rubber Parts External Engine Cleaning. Carburetor Opening. Openings Propeller Shaft.

CHAPTER VIII (aontlnued) PREPARATION OF ENGINE AFTER RUN-IN (continued) Preparatlon of Englnes for Storage (contlnued)
Crankcase Parting Surfaces Carburetor Magneto Spark Plugs Accessoriesor Auxiliaries. . . . General Inspection. Preparatlon of Englne lor Runnlng General. Carburetor CEAPTER IX INSTALLATION Installlng AND RUN-UP OF ENGINE IN AIRPLANE After Storage 804 804 Page 803 803 803 803 803 803

Englne ln Alrplane

General. With Fixed Mount. Installation of Accessories,Pipe Connections and Controls. . . . With Removable Mount. . . . . Fixed Pitch, Controllable, Constant Speed and Hydromatic Propellers. . . . . . Run-up of Engine in Airplane Ground Running Precautions... . . Adjustment of Oil Pressure Relief Valve

901 901 901 901 902 902 902 902

CHAPTER X

GUN SYNCHRONIZERS.
CEAPTER XI SPARK PLUGS CHAPTER XII FUEL PUMPS General Informatlon PescoFueI Pumps. . . . . CecoFuel Pumps
CEAPTER XIII

1001 1101

l20L 1209

CARBURETORS NA-R9A and NA-R9B... Stromberg StrombergNA-R9C1 and NA-R9C2.


Stromberg NA-Y9E and NA-Y9EL

StrombergNA-Y9C, NA-Y9G and NA-Y9G1

1301 1309 L3t7 t323

CHAPTER XIII (contlnued) CARBURETORS (continued) StrombergNA-Y9H StrombergNA-Y9J. Bendix-Stromberg Automatic Mixture Control Unit.
CIIAPTER XIV Page 1335 L34L 1361

MAGNETOS
General Construotlon

Scintilla SB9R. Scintilla VAG9-D and VAG9-DR American BoschSB9RU-3.


CHAPTER I(V

1401 1408 14tL

RADIO SHIELDING Pratt and Whitney Type.


CIIAPTER AUTOMATIC OIL TEMPERATURE XVI

1501

CONTROL UNIT.

1601

CHAPTER XVII AUTOMATIC MIXTURE AND POWER CONTROL UNIT. CHAPTER XVIII

1701 '1801

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS APPENDIX Tightening Torque Recommendations Numerical Tool List Tables of Clearances Charts for Tables of Clearances and Lubrication Diagrams

\v

INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIONS Frontispieces Right Front View (WaspHl Engine) Right Rear View Left Rear View Suggested OverhaulShop Layout
CHAPTER I DISASSEMBLY Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES Page 102 102 702 I04 104 104 105 106 106 L07 L07 108

101- Engine Overhaul Stand 102 - Loosening the Thrust Nut 103 - Checking Propeller Shaft Runout with Dial Indicator. . . 104 - Removal of Front Section (Geared Engines) 105 - Removal of Front Section (Direct Drive Engines) 106 - Removal of Reduction Drive Gear. . 107 - Removal of Front Half of Main Crankcase. 108 - Removal of Front Main Bearing Inner Race.. 109 - Removal of Crankshaft and Articulating Rod Assembly 110 - Removal of OiI Pump 111 - Removal of Gun Drive Gear. 112 - Separating Rear and Blower Sections CHAPTER II

DISASSEMBLY Fig. 201 Fig. 202 Fig. 203 Fig.204 Fig. 205 Fig. 206 Fig.207 Fig. 208 Fig. 209 Fig. 210 Fig. 211 Fig.2L2 Fig. 213 Fig. 214 -

OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES Removal of Pinion Cage Lock Nut. . Removal of Pinion Cage Assembly. Removal of Pinion Shafts Use of the Valve Spring Depressor Removal of Spring Blower Drive Coupling Rernoval of Rear Main Bearing Inner Race. Separating the Two Sections of the Crankshaft Disassembly of Flyweight Sections Removal of Knuckle Pins Use of the Blower Gear Holder. . . . . Removal of the Impeller Nut. . Removal of the Impeller. Removal of Intermediate Shaft Rear Bearing and Inner Liner. . . Removal of Floating Gear Retaining Nut. . CHAPTER III

202 202 203 203 204 205 206 206 207 207 208 209 209 209

CLEANING
Fig. 301__ Typical Engine Parts Wash Stand.

Fig. 302- Typical Engine Wash House.

302 304

CEAPTER IV INSPECTION Fig. 401- Inspectionof PropellerShaft for Concentricity Fig. 402- Use of Valve Stretch Gage. Fig. 403- Spring Testing Machine
Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig.

404 - Inspection of Cylinders for Wear and Taper. 405 - Checking Side Clearanceof Piston Rings. . . 412-4L7 406A-F - Leaded Silver Master Rod Bearings. . . . 407 - Inspection of Articulating Rods for Torsional Displacement. . . . . 4I8 421 408 - AN-484 Magnaflux Machine 422 409 - Demagnetizing Unit. . 426 410 - Magnetizing Articulating Rods. 426 Magnetizing 411 Reduction Gear Cage. 426 4L2 Magnetizing Shelf Type Cam 427 Magnetizing Cylinder in a Solenoid 413 4L4- Magnetizing Cylinder with Cable through Bore and Out Intake 427 Port. . 427 415 -- Magnetizing Reduction Drive Gear 427 416 - Magnetizing Knuckle Pin in a Solenoid. . . 428 4L7 - Magnetizing Valve Tappet Rollers on a Rod 428 418 - Magnetizing Valve Tappet Rollers in a Solenoid. . . 419 - Method of Holding Valve Tappet Rollers in Inspection Bath. . . . 428 428 420 - Magnetizing Propeller Shaft CIIAPTER V

Page 404 406 407 408 409

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES Fig. 500 - Typical Set-up for Metal Spraying Fig. 501 - Installing Valve Tappet Guide - Wasp Jr.. . . . Fig. 502 - Reaming Valve Tappet Guide - Wasp Jr.. . . Fig. 503 - Reaming Governor Driven Gear Bushing - Wasp H1. . . Fig. 504 - Reaming the Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Wasp Hl. . Fig. 505 - Reaming Cam Reduction Gear Bushing - Wasp H1-G Fig. 506 - Grinding Fixed Gear Ring Surface Fig. 507 - Boring Pinion Gear Bushing. . . . Fig. 508 - Reoperation of Propeller Shaft Threads. . . Fig. 509 - Removing Cam Reduction Gear Bushing. . . . Fig. 510 - Installing Mounting Disc for Name Plate on Sump. Fig. 511 - Drilling Out Valve Guide. Fig. 512 - Reaming Valve Guide Fig. 513 - Removal of Inlet Valve Seat - Boring. Fig. 514 - Facing Valve Seat. . Fig. 515 - Refacing Valve Fig. 516 - Reaming Rocker Shaft Inserts. . . . Fig. 517 - Removing Rocker Arm Ball Cup. . Fig. 518 - Removing Push Rod Ball End. . Fig. 519 - Lapping Cylinder Barrel Flange. Fig. 520 - Valve Tappet Reworking. Fig. 5204' - Piston Ring Arrangements (Wasp Jr. Engines) Fig. 5208 - Piston Ring Arrangements (Wasp and Hornet Engines) Fig. 521 - Checking End Clearance of Piston Ring. .

505 505 506

508 508 509 510 510 5t2 513 5L4


515 515

516 516 518 519 519 520 520 521 522 523
I

CEAPTER V (contlnued) REPAIR AND Fig.522 Fig. 523 Fig. 524 Fig. 525 Fig. 526 Fig.527 Fig. 528 Fig. 529 Fig. 530 Fig. 531 Fig. 532 Fig. 533 Fig. 534 Fig. 535 Fig. 536 Fig. 537 Fig. 538 Fig. 539 Fig. 540 Fig. 541Fig. 542 Fig. 543 ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES (continued) Page Cylinder and Piston Ring Lapping Machine. 524 Installation of Master Rod Bearing. . . . . 526 Methods of Plugging and Taping Knuckle Pins Before Plating.. . 527 Installing Piston Pin BushinC. . . . . 528 Pinning the Piston Pin BushinC. . . . . 529 Wadell Boring Fixture - Articulating Rod. 530 Removing Oil Pressure Pipe from Rear Section. 531 Reaming Magneto Shaft Bushing. . . . 532 Facing Magneto Shaft Bushing.. . . 533 Reaming Starter Shaft Bushing. . . . 534 Assembly of Pinion Shafts into Cage. 537 Assembly of Pinion Cage on Propeller Shaft. 538 Installing Rocker Arm Bearing. . . . . 540 Installing Knuckle Pins in Master Rod. . 540 Section of Master Rod Showing Knuckle Pins and Lock. 54L Assembly of Crankshaft. 541 Diagram Showing Direction of Thrust of Impeller Shaft and Intermediate Shaft Bearings - Steel Cage Type 542 Diagram Showing Direction of Thrust of Impeller Shaft and Intermediate Shaft Bearings - Outboard Support Type. 542 Assembly of Impeller with the Pusher 543 Checking ClearanceBetween Impeller and Blower Case.. 544 Blower Bearing Cover Assembly Showing Location of Securing Screws. 545 Checking Clearance Between O.D. of Spacer and I.D. of Blower Bearing Cover Hole.. 546 CEAPTER VI

FINAL ASSEMBLY with FlushPin Gage Fig. 601- Checking StarterShaftBushing


Checking Backlash between Generator Drive Gear and Starter Jaw Gear Fig. 603 - Checking Backlash between Vacuum Pump Drive Gear and Fuel Pump Drive Gear. . Fig. 6034' - Vacuum Pump Gaskets. Fig. 604 - Checking Clearance between Bottom of Cam Spacer and Top of Cam Hub - Wasp Jr. Engine. Fig. 605 Installing Reduction Drive Gear. Fig. 606 - Installing Cylinder. Fig. 607 - Installing OiI Sump Fig. 608 - Timing Marks on Scintilla SB-9R Magneto Fig. 609 - Timing Pointer for Timing and Synchronizing Magnetos. Fig. 610 - Rear View of American Bosch SB9RU-3 Magneto Showing Timing Marks Fig. 611- Wiring Diagram. CHAPTER VII RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL Fig. 701 - Typical Engine Test Chamber. Fig.702 - Adapter Mount Plate for Single Row Engines. Fig. 602 -

602 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 610 610 611 6LL

702 704

CHAPTER VII (conttnued) RUN-IN OF ENGINE AFTER OVERHAUL (continued)


Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. Fig. 703 - Typical Control Room 704 - Piping Diagram of Typical Test House 705 - Typical Installation Drawing-Wasp Jr. 83. 7054' - Typical Installation Drawing-Wasp S3H1. 706 - Sample Log of Engine Test 707 - Psychrometric Vapor Pressure Chart

706 7L0 713 714 716 7t8

IGNITION MANIFOLD

INTER-CYLINDER OIL PIPES

GOVERNOR MOUNTING PAD

PROPELLER OIL PIPE

1--

owl MoIJNTING MAIN SUMP

Right Front View (Wasp H1 Engine)

J*t

r/*ctioru

The maximum number of hours which an engine should be operated'between overhauls depends conditions. Due to the many ways in ihich primarily upon the nature and severity of rhe op-erating Pratt and Vhitney engines are used and the riumeto,ls variables, even under similar ueage,which between overhaula, affect enginesin service, general recommendations on the number of flight h_ours operators who are to serve as a starting point for maintenance procedure, are applicable only_to -Fromihen on, the time starting to operate nJw'equipment with which ihey have had nd&perience. recommendatione between oveihauls is governid by the individual operatorosexperienceand sp_ecific t6 each opeiator individually^. The safe procedure_with new equipment is to are only applicable -conservative time limit, then graduallv approach longer periods, basedon the satisfactory start with a condition of the engine at overhaul and ihe .".rni""i""o.d of d6pendability. The preferable increof time between overhaul ment of time is lS-/e. When an operator is considering an ext_ension periods, it is recommended that the?ratt and Vhitney Aircraft Service Department be consulted. For experiencedairline or fleet operators, using Wasp Jr., Wasp or Hornet errgines-forthe firet time, it ii recommended that the engines be oveihaul"h betlne"n 400 and 500 hours, baeed on an average cruising output of 50 to 60 per cent of takeoff horsepower. For new operl-tors and private owner"sit is reiommended that the engines be overhaul"d between 350 and 400 hours. Vhen experience warrants extending these ov-erhaul periods, it is important to take into account any chinges in operating proceduri, particularly if power output is affected. For domestic commercial op.r""to.r, overha"lllriods and ihe e*tensi,onthereof should be in accordancewith the regulations of the Civil AeronauticsAuthoritv. For military operations where enginepower output is dictated by tactical requirements, it is recommended that frrs'toverhaul should iot eiceed 300io 350 hours uniil considerableexperiencehas been gained with the engine model. For long range aircraft where the enginesare cruised at relatively iorn po*.r.. 400 hoirs is considereda reisonable time for first overhaul. The time interval for subsequent overhauls should be governed not only by the condition of the enginesat overhaul and their record of dependability,but ilso by the extraordinary outputs which military tacticemight demand. This Oveihaul Manual covers tLe Wasp Jr.B,Bi, "ttd'83, Wasp Hl "niHl-G,and-the Hornet information for the major overhaul E, EG,E2-GandE3-Gengine models.It^includesall necessary of these engines. Informition on any related subject may be readily found by-referring to the index. It will be noted in the text that all Overhaul Tools will be referred to by name only. The tool numbers may be obtained from the Tool List immediately following each chapter. A complete numerical overhaul tool list is also contained in the Appendix. It is recommended that those superintending engirie overhaul be familiar with the following publications: separate -Operators Handbook - This book contains instructions on the operation, care, and maintenance of engine between overhauls. Seivice Bulletins - These are issued from time to time as additional information and improvements become available or when changes are made in certain maintenance or overhaul procedurea. Service Bulletins serve the purpose oT supplementing both the Overhaul Manual and OperatorB Handbook. This Manual includes all information covering Vasp Jr. B, Wasp Hl and Hornet E Serieeengines as contained in Service Bulletins up to and including No. 352. Engine Parts List - These inciude all engine iarts by name, code word, numbero quantity per eigine, together with the engine models t6 which they apply. Interchangeability of parte ii determ-inedfrom this list and Paits List Supplements which are issued from time to time covering changesand additions. Numerical price lisfs and alphabetical code lists are also available. - The Installation Department publishes installation data to supInstallation Information plement the information presented on our engine installation drawings. Such data is presented in bulletin form which can be compiled in the form of a handbook. Tables of Clearances - The Tables of Clearances which are contained in this Manual are compiled to provide Overhaul Shops, Service Stations and Technical Schools with the fits and cleaiancesfof Pratt and Whitney Single Row engines. These tables are to be used in conjqnction with the current editions of Wdll Chlrts and the reduced size charts appearing in this Manual, both of which contain reference numbers indicating the locations of fits and clearances.The Wall Charts, which are available for use in Overhaul Shopsoalso designate the engine lubrication Eyetem in colors. It is our object to furnish Overhaul Shops and Service Stations with the very latest and beet Any information knowledge available on the maintenance of Wasp Jr.,, Wasp, and Ho_rnet_engines. not contained in this Manual will be gladly furnished upon request by the Pratt and Whitney Air. craft Service Department.

PRIMER LINES

BREATHER CONNECTION MANIFOLD PRESSURE GAGE CONNECTION

olL OUTLET
MIXTURE CONTROL LEVER I D L EM I X T U R E ADJUSTMENT THROTTLE LEVER
AUXILIARY OR GUN SYNCHRONIZER DRIVE

O I LP R E S S U R E R E L I EV FA L V E

OIL INLET

Right Rear View

stRvlct
Authorized Service Stations Service Stations. The emblem illustrated below is displayed by Authorized

AUTHORIZED

PARTS & SERYICE


All stations displaying this sign have equipment and personnel for thoroughly and efficiently overhauling Pratt and Whitney engines. Thege stations use only Pratt and Whitney Aircraft parts which are iotd at the publishei ""i'"log prices at all Service Staiions throughout the United Sfatee. Factory Service Department - Pratt and Whitney Aircraft maintains a Factory Service Department to assiet its customers in the operation and maintenance of Pratt and Whitney Aircrait engines. The Service Department maintains contact with Operatorg and Overhaul activitiee who are also ivailable for the investigation of by mearis of periodic visite of s6rvice representativeso airy specific difficulty or problem. Any request for assistance should be addressed direit to the Department of thi Pratt and Whitnev Aircraft, East Hartford, Connecticut. Seivicl,s Ordering Parts - Whenever possible, parts should be ordered from a Parts Catalog. These catalogs arJfurnished to Operatoriand Serv'iceStations and are available to other intereste? parties. In casi a parts list ie not av'ailable,give name of engine, modeloand engine number, and a full description of the part wanted and where it is used. Whenever possible, parts should be ordered through the neareet Service Station. Some parts are not furnished individually but must be purchased as assemblies. This is becauee they require special or expensive equipment for assembling and cannot be fabricated except in a ehop especially equipped for thie work. If an order is received for a unit of an assembly coming under this classification, the complete assembly will be shipped. Spare parts for carburetors, magnetos and special radio shielding together with such accessories ae propellers, hubso vacuum pumps, starters, generators, should be ordered direct from the manufacturer. Returning Parts - Whenever possibleoparts being returned for repairso information, inspection or credit, ehould be returned through an authorized Service Station. In caee it is not possible to send parts in through an authorized Service Stationo it is necessaryto first obtain the prop"i authority from the factory for their return. When requesting authority fol return of parts or when returning parts to a Service Station all information should be given as to: l. Reason for return. 2. Engine Number. 3. Type of engine from which parts are taken. 4. Number of hours of service of the part and of the engine.

If the parts are being returned direct to the factory, proper notification of shipment must be sent to the factory so that it will arrive at least one day in advance of the receipt of parts... When returning parts for repair only, it is unnecessary to obtain authority for return and, whereas desirable, it is not essentialto have them sent through a Service Station. All factory repair work is handled by the United Airports Divieion, RentschlEr Field, East Hartford, Conn.' Strictly repair iteme ehould be sent to that address.

DRIVE GENERATOR OIL PRESSURE G A G EC O N N E C T I O N

STARTER DRIVE AUXILIARY CABLE OUTLETS


TACHOMETER DRIVE

VACUUM PUMP DRIVE

F U E LP U M P DRIVE

F U E LI N L E T

OIL SCREEN CHAMBER

F U E LP R E S S U R E G A G EC O N N E C T I O N

Left Rear View

SUGGESTEDSPECTALEQUTPMENTFOR OVERHAUL SEOP


To properly and efficiently overhaul Pratt and Whitney engines, too much emphasis cannot be placed on the necessity for suitable shop facilities and equipment. In locating and laying out an engine overhaul shop, the same principles apply as for any shop where precision work is carried out. Natural light should be used where possible - northern exposure being the most desirable. Obviously, such operations as the inspection and the repair of major sub-assembliesshould be carried out in the most favorably lighted portions of the shop. For artificial lighting, other than portable hand light, mercury vapor lamps have been found advantageous. Quietness very often presents a difficult problem at the average airport and, where it can be
Quantlty 1 I)escrlptlon Air Compressor

arranged, the overhaul shop should be located behind the hangar. It is also suggested that the test house be soundproofed as well as possible. Another advantage in distance from the field is cleanliness, which is an important factor for satisfactory overhaul. Adequate and efficient heating and ventilation are also important. The arrangement of the shop should be worked out to eliminate as much lost motion as possible and maintain a constant and uniform flow of material through the several processes and operations. The suggestedequipment for the average overhaul shop is listed below. The special tools and equipment peculiar to various overhaul operations are discussed in the text of this manual. Souree of Supply
( a i Ingersoll Rand Company

New York City, New York


( b ) Curtiss Mfg. Company

Automatic Mixture Control Test Rig 1 1 1 I Automatic Mixture and Power Control Test Rig Baking Oven (with circulating fan) 36" Bullard Vertical Turret Lathe

St. Louis, Missouri Bendix Products Corporation Stromberg Carburetor Div. South Bend, Indiana Refer to Fig. 1704 ol page 1709 Gehnrich Corporation Long Island Oity, New York The Bullard Company Bridgeport, Connecticut Pratt & Whitney Aircraft East Hartford, Connecticut Pratt & Whitney Aircraft East Hartford, Connecticut ( a ) Leland-Gifford Machine Co. Worcester, Massachusetts ( b ) Avey Drilling Machine Co. Cincinnati, Ohio Dumore Cornpany Racine, Wisconsin ( a ) Detroit Rex Products Co. Detroit, Michigan (b) R. F. BlakesleeCompany Cicero, Illinois William Brewster Company New York City, New York GeorgeP. Clark Company Windsor Locks, Connecticut Pratt & Whitney Aircraft East Hartford, Connecticut ( a ) New Bngland Blower Co. Hartford, Connecticut ( b ) SouthernNew England Roofing Company Hartford, Connecticut

Cylinder Assembly and Disassembly Stand 2 each Crankshaft Holding Fixtures and Adapters (TAM-206) 1 Upright Drill Press (rt2 Leland-Gifford) Dumore Portable Tool Post Grinder DegreasingEquipment

1 10 6 1

Electric Etching Equipment Engine Disassembly Racks Engine Overhaul Stands with Drip Pans Engine Parts Wash Starid

\-

o,P '\D

I 3 r H e rD
-* i Ag-; Fp,,
o = o Y z

NOlJ.f,3dSNl

.#

r(\ trt

dl t

t +

sg
^[:]l

fiilnHilli
gu

lol |Fl

Fl
lL-'l

l a l l Q l

lI-"4

d. I *zI
t!

(,

I is+ryq H I 9 EI T T II U I

Eiil

\R n a

ou; EE,$
>1 rl

' l*LJflJ' Pil T--n I o


E

1 iflV l f* fg

-' F l l l H - s' e oo lll


tlt l.+

./

!'-; II
t t

IIIH LII LI.JI blt E]itIJi F-" I ll i'l A-{-ti:r--=----J e l F_*__l 8 i


F I T I

gl

h ffi

. r-r,

I l

l
t I l l

t
l

t o
L

t t

i L_ <_r_

_ _i__i__i
-'a rd

fr q I F I
o

S i s l
c
>

l l

u u

l l

)9o

I r(,

lEt

Flisi;;fif :!;fr !aPtl* Hrl:fii *fififi**fi t*llelli;FH;fiE


t
ld

a
I

f o

d 2

gE 1o
'E F c

..t I
I

{i t

!l J

{'t6

a 0) q0 00

!f Jct 8 dTTHHH 6

ct)

{Er {{****

+,h NN

o o<4

(,

24

z o

*&.tr + 66*5AAi{ i

SUGGESTED SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOR OVERHAUL SHOP


Quantlty 1

Descrlptlon Engine Scales


(a)

Source of Supply Fairbanks-Morse & Company Chicago, Illinois ( b ) Howe Scale Company Rutland, Vermont ( a ) Charles L. Jarvis Company Middletown, Connecticut r b ) Pratt & Whitney Division Niles-Bement-Pond Company West Hartford. Connecticut Heald Machine Company Worcester, Massachusetts Heald Machine Company Worcester, Massachusetts ( a ) Kearney & Trecker Milwaukee,Wisconsin ( b ) Cincinnati Milling Machine Company Cincinnati, Ohio ( a ) Wright Mfg. Company York, Pennsylvania ( b ) Yale & Towne Company New York City, New York (a) Lempco Products, Inc. Bedford, Ohio (b) Greenerd Arbor Press Co. Nashua, New Hampshire Taft-Pierce Company Woonsocket, Rhode Island Magnaflux Corporation Chicago, Illinois Greenerd Arbor Press Co. Nashua, New Hampshire Metallizing EngineeringCo., Inc. 210741stAve., Long IslandCity, NewYork ( a ) Monarch Tool Company Sidney, Ohio ( b ) Pratt & Whitney Division Niles-Bement-Pond Company West Hartford, Connecticut Lodge & Shipley Company Cincinnati, Ohio (a) Scintilla Magneto Co. Sidney, New York (b) American Bosch Corp. Springfield, Massachusetts ( a ) Scintilla Magneto Co. Sidney, New York ( b ) American Bosch Corp. Springfield, Massachusetts ( a ) Scintilla Magneto Co. Sidney, New York ( b ) American Bosch Corn. Springfield, Massachusetts ( a ) General Electric Company Schenectady,New York rb) Storts Welding Company Meriden, Connecticut ( a ) De Vilbiss Company Toledo, Ohio ( b ) Binks Mfg. Company Chicago, Illinois

1,,3 H.P. Flexible Shaft PedestalType Grinding and Burring Machine

Heald #73 (Red Head) Internal Grinder Heald #22 Rotary Surface Grinding Machine #3 Horizontal Milling Machine

Lifting Hoist and Track (4000lb. Min. capacity) 15-Ton Hydraulic Press

Lapping Plate (36" square) Magnaflux Equipment Manually Operated Arbor Press Metal Spray Outfit 12" Motor Driven Lathe

24" Motor Driven Lathe Magneto Charger

Magneto Testing Stand

Magneto Tool Kit

Oil Bath Equipment

Paint Spray Booth

SUGGESTED SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOR OVERHAUL SHOP


Quantity 1 1 Description Piston Ring Lapping Machine Polishing Machine
(a)

Source of Supply United Airports Division East Hartford, Connecticut Gardner Machine Company Beloit, Wisconsin U. S. Electrical Tool Co. Cincinnati, Ohio De Vilbiss Company Toledo, Ohio Pangborn Corporation Hagerstown, Maryland J. G. Blount Company Everett, Massachusetts Leland-Gifford Company Worcester, Massachusetts Refer to Plug Manufacturer Eclipse Aviation Division Bendix Aviation Corp. Bendix, New Jersey Federal Laboratories, Inc. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Eclipse Aviation Division Bendix Aviation Corp. Bendix, New Jersey Bendix Products Corp. Stromberg Carburetor Div. South Bend, Indiana Bendix Products Corp. Stromberg Carburetor Div. South Bend, Indiana (may be fabriChamplain Box Co. Hartford, Conn. cated by shop) Rinck-Mclllwaine, Inc. (Rimac) New York City, New York Link Engineering and Mfg. Co. Detroit, Michigan Taft-Pierce Company Woonsocket,Rhode Island May be fabricated by shop Taylor & Fenn Company Hartford, Connecticut U. S. Electrical Tool Co. Cincinnati, Ohio Black & Decker Mfg. Co. Towson, Maryland Van Dorn Electrical Tool Co. Towson, Maryland Albertson Mfg. Company Sioux City, Iowa Wadell Engineering Co. Newark, New Jersey Hall Manufacturing Co. Toledo, Ohio Multiplex Display Fixture Co. St. Louis, Missouri Wadell Engineering Co. Newark. New Jersev

(b) PressureFeed Tank, Complete with Gun Equipment {for preparingenginesfor storage) Sandblast Equipment (Do not use steel shot equipment) SpeedLathe Sensitive Bench Drill lLeland-Gifford #1) Spark Plug Bomb Tester Starter Tool Kit (Eclipse Starters) Starter Tool Kit (Coffman Starters) Generator Tool Kit Stromberg Flow Bench Stromberg Carburetor Tool Kit

10

Sub-assemblyParts Racks Spring Tester


(a) (b)

Surface Plate (36" square) ifor inspection purposes) Tool Racks Tool Bit Grinding Machine

ta) (b)

Valve Seat Grinder Valve Refacing Machine

(a)

(b) (c) (d) (e)

1 set 1

Wall Chart Racks Wadell Boring Fixture

REMOVAL OF ENGINE FROM AIRPLANE


General-The procedure for removing an engine from an airplane varies with the type of engine mount and the type of ship. Detailed instructions should be obtained from the airplane manufacturer and only a general description of the procedure will be given here. Before proceeding with engine removal, the ship should be housedindoors where proper tools are available, and under good conditions oflight, temperature and cleanliness. Two types of engine mounts are predominant; namely, one which is incorporated as an integral part of the airplane, in which case the controls, fuel lines, and electrical connections are disconnected at the engine, and one which may be detached from the ship as a unit. With this latter type the various connections are broken at the firewall. When guiding the engine from the ship, care should be exercisedto prevent any portion of the rear section or accessories from striking the mount. Removal of Flxed Pttch Propeller-Remove propeller by withdrawing locking pin and unscrewing hub nut. The propeller hub nut, which serves as a jack for starting the propeller off the shaft, is unscrewed by inserting the end of a straight bar (approximately 4 ft. long x /a" in diameter) through the holes in the end of the nut and turning it counterclockwise. When the nut reaches the end of its thread, the propeller is usually free enough so that it can be removed the rest of the way by hand. Cautlon-Do not allow the hub to fall off the propeller shaft. Avoid cocking propeller and burring of propeller nut threads on shaft when removing propeller. Rernoval of Controllable, Constant Speed Propellers-Complete inand Eydrornatlc structions for the removal of these propellers are given in the service manual issued by the propeller manufacturer. For convenience these instructions are as follows: Rernoval of Two Posltlon and Constant Speed Propellers-Move the blades toward the full high pitch position until the pitch is within 8" of the basic index setting of the propeller. This is done to remove all compression from the springs. Be sure, however, that the blades are not more than 8o away from the base setting or else the springs will be under compression and the threads of the clamp nut may be stripped when it is unscrewed. \ Remove the clamp nut lock ring and unscrew the clamp nut. Remove the vernier lock plate and the clamp nut gasket. Failure to remove the vernier lock plate before attempting to unscrew the cylinder head will result in serious damage to the puller bolt. Remove the propeller from the shaft. care not to damage the shaft threads. Take

IJnscrew the piston gasket nut and take out the spring assembly. Remove the two piston gaskets. IJnscrew the piston. Remove the propeller from the crankshaft. Take care rlot to damage the engine shaft threads. Now that the front cone has been installed in the propeller and the propeller has been flown, the action of changing pitch has aligned the cylinder and piston. The propeller may be replaced on a propeller shaft. without disassembling the counterweight bearings. Care must be taken, however, not to jar the cylinder and piston out of alignment. If there is any chance that the cylinder and piston have been shifted, lhg cbunterweight bearings should be disassembled to permit correct alignment of the piston threads on'the threads of tlie engine shaff and thus insure against damaging the shaft threads. Rernoval of Hydrornatle Propeller-Remove the lock screw from the dome retaining nut and unscrew the nut. This nut is attached to the dome and acts as a puller when the nut is unscrewed. Remove dome balancing hole nut at outboard end of dome and install the Dome Handle. Remove the dome assembly. Remove the lock ring from the propeller retaining nut. Unscrew the valve assembly. Unscrew the propeller retaining nut and remove the propeller from the shaft. Note-The hub snap ring and related parts inside the spider are so arranged that, as the retaining nut is backed off it pulls the propeller with it until the nut ieaches the end of the propeller shaft thread. Removal of Cowllng-Sections of the cowling, which are attached to the engine and which obstruct accessibility to the controls, should be removed. Removal of Accessories, Plpe Connectlons and Controls-The following accessoriesshould be removed, and the pipe connections and con-

REMOVAL OF ENGINE FROM AIRPLANE trols disconnected prior to removal of engine from the airplane: 1. Battery. 2. Throttle control rods (on side of carburetor). 3. Mixture control rods (on side of carburetor behind throttle). 4. Starter energizingrod (if provided). 5. Governor control linkage (if provided). 6. Hot air control rod (on air intake). 7. Oil inlet pipe connection (at right side of rear section below oil pump). 8. Oil outlet pipe connection (at rear center of engine). 9. Oil outlet temperature gage connection. 10. Oil pressure gage pipe. 11. Oil tank vent pipe. 12. Carburetor fuel supply pipe (at left side of carburetor). 13. Fuel pressure gage pipe (at left or"rear side of carburetor). L4. Fuel pressure relief pipe. 15. Fuel pump inlet and outlet pipes. 16. FueI pump drain pipe. L7. Manifold pressure gage pipe. 18. Wiring from magnetos to switch. 19. Thermocouplewiring. 20. Tachometer cable. 2L. Exhaust pipes to hotspot (if provided). 22. Exhaust manifold and pipes. 23. Carburetor air scoop (below carburetor). 24. Generator, if provided (it is necessary that all external wire connections be first disconnected). 25. Starter. 26. Carburetor. 27. Vacuum pump. 28. Any other accessories,piping or wiring attached thereto, which might interfere with removal of an engine. Rernoval of Englne frorn Alrplane-Hook the Lifting Sling, PWA-37, to a chain hoist and the sling to the lifting links provided at the top of the engine, and then relieve mount of engine weight. Remove the engine mounting bolts, starting with those at the bottom and concludine with the top bolt. Caution-Two men are required for this operation, one to remove the mounting bolts and one to operate the chain hoist. Cover portions of the rear section and accessories which may strike the mount, and then carefully remove engine from mount. Lower the engine and fasten it to the upturned mounting flange of an engine stand using six V16" bolts. The engineis now ready for the overhaul shop. When received in the overhaul shop, an inspection and record should be made of the condition of the engine and its equipment. Rernoval of Englne frorn Packlng Box-The engine may be removed from its packing box by attaching the Lifting Sling, PWA-37, to the lifting links provided at the top of the engine, and supporting the engine from a chain hoist. The box should be tilted on its side so the engine is in a horizontal (flight) position. Proceedin a manner similar to that indicated under the heading "Removal of Engine from Airplane." Cautlon-When tilting the box and engine, gradually take up the weight with the hoist to avoid danger of tipping over. Care should be taken that the arms of the Lifting Sling do not damage the upper cylinders and adjacent parts. The engine may also be removed from the packing box in an upright (propeller shaft up) position by removing the thread protector on the end of the propeller shaft, attaching the proper engine Lifting Eye, and using a chain hoist hooked to the Lifting Eye. Support the engine weight by the hoist, remove the bolts securing the blower section to the plate in the box, and carefully guide the engine from the plate while lifting it with the hoist. The engine should then be placed on an engine stand and fastened with at least six bolts. The carburetor and other accessories should be removed from their compartments in the packing box.

\-

101

CEAPTER I DISASSEMBLY OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

PRELIMINARY

INSTRUCTIONS AND OPERATIONS do not remove screws which fasten magneto coupling gears to the rear ends of the magneto drive shafts. screw driver used for this Cautlon-The operation should fit snugly into the slots of the screws. If the screw driver is too small it will damage the screw slots. nuts which fasten starter to Starter-Unscrew rear section and remove starter. Starter Jaw Nut-Loosen but do not remove nut which fastens starter jaw to the rear end of the starter shaft. Gun Synchronlzers or Accessory Pumps(Inscrew the nuts which fasten them to rear section and remove. This procedure will apply to the removal of gun or pump drive covers if these parts are installed. Vertlcal Accessory l)rlve Shaft-Loosen but do not remove nuts on the upper ends of the vertical accessorydrive shafts. The engine should then be turned with the stand so that the propeller sllaft is in an upright vertical position and the rear section is nearest the floor. Drlve-Unscrew fillister head Tachometer screws which secure tachometer couplings to the rear section and remove couplings and shafts. order to facilitate Thrust Bearlng Nut-In later removal of the thrust bearing nut, loosen it one quarter turn using the Thrust Nut Wrench (see Fig. L02). Ignltlon Wlres-Unfasten at spark plugs. Spark Plugs-Remove spark plugs with the proper Spark Plug Wrench. Propeller Shaft Run-out-Mount a dial indicator on a thrust bearing cover stud with the plunger resting on the propeller shaft (see Fig. 103). The run-out should not exceed .005" and .015" (full lndlcator readlng) on the rear and front cone seats respectively. In the event that these limits are exceeded,particular note should be made for further investigation after the engine has been completely disassembled.

Before proceeding with the dismantling operations as outlined in this chapter, the engine should be mounted on an Engine Overhaul Stand (see Fig. 101). This is best accomplished by attaching a Lifting Eye to the end of the propeller shaft and raising the engine onto the stand with a lifting hoist having a minimum capacity of one ton. Fasten the engine to the stand with at least six bolts through the mounting bolt holes in the blower section. The dismantling instructions which follow are written with the understanding that all safety wiring, palnuts and cotter pins will be removed where necessary before attempting to disassemble any part from the engine. For preliminary steps in engine disassembly, the.engine stand should be turned so that the engine assumesa horizontal (or flight) position. The procedure outlined in the following paragraphs is suggested. Oil Dratn Plugs-Remove the plug at the bottom of the oil screen chamber in the rear section with the Oil Screen Cover Wrench, and lift out the oil screen and check valve assembly. Also, remove the oil drain plug from the bottom of the sump. Allow the oil to drain from the oil screen chamber and from the sump into suitable receptacles. At this time it is advisable to examine the screen, the sump drain plug and the oil for the presence of any metal chips or foreign matter which would indicate a failure or some other unsatisfactory condition in the engine. Parts-Remove Magnetos and Attachlng magheto spark control rods, if provided. Remove bolts, and unfasten clamps which attach magneto shields to the magneto. Then remove the- shields and distributor blocks. Both sets of magneto distributor blocks should be protected with heavy paper or cloth. Remove cap screws which secure magnetos to the rear section and lift off each magneto with its respective rubber coupling. Magneto Coupllng Gear Screws-Loosen but

DISMANTLING Dismantle the engine as follows: all primer lines at Prkner Llnes-Disconnect the blower end and also at the cylinders to which they are attached. Unfasten clamps holding them to the intake pipes and withdraw each primer line from the deflector through which it extends. Cyltnder I)efleetors-Early Wasp Jr. B engines were equipped with V-type inter-cylinder deflectors. These deflectors are secured to the cylin-

102

DISASSEMBLY OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 101 -

Engine Overhaul Stand

%
Fig. 102 Loosening the Thrust Nut Fig. L03 Checking Propeller Shaft Runout with Dial Indicator

103

DISASSEMBLY OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES ders by means of a butterfly clamp. To remove, unscrew the wing nuts which fasten the deflectors to the clamps and remove the deflectors and clamps. Later Wasp Jr. B, early Wasp H1 and H1-G, and Hornet E engines were equipped with bolted pressure type deflectors. To remove, unscrew lhe nuts holding the cylinder head deflectors to the cylinders. Unbolt each from the adjacent deflector and remove. LJnscrewwing nuts holding the inter-cylinder deflectors to retaining clamps and remove clamps and deflectors. "latch type" pressure deflectors, the type The current engines, are removed in the same on used "bolted type", except that intermanner as the head deflectors are detached cylinder and cylinder bv withdrawing the spring loaded clamps from the cylinder head deflectors. Jr. engines having either the "one On Wasp "automatic" type of valve lubrication, shot" or the oil supply pipe should be disconnected at the of No. 1 cylinder and at the inter-cylinder tee-pipe "one shot" valve on the rear Iubricator pump or section befbre the removal of the No. 1 cylinder the head deflector. Withdraw the pipe from "one deflector. On engines incorporating the shot" system, it will also be necessary to disconnect the oil supply pipe to No. 6 cylinder. Intake Ptpes-Loosen the packing nuts at the blower section, using the Intake Pipe Packing Nut Wrench. Remove the cap screw and nuts at the cylinder ends and remove the intake pipes from the engine. pipes are made of thin gage Note-These aluminum and are easily damaged if dropped. Push Rods and Covers-LJnscrew the top and bottom push rod cover gland nuts, using the Push Rod Tube Gland Wrench. Remove the clamps which secure the spark plug conduits to the push rod covers. Rocker Box Covers-Remove the rocker box coversfrom each cylinder. On the Wasp and Hornet engines, prior to the removal of the two rocker box covers adjacent to the sump, the tee-pipe connecting to the sump should be disconnected and then the rocker caps and tee-pipe removed as a unit. The rocker caps may then be disconnected from the tee-pipe. Turn the engine until the valve actuated by the push rod to be removed is closed. Depress the valve spring with the Rocker Arm Depressorand remove the push rod and cover. Radlo Shteldtng-Unscrew bolts which fasten the front and rear radio shielding manifolds to the main crankcase section and lift off the two manifolds. On some shielding, the union nut joining the two sections of the rear manifold should be unfastened prior to removal from the engine. Otl Suctlon Ptpes-Unscrew the nuts which fasten the lower ends of these pipes to the rear of the sump and the upper ends to the right hand side of the rear section. Then unfasten clamps and remove pipes. the Oil Sump Nut Wrench, Otl Surnp-Using unscrew the four nuts securing the sump to the engine. Pull the sump from the engine, taking care not to damage the oil pressure pipes which fit into the sump on Wasp and Hornet engines. to the removal Cyltnders and Plstons-Prior of cylinders, the wrap locks or hose clamps must be removed from the inter-cylinder lubricator or drain pipes and the hose connection between the pipes slipped to one side. The rnaster rod cyllnder should be the last rernoved.. On Wasp Jr. and Wasp engines this is No. 5 cylinder, and on Hornet engines it is No. 7 cylinder. Turn the crankshaft or propeller shaft with the Crankshaft Spline Wrench, until the piston of the cylinder to be removed is at the top of its stroke. Remove the cylinder hold-down nuts, using the Cylinder Nut Wrench, and pull off each cylinder. Upon removal of each cylinder, it is recommended that the cylinder be placed on wood or in some appropriate carrier to prevent damage to the cooling fins and the bottom end of the barrel. Push the piston pin from each piston and remove the latter. Note-If difficulty is experienced in pushing out a piston pin, the head of the piston may be slightly heated and then the pin tapped out, using a fiber drift.

using a drift to drive out a Cautlon-When piston pin, the articulating rod in which the pin is fitted should be supported to prevent damage to either the knuckle pin bushing or the master rod bearing. Front Sectlon (Dlrect l)rlve Englnes)-Remove the thrust bearing cover, thrust nut and oil slinger, and remove nuts which attach front section to front half of main section. Install the Front Section Puller, securing it to the thrust bearing cover studs. On Wasp Jr. engines, make sure that valve tappets are in their full outward position, before attempting the removal of the front section. Place the puller washer over the end of the crankshaft and tighten the puller screw against washer, until front section may be lifted off by hand (seeFig. 105).

LO4

DISASSEMBLY

OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

13 B,
}

Fig. 104 -

Removal of Front Section (Geared Engines)

Fig. 105 -

Removal Engines)

of Front

Section (Direct

Drive

Fig. 106 -

Removal of Reduction Drive Gear

105

DISASSEMBLY OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 107 -

flsmsYal of Front Half

of Main

Crankcase

not attempt to remove front Cautlon-Do section by hammering on valve tappet guides or by prying between parting faces of front section and crankcase. Front Sectlon (Geared Englnes)-Remove the nuts holding thd front secti-on to the front half of the main crankcase. On the Ilornet EG, E2'G, and. E3'G englnes. tt ts lmportant to rernove the short oll feed ptpe tn ihe oll supply llne to the governor in 6td"t to prevent serious damage to the propeller oil feed bip" assemblyr To remove this- pine, and screw a Vta"-20 unscrew ilie locator pipe -internal threads of the threaded bolt into the pipe. Pull out the pipe by pulling on the bolt. Screw the Propeller Shaft Lifting Eye to the front of the propeller shaft, and, -using a chain hoist, tift the front section from the engine (see

Bearlng Support Plate-Loosen, bu-t-do not removelhe nut securing the governor drive gear to the front of cam reduction gear. Remove the three screws holding the bearing support plate to the front half of-the main crankcase and lift off the plate. Cam Spacer and Cam (Wasp J".) - Pgfore removal examine crankshaft for burrs which might hinder removal of cam spacer and cam drive gear. These may be removed by stoning. Lift off cam spacerand cam. Cam Reductlon Gear-Lift the cam reduction gear from its bushing - in the front crankcase on Wasps and Hornets. Lift off the spacer and wire to the cam reduction gear, to assure correct relationship of parts at reassembly. The cam reduction gear on Wasp Jr. engines is removed after disasiembly of the main crankcase. For instructions for removal of this part, refer to Chapter II. Maln Crankcase Sectlon (Front Half)-Unscrew the nine castellated nuts from the through bolts uniting the two halves of the main crankcase. Using a fiber drift, tap the nine crankcase bolts downward until they bottom on the blower section. Cautlon-Do section. not drive bolts against blower

Fie.10a).

Reductlon Drlve Gear-Bend down the tab on the reduction drive gear lock nut, an4 using the Lock Nut Wrench, unscrew the lock nut. Usine the Reduction Drive Gear Puller, pull the drivJgear from the front crankshaft splines (see Fig. 106). The bearing which supports this geal will-lift out of its support plate when t-he gear -i9 pulled. For removalblthe bearing, seeChapter II.

106

DISASSDMBLY OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

""'..''.:

Fig. 108 -

Removal of Front Main Bearing Inner Race

Fig. 109 -

Removal of Crankshaft and Articulating Rod Assembly

Remove the front half of the main crankcase, lifting up evenly on both sides to prevent cramping the front main bearing (see Fig. 107). It may be necessary to tap the crankcase lightty with a fiber drift to start it. The front main bearing outer race and rollers are removed with the front half of the crankcase on geared engines. Subsequent to disassembly of the front half of the main crankcase on direct drive engines, the front main bearing outer race and rollers should be lifted from the crankshaft by hand. Early Wasp Jr. B engines were equipped with one-piece front main bearings. See next paragraph for disassembly. Front Maln Bearlng Inner Race-Before disassembling the crankshaft from the engine it is recommended that the front main bearing inner race or the one-piece front main bearing on early Wasp Jr. B engines be removed with the Front Main Bearing Puller (seeFig. 108). Crankshaft and Artlculatlng Rod Assernbly-Screw a Lifting Eye on the forward end of the crankshaft, and lift the complete assembly from the rear half of the main crankcase, by means of a chain hoist, and lower upon a suitable carrier (seeFig. 109). Maln Crankcase Seetlon (Rear Half)-Unscrew the nuts which fasten this section to the

blower section. Remove this section by lifting it upwards from two positions. One position should be at a point between the cylinder pads of Nos. 5 and 6 cylinders, while the other should be directly opposite this position. It may be necessary to tap the section with a hammer and fiber drift at several positions in order to release it from the blower. Remove the crankcase through bolts. Turn the accessory section with the stand so that the rear section lies in the flight position. Then disassemble the following parts from the rear section. Starter Jaw and Shaft-LInscrew the nut which fastens the starter jaw to the rear end of the starter shaft and remove jaw. Remove the starter drive gear and shaft from the accessory section by tapping the shaft forward with a fiber drift and hammer. Generator Drlve Assernbly-Unfasten the four nuts which fasten the generator drive cover and generator drive assembly to the rear section and remove these parts. Magneto Drlve Shafts-Remove screw which fastens each magneto coupling flange to its respective magneto drive shaft and pull each flange from its shaft.

LO7

DISASSEMBLY OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 110 -

Removal of Oil Pump

Fig.111 -

Removal of Gun Drive Gear

IJnscrew the fillister head screws which fasten each magneto drive cover to the rear section and remove the covers and the magneto drive oil seals. Remove the magneto drive shafts from the rear section, by pulling forward on each shaft from the front end of the blower section. As each shaft is pulled forward, the bevel drive gear will drop if it is not held. If the bevel drive gear keys are loose in their slots, remove and wire them to the shafts to prevent their loss during subsequent cleaning and inspection. Otl Purnp-Unscrew nuts which secure pump to right hand lower side of the rear section. Attach the Oil Pump Puller to the oil inlet flange and remove the oil pump from the rear section (seeFig. 110). To remove the oil pump from early engine models, which do not have the oil inlet flange, tap the pump from the rear section with a long fiber drift inserted through the generator drive opening. Fuel Purnp and Drlve-Unscrew nuts which securefuel pump to the lower left hand side of the rear section and remove the pump with its drive gearand bracket.

On Wasp Jr. engines, having automatic valve Iubrication, the valve lubricator pump is cast integrally with the fuel pump. The oil lines connected to this pump should be removed prior to disassembly of the fuel pump from the rear section. Stde Vacuurn Purnp Drlve-Insert a long fiber drift through the magneto drive opening in the rear section and drift out the vacuum pump drive shaft and gear. Vertlcal Aeeessory I)rlve Shafts-IJnscrew nuts which secure ball bearings and gun synchronizer drive gears to the upper end of each vertical drive shaft; remove the gun drive gears with the Gun Drive Gear Puller (seeFig. 111), then remove shafts by tapping them downward with a fiber drift and hammer. Care should be exercised to see that shafts do not drop onto the floor when driven downward. Remove the vertical drive shaft bearings from their recessesin the rear section by driving upward with a long fiber drift. Fasten the nuts, ball bearings and gun control gears to their respective shafts to insure proper relationship of the parts upon reassembly. Otl Draln Ptpe-Unscrew nuts which fasten oil drain pipe to the blower and rear sections, then remove pipe.

108

DISASSEMBLY OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 112 *- Separating Rear and Blower Sections

Carburetor Hotspot 1If Provided)-Unscrew nuts which fasten hotspot to carburetor mounting flange on rear section and remove hotspot. Otl Pressure Relief Valve-The oil pressure relief valve is located in either of four positions; the oil pump housing; the right side of the accessory section, just above the oil pump; the sump; or at the left side of the oil pressure chamber. Unscrew the acorn-shaped cap from the oil pressurerelief valve and remove cap. With Oil PressureRelief Valve Wrench unscrew body, and remove spring and plunger. Remove adjusting screw and nut from valve body. Turn the accessorysection with the stand so that the forward end of the blower section is facing the ffoor. Separating Rear and Blower Sectlons-Unscrew nuts which fasten rear or accessorysection to blower section In separating the rear and blower sections, two long wooden levers are used in conjunction

with a wooden block as a fulcrum. Place one lever under the oil screen chamber cover. which is reassembled for the purpose, and place the other in the generator drive opening. The block should be located on the stand. Bear down evenly on both the levers and force the rear section up and away from the blower section. It is important to apply equal pressure to both sides so that the two sides will lift evenly, thus avoiding possible damage to the oil pressure pipe (see Fie. 112). Caution-Do not attempt to pry the sections apart by inserting an object between their parting faces. Place the rear section on a table, so that it will rest on the magneto pads. If it is set down on the front side, the oil pressurepipe and magneto shaft bushings may be damaged. Magneto I)rlve Gear (On Magneto)-Remove the nut, then pull the gear from the drive shaft of the magneto with the Magneto Drive Gear Puller.

109

DISASSEMBLY

OF ENGINE INTO MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

TOOL LIST
Wasp Jr.
Tool Name - RockerArm. . DDPRESSOR
EYD EYE EYE EYE EYE PLATE PULLER Lifting, #30Spline..... Lifting, #40Spline.....

Wasp
B3

Hornet
D x x x x x x E . G E2. G 88. G

Tool No. PWA-455


. . .PWA-520 . . .PWA-1332

B x x

82

E1 x x

ET. G

x x

x x

x x x

. . .PWA-1333 Lifting, #50Spline..... Lifting, For Geared Crankshafts.PWA-662 Lifting, For Geared Crankshafts.PWA-1079 Mounting, IJse with TAM-1161 . . TC-23007 Front Main Bearing (One Piece . PWA-150 Bearing) Front Main Bearing Front Main Bearing Front Main Bearing Front Section Front Section Gun Drive Gear Magneto Drive Gear. . . : . . Oil Pump Reduction Drive Gear. . . . . Reduction Drive Gear. . . . . Engine Overhaul, Use with 23007

x x

x
x

x x
x x x x

PULLER PULLER PULLER PULLER PULLER PULLER PULLER PULLDR PULLER PULLER STANI)

....PWA-470 . ...PWA-505 . . . .PWA-L6L7 ....PWA-67 . . ..P W A -657 . . . .PWA-2372 ....PWA-621 . . . .PWA-L327 ....PWA-442 ... .PWA-394 TC. . . ..TAM-I161
. . . .PWA-112 . . . .PWA-155 . . .PWA-197 . . PWA-186 . PWA-237 . .PWA-144 . PWA-67L ....PWA-228 PWA-341

x x x
x

x x x x

x x x x

x
x x x x x

x x
x x

x x

x x

x x x x

x x x
x x

x x x x

x x

x
x

x x

WRDNCE -Crankshaft, #SOSpline W R D N C E - Crankshaft, #40Spline WRENCE - Crankshaft, #50 Spline. W R D N C E - Cylinder Nut WRENCE WRDNCE Intake Pipe Packing Nut Intake Pipe Packing Nut

x
x

x
x x

x
x x x x x

x
x x x

x x
x x x x

x
x x

x x
x x x

x x
x x x

x
x x x x
I

x
x
t

WRENCE - Oil Pressure Relief Valve. WRDNCE -OilScreen Cover WRENCE WRENCE WRDNCE WRDNCH WRDNCE WRENCE WRENCE Oil Sump Nut. . Push Rod Tube Gland

x
x

x
x x

x
x

x
x x

. . . .PWA-2434 - Reduction Drive Gear Lock Nut. PWA-504 - Reduction Drive Gear Lock Nut. PWA-660 -Thrust Nut.. . .PWA-1093 -Thrust Nut.. ..PWA-1092 - Thrust Nut. . . PWA-1084

x x

x
x x

x x
x

r x

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

..PWA-1094 WRENCE -Thrust Nut.. . .PWA-1095 Nut. Thrust . WRENCE rY*" hex. . . . PWA-1398 Plug SPark WRENCE hex.. . . . . .PWA-L44I BendixPlugTB WRENCE 74" W R E N C E - Bendix Plug656 - Y4" hex.. . . . .PWA-1474 PWA-1684 W R D N C E - Bendix LS10 - V8" hex.. . 34" PWA-1696 hex.. Aero LS 1AB WRDNCE W R E N C E - Aero LS 3AB - ,(" hex., BG LS 32L - 78" hex., and AN type p l u g s- 7 8 " h e x . . . ..PWA-2254

x x x x x

x x x x x

x x x x x

x x x x x

x x x x x

x x x x x

x x x x x

x
x

20r

CHAPTER II

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES


FRONT (Nose) SECTION-WASP Tappets and Rollers (Wasp Jr. B and B2)Depress the tappets in the guides until the roller pin-s may be removed. Disassemble pins and iollers. Unscrew the combination tappet and tappet guide loc\ing screw,after which the tappet may be removed. Rocker Otl Mantfold (Wasp Jr. B3)-Remove the holding screws from the bossesand lift off the rocker oil manifold. Use care in removing the ends of the manifold from the oil pressure bracket. Remove the tappets and rollers in the same manner as for the Wasp Jr. B and 82. Front Breather Assernbly (If Provlded)Remove the two screws and lift cap from body. FRONT (Nose) SECTION-WASP Propeller Otl Feed Ptpe Assernbly-Unless damaged,these pipes should not be removed from the nose. Should removal be necessary,unscrew the two bolts holding the governor oil feed pipe in place and remove pip_e., Unscrew plug from nos-e. Insert a hook-ended puller in pipe and remove from nose section. Governor Drtve-The direct drive Hornet E model does not incorporate a governor drive JR.

Insert a piece of flat stock between the screw bossesand unscrew breather from case. Propeller Regulator Valve-Remove the nuts securing the propeller regulator valve assembly to the front section. Lift the complete assembly from the front section. Drift out the tapered pin holding the lever to the end of the shaft and remove the lever from the shaft. Remove the shaft from the valve support. IJnscrew the packing nut and take out the packing. Thrust Bearlng-Tap the thrust bearing out of the liner with a fiber drift, using care not to drive against the ball retainers. HI AND HORNET E (Dlrect Drlve) assembly. To disassemble the Wasp H1 governor drive, remove the nuts which hold the intermediate governor drive gear support to the engine nose section and remove the assembly. Remove the retainer snap ring from the governor drive gear shaft and slip the shaft from its bushing. Bearlng-Remove Thrust as described for Wasp Jr. engines.

FRONT SECTION (Reductlon Gearlng and Ilouslng Assernbly)WASP Hl-G, HORNET E-G and Ez-G Reductlon Gebring-Remove the thrust bearing cover, thrust nut, and oil slinger, and place the propeller shaft in the Holding Fixture, fitted with the proper Adapter. Bend down the tab of pinion cage nut lock washer and loosen and remove cage lock nut with the Pinion Cage Nut Wrench (seeFig. 201). Install the Pinion Cage Puller on the rear of the propeller shaft with the three puller arms inserted in the threaded holes provided in the rear of the cage and pull the reduction gear pinion cage assemblyfrom the shaft (seeFig. 202). Remove the propeller shaft from the Holding Fixture. Remove the propeller shaft from the reduction gear housing by holding the housing in two hands and tapping the rear of the shaft on a wooden block. Remove the propeller oil transfer rings from the carrier on the brobeiler shaft. Then pull the carrier from the shait, using Oil Seal Ring Carrier Puller. Fit a hollow cylindrical drift, of sufficient I. D. to clear the propeller shaft flange, over the propeller shaft and pressoff the thrust bearing. Plnlon Cage-Remove the nuts and bolts uniting the two halves of the pinion cage. Set the cage on a clean bench, rear side down, and remove the pinion shaft nuts. Separate the two halves of the pinion cageby driving against the pinion shafts with a suitable drift. After separating the halves, remove the pinion gears, then support the rear half of the pinion cage on a suitable base, and drive out the pinion shafts (seeFig. 203). Propeller Oll Feed Ptpe-On Hornet E-G, E2-G, and E3-G enginesunscrew the plug from the outside of the reduction gear housing, and remove the pipe which extends to the fixed gear. On the Wasp H1-G engine,this pipe is removed by unfastening the clip from the inside of the reduction gear housing and lifting out the pipe and fixed gear as a unit. Flxed Gear-Unscrew the castellated nuts which secure the fixed gear to the inside front of

202

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

tl

Fig. 201 -

Removal of Pinion Cage Lock Nut

Fie. 202 -

Removal of Pinion Cage Assembly

the reduction gear housing. Lift the gear from the studs. This gear must be disassembledwith the oil pipe on the Wasp Hl-G engines. Governor Drlve (Hornet E-G and Ez-G only) -Remove four screws holding governor or governor drive cover to governor drive mounting pad and tift off cover. Disassemble the retainer

snap ring from the end of the governor drive gear shaft and then lift the gear from its bushing in the reduction gear housing. Propeller Shaft-For disassembly of propeller shafts equipped for Hydromatic Propellers, see the paragraph entitled "Propeller Shaft" under Hornet E3-G engines. E8-G

FRONT SECTION (Reductlon Gearlng and Ilouslng Assernbly)-HORNET Reduction Gearing-Remove the thrust bearing. cover plate and the thrust nut. Using an arbor press, press the propeller shaft assembly from the reduction gear housing. Place this assembly in the Holding Fixture, fitted with the proper Adapter. Place reduction gear housing nose down on bench, and tap out the thrust bearing with a fiber drift, taking care not to drive on ball retainers. Remove the 18 through bolts holding the pinion cage assembly together and the six pinion shaft bolts and washers. Protect shaft just forward of cage with cloth or heavy paper and then tap successivelythe rear face of each pinion shaft with a drift until the front half of the cage is free of the rear flange and remove the pinion gears. Remove the assembly from the Holding Fixture. The pinion shafts may be removed from

the front half of the cage using Reduction Gear Pinion Shaft Drift and arbor press. During this operation, the sleeve, which is part of the drift assembly, is placed over the shaft to support the cagenear the shaft and prevent distortion. Flxed Gear-Remove the pressure oil pipe to the fixed gear from the outside of the housing. Remove nuts holding fixed gear to inside front of reduction gear housing and remove fixed gear. Propeller Shaft-Remove propeller oil transfer rings from their grooves. Remove the hydromatic propeller shaft plug lock washer retaining screw and lock washer,and unscrew the plug. Governor Drive-Remove Hornet E2-G. as described for

203

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 203 -

Removal of Pinion Shafts

Fig. 204 -

IJse of the Valve Spring Depressor

BEARING SUPPORT PLATE Governor fdler Gear-Lift this gear from its supporting bushing in the bearing support plate. Carn Reductlon Gear-Unscrew the nut from the end of the shaft, and lift off the spacer and governor drive gear. Withdraw the shaft from its bushing. Governor Otl Feed Plpe (Ilornet E-G Serles Englnes)-Remove the screws securing the bracket to the bearing support plate. Remove the oil pipe retaining clip. Pull the pipe from its socket and lift from the bearing support plate. Reductlon l)rlve Gear Bearlng-Jack this bearing from the gear hub, using three 5 "-24 screws inserted in the threaded holes provided in the reduction drive gear. JR.

MAIN CRANKCASE SECTION (Front Half)-WASP Carr Reductlon Gear-The cam reduction gear is supported by and turns in a bushing in the front half of the main crankcase. Using the Cam Reduction Gear Holder to prevent the gear

from turning, remove the locking nut with the Cam Reduction Gear Nut Wrench, and disassemble the gear and shaft from the crankcase. IIr AND HORNET E SERIES

MAIN CRANKCASE SECTION (Front IIalf)-WASP Carn and Oll Feed Bracket-Remove the nuts holding the cam retainer plates and disassemble the retainer plates, oil feed bracket, cam and cam bearing from the front crankcase. Tappets and Rollers-Depress the tappets in the guides until tne roller pins and rollers may be removed. Slip each tappet from its guide.

Front Maln Bearlng Outer Race and Rollers -LJnscrew the front main bearing retaining nut on geared engines with the Front Main Bearing Retaining Nut Wrench. Lift out the outer race and rollers. This nut has left hand threads and should be turned to the right to loosen.

204

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 205 -

Removal of Spring Blower Drive Coupling

CYLINDERS Valve Sprlngs and Valves-Place the cylinder over a wooden block which has the same contour as the inside of the cylinder head. It is suggested that a means be devised to use the wooden block in conjunction with a regular cylinder stand, which may be constructed to hold one or all nine cylinders. Depressthe valve springs with the Valve Spring Depressor and disassemble the split locks holding the outer valve spring washer in position (see Fig. 204). Lift out the valve springs and both inner and outer washers. Disassemble safety circlets from valve stems using a blunt-ended flat piece of dural to avoid scratching the valve stems. Remove wooden block and lift out valves. not let valves fall out and strike Cautlon-Do cylinder wall. Rocker Shafts-Remove cotter pin and nut holding rocker shaft, then tap out shaft with a fiber drift, and remove rocker arm. On Wasp "one shot" or "automatic" Jr. engines with valve lubrication, the lubricator pipe should be unscrewed from the ends of each rocker shaft. Then remove the rocker shaft nut on the inner end of each shaft, drive out shaft with fiber drift, and remove rocker arm and bearings. Rocker Arm Bearings-Mount each rocker arm under an arbor press anC press out the rocker bearing using the Rocker Bearing Drift and Base. On early Wasp Jr. B engines, equipped with two bearings on each rocker shaft, use the Rocker Bearing Puller to remove these bearings. This consists of a base in which a slotted extractor is placed. Put the rocker over the extractor and drive the punch into the slotted extractor. This will drive out the bearing next to the base. Turn the rocker over and remove other bearing in same manner. Plston Rlngs-Remove the piston rings from the piston, using the Piston Ring Pliers. The compression and scraper rings are normally replaced at each overhaul. Record should be made of any stuck, broken or sluggish rings. In the event the dual oil rings are to be reused, they should be tagged to indicate the piston frcm which they were removed. Plston Ptn Plugs - Piston pin plugs should be removed for magnaflux inspection of the piston pins. If the plugs cannot be taken out readily, drill a hole in one plug large enough to accomInsert drift in hole modate a small brass drift. and drive out opposite plug. Turn pin around and drive out remaining plug.

205

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

N.a
Fig. 206 -- Removal of Rear Main Bearing Inner Race

CRANKSHAFT ASSEMBLY Mount the splined end of the crankshaft in the Crankshaft Holding Fixture fitted with the proper Adapter. Sprlng Blower Drive Coupllng-Remov_e the nut and washer which secure the fixed spider of coupling assembly in the crankshaft the spring gear. Then with the Spring Coupling Puller, remove the assembly from the crankshaft gear (see Fig. 205). Disassemblethe fixed spider,,floating spider and the spring and button assemblies. Gear-Unscrew the four Rear Crankshaft flat-headed retaining screws and disassemblethe gear from the rear of the crankshaft. In the l-ater Wasp H1 engines, the four retaining screws are eliminated. Rear Maln Bearlng-Remove the outer race and rollers of the rear main bearing. The inner race may then be removed with the Rear Main Bearing-Puller (see Fig. 296). Early.Wgsp .Jr. engrnesrncorporate a one piece rear main bearing wtich may b-eremoved as a unit with the Rear Main Bearing Puller. Crankshaft Front and Rear Sectlons-Before separating crankshaft sections,it is recommended th-at the end clearance of the master rod bearing be checked with a feeler gage and recorded on the inspection sheet. The crankshaft is held together with a through bolt secured by a cotter pin located near the head of the bolt. Removs the cotter pin. Unscrew the through bolt with the Crankshaft Bolt Wrench. The hole which accommodates the through bolt in the crankpin is threaded at each end. On some of the earlier models, after the bolt has been unscrewed a certain distance, it will be free in the crankpin, but cannot be removed until it is screwed back through the second thread. The diameter of the second hole has been increased on later engines, so that bolt can be withdrawn after it has been unscrewed from the crankshaft front section only. Separate the two sections of the crankshaft, using the Crankshaft Pusher (see Fig. 207). It is important to coat the threads of the puller with white lead and oil to prevent "picking up" of the threads. Flywelghts (Rernovable Typ")-Remove the Allen PIug and then disassemble the flyweight bolt, using the Flyweight Bolt Wrench. The flyweight sectionsmay then be jacked apart with the Flyweight DisassemblyPusher (seeFig. 208). Flywelghts (Rtveted Type)-Should it be desired to remove the riveted type flyweights for any reason, refer to Chapter V, "Repair". Otl Plug-Remove the oil plug from the front crankshaft section with the Crankshaft Oit Plug Wrench. Sprlng Blower Drive Bolt-The Spring Blower Drive Bolt Wrench is used to remove this part from the crankshaft rear section if necessarv.

206

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

W
Fig- 207 Separating the Two Sections of the Crankshaft Fig. 208 Disassembly of Flyweight Sections

MASTER ROD AND ARTICULATING Knuckle Plns-Remove screws which fasten knuckle pin locks on web at rear of master rod; then remove locks. For late Wasp Jr. B2 and all 83 engines remove the two screws which hold the locking bar at the front end of each pair of knuckle pins; then remove the locking bars. Fit correct size Bushing and Spacer on base of Knuckle Pin Press Fixture and rest master rod on top of Spacer with the forward side facing upwards and with the Bushing fitted through the master rod bearing. care should be exercised Cautlon-Extreme to avoid damage to the surface of lead silver master rod bearings when fitting the master

.ROD ASSEMBLY

rod over the Knuckle Pin Press Fixture Bushing. Turn master rod so that the knuckle pin to be removed is located directly over one of the slots in the base of the fixture, and locate "L" head plunger over knuckle pin; then place correct size drift between plunger and knuckle pin. Appty pressure on the handle of fixture and at the same time tap the plunger with a copper hammer until the knuckle pin starts to move, (see Fig. 209). The handle should then be depressed until the knuckle pin is pressed from the master rod. It is recommendedthat the Expanding Wedge be inserted between the webs of the master rod for support when applying pressure to the knuckle pins. Hr AND IIORNET E SERIES

BLOWER SECTION (Outboard Support Type)-WASP Breather Assernbly-Remove the two screws holding the cap in place on the external breather of the blower section and remove the breather. Oll Pressure Ptpe and Bracket AsserrblyRemove the screws holding this pipe assembly in position and remove pipe. Rernoval of knpeller-Lock the floating and intermediate blower drive gears together with the Blower Gear Holder (see Fig. 2L0). The

impeller nut locking pin should first be removed by cutting off one end with a small suitably shaped chisel, then driving the pin from the impeller nut with a suitable drift. Remove the impeller nut with Impeller Nut Wrench (see Fig. zLL). The threads of the impeller shaft are left hand so that the nut should be turned to the right to loosen. Using the Impeller Puller, remove the impeller from its shaft (seeFig. 2L2).

207

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES Later engine models incorporate an improved impeller nut locking pin, which incorporates a shoulder and which is drilled at the opposite end. This is securedin place by flaring the drilled end into a counterbore in the nut. A special Impeller Nut Locking Pin Tool is used to flare these pins at the drilled end. This tool may also be used for removal of the pin. Rear Blower Bearing Cover-Remove the eight screws holding the cover to the blower section and disassemblethe cover. Remove the two baffies, shim, and impeller shaft rear spacer. Intermediate Gear and Shaft AssernblyRemove nut and washer from end of intermediate shaft bolt. Remove the intermediate shaft bolt. Using the Intermediate Shaft Rear Bearing Puller, remove the bearing and inner liner from the rear end of the shaft (see Fig. 2L3). Remove the bearing from the liner with the Intermediate Shaft Rear Bearing Disassembly Drift, if the bearing is to be replaced. Remove the intermediate shaft front bearing support by removing the nine screwssecuring it to the blower sectron. Floating Gear-Unlock the floating gear tab lock washer, then unscrew the floating gear retaining nut (left hand thread) with the Retaining
Fig. 209 Removal of Knuckle Pins

L-

Fig. 210 -

Use of the Blower Gear Holder

208

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 211 -

Removal of the Impeller Nut

Nut Wrench (see Fig. 2L4). Remove lock washer, spacer, and front thrust plate. Remove floating gear and needle bearings, taking care that the needles do not drop out and become lost. Disassemble the rear thrust plate and inner race of the floating gear. The intermediate gear and shaft should next be disassembled. Disassemblefront bearing from shaft.

hnpeller Shaft-Using a fiber drift, drive the impeller shaft and its two front bearings forward and remove from the blower section. Tap impeller shaft rear bearing from the blower section. Remove locking pin and nut at front of the impeller shaft and disassemble the two front bearings from the shaft. JR.

BLOWER SECTION (Steel Cage Type)-WASP Breather Assernbly-Remove as described for Wasp H1 and Hornet E series engines. Oll Pressure Ptpe-Remove the screw securing the oil pressure pipe bracket to the blower section. Remove the pipe by withdrawing from its socket. the impeller Rernoval of Irnpeller-Remove in the same manner as described for the outboard support type. (Wasp H1 and Hornet E.)

Rear Blower Bearlng Cover-Remove the eight screws securing the rear blower bearing cover in position and remove the cover. Remove the gasket, closure, and impeller shaft rear spacer. With gears still locked, unscrew the nut from the rear end of the intermediate gear shaft using the Intermediate Blower Gear Nut Wrench and remove the bearing, using Intermediate Shaft Rear Bearing Puller.

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

209

Fig. 212 -

Removal of the Impeller

Fig. 213 -

Removal of Intermediate Shaft Rear Bearing and Inner Liner

Floatlng Gear Assernbly-Unscrew the floating gear retaining nut with the Retaining Nut Wrench. Next remove the front end thrust plate. Disassemble the tloating gear and needles, taking care not to let the needles drop into the blower section. Remove the rear end thrust plate and floating gear inner race. Impeller Shaft-Drive out the impeller shaft towards the front with a fiber drift and hammer. Tap the two rear bearings from the rear section. Remove the locking pin and nut from front of impeller shaft and tap off the front bearing. Interm.edlate Gear and Shaft Assernblyllnscrew the main cage retaining screws and jack the main cage from the blower section by inserting four rZ"-28 screws in the holes provided. Care must be taken not to tilt the cage and thereby cramp the large ball bearing on the intermediate gear shaft. Remove the intermediate gear and shaft assembly. Tap the bearing from shaft by inserting a small steel drift through the holes in the intermediate gear and driving on the inner race of the ball bearing.

Fig. 2L4 -

Removal

of Floating

Gear Retaining

Nut

2L0

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

REAR SECTION the single Generator Drive Assembly-For bearing type remove four screws holding the bearing retainer plate in place and remove the drive gear assembly from bracket. Fasten the gear assembly in a soft jawed vise, remove the iotter pin, and using Generator Drive Gear Nut Wrench, unscrew the spanner nut holding the bearing on shaft. Remove the bearing by tapping with a fiber drift. For the double bearing type fasten the assembly in a soft jawed vise. Bend down the tab of the lock washer and remove the spanner nut from the end of the shaft, using Generator Drive Gear Nut Wrench. Tap the gear from the inner races of the bearings and remove the outer bearing and spacer. LJnscrew the four screws holding the bearing retainer plate in place and remove the plate and inner bearing. are four through bolts that Otl Purnp-There secure the various sections of the oil pump together. Two of these bolts are a loose fit while fhe other two are a tight fit and act as dowels to keep the various sections in alignment. Remove the nuts and washers from the two tight bolts and drift them from the pump. Then remove the nuts from the two loose bolts and remove the bolts. Detach the base, or pressure section, of the pump from the scavenge sections. If difficulty is experienced in removing the gear which is keyed to the drive shaft, place it in a soft jawed vise and remove it by tapping lightly on the end of the drive shaft. At the same time hold the pump sections away from the gear to prevent the key from imbedding in the adjacent section. Remove the remaining sections and gears in the same manner until the disassembly is complete. Valve Lubrlcator Pump (If Provtded)-Unscrew the four nuts holding the cover plate in position and lift off the cover plate. Withdraw the shaft and spring assembly, and remove the two ball thrust bearings. Using a brass drift, remove the drive gear shaft and tift out the drive gear. out the Stde Vaeuurn Purnp Drlve-Drive cotter pin and remove the nut from the end of the drive shaft. Disassemble the two ball bearings and spacer from the shaft. the Starter Shaft and, Bearlng-Remove bearing from the shaft with the Starter Shaft Bearing Puller. Remove the bearing spacer from the shaft.

211

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

TOOL LIST
Wasp Jr.
Tool Narne
ADAPTER ADAPTER -

Wasp
B3 ET ET. G E

Ilornet E . G E2. G 83. G

Tool No.

82

Crankshaft Holding Fixture. . .PWA-1919-1 Propeller Shaft Holding Fix. PWA-1919-1 ture. . Crankshaft Holding Fixture. . . PWA-19L9-2 Crankshaft Holding Fixture. . .PWA-1919-3 Propeller and Crankshaft . . PWA-1919-4 Shaft Holding Fixture . . . PWA-810-1 . . .PWA-810-3 ...PWA-459 AsPWA-614

x x x x x x

ADAPTER ADAPTDR

ADAPTDR -

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

Knuckle Pin Press Fixture. Knuckle Pin Press Fixture. DEPRESSOR -Valve Spring DRIFT AND BASD - Rocker Bearing, sembly and Disassembly BUSEING BUSEING DRIFT -

x
x x

x x x

x x x

Intermediate Shaft Rear Bear. PWA-1283 ing, Disassembly Reduction Gear Pinion Shaft, ...PWA-1532 Disassembly... PWA-296 Knuckle Pin Press Crankshaft and Propeller . . . .TAM-206 Holding PWA-338 Blower Gear (Steel Cage) Blower Gear (Outboard Bear.PWA-609 ite)..

x x

DRIFT

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x

x x x

FIXTURE FIXTURD

x x

EOLDER EOLDER

x x
x

Cam Gear (Use with PWA-7) . PWA-248 PWA-1791, Piston Ring. PULLER AND PUSEER - Impeller. . . . . . .PWA-1306 - Impeller Disassembly. . .PWA-51 PULLDR - Intermediate Shaft Blower PULLDR RearBearing (Steel Cage) . . . .PWA-346 EOLDER PLIERS PULLDR Blower Shaft Intermediate Rear Bearing (Outboard Bear.PWA-627 ing)..

x x

x x

x
x

x x x x

x x x x

x
x x x

PULLER PULLER PULLER PULLDR

Pinion Cage

PWA472

Propeller OiI Seal Ring Carrier.PWA-1268 . . . .PWA-7275 Rear Main Bearing Rocker Bearing (2 Bearing ....PWA-281 Rocker) ..PWA-448 ..PWA-674 . . PWA-2044

x x x x x

PULLDR PULLER PULLER PUSEER

-SpringCoupling -SpringCoupling -

x x x

x x x

x x

x x x x
T

x
I

Starter Shaft Bearing Crankshaft, Disassembly. . . . .PWA-1066

x x

212

DISASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES TOOL LIST (Continued) Wasp Jr.


Tool Narne
PUSHER PUSEER PUSEER SPACER -

Wasp
B3 EI Hl. G E

Ilornet
E.G E2- G E 3 - G

Tool No.

82

Crankshaft, Disassembly.. . . .PWA-1387 Crankshaft, Disassembly. . . . .PWA-1388 !'lyweight, Disassembly PWA-1068 Knuckle Pin (for use with PWA-296). . . PWA-2093 Knuckle Pin (for use with PWA-296)..... . PWA-2252 Knuckle Pin PWA-296) (for use with . PWA-2530

x x x x x x x x

x x x
x

x x

x x

SPACER

SPACER

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

TOOL WEDGE WRENCE WRENCE WRENCE WRENCH WRENCH WRENCE WRENCE WRENCE WRENCE

Impeller Nut Locking Pin. . . . PWA-1558 -Expanding... ....PWA-991 - Cam Reduction Gear Nut. . . . PWA-7 - Crankshaft BoIt (It6" hex.) . . PWA-1914 - Crankshaft BoIt . . PWA-603 Crankshaft Bolt . . PWA-106 Crankshaft Flyweight PIug. . . PWA-I102 Crankshaft Oil Plug. . . . PWA-? Floating Gear Retaining Nut. . PWA-345 Flyweight Bolt . . .TAM-1773 Front Main Bearing Retaining Nut ....PWA-648 Front Main ing Nut Bearing Retain....PWA-659

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x x x x x x x x x

x
x x x r

x x x x x

x x x x x

WRENCE

x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x x

x x x

x x x

WRENCE WRENCH WRENCE

Generator Drive Gear Nut. . . . PWA-174 PWA-1269 Impeller Nut fntermediate Blower Gear Nut (Steel Cage) . PWA-347 Pinion Cage Lock Nut. " Pinion Cage Lock Nut. . PWA-502 PWA-660

x x

x x

x x

x x

WRENCE WRENCE WRENCE WRENCH WRENCE

x x x x x

. PWA-487 Reduction Drive Gear Nut. Reduction Drive Gear Nut . PWA-660 Spring Blower Drive Bolt. . . . . PWA-1195

x x

301

CHAPTER III

CLEANING
General-Two methods of cleaning are generally employed in preparing the parts of a disassembled engine for inspection and repair. It is customary to degrease all the parts of the engine as soon as the disassemblyhas been completed. It will be found that the usual degreasing methods will also be quite effective in removing any soft sludge carbon deposits. However, in the case of hard carbon deposits, such as are found on the piston assembly, a decarbonizing process is required. Great care should be used in separating the magnesium parts from the steel and aluminum parts. MAGNESIUM PARTS SHOULD ALWAYS BE CLEANED WITH A NEUTRAL, NON-CORROSIVE, DEGREASING MEDIUM. Degreastng-The removal of grease and soft carbon compounds may be accomplished by spraying with gasoline, kerosene, or a white furnace oil. Due to the inflammabilitv of the first two named washing mediums, moit operators prefer to use a high grade white furnace oil of 38-40 specific gravity. The parts may be either immersed in the oil or sprayed in a protected hood with the oil and compressed air (see Figs. 301-302). For many of the parts of the engine, this method of cleaning will be found satisfactory. A vapor condensate method of cleaning has been developed by the Detroit Rex Products Company, 13007 Hillview Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. In this method the vapor from a tank of steam heated "Perm-A-Clor" condenses on the cool parts and washes off all the grease,leaving the parts perfectly dry as they are removed from the chamber. In this process, as well as other methods which leave the parts unprotected, the cleaned parts should be sprayed with a light oil as soon as they are washed to prevent rusting. of the decarbonizing soDecarbonlzlng-Most lutions on the market also remove the unbaked enamel from the engine parts. A great variety of commercial preparations are available, some of which will attack aluminum and magnesium parts if they are allowed to stand too long in the solution. It is urged that the operator proceed with caution in trying out unfamiliar decarbonizing agents and follow carefully the manufacturer's instructions governing the use of the particular solvent. In general, these solutions may be divided into two classes-those that use water as a solvent and those that use'a hydrocarbon solvent, such as kerosene. Magnesium parts should never be cleaned in any decarbonizing solution of caustic soda base, or in any process in which water may accumulate in the bottom of the cleaning tank. It ls very irnportant that leaded sllver rnaster rod bearlngs are not subjected to any cleanlng bath other than whlte furnace oll, or lts equlvalent. Two successfuldecarbonizing agents known as "Penetrol" and "Carbrax" that are widely used for removing hard carbon deposits are produced by the Turco Products Company, 6135 South Central Avenue, Los Angeles, California. In the use of these products, the manufacturer's instructions for mixing the compound to the proper strength should be closely followed. The second named agent, "Carbrax", has been found particularly effective in removing the hard carbon deposits from pistons with a minimum of damage tothe piston and a minimum of hand labor. It should not be used for other aluminum or magnesium parts. Another chemical compound which has proved effective is "Oakite", manufactured by Oakite Products, Incorporated, 22 Thames Street, New York City. When a decarbonizing agent other than a white furnace oil, or its equivalent, is used, the parts should be washed thoroughly in hot water to remove any trace of the cleaning agent. If this is not done, the remaining solution may combine with the moisture in the lubricating oil when the engine is returned to service and may cause violent foaming of the oil, with a resulting discharge of oil from the breather pipes. Cleanlng Proced.ure-After the external surfaces of the parts are cleaned, a particular effort should be made to insure that all the internal passages of the engine are thoroughly cleaned and blown out with compressed air. Particular attention should be paid to the oil passages of the crankshaft, blower, and rear section. A sufficient number of the oil passage plugs should be removed to facilitate the cleaning and inspection fhen the degreasingfluid should of the oil passages, be forced under pressure through each of the passages, and the system blown out with compressedair. Pistons should be immersed in the cleattittg solution until the carbon has been softened so that it can be wiped off or removed with a soft metal or wood scraper. Particular care should be taken in cleaning the carbon from the ring grooves to prevent damage to the grooves. Although some cleaning solutions are very effective in removing the carbon from the inside of the pistons, sandblasting of the inside surfaces is generally necessary in order that a thorough inspection may be made for cracks.

302

CLEANING

Fig. 301 -

Typical Engine Parts Wash Stand

CLEANING
When the pistons are sandblasted, the piston pin bossesshould be closed off with rubber plugs. 'Ihe sandblasting should not be more than necessary to remove the carbon, as excessiveblasting sometimes tends to make small cracks invisible. After sandblasting, the oil drain holes in the oil ring groovesshould be cleanedout. The use of a soft wire brush on non-bearing surfaces is permissible. Do not disturb the polished glaze formed on the outside diameter of the piston and the inside diameter of the piston pin bosses. The outside of the cylinders may be sandblasted to remove the enamel before repainting. When the outside of the cylinder is sandblasted, the spark plug bushing, push rod cover tube gland, and rocker shaft inserts should be protected with rubber plugs, and the rocker box covers should be installed. When the inside of the exhaust port is sandblasted, the exhaust valve seat and guide should be protected with a discarded valve. It is recommended that only a fine grade of sand be used during the sandblasting operation. The use of steel grit or coarse sand is dangerous. The sandblasting should be done uniformly over the entire surface and the nozzle should not be held in one place so as to cause excessiveerosion of the metal. It should be remembered that continual sandblasting of the cooling fins will eventually wear the fins away and impair their cooling efficiency. The inside of the cylinder head should be sandblasted to remove the carbon and permit a thorough inspection of this surface. During the sandblasting, the threaded holes in the spark plug bushings should be protected with rubber plugs or with a set of discarded spark plugs. The barrel of the cylinder is protected with a rubber sleeve. It is permissible to sandblast the valve seats. This is often desirable. as it cuts the carbon or glazethat is apt to form'on the seats, particularly the exhaust, and facilitates reconditioning. The ends and insides of the valve guides should be protected with rubber plugs, however. Atry hard carbon remaining on the head of the valve after removal from the cleaning solution may be removed with a fine wire brush. It is permissible to sandblast the exhaust valve providing that a very fine grade of sand is used and the stellite face of the valve and the valve stem are protected. It is not advisable to sandblast the intake valve as sandblasting removes the

303

outside coating which tends to protect the head from further corrosion. Very little corrosion takes place on the head of the exhaust valve. Ball and roller bearings should be cleaned with a neutral cleaning solution. In caseswhere hard carbon has been deposited in the bearing, it may be immersed in "Penetrol", or any carbon solvent that will not attack the bearing or the retainer. Most bearing trouble is caused by the entry of dirt into the bearing. The cleaning of a bearing is a particular, painstaking job, and should be done with complete thoroughnessand caution. Anti-friction bearings are very susceptible to magnetization, both in transit and storage, and while running in the engine. Any magnetization of the bearing will cause minute magnetic particles to adhere to the balls and the races and will cause scoring of these parts during operation. It is, therefore, recommended that all bearings be demagnetized by passing them through a demagnetizer, and thoroughly washed and oiled before installing them in an engine. This applies to both new and used bearings. Non-dernountable bearings are demagnetized as an assembly. With the demountable type bearings, the parts are passed through the demagnetizer separately. Large bearings should be rotated as they are being brought out of the demagnetizer. After removal from the cleaning solution, the bearing should .be washed and blown out with compressedair. When blowing out the bearing with compressed air, hold both races to prevent turning of the bearing. DO NOT ALLOW THE BEARING TO SPIN. Spinning of the bearing in a dry condition will causescoring of the races. The cleaning of the bearing should be continued until the bearing runs smooth when well oiled. A dry bearing will often appear loose and defective. When the bearing has been cleaned, it should be oiled, wrapped in waxed paper and put in a box to prevent the entry of dirt. A clean bearing should never be allowed to lie exposed on the work bench. Strict observance of these precautions will keep bearing trouble down to a mrnlmum. Leaded master rod bearings are cleaned by flowing a white neutral furnace oil over the surface. Do not wipe with a rough cloth. Cleaners, such as "Penetrol", "Oakite", etc. will remove the lead from the bearing surface.

304

CLEANING

Fig. 302 -

Typical Engine Wash Ffouse

401

CEAPTERIV INSPECTION
GENERAL INFORMATION Thorough and intelligent inspection of all the engine parts, is the controlling factor in efficient and dependable overhaul work, and too much importance cannot be placed on careful examinatioir, and the decisioni it involves. The fulfillment of these requirements at overhaul cannot be accomplished solely from any instructions that may be presented. Instructions are necessary, but their main importance in many instances will be to supplement the judgment and experience that a qualified inspector gains after years of this work. For less experienced personnel, the procedure described in this chapter should be closely followed. That portion of the Overhaul Shop devoted to this work should be so located as to receive the maximum of natural illumination, and should provide sufficient space so that all engine parts can be arranged on an inspection table at the same time. With all the parts arranged on one table, the inspector may make reference to other component parts which may be affected by a worn part. In this manner it is often possible to determine at once the cause of any abnormal wear, and to judge the condition of the engine as a whole as compared with other engines having the same amount of service. During the inspection procedure the inspector should check and record the total time of major engine parts, retiring from service, at the specified time, &try part for which a definite life has been established. If a part requires repair, a tag should be attached to it, describing the work necessary for reconditioning the part. Where the reconditioning affects a fit or clearance, the tag should remain attached to the part until final assembly. This will serve as a warning to check the fit or clearance with its adjacent part or parts. Scratched or scored bearing surfaces and bushings should be routed to the Repair Department for correction as described in Chapter V. The parts should then be reinspected and the inspector should make certain that involved clearances have not been adversely affected. The typical engine inspection form, shown in this chapter, is suggested for use in the average overhaul shop. This form rnay be amended to suit individual practice and conditions. A record of the wear and clearances, also pertinent information concerning the condition of the component parts of the engine, should be made by the inspector on these inspection forms. Instructions for the reconditioning or replacement of a part should be included when either of these two procedures is found necessary. From the information recorded by the inspector, it should be possible for workmen to determine readily what repair operations or replacements are necessary. Clearance measurements are for the most part made with micrometers or feelers. When feelers are used for determining clearances, the final size of feeler should be a reasonably snug fit. Where extremely accwate measurements are desirable, micrometers must be used. The backIash of all gears should be measured with a dial indicator suitably mounted, so that the plunger will rest at the same distance from the center of the gears as that of its pitch diameter. Plug gagesare furnished for certain functions, and are of the "NO GO" and "GO" types, the proper fit being obtained when the "GO" end fits and the "NO GO" will not enter the holes The inspection procedure should include the measurement of all the fits and clearances indicated by reference numbers and arrows on the Clearance Charts at the back of this manual, or on large wall charts where these are available. The desired fit or clearance values will be found opposite the corresponding reference numbers in the Service Table of Clearances, also included at the back of this manual. The Clearance Tables are self-explanatory as to method of use and contain reference numbers coffesponding to those on the Clearance Charts; minimum and maximum limits for the desired fit or clearance at each location, and replacement limit figures. Inspection of engine parts is divided into two categories, "Physical" and "Magnaflux" inspection. These two methods of inspection are treated separately in the instructions which follow.

PHYSICAL INSPECTION PROCEDURE-GENERAL The physical inspection of the engine involves certain procedures that are common to similar parts and areas of the various detail parts and sub-assemblies. To eliminate excessive repetition of instructions, the following inspection procedure will be general to the parts specified, and should be performed in conjunction with such other inspection as may be prescribed for the same parts. Flts and Clearances-Check all backlash, fits and clearance figures, the locations of which are indicated on the Clearance Charts. Studs-Examine all studs for stretch, cross-

402

INSPECTION threading, mutilation respective locations. and looseness in their Otl Seal or Transfer Ring Bearing SurfacesOil seal or transfer ring surfaces and liners should be checked for excessive grooving. When the wear from the rings has reached a maximum of .003" on the I.D., or when wear has resulted in a ridge of .0015" at any one location, the surface or liner should be reground to accommodate oversize rings. Antl-Frlctlon Bearlngs-,Some types of current bearings can be completely disassembled. Inner and outer races, as well as individual rollers or balls, of such bearings can be thoroughly inspected and may be magnafluxed if desired. If rnagnafluxed, extrerne care should be exerclsed to rnake certain that all the parts are cornpletely dernagnetlzed before r&ssrnbly. Inspect the races and rollers or balls for signs of pitting, galling, scoring, flaking and excesslvewear. Where roller or baII bearings are of a type that cannot be completely disassembled, or can be only partly disassembled,the bearings should be thoroughly cleaned and visually inspected as far as possible. An effort should be made to examine carefully inner and outer races and the rollers or balls for the conditions mentioned in the preceding paragraph. The bearings should then be oiled with a light oil and checkedfor smoothness. Dry bearings are quite apt to feel rough and sound noisy when turned. Inspec{ ball or roller retainers for cracks or defects. loose rivets and signs of corrosion. The inner diameter of inner racesand the outer diameter of outer races, should be examined for indications of excessivespinning. Such an indication warrants an investigation of involved fits. Radial and axial wear of bearings is usually negligible if the bearings are satisfactory in other respects. With the exception of impeller and rocker arm bearings,for which limits are specified in this chapter, bearings may be continued in service as long as they appear in good condition and turn smoothlv.

for flaking, pitting, galling, Liners-Examine with mating parts. wear and looseness excessive Bushlngs-Examine for cracks, mutilation, scorirg, indications of overheating, looseness and wear. excessrve Crankcases, Brackets, Adapters, Surnps, Cover Plates, Etc.-Inspect for cracks, nicks, breaks, smoothnessof mounting flangesand parting surfaces, obstructions in drilled passages, condition of paint, tightness of plugs, and mutilation of internal threads in tapped holes. Gears-Examine for evidence of improper tooth bearing, pitting, fatigue cracks, excessive wear and burrs. Shafts-Examine for straightness, condition of threads and splines, smoothnessof bearing journwear and fatigue cracks. als, excessive Shafts may be examined for straightness by a plane surface, by rolling bearing surrolling on (rV" blocks and checking for run-out faces on with a dial indicator, or in some cases on lathe centers. Plpes - Inspect all oil pipes for dents, cracks, nicks, and condition of their flanges (if provided). It is important to check all oil pipes that fit in a mating bracket or hole in crankcasefor any loosenesswhich might result in loss of oil pressure. Rivets-Examine rivets for secure anchorage.

Otl Seal or Transf er Rings (Plston Rlng Type)-If oil seal or oil transfer rings are in good condition and show no appreciable wear or loss of tension, it is recommendedthat they be continued in service. When the rings are worn, the carriers should be carefully inspected for wear and roughness.

PHYSICAL INSPECTION PROCEDURE-DETAIL Contained in the following paragraphs are the detail inspection instructions for engine parts which cannot be classifiedor completely covered in "Physical Inspection Procedure--General". To assist in determining what parts are to be inspected in accordance with the instructions given under the aforementionedtitle, a paragraph entitled "General" which lists these parts, appears directly following each major subassembly title. In a few instances the parts so Iisted will require additional inspection and, in such cases,the procedure is described in a subsequent paragraph. To illustrate the foregoing, under the heading of "Front (Nose)Section-Wasp Jr.", in the first paragraph which follows, the Thrust Bearing Liner appears. By referuing back to "Liners" under "Physical Inspection Procedure - General", instructions for the inspection of this part may be found. Likewise, the "Thrust Bearing Cover" appears in the same paragraph. As this assembly consists of a cover plate and a liner, its inspection may be accomplished as described under these respective headings in "Physical Tnspection Procedure General".

403

INSPECTION FRONT (Nose) SECTION-WASP


General - General, Page 401) (See Procedure Physical Inspection

JR.

Nose Section Propeller Oil Feed Pipes Propeller Oil Transfer Rings Roc-ker Oil Manifold Tappet Locking Pin Thiust Bearing Thrust Bearing Cover Thrust Bearing Liner Otl Sltnger-Inspect for galling, distortion and mutilation of surface. threads and Tb.rust Bearlng Nut-Examine wrench slots for mutilation, and front and rear surfaces for galling. If the front face is badly ealled or worn from the propeller rear cone, it ils permissible to lap it on a surface plate or face it otr on a surface grinder, providing the thickness is not reduced more than .0L0" under that of a new nut. Valve Tappet Gulde and Tappet Assernbly -The tappet roller should rotate freely on its pin and should be examined under a glass for iritting and roughness of the O.D. and cracks FRONT (Nose) SECTION-WASP \-'
Gleneral - General, (See Page 401) Procedure Physical Inspection

at edges. Breaks in the case hardening may extend and cause failure of the rollers. Inspect the tappet roller pins under a glass for pitting, scoring, cracks, and signs of overheating. Check the fit of each tappet in its guide. Tappets should work freely in their guides without binding. Check tappet for cracks and scoring. Examine the baII cup for wear and smoothness and if worn more than )(2", or worn uneven, it should be replaced. Check for broken tappet spnngs. The guides should be examined for cracks, especially at the extremities of the slots, and for signs of scoring. The tightness of the guide in the nose section may be checked by tapping the end of the guide lightly with a leather mallet. Front Breather (If Provlded)-Check valve stem for freedom of operation in valve guide. Propeller Regulator Valve-Check the general condition of the valve and see that it turns freely in its housing. Replace the cork packing at every overhaul. IIr AND HORNET E (Dlrect Drlve) Thrust Bearing Thrust Bearing Cover Thrust Bearing Liner Otl Sltnger-Inspect for galling, distortion and mutilation of surface. threads and Thrust Bearlng Nut-Examine wrench slots for mutilation; front and rear surfaces for galling. If the front face is badly galled or worn from the propeller rear cone, it is permissible to lap it on a surface plate or face it off on a surface grinder, provided the thickness is not reduced more than .010" under that of a new nut.

Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Gov. Drive Gear Bushing Gov. Drive Gears (Wasp H1 only) Intermediate Governor Drive Bushing (Wasp H1 only) Intermediate Governor Drive Gear (Wasp H1 only) Nose Section Oil Feed Pipe Propeller Oil Transfer Rings Propeller Oil Feed Pipes

FRONT SECTION (Reductlon Gearlng and Ilouslng Assembly) WASP HT.G AND EORNET E.G SERIES
Gleneral - General, (See Page Procedure 401) Physical lnspection

Fixed Gear Gov. Drive Gear (not on Wasp H1-G) Gov. Dr. Gear Bushing (not on Wasp H1-G) Pinion Cage Lock Nut (not on Hornet E3-G) Pinion Gears and Bushings Pinion Shaft Propeller Oil Feed Pipes Propeller Oil Transfer Rings Propeller Oil Transfer Ring Carrier Reduction Drive Gear Reduction Gear Housing

Thrust Thrust Thrust Thrust Thrust

Bearing Bearing Cover Bearing Liner Bearing Cover Liner (Hornet E3-G) Nut Oil Seal Rings (Hornet E3-G)

Otl Sllnger (Not on Hornet E8-G)-Inspect for galling, distortion and mutilation of surface. threads and Thrust Bearlng Nut-Examine wrench slots for mutilation; inspect front and rear surfaces for galling. If the front face is badly galled or worn from the propeller rear

404

INSPECTION cone, it is permissible to lap it on a surface plate or face it off on a surface grinder, providing the thickness is not reduced more than .010" under that of a new nut. Plnlon Cage-Check the spline fit on the propeller shaft. Check the fit of the pinion shafts in the pinion shaft holes and note the condition of the holes. Inspect the pinion cage bolts, pinion shaft bolts and pinion shaft washers for general condition. the rear cone seat Propeller Shaft-Inspect and hub splines for galling and wear. Check the rear pilot for smoothness. Examine hub, thrust MAIN
General

and pinion cage nut threads for general condition. On the Hornet E3-G engine, inspect the pinion shaft holes for wear and fit of pinion shafts in holes. Check the propeller shaft for run-out either on two "V" blocks, one under the thrust bearing seat, the other under the pilot end or between lathe centers (see Fig. 401). A maximum runout of .008" full indicator reading, is allowed at the front cone seat. Reductlon l)rlve Gear-Examine splined area Check bolts holding for burrs and mutilation. gear to drive hub for tightness.

CRANKCASE SECTION (WASP JR.) Oil Feed Pipes Oil Scavenge Pipe Propeller Oil Transfer Rings Sump Cam Reductlon Gear Bushlng - The alignment of the cam reduction gear bushing should be checked prior to removal of the front half of the main crankcase from the engine. Place the stepped Aligning Bar in the cam reduction gear bushing. Make sure that it is rigidly held by inserting it as far as it will go. The Alignment Block which has one side beveled at one corner and a step at the opposite end should be placed over the crankshaft so that the two faces forming the step are adjacent to the Aligning Bar. Using feeler gages, check the clearances between the bar and the faces of the block at the front and rear ends, taking readings with the crankshaft in four different positions. There should not be more than .004" difference in clearance throughout the length of the block. Crankshaft Thrust Bearlng Spaeer-Inspect the propeller thrust bearing seating surface for galling and fit in the thrust bearing. Check inside surface for galling and fit on propeller shaft. cam with loose rivets Cam (Plate Type)-A usually will not ring true if it is tapped or dropped lightly on a wooden bench. Examine the teeth of the cam rim for improper bearing, wear, or Should cam lobes show any serious pitting. signs of uneven wear or pitting, the cam should be replaced or reground. Should it be felt necessary to regrind cam lobes, cams should be sent to United Airports Division, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Conn. for a decision as to whether cams should be reground or replaced. Check the cam lobes for indications that the tappet rollers are bearing centrally. Cam Otl Feed Bracket (Two Pleee Type)Inspect the cam oil feed bracket for general condition and check the oil pipes for tightness. Examine mating surfaces of two halves for galling.

- Scncral, (See Inspection Procedure Page 401) Physical

Cam Cam Drive Gear Cam Oil Feed Bracket Cam Reduction Gear Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Crankcase Through Bolts Crankshaft Thrust Bearing Spacer Front and Rear Main Bearing Liners Main Crankease Sections (Front and Rear Halves) Main Oil Transfer Rings

Fig. 401 -

Inspection tricity

of Propeller

Shaft for Concen-

405

INSPECTION Examine the condition of the floating type main oil transfer rings and their fit on the cam hub. Check their side clearance and examine for It is not necessary to replace concentricity. ring at each overhaul unless worn this type of excessively. However, it is well to lap both plate and ring contact surfaces at each overhaul. Cam Otl Feed Bracket (One Plece Type)Check the fit of the one-piece type bracket on the cam hub. Examine the steel bushing which is riveted inside the casting for general condition. This part cannot be removed for inspection. Cam Spacer-Examine for galling, distortion, and warping.

MAIN CRANKCASE SECTION-WASP ET AND HORNET E SERIES ( Dlrect Drlve and Geared) - Gonsral, Page 401) Procedure Inspcction Physical General (See Bearing Support Plate Cam Bearing Cam Drive Gear Cam Oil Feed Bracket Cam Reduction Gear Cam Reduction Gear Bushings Crankcase Through Bolts Front and Rear Main Bearing Liners Front Main Bearing Retaining Nut Governor Idler Gear (Hornet E-G, E2-G, and E3-G) Governor Idler Gear Bushing (Hornet E-G, Ez-G, and E3-G) Front and Rear Main Crankcase Sections Main Oil Transfer Rings Oil Feed Pipes Oil Scavenge Pipes Reduction Drive Gear Bearing Reduction Drive Gear Bearing Liner Sump Carn Drlve Gear - Inspect splined area for galling and for fit on crankshaft. cam teeth for Cam (Shelf Type)-Inspect improper bearing, wear, and signs of pitting. Check the inside bearing surface for smoothness. Should the cam lobes be worn unevenly CYLINDERS-ALL
General - General, (SecPhysical Page 401) Proccdure Inspection

or show signs of serious pitting, the cam should be replaced or reground. Valve Tappet Gulde and Tappet Assembly -The tappet roller should turn freely on its pin. Examine under a glass for pitting and roughness of the O.D. and cracks at edges. Breaks in case hardening may extend and cause failure of the rollers. Inspect the tappet roller pins under a glass for pitting, scoring, cracks, and signs of overheating. Check the fit of each tappet in its guide. Tappet should work freely in the gurde without binding. Check tappet for cracks and scoring. Examine the ball cup for wear and smoothness and if worn more than Ye" ot uneven, it should be replaced. The gurdes should be qxamined for cracks, especially at the extremities of the slots, and for signs of scoring. The tightness of the guide in the crankcase may be checked by tapping the end of the guide lightly with a leather mallet. engines having the propeller Sump-On regulator valve located in the sump, follow the instructions for inspection of this part as given under the Front (Nose) Section for Wasp Jr. engines. MODELS carded. Small cracks in the head fins are not cause for rejection. Inspect the inside surface of the cylinder head and the inlet and exhaust ports for cracks. Examine the heavy strengthening rib on the front of the valve housings and the heavy flange at the base of the cylinder head for cracks. Examine the insides of the rocker box walls for cracks. valve guides for exceValve Gulde-Examine sive wear. As valve guides do not wear evenly and become out-of-round, the flat type Maximum Wear Gagesare recommended for use. The maximum width of the gage is the limit for the guide size. If this enters more than one half inch at the top or bottom of a guide, the guide should be replaced.

\-

Push Rod Cover Glands Rocker Bearings Rocker Box Covers Rocker Box Oil Drain or Pressure Pipes Rocker Shaft Inserts (in Cylinder Head) Spark Plug Bushings Cyltnder Heads-As recommended in Chapter III, "Cleaning", cylinders should be sandblasted on the outside to remove old enamel before repainting. This also proves an effective means of disclosing cracks which might not otherwise be apparent. If cylinders are not to be repainted, closely examine the enamel, for breaks which would indicate cracks. If two or more center head fins are cracked their entire length, the cylinder should be dis-

406

INSPECTION

Gage on New Valve

Gage on valve showing space where radius joins the valve stem. lf ,6' or more clearance approximately of the arrows, the valves should be rejected.

at the position

Gage on valve showing space under head. If Kz'or more clearance approximately at the position of the arrows, the valves should be rejected.

Fig. 402 -

Use of Valve Stretch Gage

407

INSPECTION for signs of Valve Seat Inserts-Examine erosion, burning, pitting, warping -or looseness. It is well to check the seating of the valves on their respective cylinder head inserts- by use of Prussian-Blue (after grinding or lapping). If an insert is pitted or warped to such an extent that a reasonableamount of recutting or regrinding the seat will not removg thg pits or t"Jtore itJ roundness,the insert obviously should be replaced. An insert, whether bronze or steel, should be replaced when the wall at the lower extremity has been reduced in thickness to a-pproxima[ely Yrc"; in other words, just before the 15' r*s,rtfacind tool is ready to cut into the cylinder head. Exhaust Valves-Due to the intense heat to *fti.tt exhaust valves are subjected, their Ii& is U*it"a as compared with inlet valves. The life of an exhaust valve depends upon the model 6T engitt"-in which it is installed and the-!{Pe of servicl the engine has undergone. Exh-aust 'rr"t.r". should be carefully inspected at overhaul for wear, stretch and erosion. Radius Limit (or Contour) Gages are available for the various lrutr"t aira sftoutd be used in addition to careful visual examination. When using the gage, hold the valve at eye Ievel with the edge of the gageagainst the valve rl.* and the curvature of the gage against the iuai"t of the valve head, so that any passageof ii?ttt between the valve and the gage -may be readilv seen. A clearance of \2" or more between lfte eie" and the valve is cause for, replacement of ttr]. ialve. Figure 402 indicates the two points "l *hich valves stroda be checked for stretch. Exhaust valves, having creases or signs of r*.llitte ot drawing whefe the head joins the rt"*, ittoUa be rbplaced regardless gf wlat the Radius (or Contour) Gage shows. Flxamine ttr. tip of the yalYq foI "rrpping or wear,. and stone flat to avoid chipping around the periphery' Valve stems should be measured and their diameters compared with the appr-olimate measurements oi the guides, as indicated by the Wear Gage, to determine the clearance Muii*"U"i*""" the valve stems and their guides' A tapered, worn or out-of-round condition of .006" or more on a valve stem warrants replacement of ihe-vulve. Check condition of the grooves for - the locks, 9n4 for burrs i"iti"g or scoring bybeen caused during dishive might fr-tti.ft" assemblY. Inlet Valves-Valve Radius (or Contour) G.ages for the inspection of - inlet are not necessary -the stems foi wear and the Inspect lr"in.t. galling or burrg. See groovei for wear, f,o.t Ittut t"he heads are not pi[ted or corroded to the Check e"le"t of seriously weakening thgm. the clearance of the stems in their respective guides. Valve Sprlngs, IVashers and Locks-Examine the spriigs f6r'cracks, rust, and pit marks. AII springs should be checked for tension. Several instrriments are available for making this check or an ordinary Fairbanks scale-may -b9 used if it is equipped witfr two vertical uprights and a horizbntil arm (see Fig. 403). For pressure limits see Service Tables of Clearances. Check the locks for buns and galling and for fit tith the valve. A properly fitted Iock should h"n" no perceptible movement yhgn in place otr tft" vaive arid the radii of the lock and valve should coincide. washers for signs- of Check the valve spring -cracks and imperfect scoring, galling, pitting, bearing. Roeker Arrns, Bearlngs, and' Adiustlng the'axial movement of the rocker S"""-.-If ;r* bearing permits a side,play in excess.of .0L5", measured at the rocker- arm adjusting screw, the bearing should be replaced. Exhaust rocker arm bearings are subjected to heavier loading and greater heat than are those on the intaLe side-and consequen-tlyare oT-shottet life. To obtain maximum bearing tif", it is feasible to shift exhaust rocker bearings over to the inlet rocker arms after one or two that ttre bearings are runs, assuming, of course,The inlet rocker condition. ,tiU i" servicdable LLutittgs may in turn be transferred to the exG;;t ;;ckei arms. When installing part of a

Fig. 403 -

Spring Testing Machine

408

INSPECTION

Fig. 404 -

Inspection of Cylinders for Wear and Taper

set of new beariogt, the new ones should always be assembled to the exhaust rockers. Inspection should determine the final selection and location of rocker bearings at overhaul and they should be tagged accordingly. Examine push rod ball socket in each rocker arm for loosenessand wear. If worn %2" or more, as measured with a depth gage, it should be replaced. Check the valve adjusting screw assemblies. Particular attention should be given to in socket, the half ball for unusual wear, looseness nicks, or a pitted condition, and the screw should be inspected for cracks. ball ends for looseness Push Rods-Examine and wear. A clear ringing sound when a push rod is dropped on a bench indicates tightness; also that the push rod is not cracked, although further inspection for cracks should be made. Examine for straightness by rolling on a flat surface plate. Push Rod Covers-Examine for cracks, especially at the flange. Inspect condition of the packing nuts. Intake Plpes-Inspect pipes for dents, abrasions, and cracks. If questionable, subject to pressure test. See that flanges are not bent and that pipes are not excessively necked at the blower end.

Cyllnder Barrels-The greatest wear in a cylinder barrel usually occurs at the rear, slightly toward the thrust side, and where the upper piston ring reaches the top .of its stroke. As wear increases at the top of the barrel a step is formed and this step should not be permitted to exceed .006" at any part of the circumference. It is permissible to let the maximum total wear reach .006" over the diameter of the standard bore, as measured at the bottom of the barrel, providing there is not a sharp step of more than .006" at any point (see Chapter V, Repair), and that .006" out-of-roundness is not exceeded. A Block and Indicator, of which the indicating needle has been set at the zero mark, through use of a Master Ring of the basic diameter of the cylinder barrel to be measured (seeFig. 404), serves to measure the wear and out-of-roundness of the barrel. By moving the Block and Indicator along the length of the barrel and looking for any fluctuation in negative directions, in various radial positions, the presence and extent of wear or distortion may be determined. A positive reading at the top of the barrel indicates the amount of choke left in the tapered (or reground) type of barrel. By observing any difference in the diameters of the cylinder at a given distance from the end of the barrel, the out-of-roundness of the cylinder at that location may be determined. A step at the top may be

INSPECTION calculated by subtracting the indicator reading obtained above the top of the upper ring travel from that obtained at the exact top of the upper ring travel. Three different types of cylinder barrels may be found in the subject engines, depending upon the time of manufacture. These are as follows: Type
Identtffcatlon Stamped on Edge of Flange

409

\\--

barrels may be reground straight, but it must be born in mind that this operation destroys the choke feature and its advantages. Regrinding of nitralloy barrels is not recommended. If the wear limit of a banel is reached before 1,500 hours of service, it is feasible to rebarrel the cylinder. This is strictly a factory job and cylinders should be returned to the United Airports Division, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Connecticut for this operation. The cylinder hold-down flange should be inspected for flatness, squareness and trueness by the use of Prussian Blue and a suitable cyli-ndrical surface plate,. _ An uneven seating surface. may be corrected by lapping the flange on a suitable lappi_ngfixture, providing the flange is not uneven or distorted more than .005". Examine the cylinder barrel for cracks and damaged _fi4r. This inspection should be suppleme_nted by magnafluxing, as subsequent-ly described under "Magnaflux Inspection".

Straight type carbon machine steel Choked type chrome molybdenum steel. . . Choked type nitralloy steel

L77 185 139

Straight cylinder barrels are ground after assembly of the head and may be reground to accommodate standard oversize pistons and "Choked" rings, "Tapered" or type cylinders are ground prior to assembly of the head and provide a straight cylinder bore at operating temperatures. Choked chrome-molybdenum cylinder

PrsToN, PrsToN PrNS, AND PISTON RINGS


to inspection, it is recommended Plstons-Prior that pistons be sandblasted on the inside surfaces, as described in Chapter III. \Examine the pistons for cracked or dished heads, cracked skirts, broken ring lands, and scored piston pin holes. Check the top of the piston for flatness by using a straight edge and by measuring any deflection of the center of the piston with a feeler gagg. $ deprgssion of .Q=06" or more, rs cause for rejection of the part. This condition, when occuning in a short period of service, usually indicates that detonation has occurred in the cylinder and should be reported to the Superintendent of Overhaul for investigation. Any considerable depression at the topof the piston will usually cause cracks between-the reinforcing ribs on the underside of the piston head. Examine the sandblasted inside surface of the piston, inspecting particularly the underside of the head and the webs at the piston pin bossesfor cracks. If the piston is heated slightiy, the presence of cracks may be more easily dbtected by the seepage of residual oil from the cracks. Check the width of the piston ring grooves by measuring the side clearance between a standard size ring and the land (seeFig. 405). In determining the ring side clearance, measurements should be taken at several places around the piston and particular care shbuld be exercised to see that all carbon has been removed from the ring grooves before these measurements are taken. In measuring the side clearance of yed_ge-lyperings, the outer face of the ring must be flush with the piston. Should this clearance exceed th.at given in the Table of Clearances, oversize rings should be used at reassembly. When rlsing _rings-oversize in thickness, ring grooves which have become stepped more than .003" should be trued up to take .005", .010" or .020" oversize rings (seeChapter V, Repair). Shoutd the groove side wear exceed .020r' the

Fig. 405 -

Checking Side Clearance of Piston Rings

410

INSPECTION Refer to excessive wear, and rust pitting. Chapter V for information on piston pin types. is permissible to re-use Plston Pln Plugs-It piston pin plugs which have not been damaged iluring rembvai and which are still within the desire-d service limits for fit in the piston pin. The plugs are originally__installed _previous to grinding the piston pin. When used f-or-replaceirent, [owev-er, they must be installed to the service fit specified in the Table of Clearances to prevent swelling the end of the piston pin. Plston Rlngs-All piston rings except the dual oil control and scraper rings are replaced at each overhaul. These rings may be used for two overhaul periods provided they show no appreciable wear or loss of tension. ROD ASSEMBLY

piston should be scrapped, as further reduction in the inter-ring land width will weaken the lands and may cause failure. With the wedge-type construction, it will probably never be necessary to machine the ring groove for oversize rings. If, in exceptional cases,this does become necessary, pistons should be returned to the United Airports Division, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Connecticut, for reoperation. Plston Plns - Prior to inspection of the piston pins, the plugs should be removed as described in Chapter II. Inspect the piston pin for scoring, cracks, CRANKSEAFT
General

AND ARTICULATTNG

- General, Page 101) Procedure Inspection (SeePhysical

Blower Spring Drive Bolt Crankshaft Bolt Crankshaft Front Section Crankshaft Rear Gear Crankshaft Rear Section Flvweieht Liners Frbnt ind Rear Main Bearings Knuckle Pin Bushings Piston Pin Bushings Front and Rear Maln Bearings-Inspection of these bearings will reveal that wear occnrsl sooner on the inner race than on the outer. Except for those on the early Wasp Jr. B engines, the Eearings are made with a separqble inner race. so that it can be examined and replacernent made if necessary. Inspection of the inner race will usually show that the load has been concentrated upon a small part of the circumference of the race. Viewing the shaft from the uppermost, this is lorear with the crankpin "five o'clock" position. cated at about the If a bright line is noticed on the loaded side of the innlr race under one end of the rollers, the race should be turned on the shaft to bring a fresh area into the loaded zorre- It is suggested tttut the race be turned 120o, which will allow ior another turning at the succeeding overhaul. lf uny pitting or flaking of the r?qelvay-is visible the iace should be discarded. io thb iraked eye, -outer race and rollers will be in Ordinarily the eood condition and may be reused when a$sem6tea with a new innei race. However, if the bearing feels rough- when-assembled with a new inner iace or if- the rollers appear pitte-d' or damaged in any waY, the entire assembly should be replaced. Master Rod-Inspect the knuckle pil holes for evidence of gallin!, ridges, scoring, burrs, and cracks. Chedi<thtfit of-the knuckle pins in-the knuckle pin holes. The measurements should be taken after any polishing operations.

The Master and Articulating Rod Alignrng Fixture is used for checking the master rod for alignment (bend and twist). This fixture maY be used either with the master rod bearing and bushing installed or with them knuckle pin removed. To check the rod for bend, place the master rod on the fixture with the expanding mandrel inserted in the master rod bore. Extreme care should be exercisednot to damage the leaded surface of the master rod bearing. By adjusting the mandrel and jack, regulate the position oflhe rod so that its center line is approximately 45/s" above the surface plate and -parallel to it. Piice the expanding sleeve in-the piston pin and expand-with its arbor -until tight. bushing -up the iirdicator until it makes contact Move with the arbor 3" from the centerline of the master rod. Remove the jack and with the left hand move the rod up and down and record the maximum readins obtained on the dial indicator. Without movinglhe position of the dial indicator bracket, remove fhe master rod, reverse its and reinstall on the fixture.- Ag"it -move faee, 'rod up and down with the left hand and the observe the maximum reading on the dial indi cator. A difference in the 1wo readings will indicate bend in the master rod. A maximum difference of .005" is allowed with the indicator nlaced 3" from the centerline of the master rod ior r new rod and .0L0" for a used rod. It is very important that the rod is- parallel with the aligning fixture within this limit. To check for twist, replace the jack and reverse the indicator bracket so that the plunger will bear on the bottom side of the arbor at a position 3" from the centerline of the master rod. Move the indicator back and forth until a maximum reading is obtained. Repeat this operation on the other side of the arbor and compare the two readings. A maximum twist of .010" at a total distance of 6" (3" on each side of centerline) is allowed.

4LL

INSPECTION "prefitted" type Master Rod Bearlng-The leaded silver master rod bearing is now standard in the subject engines. Some of the earlier engine models were originally equipped with the bronze alloy type of master rod bearing. The "prefitted" type leaded silver bearing is supplied for spares and is recommended for replacement. the bores Bronze Alloy Bearlngs-Examine for scoring, excessive wear, scratches, flaking, indications of overheating and impregnations of foreien particles. Measure the I.D. of the mast"er rbd bearing in at least four positions around the circumference at three or more points along the bore, uging-inside micrometers. These measurements should be recorded for future reference. Leaded Sllver Master Rod Bearlngs-In most instances, the deciding factor in determining the further serviceability of leaded silver beirings during inspection at overhaul is the condition of the lead coating which covers the silver. If the lead coating is in good condition, the bearing will automatically be within the prescribed clearance limits unless extreme outbf-roundness or distortion of the master rod bore exists, or unless the bearing is to be used with a crankpin having dimensions other than those of the one with which the bearing was originally used. As the condition of the bearing is determined by visual inspection, the object of the following discussion, with the accompanying photographs, is to acquaint the overhaul personnel with the various appearances and to assist in evaluating them. Limitations of photography prevent the accurate illustration of acceptable and nonacceptable conditions of the leaded bearing surface, and it is impossible to show in the accomnanying photographs the difference in appearance wtriitr exists between a polished lead surface and an exposed and polished silver surface. Usually, however, these two conditions are readily distinguishable upon examination of the actual beirine. If there is any doubt as to whether a polished area has a lead or silver surface, it may be tested by running a finger nail lightly over the surface. A leaded surface will scratch readily; a hard, glassy surface indicates polished silver. The two bright streaks down the middle of some of the photographs are the result of reflected lieht from the curved surface of the bearings and sf,ould be disregarded. Figure 406-A shows a bearing wtrich has-had severe usage, as indicated by highly polished portions of the lead surface, but which is still satisfactory for continued service. The light "A" as well as other light areas, are well area at covered with polished lead. The light-colored streaks, which have a frosted rather than polished itappearance upon examination of the bearing "p", indis6lf, emanating from the oil holes at cate low spots in the lead coating. Such streaks are not cause for rejection of the bearing. The lieht color merely indicates that the lead in this aiea has not been in contact with the crankpin. Low areas which have not been in actual contact with the crankpin retain the light color of an unused bearing, whereas the remaining surface normally takes on a much darker appearance after the bearing has been in service. Such indications should not be confused with areas of corrosion which may be similar in appearance and which may also occur around the oil holes. Areas of corrosion may take any shape and may occur at any position adjoining the oil holes. Corrosion spots often have a brownish pitted appearance. "C" in Fig. 406-A The scratchesindicated by are from testing the surface for lead with a finger nail. Obviously, the lead coating of a bearing should not be scratched, or otherwise disturbed more than necessary,but light scratching with a finger nail will not prove detrimental. condition of the lead Fig. 406-8 illustrates a"hen tracking", which surface, commonly called consists of a closely knit group of small, interconnected furrows. Where this condition is confined to small, well-defined areas, not greater may be than rA sq,. in. in extent, the bearing "hen tracking" continued in service. Where the is extensive, or where the condition shows signs of spreading all over the surface, as in Fig.406-8, the-bearing should be returned to the factory for reprocessing. Fig. 406-C illustrates a bearing with mqtal particles imbedded in the lead surface. This iondition results from foreign matter accumulating in the oil system of the engine. Where a few isolated particles of foreign matter have become imbedded in the leaded surface and the lead has formed a protective coating over and around the particles in such a manner that they _cannot ilamage the crankpin, the bearing may be continued in service. Consideration should also be given as to whether the particles are of steel or of aluminum Fig. 406-D shows a magnified view of a bearing surfa-cein which a foreign particle has imbedded itself, first scratching a groove in the surface. It can be noted that the lead which was displaced by this particle has blended into the adjoining lead coating; also that a protective coating has formed over the particle itself. In such cases, the bearing is suitable for further use. attempt to remove foreign Cautlon-Never particles from the lead surface, as serious damage may result to the lead coating. Fig. 406-E shows a bearing surface which has corrosion been seriously corroded. Small isolated "A" and "B", spots, the size of those shown at are not cause for rejection of the bearing; however, where several spots are grouped together, as in this instance, the bearing should be reprocessed. Corrosion spots in the presence of

4L2

INSPDCTION

Fig. 406-A -

Leaded Master Rod Bearings

4L3

INSPECTION

Fig. 406-B -

Leaded Master Rod Bearings

4t4

INSPDCTION

Fig. 406-C -

Leaded Master Rod Bearings

4L5

INSPECTION

Fig. 406-D -

Leaded Master Rod Bearings

4t6

IIYgPDCTION

c
B A

Fig. 406-E -

Leaded Master Rod Bearings

INSPECTION

4L7

Fig. 406-F -

Leaded Master Rod Bearings

418

INSPECTION under the extremely high pressure which develops when the oil is wedged between the crankpin and the bearing. These triangular areas are at always sharply defined and always appear_ (tD" about the pbsition which is illustrated at of Fie. 406:F. The same condition also appears at the left hand oil hole of the bearing illustrated in Fig. 406-.4.. Generally speaking, it is safe to continue the use of a leaded silver bearing if no part of the lead coating has disappeared to the extent that the silver b-eneath can come in contact with the crankpin. Small individual pits or minute areas of inc-ipient corrosion, such as sometimes occur opposile crankpin holes when the engine has b-e6n idle, with the crankshaft in one position for an extended period, are not considered detrimental. If there is any doubt as to the serviceability of a bearing, however, it should_be returned to the factory for inspection and reprocessing, if the latter proves necessary. The leaded silver bearing may be measured with inside micrometers in the manner prescribed for bronze alloy bearings, but great care should prevent damage to the lead be exercised to "feel" should be very tight when surface. The using the micrometers. wear Artlculatlng Rods-As bushings generallyin an egg-shaped manner along the articulating

"hen tracking", as illustrated at point severe "C", constitute grounds for rejection of the corrosion spo_tsas large as bearing. Obviously, "D" are cause for immediate rejection the one at of the bearing. a condition which is Fis. 406-F illustrates "lead washing". Much of comfronly known as the lead coating has disappeared due to acid attack resulting from high acidity of the lubrithil -bpg.ring_shorvs cating oil. Examination of "A", "B", and "C", that [he areas, indicated at are entirely devoid of any lead coating. Any one of these areas is sufficient cause for rejection of the bearing. In cases which are as extreme as this one, it is improbable that the finger nail test would be necessary to determine whether or not the lead coating has disappeared to the extent this that the bearing should be reprocessed,but "C" test might prove necessary if the area at were ttie orily one in question, as the light or polished appearance is similar to that of a bearing wtrictt has 6een subjected to severe load. ((T)" on this same bearing Indicated at point is a condition which is apt to occur more or less frequently and which is in no way detrimentql, nariely, a small triangular section, at one -side of an oil hole, where lead has been removed from the surface. It is believed that this condition is due to physical removal of the plating by oil

Fig. 407 -

Inspection of Articulating

Rods for Torsional Displacement

4L9

INSPECTION rod center line, the clearance between the knuckle pin and the knuckle pin bushing should be ineasured by using a narrow feeler gage, or a snap gage and micrometers. Articulating rods are checked for bend and twist on the same fixture and in the same manner as the master rod, with the exception that the piston pin bushing end is placed over the mandrel ?seeFie. -As407).The same bend and twist limits with the master rod, it is particularly apply. irirbdrtant that the articulating rods are parallel wifh the aligning fixture within the prescribed limit. Knuckle Pins-Chrome-vanadium knuckle pins were originally supplied on all lhe subject ensines, with the exception of the Wasp Jr. 82 and 83 and Hornet E3-G engines. Nitralloy pins are now supplied and may be identified by "249" stamped on one end. ihe nu-bet Prior to inspection any plating remaining on the pins should be stripped, and galled areas poHshedwith crocus cloth and oil. Inspect the bins under a glass. The presence of cracks is iause for rejection. Check for scoring. Make sure that oil passages are clear and that the aluminum plug inside of the pin is properly anchored and intact. Knuckle pins worn out-of-round more than .0015" should be replaced. For fitting replacement pins, see ChaPter V. Sprtng C_oupltng Blower Drive - Examine spiines and spring retaining webs on fixed spider f6r burrs anil wear. Examine spring retaining webs and teeth on floating spider for wear, burrs, and cracks. Check the pressure of each spring. If worn more than %2" on the ends, the springs should be replaced. Inspect the bronze friction band for wear. Check the buttons for galling on the ends and stone smooth any galled areas. Crankshaft Gear-Examine lugs on rear side of gear for buns. of Crankshaft Run'outDeterrnlnatlon An assembled crankshaft may be checked for and rear main run-out by mounting the front"V" blocks on a bearing seats on two movable plane table. Rotate the crankshaft slowly and measure the run-out with a dial indicator. The run-out should not exceed .008" at, the front cone seat and .004" at the rear cone seat, full indicator reading. For geared engines, the maximum allowable run-out is .002", full indicator reading, with the dial indicator plunger bearing on a concentric ring placed on the crankshaft splines as near the front as possible. is important that the crankshaft bolt should be normally tight when checking crankshaft run-out. As the diameter of the front main bearing seat on the Wasp Jr. engine is smaller than that of the rear main bearing seat, the front half of the crankshaft must be raised a distance equal to half the difference of these diameters, so that the centerline of the crankshaft will be parallel to the plane table. This is accomplished by placing a concentric ring of correct thickness bver the front main bearing seat, or by propping up the front block with shim stock. O.D. of Measurernent of Crankpln-The the crankpin should be measured in at least four positions around the circumference at three or more points along the length, using a micrometer. Compare the mean measurement thus obtained with the similar one taken from the master rod bearing to judge the clearance between the master rod bearing and the crankpin. The wear on the crankpin is normally negligible with the leaded master rod bearings. Measurements should be taken, however, and recorded at each overhaul. A crankpin should not be allowed to become out-of-round mornethan .00]-" , and should not be permitted to remain deeply scored. ,Slight scoring or roughness may be corrected with crocus cloth and oil. Severe scoring or more than .001" out-of-roundnesswill require lapping, or, in extreme cases,grinding. Instructions for lapping crankpins are given in Chapter V. Note-It

\-

BLOWER SECTION
General - General, Page 101) Procedure (See Physical Inspection

Blower Bearing Cages Blower Bearing Cover Blower Case Breather Assy. Floating Gear Lock Nut Floating Gear Impeller Nut Impeller Shaft Intermediate Blower Drive Gear Bearings Intermediate Blower Drive Shaft Intermediate Shaft Bolt

Intermediate Shaft Rear Bearing Liner Magneto Drive Shafts Magneto Drive Shaft Bushings Oit Pipe and Bracket Starter Drive Shaft Starter Drive Shaft Bearing Blower Case-Inspect mounting lugs for condition and alignment of mounting faces. Check bearing cages -for for condition of the bearing race tightness in the case. Oversize bores and cages are available and may be installed as described in Chapter V.

420

INSPECTION
factory. The impeller shaft should be tin flash plated at each overhaul. The impeller shaft bearings should be replaced at each overhaul. the inner Floatlng Gear Bearlng-Examine and outer floating gear race for roughness or pitting. Examine needle bearings for pit marks wear, particularly at their extremior exces.sive ties. Examine floating gear front and rear spacers for excessivewear or scoring.

the knpeller and knpeller Shaft-Inspect impeller vanes for nicks and mutilation. Check for galling on the hub and the hub splines. See that the serial numbers stamped on the impeller and on its shaft match, on engines having a blower ratio greater than 10:1. Check the spline fit between the impeller and the impeller shaft. If the impeller is tight on the impeller shaft for a distance of one third of the impeller hub, the fit may be considered satis-

REAR SECTION - General. Procedure Physical Inspection Page 401) General (See Fuel Pump Drive Gear Fuel Pump Drive Bracket Generator Drive Gear Generator Drive Bearing Generator Drive Support Gun Control Drive Gear Lubricator Gear Lubricator Spring Magneto Drive Gears and Couplings Magneto Drive Shaft Bushings Oil Drain Pipe Oil Pressure Pipe Oil Screen Cover Rear Case Starter Drive Shaft Bushing Starter Jaw Tachometer Drive Gear Vacuum Pump Drive Gear Vacuum Pump Drive Liner Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft Ball Bearings Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft Bushings Rear Case-Inspect the vanes in carburetor elbow to see that they are tight and in good condition. If necessary, lap the carburetor or hotspot mounting pad. Check tightness of magneto locating dowels. MAGNAFLUX "Magnaflux" method of inspecGeneral-The tion leads to the detection of defects and fatigue cracks which otherwise could not be seen in the normal course of inspection, and its use is recommended for overhaul shops. This inspection should include the _testilg of the parts 6y the magnetic method, the tabulationbf the liind, natuie, and extent of the defects found, and the final decision as to the suitabitity of the parts for further service. Inspectors in this field should be specialists who have been thoroughly trained to evaluate correctly the various indications which may be encountered. processconsists of magnetizDescrlptton-The ing the part to be inspecte$ and jmmersing it in a tank iontaining magnetic oxide suspended in top face of Fuel Pump Drlve Bracket-The the fuel pump drive bracket which forms a seat for the gear should be smooth and parallel to the face of the flange. oil pump body for scoring Oll Purnp-Examine and wear. The gears should turn freely and smoothly and show no indication of rubbing on the body. Inspect the drive and idler shafts for roughness and wear. Check fit of keys in keyways. Otl Pressure Relief Valve-Examine plunger for proper seating in the cage. See that _relief valve spring is in good condition and has sufficient pressrure. the oil screen for disOtl Screen-Examine tortion, mutilation of the screen, or splits in the solder. Check fit of screen in recess in rear case and examine check valve seat. Examine check valve for proper seating. Eotspot (If Provtded)-Examine the hot spot tube for signs of burning through and excessive rusting. Examine the ends of the tubes for roundness and signs of nicks or damage. Magneto Rubber Coupltng-See "Assembly". titled INSPECTION Varsol, a vehicle similar to kerosene, the boiling point of which is around 300" F. (149" C.). Kerosene may be used, but generally it is too oily to give satisfactory results. The oxide is kept dispersed by air bubbling through_ small holes in air pipes located in the bottom of the tank. When an electric current flows through a conductor, a magnetic -right field is created around the angles to the direction of conductor at current flow. Atty flaw or crack in the conductor material causes the direction of flow to be changed and a resultant distortion in the magnetic-field. This causes north and south poles to be formed on either side of the flaw, varying in strength directly with the angularity of the flaw or track to the direction of current flow. When the part is immersed in the testing bath, the oxide particles will bridge the gap between chapter en-

42I

INSPECTION

Fig. 408 -

AN-484 Magnaflux Machine

the two poles. Since the indications are strongest when the part is at right angles to the field, irregularly shaped parts are sometimes magnetized in more than one direction. There are three methods of magnetization employed, depending on the size and shape of the part and the direction of the field that is required. Crankshafts, bolts and all long pieces are magnetized by passing the cunent lengthwise through the piece. Ring gears, sleeves,and other circular pieces are magnetized by placing a brass or copper rod through the piece and passing the current through the rod. The third method of magnetizing consists of placing the part in a solenoid while the cunent is passed through the coils of the solenoid. This method is employed in magnetizing such parts as mall bolts and knuckle pins, and will give the strongest indications at right angles to axis of the piece. All three of these methods of magnetization are sometimes employed to test a single part of the englne. The basic principle to be remembered in magnetizing the parts, is that the indications are strongest in lines parallel with the flow of cunent and at right angles to the magnetic field. The indications need not be exactly parallel to the flow of the current (or at right angles to the magnetic field), but are strongest at this point

and gradually become weaker until they completely disappear at approximately 20o from the magnetic field. Thus it is often sufficient to magnetize the piece in only one direction. Before the parts are magnetized they should be thoroughly cleaned of oil, grease, carbon and sludge. This will permit intimate contact of the iron particles and the metal, and will prevent pollution of the inspection bath. All oil passages which are not readily cleaned should be plugged with conspicuous fiber or wooden plugs before immersion in the testing bath. All surfaces that are scratched, scored or galled should be stoned and polished with crocus cloth and oil before being magnafluxed. If this is not done, the resulting indications will be false and misleading. When the magnetizrng current is passed directly through the piece, particular care should be taken to see that a good contact is established on both ends of the piece. If this is not done, the piece will be burned at these points by the heat generated from the heavy curent passing through the poor contacts. Pads, made of braided copper tape, or plates of soft lead, are usually used to insure good contact with the electrodes of the machine, unless special adapters or fittings are required. In short, a good low resistance contact should be insured to prevent burning of the part at the points of contact.

422

INSPECTION

Fig. 409 -

Demagnetizing Unit

One half second is ample time for the current to magnetize. There is great danger of burning the parts if the current is allowed to flow for any appreciable period of time. Three to five minutes immersion in the testing bath is ample for building up the iron oxide powder on any defects in the parts. The magnitude of the indication of a fault in any piece will vary greatly with the flux density of the magnetic field at the point in question and the method of applying the fluid. For example, if the solution c6ntii"iirg the iron powder i-s allowed to flow over the part while it is being magnetized, the indications, or building up of the iron powder, will be very rapid and will usually be of greater magnitude than if the part is magnetized and then immersed in an agitated bath in which the iron powder is held in suspension. The former method of magnafluxing also shows forging flow lines, inclusions of nonmagnetic materials below the surface of the metal, laps, seams and any rapid change of section of the parts. These indlications are seldom cause for rejection of the part at overhaul, except where they have occurred in a highly stressed area and might cause fatigue cracks. For overhaul shop use, the residual method of mBgnaflux testing rather than the continuous method is recommended. In the former method, the part is magnetized and then immersed in

the testing bath. Very short applications of DIRECT CURRENT are used for the magnetizing. Longer applications of the magnetizing current are not only unnecessary, but they tend to heat up and burn the piece being tested and run down the storage batteries of the magnaflux machine. The horizontal type of machine (AN-484) with 4" and 8" solenoids is recommended for engine overhaul shops, (see Fig. 408). The individual operator may make up different size solenoids to fit any specific requirements. Information concerning this equipment may be obtained from the Magnaflux Corporation, 25 West 43rd Street, N. Y. C. After each "lengthwise" and "crosswise" magnetization and also after the final inspection, the parts should be completely demagnetized. The part should be inserted in an alternating current demagnetizer (see Fig. 409) and then withdrawn slowly. On parts that are irregular and therefore difficult to demagnetize, the rate of withdrawal from the dema gnetizer should not exceed twelve feet per minute. Cams and other ring-shaped parts should be rotated as they are withdrawn from the demagnetizer. Smaller parts that are more regular may be withdrawn somewhat faster. After demagnetization, the parts should be tested for magnetization with a compass. A maximum deflection of 3" at a distance of 6" from the part is allowed in this test.

423

INSPDCTION The oil passageswhich were plugged prior to magnafluxing the part, should be unplugged after inspection and the part thoroughly washed and oiled. If a part showing a slight defect is passed for service, a complete record of the defect, showing its location and extent, should be kept so that the part may be given special attention at the next inspection. From the operator's point of view, the magnaflux method of inspection is of value mostly in bringing to light possible fatigue cracks which develop while the part is in service. The ability to evaluate magnaflux indications properly is to a great extent, a matter of experience and judgment, acquired only after extended experience covering various shaped parts and different types of defects. For this reason, we cordially invite all new operators, or new users of the magnaflux method of inspection of our engines, to send the man who will specialize in this work, to the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft factory for a training course in this method of inspecting engine parts. In this manner, one will have the opiortunity of obtaining in a short time a variety of-experience in the magnetizing of the various engine parts and the interpretation and evaluation of the resulting magnaflux indications. In the inspection of parts being magnafluxed attention will be given to the following general areas where defects are most likely to occur. On specific parts where special attention to a particular section is necessary it is noted in the Table of Magnaflux Data which follows. Inspect gear teeth at the roots and at the pitch line of the thrust side. Inspect splines and mating lugs at the roots. Fillets and sharp angles on stressed parts should be given particular Note galled or roughened areas attention. carefully for the beginning of fatigue cracks. Steel pipes with flanges should be inspected at the union of the flange and the pipe. Inspect bolt and shaft threads at the roots. Oil holes and shaft holes in stressed areas should be examined for radial cracks emanating from the holes. "lengthIn the table which follows the term wise magnetization" will indicate that the magnetizing current is directed along or parallel to "crosswise the major axis of the part. Likewise, is indicate that current will magnetization" directed approximately 90o to the major axis.

424

INSPECTION
TABLE OF MAGNAFLUX
Name ol Part

DATA
Itens lor Speolol Attentlon

Method ol Magnetlzstlon and Reoom,mended Amperege 2500 amps. lengthwise 2500 amps. through rod passed through bearing bosses L000 amps. through 8" solenoid 1000 amps. in 4" solenoid 1500 amps. lengthwise 1000 amps. 4" solenoid 1000 amps. in 4" solenoid 1500 amps. Direction varies to suit shape of the particular brace 2500 amps. through a rod. Rotate cage eccentrically around rod

Articulating Rods (See Fig. 410)

Inspect area where flange meets the web of the rod and for crosswise defects in the "I" section Examine heads threaded area and under bolt

Bolt, Intermediate Drive Gear Bolt, Crankshaft Bolts Pinion Cage Brace, Carburetor (If provided)

Blower

Check radius under head Examine heads threaded area and under bolt

Cage, Reduction Gear (SeeFis. 411) Cam and Drum Assembly (Wasp Jr.) Cams, Shelf Type (See Fig. 412) Crankshaft, Front

Inspect area around and in pinion holes and at parting surfaces

shaft

2500. amps. through-rod_while the fluid is Any defect on cam follower tracks is cause passing over a cam lobe. Repeat for all lobes for rejection 2500 amps. through rod passing cam eccen- Inspect for defects on cam follower tracks. trically around the rod Any defects here are cause for rejection 2500 amps. lengthwise between a brass ball Examine the splines, pin shoulder and fillets in front of crankshaft and one in hollow carefully for defects crankpin 2500 amps. lengthwise making contact at end of pin and in rear and main bore 2500 amps. crosswise through crankshaft cheek 500 amps. crosswise in a solenoid made up of 10 turns of No. 0000 wire wound on a fiber cylinder 10" in diameter 2500 amps. Iengthwise passed through a length of No. 0000 wire placed down through the cylinder and out an exhaust port 1000 to 1500 amps. lengthwise 1500 amps. through rod in bore 2500 amps. through a rod placed in bores 750 amps. 4" eolenoid 2000 amps. lengthwise 1500 amps. Iengthwise 2500 amps. lengthwise 2500 amps. through rod in bore 1500 amps. lengthwise 2500 amps. through rod in bore 1500 amps. lengthwrse 2500 amps. lengthwise 2500 amps. lengthwise 1500 to 2000 amps. lengthwise 2500 amps. lengthwrse 1500 amps. lengthwise 2000 amps. lengthwise 2500 amps. between rear face of hub and front face of ring gear 2500 amps. through rear of hub flange and front of ring geat at several points to completely magnetize ring gear 2500 amps. through rod in bore Inspect for defects around rivets Inspect the thrust face Inspect bore of cylinder for circular defects Inspect bore of cylinder for lengthwise defects. Examine cylinder hold-down flange for defects, particularly the area around the stud holes

Crankshaft,

Rear

Cylinders and 414)

(See Figs. 4Lg

Dog, Vacuum Pump Drive (If provided) Flanges, Magneto Coupling Flyweights Flyweight Screws Gear, Cam Drive Gear, Cam Reduction Gear, Fixed Gear, Floating Gear, Fuel Pump Drive Gear, Generator Drive Gears, Gun Drive Gear, Intermediate Blower Drive Gear, Magneto and Drive Shaft Gear, Oil Pump Drive and Idler Reduction Gear, Pinion, Drive Gears, Pump and Gun Control Gear, Rear Crankshaft Gear, Reduction Drive (See Fig. 415)

425

INSPECTION
Table of Magnaflux
Narne ol Pert

Data (Contlnued)
trteme for Speolal Attentlon

Method of Magnetlzstlon snd Reoommended Amperege

Gear Vacuum Pump Drive Jaw. Starter Knuckle Pins (See Fig. 416)
Master Rod

1500 amps. lengthwrse 2000 amps. through rod in bore 1500 amps. lengthwise 1000 amps. in,4" solenoid 2000 to 2500 anps. lengthwise 2500 amps. through gy',"copper rod in piston pin bore 2000 amps. through f" copper rod in each knuckle pin hole. (Separate operations) 1-500 amps. in an 8" solenoid If main bearing is in place - 2500 amps. making contact at front and rear bearing boss If main bearing is removed-2500 amps. through 11" copper rod in main bore. Rotate part eccentrically around copper rod Watch particularly for any transverse defects at upper end of "I" section Inspect for lengthwise and circular defects, particularly on the press fit diameters Inspect for cracks around knuckle pin holes and on flanges between holes

Pins. Piston Pins, Valve Tappet Roller

2000 amps. through a 94" rod in bore 500 amps. Iengthwise, between plates and in small solenoid with axis of pins and solenoid parallel 1500 amps. through rod around which race is rotated eccentricallv 1500 amps. through a rod around which the race is rotated eccentricallv 1500 amps. through rod in bore 1000 amps. through 4" solenoid, holding rollers at right angles to solenoid coil 1000 amps. in l" solenoid 1500 amps. lengthwrse 1500 amps. lengthwrse 1500 amps. lengthwise 2500 amps. lengthwrse 1500 amps. lengthwise 750 amps. itt 4" solenoid 2000 amps. lengthwrse 1500 amps. Iengthwise 1500 amps. lengthwrse 2500 amps. through rod in bore Not over 500 amps.lengthwise Not over 500 amps. lengthwise with spring under slight compression Not over 500 amps. lengthwise with spring under slight compression 1-500amps. Iengthwise

Any defects on either the inside or outside of the pin is cause for rejection lnspect for longitudinal and circular defects

Race, Floating Front Races, Main Bearing

Gear Inner and Rear

Inspect roller tracks Inspect for fatigue defects, or large hair lines on O. D.

Rollers, Valve Tappet (SeeFigs. 4L7, 4L8 and 419) Screws, Valve Adj. Shaft, Impeller Shafts, Oil PumP Drive and Idler Shafts, Pinion Shaft, ProPeller (See Fig. 420) Shafts, Rocker Shaft, Starter and Gear Shafts, Tachometer Drive Shafts, Vertical Drive AccessorY

Inspect corners of slot

Spiders, Fixed and Floating, Blower Drive Springs, Intake haust Valve and Ex-

Reject for any defects Inspect for circular defects Inspect for circular defects Inspect for indications around slotted end and around roller pin holes. Inspect inside surface of socket Inspect for fatigue defects in the bore

Spring, OiI Pressure Relief Valve Springs, Blower Drive Gear Tappets, Valve

Washers, Intake and Exhaust Valve, Upper and Lower

1500 amps. through rod in bore

426

INSPECTION

Fig. 410 -

Magnetizing Articulating Rods

Fig. 411 -

Magnetizing Reduction Gear Cage

Fig. 412 -

Magnetizing Shelf Type Cam

427

INSPECTION

Fig. 413 -

Magnetizing Cylinder in a Solenoid

Fig. 414 -

Magnetizing Cylinder with Bore and Out Intake Port

Cable through

Fig. 415 -

Magnetizing

Reduction

Drive

Gear

Fig. 416 -

Magnetizing

Knuckle

Pin in a Solenoid

428

INSPECTION

Fig. 4L7 -

Magnetizing Valve Tappet Rollers on a Rod

Fig. 418 -

Magnetizing Solenoid

Valve

Tappet

Rollers

in

Fig. 419 -

Method of Holding Valve Tappet Rollers in Inspection Bath

Fig. 420 -

Magnetizing Propeller Shaft

429

(Sheet No. l) TYPICAL ENGINE INSPECTION RECORI)


Owner Reason for Overhaul. Englne Type ..

. . Job No.. . . Englne No. . . . Total Tlme. .


FRONT SDCTION

. . I)ate. .

........Thrust Bearing. . ....,.Thrust Cover..... . . . . . . . . T h r u sB t rg. Spacer.......... ........Thrust Slinger... Hydro VaIve........ .. . . Hydro Valve Location...........

....Red. Gear Cage

\-,

Reduction Gear Alignment.......... Oil Pump Drive Gear.........

SUMPS AND OIL PIPES Sa cp r e wH o l e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,...............C ..Washers.. ..Packings.

Erternal Plpe Assys................ Front Sump to Rocker Boxes........ Front Sump Drain to Pump... Front Sump Vent to Front Main Case.......... ....;......

Inspector.....

......Approved......

430

(Sheet No. 2) TYPICAL Job No.. . . ENGINE INSPECTION RECORI)


. Englne No.. PISTOITS ANI} CYLINI'ERS
..CompressionRatio....

.I)ate

Condition Head................. Condition BarreI............... Rocker Inserts...... Oversize... Taper Out-of-Round............ Max. Dia............ Exh. Valve Guide.... Condition Inl. Valve Guide............... Condition Spark Plug Bushing..,...... Exh. Valve Dia.................. Exh. Valve Stretch........... Condition Inlet VaIves....................... Condition D,-^L D^,rtvsD r rrD' r Ie*" '
1rt1............

ValveSeats {-. IInl' """"'

fn x h . . . . . . . . . .

Exh.......... InI.............. Rocker Arms........ Rocker Shafts....... Rocker Brgs....... Intake Pipes......... Rocker Box Covers...........

431

(Sheet No. 8) TYPICAL ENGINE INSPECTION RECORD


Job No.
Bnffiee...... Inter. Cyl. Bafres............... Head Bafres.......

. Englne No.. .........Type


Blast Elbows............. .......DrainPipe Covers . . . . .. ;."hers .... .. .... .Grommets...

CRANKCASE

SDCTIONS

Cam Reduction Gear Bushing


Clearance... Tolerance...

Cam End Clearance

Oil Seal Ri

....CamOiler Supply Pipe...... .....Prop.Oiler Supply Pipe..... Sn he ot Valve Assy..... ..............O , . . . . . . . T . p p eM t anifold................

Remarks.. No............. .Nuts..........

Rear Meln Crankoase Cam Bearing and Cam Cam Bearing and Liner Cam End Clearance Oil Seal

. . . . .. . . C a mT r a c k s . . . . . . Brg. & Teeth........ .......Cam Tappet Guides...... Tappets.... Rollers & Pins....... Remarks.. Sleeve...... ......Cam .Cam Oiler Bkt. .Cam Reduction

olts, Nuts & Washers ..........C'caB se .....OiIManifold & Screws..

Granksheft............... Run-out at Thrust..... Crankpin Dia. Front.. Horizontal Vertical


Crankshaft Plugs Front

...End........

....CrankpinSplines Front. Horizontal Vertical Front. Front.. ... .....Rear... ........Rear.......

Front.

.BalanceWeight..... .....OiIPassages... ....CrankshaftKey.... Nuts & Cap. Screws. ..........BoIts,

Meln

Bearlng Center.... ..

Front..... .

Remarks.. Sprlng Blower Drlve Springs Rear Gear Inspector


...Clear....

Fixed

432

(Sheet No. 4) TYPICAL ENGINE INSPECTION RECORI)


Job No.. . . MASTDR AND ARTICULATING

Knuckle Pin Holes

............Knuckle

Main Brg. Surfaces..................Backs.........

Vertical

Knuckle Pin Holes Main Brg. Surfaces..................Backs.....

BLOWDR AND BDAB SDCTIOITS


Blower

Plugs......... Mounting Bolt Holes........ Check for Cracks Press.Pipe & Bkt....... Imp. Brg. Cage....... I n t . B r g . C a g e .. . . . . . . . Mag. Shaft Bush. Left.... Mag. Shaft Bush. Rieht......... Mag. Shaft Bush. Tol.. . Roller Brgs........ Remarks.. .. . ..Oil Slinger...... Laminum Shim.......... Brg. Oil Baffie........

433 (Sheet No. 5)

TYPICAL ENGINE INSPECTION RECORI) Job No.....


Rear Sectlon...

D ate.

\olr
Assy..,.......

Nut...........

\-,
Drive Gear.......

EARNDSS AND SPARK PLI'GS

\-

Ignltlon

Eornees..

Manifold Wire..........

\Spork Plugs........

Inspector...

434

(Sheet No. 0) TYPICAL Job No.. . . ENGINE INSPECTION RECORD


. Englne No..
ACCESSOBIES Rtght Magneto Housing... Rota. Magnet.... Dist. Finger Cyl.... .. Brkr. Contact Screws...... Coupling.. Ground Screw....... Remarks.. ..Number.

. Date

B .. .........Dist . locks........ ush............... . . . . . . . . . . . . . C a r bB orn

MainBodyCases......''..........BodyScrews

OII Temp. Control -

Bodies

...Thermostat.............

...Va1ve.....

Set. Number............. Needle Valve Sylphons.. P r e s sC o n t . V a l v e . . . . . . . . Gaskets........ tltorter.... Series............ Plan. Gear.. Fly Wheel.. Bevel Pinions..... Remarks.. Storter Motor...... Housing... Brushes.... Field Coils.......... Terminal Shield........... Solenold Swltch..... Housing... Terminal Nuts............. Shielding.
Meshlng Solenold.

ess......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M i d - p o s i t iP orn Valves... .......Needle . . . . . . . . . . C o nV t .a l v e L e v e r s . . . . . .

ress...................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . C r u i s iP ng Shifter... .........Range nd Washers........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N ua ts

...Bell Gear..........

Housing.. Coil Term. Nut......... Shielding.

435 (Sheet No. 7)

TYPICAL Job No.. .


Booster Coll........... Housing... Contact Screw........... Remarks.. Generator..............

ENGIND INSPECTION RECORI) . Englne No..

. . Date

Model.......

Armature Brushes....

..Sp". Dampeners... Reverse Cur. Cutout............... Resis. Units........ Remarks.. Shlpplng Parts.,...... Hub Attach. Parts.. Primer Lines......... Spark Plug Hole Plugs.................. Remarks,.

Inspector.....

436

INSPECTION

TOOL LIST
Wasp Jr.
Tool Narne Tool No. B B2 B8

Wasp
E1 ET- G

Hornet E E . G 82. G 8 3 . G

BAR AND BLOCK - Aligning, Oam Reduction Gear Bushing. . . . . .PWA-214 BLOCK AND INDICATOR Bore. CYlinder PWA-312

FIXTURE

and Articulating Master Il.ods, Aligning (Magnetic ....PWA-1781-60A indicatorbracket)

FIXTURE

l\faster and Articulating Itods, Aligning (Magnetic ....PWA-1781-61A indicatorbracl<et)

FIXTURD

and Articulating Master Rods, Aligning (Magnetic . . . .PWA-1781-63A indicator bracket)

GAGE -

Maximum Wear Exhaust Valve ....PWA-309 Guide Diameter Maximum Wear Exhaust Valve ....PWA-7451-64 Guide Diameter Maximum Wear Exhaust Valve . ..PWA-1451-16 GuideDiameter Maximum Wear Exhaust Valve ....PWA-1451-63 Guide Diameter Maximum Wear Inlet Valve Guide ....PWA-311 Diameter Valve Radius Limit (or Contour) PWA-737 Valve Iladius Limit (or Contour) ..PWA-450 Valve #7009 Valve Raclius Limit (or Contour) ..PWA-656 Valve #11L52 3472-T-3 Master, use with PWA-312 M a s t e r , u s ew i t h P W A - 3 1 2 . . . . . 1 3 1 3 - T - 5 2133-T-12 Master, use with PWA-312

GAGD -

GAGE -

x
x x x x

GAGE -

GAGE -

x x

x x

x x

GAGE GAGE -

GAGE RING RING RING -

x x x x x x x

501

CEAPTER V

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES


REPAIR General-In this chapter the method of repairing or replacing engine palts is described. Certain rep"ii instrlctio-ns, c6rrlron to a number of similar contained in the subsequentparatype parts, are"General" graphs of this section and will not be repeated under the detail repair instructions. Ilouslngs, Cover Plates, Crankcase Sectlons, Etc.-Burrs or mutilations which do not tend to increasein size or in any way impair the serviceability of the part should be smoothed over or removed. Excessive flaking, chipping or scratching of paint should be cause for completely repainting the part. Studs-Studs which are loose or have mutilated threads should be replaced by oversize studs. Whenever a stud which is already oversize requires replacement, it should be replaced by the next oversize. Consult the parts list for available sizes. Where the threads of a stud hole have become damaged or stripped out it is possible to drill and retap the hole for a special stepped stud if tltere is sufficient material around the hole. It is also sometimes possible to install a bronze bushing in such cases. The Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Service Department should be consulted if this is contemplated. loose rivets which are found at inRlvets-All spection should be replac6d, or tightened if feasible. Bearlng Surfaces and Bushlngs-Bearing surfaces and bushings should be polished with crocus cloth and oil if scratched or scored. A fine stone may be used on steel bearing surfaces if polishing with crocus cloth is not sufficient to make them smooth. Unless scratched or scored the glazed surfacesof bushings should not be disturbed. overhaul it is common practice to Plating-At plate certain engine parts to prevent galling, corrosion or picking up of the metal. During the plating operation, stressesare set up in the metal, causing embrittlement, which may cause cracks and subsequent failure if not corrected. It is believed that the embrittlement is due to the absorption of hydrogen by the metal during plating operations. The harder the metal being plated and the thirrner its section, the greater the embrittlement. To relieve this condition, it is recommended that, immediately after any kind of plating, highly stressedparts, in particular, be baked for one hour at a temperature of 275" F. -- 300' F. (135' C.-149" C.). Iffacilitiesfor baking arenot available, the parts may be placed in actively boiling water for approximately three hours. Springs or other articles subject to flexure, should not be flexed prior to the baking operation. In caseswhere plating work is sent to a commercial plating concern, these precautions should be emphasized. Expanslon of Parts by Heat-In many instances, the removal of liners and bushings requires that heat be applied to the metal surrounding the part to be removed. The method of placing the part in a heated oven and gradually bringing the entire area up to the required temperature is the safest and the least likely to cause warping. The heating of the parts with a torch is the most universally practiced method, and is satisfactory providing sufficient care is exercised in its use. A soft flame gas torch should be used, and care taken not to allow the flame to concentrate too long on one spot. The flame should be played over the entire area surrounding the part to be removed. Becauseof the nature of magnesium, the application of a torch to this metal requires .the utmost care. The immersion of magnesium parts in actively boiling water will expand them sufficiently for the removal of liners, without the attendant danger of warping occasioned by the use of a torch. The amount of heating that is necessaryfor the removal of liners is largely a matter of judgment and experience. If magnesium parts are kept below 250o F. (LzL" C.) and if aluminum parts are kept below 300oF. (149" C.), the danger point will not be reached. Chrornlc Acld Treatrnent - The chromic acid treatment is an anti-corrosion treatment applied to magnesium base alloys. At overhaul it is sometimes desirable to thus treat magnesium parts which contain indications of corrosion or on which the original pickling treatment is no longer effective. A steel tank large enough to permit submersion of any part which is to be treated is required. The procedure for stripping and cleaning the parts is as follows: Degrease the parts in a vapor degreaseror in kerosene. Remove the paint as described in the paragraph entitled "Painting", and immerse the parts for approximately five minutes in a boiling chromic acid solution (100' C. - 212" F.) of the following composition: Chromic Acid (Cr0r) 1.5 lbs. Water to make 1.0 gal. If tap water is used, .lo/o silver nitrate (AgNOs) should be used to precipitate soluble chlorides.

502

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES Alurnlnurn Alloy lleads and Steel Barrels 2 coats black high-bake enamel and bake 3 hours at 425" F. (218' C.) The following makes of finishes are satisfactory for use: Zinc Chromate Primer PWA Spec. 219 manufactured by the Egyptian Lacquer Co., l27A Sixth Ave., N. Y. C. Gray Aircraft Engine Enqme! PWA Spec.-146 muttrrfactured by the Egyptian Lacquer Co., 1270 Sixth Ave., N. Y. C. Black Aircraft Engine Enamel, PWA SP*' 803-A manufactured bV Pratt & Lambert Co', Buffalo, New York. Black Aircraft Engine Cylinder Enamel (BWA Spec. 226-A) V-1183, manufactured by the Lowe Bros. Co., Dayton, Ohio. All surfaces contacting flat gaskets should be painted with one coat each of zinc chromate primer and enamel. Aluminum alloy and steel mating surfaces should be left unpainted. Magnesium alloy mating, surfaces should be painte? with one coat each of zinc chromate primer and enamel. is not anticipated Metallized Cylinders-It that frequent iesurfacing of aluminu-m sprayed cvlinders will be necessiry, although this will largely upon conditions o-foperation and d"epend th6 kind of tr-eatinent to which the cylinders are subjected (as well as upo-n the -quality of the metallizing' job). Norm^ally, it shbuld be sufficient to clean cylinders in a regular engine-parts cleaning bath a[ overhaul, and respraying should not be necessaryfor at least two or three overhauls. When resurfacing becomesnecessary' or if it is desired to metalliZe cylinders which were previously enameled, this may be accomplished as follows: Thoroughly degrease,sandblast, qld clean the external frrrfaceJ as described in Chapter III' The old aluminum finish need not be entirely removed, the well bonded portions making q satisfactory base for a new coat. Where enamel was previously used, however, all traces of the ettatttlelmust be removed. After cylinders have been cleaned and sandblasted, do not touch wlth bare hands a surface whlch ls to be rnetal sprayed. Cover all studs and openings. -stoppers, (Old parts such rubber hose and as metal plates, rubber copper tribing are often useful-for this purpose.) Olh rocker Jovers, held in place by pieces of copper tubing inserted over ?nd ^pinched tight on ttte studs, are recommended for p-rotectin-g the inside of ihe rocker boxes. Discarded spark

Dissolve the silver nitrate in distilled water and add it to the chromic acid bath. Remove the parts and rinse thoroughly in fresh cold running water and then in hot water. Dry with compressed air. Apply the primer "Painting". and paint as describedunder repainting parts at overhaul, Palnting-Before their surfaces must be properly prepared to receive the paint. If it is desired to remove the original finish, any one of three methods of stripping may be used. The first, dipping the painted parts in a heated stripping solution, is the most effective. Solutions such as the No. 70 Stripper of the E. A. Gerlach Co., 3567 Sepviva St., Philadelphia, Pa., are satisfactory for use in the The second method involves first method. brushing a heavy coat of a paint removing substance on the paint and then wiping the old pqint "Wonder-Paste" manufacfrom the metal. tured by the Wilson-Imperial Co., Newark, N. J., is one of the satisfactory products for use in this The third method involves removal method. of the paint with a stiff wire brush. When this methoil is used with magnesium parts, it is desirable to retreat them \{rith the Chromic Acid Treatment. If the old paint is not to be removed, the surface should be smoothed up with emery or crocus cloth. Cylinder heads should have all the remaining old paint removed by sandblasting prior to repiinting to prevent building-up of the old coats and impairment of cooling efficiency. Rfer to Chapter III for instructions on sandblasting cylinders. Prior to printing, all surfaces should be degreased as described in Chapter III "Cleaning". Holes should be plugged with corks, and areas and perts not to be painted should be covered with suitable masks or masking paper. The following list gives the type of paint, number of coats to be applied, the length of time for baking and the baking heats to be used. Paints may be applied with an atomizer or a brush; they may be baked or air-dried. Magneslurn Parts (A) 1 coat zinc chromate primer (B) 3 coats gray enamel or (C) 3 coats black enamel Alurnlnurn Alloy Parts (Ereept Cylinder Ifeads) (A) 1 coat zinc chromate primer (B) 2 coats gray enamel or rc) 2 coats black enamel Baklng Tlme for Above Palnts (A) llhow at250'F. (121'C.) (B) 1)4 holulrs at 275" F. (135" C.) (C) 1)4 hours at 275"F. (135' C.)

503

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

o F

aE----*
g 3
Qz uJf I

t I

bo
i

h }r

td ld J

2 a< o a, F o. bJ u tr

lrj

li

+) Q)

f)

tl-**

l l
ro bi

fr= frz it
o-

8"

c> <L'
td > l F lrj trt )
I L J

G td

fs
tr o
an an ld c, o.

= o
U

504

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES plugs and gaskets ryay_ be used to proteq_t the threaded inserts. The lower side of the cylinder mounting flange and the skirt of the barrel should be protected by a sleeve made high and wide enough to hold the assembly firmly. The booth in which the cylinders are to be sprayed should be equipped with an exhaust fan to diaw off fumes, etc., and should have a small turntable on which the parts may be rotated. 'fhis turntable may be power driven if desired. mitten If the table is rotated by hand, an asbestos must be worn to protect the operator from the flame of the spray torch. Rocker box covers should be held flat while being sprayed. is important that the operator Cautlon-It wear a respirator and goggles while sandblasting and metal spraying. The spray gun should be held approxim4tely six inchei from the work and at an angle of about 15' - 20' to the surface in both directions, so that the area between the fins is effectively coated. Apply a final coat holding the gun at ggatright angles to the surface to insure a goo_d ing on the edges of the fins. The desired thickneis is .003" and the maximum thickness should not exceed .005". Excessively thick coating tends to produce a rough finish and has a tendency to flake off. After spraying, inspect the finish for uniformity and quantity. When cylinders are to be stored after spraying, they should be completely coated with No-Oxide EEE, which may be obtained from Dearborn Chemical Company, New York City, N. Y., or some other similar corrosion preventing compound. Assuming that compressed air (35 cu. ft, of free air per minute at 80 p.s.i.) and sandblast equipment is available, the following equipment is recommended: Type E Metco Metallizing Unit complete with: 1 _ 11 B & S and rf,, Wire Nozzles 1-11 B&Sandft"Aircaps 1 - Lathe Fixture 1 - Tube Valve Lubricant 1 - Tube Gear Case Lubricant 1 - Complete set of Tools 1 - Instruction Manual Type 2H Gas, Oxygen, and Air Hose Unit Type A Metco Air Control Unit Type 25 Metco Wire Control Unit No. G-10 Metco Oxygen Regulator No. 2G-X40A Gas Regulator Type -No. W Metco Compressed Air Drying Unit 554A, complete with expeller and aftercooler Wilmington - Metco Type SH23 City Gas Compressor complete with Yz H.P., L20-220 Volt, single phase, 50-60 cycle, dust proof motor, gastankrpressure switch, and flash back arrestor. Note-All of the above material is obtainable from: Metallizing Engineering Company, Inc. 2107 41st Avenue Long Island City, New York Note-If it is desired to use Propane, Hydrogen, or Acetylene Gas (in bottled form) in place of city gas, the gas compressor rs unnecessary.

Fig. 500 shows schematically a typical metal spray equipment set-up.

DETAIL INSTRUCTIONS FRONT (Nose) SECTION-WASP for any reason it Thrust Bearlng Llner-If is neaessary to replace a liner in the front section, the area adjacent to the liner should be heated to a temperature of 200" F.-250' F. (93' C.-121" C.) (see Page 501) and then the liner should be drifted out of the nose. In order to reinstall the new liner, the front section should be reheated to the same temperature and the new liner inserted in position. This operation will be facilitated by chilling the liner with dry ice (COz) prior to installation in the front section. Care should be taken to see that the oil holes in the new liner are in alignment with the oil holes in the front section and that the liner is bottomed properly. This latter condition should be checked by attempting to JR.

insert a .001" feeler gage between the liner and the case. If it is not possible to insert this gage at any point, the liner may be judged to have bottomed properly. After a new liner is installed, the thrust bearing seating surface and the propeller_oil--transfer riig seatiig surface should be ground. Where it is necessaryto grind the bore of a liner to accommodate oversize oil transfer rings, the same instructions apply as for a standard bore with the only difference being in the size to which the Iiner is ground. To accomplish the grilding, the front section should be bolted to an adapter plate mounted in a lathe. Using a dial indicator, indicate the nose section so that the liner forward face and bore are turning concentrically

505

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 501 -

Installing Valve Tappet Guide -

Wasp Jr.

Fig. 502 -

Reaming Valve Tappet Guide -

Wasp Jr.

'fhe bores within .001" full indicator reading. should be ground to the desired diameters with a tool post grinder. The front liner should be ground to such depth that the surface of the iear seating flange for the thrust bearing measures !.2I7" + .002" from the front surface of the liner. In doing this grinding, the parts should be free of grease and oil, and the liner should be dry ground so that the metal particles may be readily removed from the oil passages, ete. After cleaning, polish the bore of the liner with crocus cloth and oil. Valve Tappet Sockets-Sockets may be removed by using the Tappet Ball Socket Puller. The tappet and socket assembly should be inserted into the split bushing so that the bushing clamps around the O.D. of the socket. Secure the bushing firmly between the jaws of a vise, and using the puller, remove the socket from the tappet. An alternate method of removing sockets from Wasp Jr. B and 82 tappets and the nondraining tappets on the Wasp Jr. 83, Wasp and Hornet engines is to drill and ream an .8L35" + .001" hole in a steel block and insert a steel bushing, having a hole with a diameter of .793" + .001", in the lower part of the block. This bushing is necessaryin order to provide a good shoulder to support the tappet while the socket is driven out. Place the tappet in the drilled

hole with the socket down. Then insert a drift in the upper end of the hollow tappet and force the cup out with an arbor press. In order to install a new socket, the cup should be lightly placed in the tappet. Then place the assembly, socket down, in the .8135" r .001" hole in the steel block used for removal and press the socket into the tappet with an arbor press. the draining type tappets, the Note-In tappet ball socket and oil bushing must be assembled prior to insertion in In doing this, make the tappet. certain that the oil hole in the bushing is aligned with that in the tappet. Valve Tappet Guldes-To remove the valve tappet guides it is necessary to heat the front section (see Page 501) after which the guides may be removed with the Valve Tappet Guide Drift. After removal of the guides, the guide holes should be cleaned up with crocus cloth and oil. In the event that a standard size guide will not provide the desired fit, oversize guides are available. When installing oversize guides, the holes in the front section should be reamed sufficiently with a 1912"standard expansion reamer to clean them up. Turn down the tappet guide to give the required fit in the nose section.

506

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES


The straight reamers are used for taking the primary cuts and the spiral reamer is used in a final operation to clean yq ?ny high spotg which may remain. The straight reamer having the pilot in front of the flutes should be used first and inserted from the outside end of the tappet guide. With this reamer the guide should be reamed to within one-quarter of an'inch from the inside end. The second reamer should then be inserted, handle end first, from the inside end of the guide. The reaming operation should be effected while pulling the reamer out through the tappet guide. Prior to the use of this reamer, the Tappet Guide Reaming Clamp should be installed around the inside end of the tappet gurde to prevent spreading of the guide at the roller slot (seeFig. 502). Propeller Regulator Valve-If a new propeller regulator valve and shaft assembly is installed, the valve should be lapped into its seat with a fine valve grinding compound. Make sure that all traces of the compound are removed from the shaft and seat before assembly. Front Breather Assembly-'Should any defects have been revealed during inspection, the complete assembly should be replaced. Hl AND HORNET E (Dlrect Drlve)

Prior to installation of a new guide the front section should be reheated and the guide and its retaining hole coated with a suitable grease "No-Oxide-E". The new guide may be such as chilled with dry ice (COz) to facilitate installation. With the aid of the Valve Guide Drift and a fiber mallet, install the new guide so that it is positioned correctly in the case, i.e. so that the slot in the guide is parallel to the cam roller If replacing less than a complete set tracks. of guides, the Tappet Guide Aligning Plate should be placed in the slot of the adjacent guide and the replacement guide aligned by means of this plate. If replacing a complete set of guides, the first guide should be aligned with the slotted Aligning Plug which is placed in the hole adjacent to the guide being installed (seeFig. 501). This plug may be rotated in the nose section until its slot is parallel with that of the guide. Then insert the Aligning Plate in the slots of the Aligning Plug and the guide. After driving home the first guide, the next guide can be aligned from it, and the same procedure followed until all the guides are installed. The tappet guides should be reamed with the Tappet Guide Reamers. These reamers consist of two straight reamers and a spiral reamer. FRONT (Nose) SECTION-WASP instructions on Thrust Bearlng Llner-For replacing or regrinding, see paragraph with same heading for Wasp Jr. engines. The thrust bearing seating surface should be ground to a depth of L.296" + .002" from the front flange of the thrust bearing liner on the Wasp engine and t.208" + .002" on the Hornet engine. Governor Drlve Gear Bushlng (Wasp Hl)To remove this bushing, drive it from the front section using the Governor Drive Gear Bushing Clean any high spots from the bushing Drift. hole with a standard expansion reamer and, if fitting an oversize bushing, turn down the O.D. of the bushing in a lathe to obtain the desired fit in the nose section. Drive in the new bushing with the Governor Drive Gear Bushing Assemblv Drift and ream it to size with the Governor Diive Gear Bushing Reaming Fixture and Reamer (see Fig. 503). Instructions covering checking and adjusting backlash are given in "Intermediate Goverthe subsequent paragraph nor Drive Gear Bushing". Intermedlate Governor Drlve Gear Bushlng (Wasp Hf )-To remove this bushing, drive out the staking pin and remove the bushing with the Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Puller. Clean up the hole in the support and drive in the new bushing with the Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Assembly Drift, making sure tbat oil holes are properly lined up. Use the Cam Reduction and Intermediate Gov-

Fig- 503 -

Reaming Governor Driven Wasp H1

Gear Bushing -

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES


ernor Drive Gear Reaming Fixture and Reamers for reaming this bushing (see Fig. 504). After reaming the new bushing, the gear should be inserted in position in the intermediate governor drive gear support and the support should then be bolted in position in the front section. Check the backlash between the two governor drive gears, using a dial indicator. If i-nsufficient backlash is obtained, the intermediate governor drive gear bushing should be faced off the desired amount by mounting the support in a lathe and turning off the face of the bushing. replace Cam Reductlon Gear Bushlng-To this bushing, drive out the staking pin with a

507

small steel drift and remove the bushing with the Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Puller. If the br,r,shinghole in the nose section requires cleaning up, an oversize bushing should be used and turned down on the O.D. to obtain the desired fit. Drive the new bushing into the retaining boss and, using the hole in tlge case as a guide for the rf" drill, transfer-drill the staking hole in the new bushing and drive in the staking pin. Ream the hole with the Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Reaming Fixture, Reamer Bar, Roughing Reamer, Finish Reamer and Aligning Check the alignment as Bar (see Fig.505). described in Chapter IV.

FRONT SECTION (Reduetlon Gearlng and Houslng Assembly) wasP El-G, EoRNET E-G, E2-G AND E8-G Thrust Bearlng Cover Assernbly (Hornet ES-G)-The liner in the thrust bearing cover plate is shrunk in and the rear edge spun over after assembly. In order to remove the liner, place the plate in a lathe and face off the spun Surface on-the rear edge of the liner. Then lieat the area of the plate around the liner to 200o F. (93" C.) (see Page 501) and drive the old liner from the plate. The new liner may be pressed into place with the plate at the same lemperature. Care should be taken to see that the flange of the liner is seated on the forward' face of the plate. The rear edge of the liner should then be spun over to form a shoulder on the rear edge of the plate, by trueing up in a lathe to run within .001", full indicator reading, and spinning it over with a spinning tool. The procedure for grinCing old liners to accommodate .005" or .010" oversize oil seal rings is similar to that for grinding a new liner after installation in the cover, with the exception of the difference'in the size of the bore. inspection has reThrust Bearlng Llner-If vealed the necessity of replacing this liner, it should be accomplished as follows: Drift out the thrust bearing cover studs, using a fiber drift. The studs should be driven from the inside of the reduction gear housing to the front. Heat that portion of the reduction gear housing adjacent to the liner to a temperqture of 200dF.-250' F. (93' C.-t2L' C.) (seePage 501) and drive the liner from the nose section. Again heat the case and install the new liner in position, making certain the oil holes in the liner coincide with those in the case and that the liner is properly bottomed. Using an arbor press, reinstall the thrust bearing cover studs, making sure that they are a tight fit in the front section. The method of grinding thrust bearing liners on seared -direct engines is the same as that described drive engines under the heading for Wasp Jr. engines. The liners should be ground to the desired dimensions with a tool post grinder. Governor l)rlve Gear Bushlng (Eornet OnIy) -This bushing may be removed with the Governor Drive Gear Bushing Disassembly Drift and a replacement bushing installed with the Assembly Drift. Oversize bushings are available and may be fitted after reaming the. hole in the case with an expansion reamer until the required fit is obtained with the replacement bushing. When installing a new bushing it is important that the oil holes line up properly. The new bushing should be reamed with the Propeller Governor Drive Gear Bushing Reaming Fixture and Reamer. After installation of a new bushing, the intermediate governor drive gear should be installed on the bearing support plate and the plate should be temporarily fitted in place on the reduction gear housing for the purpose of checking the backlash between the intermediate governor and the governor drive gear. Should drive gear there be insufficient backlash between the governor drive gear and the intermediate governor drive gear, it may be increased by facing the governor drive gear bushing with the Governor Drive Gear Bushing Facing Tool. Flxed Gear-To regrind the fixed gear bore for oversize oil transfer rings, mount the gear in a lathe and indicate so that the runout does not exceed .001" full indicator reading on the forward flange and outside diameter of the centering shoulder; grind to the desired diameter (see Fig. is 506). As the I.D. of the ring seating surfa_ce less than that of the rest of the bore on the Wasp H1-G engine and greater than that of the rest of the bore-on the Hornet E-G series engines, the newly ground surface should be blended with the adjacent area of the bore. Polish the bore with crocus cloth and oil.

508

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 504 --- Reaming Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushittg -

Wasp Hl

Fig. 505 -

Reaming Cam Reduction Gear Bushing -

Wasp Hl-G

509

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 506- GrindingFixedGearRing Surface Plnlon Cage-Pinion cagehalves are not interchangeablewith one another. In the event it is desired to replace a pinion cage half, the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, Service Department, should be consulted. gear bushings Plnion Gear Bushlngs-Pinion are removed and installed with the Pinion Gear Bushing Drift and an arbor press. After installation, the new bushing should be bored or ground to size. To make certain that the I.D. of the bushing will be concentric with the pitch diameter of the gear, insert six pins .218" in diameter between the teeth, equally spaced around the circumference of the Beil, fastening them with a rubber band, and temporarily attach the gear to the face plate of a lathe or boring mill with a draw bar. Adjust the position of the gear so that the run-out of the plunger of a dial indicator resting on the pins does not exceed .001" full indicator reading. Then fasten gear permanently with straps and remove bolt from the draw bar. Using a suitable boring bit in conjunction with the lathe or boring mill, bore the diameter to the desired dimensions (seeFig. 507). If grinding is desirable, a K5BE Norton Wheel in conjunction with a Heald No. 50 Grinder with a wheel speed of 13,000 R.P.M. may be used. Reductlon Drlve Gear-In the event that either the reduction drive gear or the reduction drive gear hub should require replacement, the Service Department of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft should be consulted prior to replacing these parts. Propeller Shaft and Threads-It has been found in some cases that sharp edges at the thread ends of the propeller shaft hub nut and the propeller shaft become crossed or damaged and cause thread seizure. To prevent this, it is recommended where sharp ends exist, that the partial thread be removed from where it starts to a point where the thread is of full depth and section (see Fig. 508). This operation is accomplished by grinding or fiIing the partial threads down to their root diameter and cutting off with a taper of approximately 3f" from the root to the top of the full thread on the propeller shaft threads, and a taper of approximately 3.4" on the nut thread. The edges of these tapers should be rounded with approximately %t" radius and all burrs and sharp edges removed by stoning. replace Propeller Shaft Rear Bearlng-To a propeller shaft rear bearing, the assembled crankshaft should be mounted in a suitable Iathe. A brass or copper sleeve should be fitted over the splines as near the front of the crank-

510

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

INCOMPLETE r- CLEAR AWAY \ rxneeo uNnL FULL


\ \ DEPTH OF THREADIS oenrNeo. RoUND EDGES.

\ T

Fig. 507 -

Boring Pinion Gear Bushing

Fig. 508 -

Reoperation of Propeller Shaft Threads

shaft as possible. With the sleeve pressed in place over the splines, mount the assembled crankshaft in the lathe, chucking the rear main bearing boss and dead cehtering the front end in the beveled face. The shaft should then be indicated at the front and rear main bearing bosses to within .001" run-out, full indicator reading. Turn down the outside diameter of the sleevewhich has been pressedover the splines to insure its concentricity with the main bearing boss. Then mount a steady rest on the O.D. of the sleeve, remove the dead center and hore out the bronze bearing to a thin shell. Care should be taken when boring out the bearing not to damage the shoulder in the shaft against which the rear of the bearing rests. The shell may then be collapsed and removed from the end of the shaft.

Clean up any burrs, etc., which may have resulted from the boring operation, and immerse the front of the crankshaft in oil heated to 350" F.-400" F. (177' C.- 204"C.), for approximately 20 minutes. At the same time, chill the new bearing to be installed with dry ice (COr). The new bearing should then be installed in the shaft, using the Propeller Shaft Rear Bearing Pusher, so that the rear of the bearing rests against the shoulder in the crankshaft. Transfer-drill the staking hole in the bushing with a No. 19 (.166") drill, and, supporting the bore of the bushing with a suitable arbor, drive in the staking pin. Mount the assembled crankshaft in a lathe as described previously and bore out the I.D. of the bearing to give the proper clearance with the propeller shaft pilot.

MAIN CRANKCASE SECTIONS cams are Plate Type Carn (Wasp Jr.)-As originally finish ground at the factory to the high Iimit, it is possible to regrind the roller tracks at overhaul provided it is not necessary to grind to a depth in excessof .015". However, as special equipment is required for this operation, cams should be returned to United Airports Division, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Connecticut, for regrinding. See Chapter IV, under "Cam (Plate Type)" for further information. Should inspection reveal the necessity for a new cam hub, the cam assembly should be mounted front side down in a suitable holder and the rivets removed. The rivets may be started with a round nose punch, and then pulled from the hub with a rivet puller. Disassemble the hub from the cam with a leather mallet. Inspect the holes and their countersunk areas and clean up where necessary.

511

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES InstaII the new hub on the cam and transfer drill the 35 rivet holes with a #22 (-I57") drill. Break the sharp edgesof the drilled holes on the front of the n-ew Cam hub with a countersink and clean up with emery cloth. Drive in the new rivets and upset the ends on a rlyeting machine or with a round nose punch. Using a surface srinder, grind the rivet ends flush with the rear Surfaceof the cam. Carn Adjustrnent (Plate Type) .It insPection reveals tiat the tappet rollers are riding slightly off center on the cam track, the cam fore and aft position may be adjusted by varying the- thickiess of the crankshaft adjusting spacer located ""aut the thrust bearing. Where it is found ttrat the tappet rollers are riding too far forward ott th" camiiack, the cam may be moved forward by reducing the thickness of the spacer the required amount. In the event that the tappets aie riding too far to the rear on the cam track, lh. .u- -uy be moved to the rear by installing a spacer of increasedthickness. Shelf Type Cam (Wastrl Hl and Hornet E Sertes)-'ihe prece4iry lnstructions relative to regrinciing the cam lobes also apply to the shelf type cam. Cam Otl Feed Bracket (\ilasp Jr.)-Should the short oil feed pipe be loose in the bracket, it may U" iient"ned by sweating solder onto the end of itt. iip. and then scraping the end until the desirbclfit is obtained. Cam Reductlon Gear Bushlng (Wasp Jr.)The replacement of the cam reduction gear bushing should be accomplishedas follows: Using a small steel drift, drive -theistaking-pin from tht bushing. Then, using the Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Puller, remove the bushing from the crankcase. Prior to installation of a new bushing, clean utr anv burrs on the case caused by removal of tie brishing and see that the oil holeg are perfectly clean by blowing out with an air blast. Using the large slotted washer and the thick steel bushing of fhe Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Puller install the new bushing in the case so that the two oil holes are at right angles to the oil Dressure hole in the case. With a LA" drill, transfer-drill the staking pin hole and drill the oil bleed hole into the bushing. Place a steel arbor of sliehtlv less diameter than the bushing in the bushing ind drive in the staking pin. This bushing should not be reamed until the front half of the main crankcase section is assembled onto the engine. To accomplish th!s, place the Aligning Fixture over the end of the crankshaft and align the Fixture by means of the Alienine Bar. The bushing should then be reained-with the Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Reamer. The atignment of the bushing. aflgr rearnilg should be-checked as described in Chapter IV, "Inspection". Carn Reductlon Gear Bushlng (Wasp and to replacea cam reduction necessary Ilornet)-If sear bushing, drill out staking pin and remove bushing from caseusi4g the Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Puller, (see Fig. 5-09). In case the desired fif cannot be obtained with a standard size bushing, an oversize bushilg +uy b-eused, turning down its O.D. to give the desired fit with the crankcase. Install the new bushing, placing oil hole 90' from oil hole in case. Drill bushing staking hole and stake bushing. The bushing may the! be reamed using the Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Reaming Fiiture, Reaming Bar, Rough Reamer and Finish Reamer. In gearedenginesthe cam reduction geal bushis replacedin the ing in"the bearing support Plat^e same manner as described for the crankcase. However, when reaming, the bushings in both the bearing support plate , and front crankcase must be line reamed together with the support plate in position on the front crankcase. Reductlon Drlve Gear Bearlng Llner-In the event that the reduction drive gear bearing liner requires replacement, -the bgqti"g support plate stuida be mounted under a drill pressat an angle of 60o to the bed of the press. With a Yt6"drili, spot drill the four dowel pins tf" deep. Then *ittt a No. 15 (.180") drill, drill into the dowels. It will be found that in most cases,the shell of the dowel will seize to the drill and will be removed when the drill is withdrawn. If the shell of the dowel does not come out at this time, it should be collapsed and removed. Heat the bearing support plate to 350'F. (177"C.) tseePage 501) an-ddrive out the old liner. removing the liner, ascerCautlon-Before tain that the dowels have been completely removed, as the bore of the bearing support plate is likely to be damaged should any pieces bf tne dowels be wedged between the liner and the plate. An alternate method of removing the liner is to grind three grooves acrossthe smooth face of the"liner just deep enough to approach the metal of the pl-ate and- then collapse and remove the liner. sure that in grinding, the Cautlon-Make wheel doesnot touch the baseof the plate. To install a new liner, clean up the hole in the plate, reheat the plate to 350" F. -(177"C.) and press in the new litler, Iocating the- dowgl pj" holes 45o from the old holes. Transfer-drill the dowel pin holes with a No. 13 1.185") drill, Vt6" in depth, and drive in four steel p!ls.- The pins shoulh be peened over and filed flush with the liner. Then bolt the bearing support plate to

5L2

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES the face plate of a lathe and true up on the front and shoulder until it runs true within .002" full indicator reading. Secure in this position and grind the liner to the proper size. Polish with crocuscloth and oil. Front and Rear Maln Bearlng Llners-In order to remove the front and rear main bearing liners the four dowel pins in their bores should first be removed. Place the crankcase section in a suitable holding fixture with the parting surface down. The mounting surface of the fixture should be at an angle of 60o to the bed of the drill press. Spot drill each pin with a \6" drill approximately Ya" deep. Then, with a ffLi (.180") drill, the dowelsshould be drilled through. It has been found in shop practice that usually the shell of the dowel pin will seize to the drill and come out when the drill is removed. If this is not the case, the shell of the dowel should be collapsedand removed. removing the liners, check Cautlon-Before to determine if all four dowels have been entirely removed as damage to the bore of the case is likely to occur from pieces of the dowel pins being wedged between the liner and the bore of the case. Grind three grooves acrossthe inside face of the liner as deep as possible without touching the bore of the case. These grooves should be equally spaced. Collapse and remove the liner from the crankcase. Prior to the installation of a new liner, clean the bore of the case and the O.D. of the liner thoroughly to insure good contact between liner and bore of case. Heat the crankcaseto 250" F.Page501) and in300' F. (121' C.-149' C.) (see stall liner in its place. torch is used, do not allow flame Cautlon-If to heat section of front crankcasearound valve tappet guides as they are liable to becomeloose and misaligned. Note-Chilling the liner before assembly will simplify installation in the crankcase. When installing new liners, it is recommended that the dowel pin holes in the new liner be located equi-distant from the old pin holes in the case. 1'o insure bottoming the front main bearing liner flange of geared engines in the crankcase, tap the liner with a mallet while the case is cooling. After the casehas cooled, place it in the holding fixture which was previously used for drilling out the old dowels, and transfer-drill four holes with a #LB (.185") driIl Vl6" deep (overall depth) through the liner. Drive in four dowels and rivet them over. On geared engines,the threads in the I.D. of the front liner may become distorted during the shrinking operation. To correct this, the threads should be chased on a lathe or with a suitable hand thread chaser. Note-The size and number of these threads is 6" x 16, U. S. Standard Form, class 3, Ieft hand on the Wasp H1-G and7" x 16, U. S. Standard Form, class 3, left hand on the Hornet E-G series. If this operation is to be done on a lathe it must have a minimum swing of 24" to accommodatethe case. After the liners are installed, mount a Face Plate Adapter (drilled so that the rear main crankcasesection with studs may be bolted to it) on a suitable internal grinder, or a 24" Iathe. Indicate the snap ring to run true within .001" full indicator reading. Assemble the two sections of the crankcase together and attach rear section to face plate. Indicate the front parting face and front O.D. of case to run true within .001" full indicator reading. Finish grind the liners to the proper dimensions. This may be done on a 24" Iathe with a tool post grinder if an internal grinder is not available. Valve Tappet Guldes-To remove the valve tappet guides it is first necessary to remove the guide locking screws on Wasp engines and the guide locking pins on Hornet engines. The case should then be heated and the guides removed with the Valve Tappet Guide Puller. After removal of the guides, the guide holes should be cleaned up with crocus cloth and oil.

Fig. 509 -

Removing

Cam Reduction

Gear Bushing

513

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES In the event that a standard size guide will not give the desired fit, oversize guides are available. When installing oversize guides, the holes in the case should be reamed sufficiently with a l%2" standard expansion reamer to clean up. Turn down the tappet guide to give the required fit in the crankcasesection. Prior to installation, coat a new guide and its retaining hole with a suitable grease such as "No-Oxide-E". Heat the case to 200" F.250oF. (93' C.-L?L'C.) (seePage 501). With the aid of the Valve Guide Drift and a fiber mallet install the new guide so that it is positioned correctly in the case,i.e. so that the slot in the guide is parallel to the cam roller tracks. If replacing less than a complete set of guides, the Tappet Guide Aligning Plate should be placed in the slot of the adjacent guide and the replacement guide aligned bv means of .this plate. If replacing a complete set of guides, the first guide should be aligned with the use of the slotted plug which is placed in the hole adjacent aligning to guide being installed. This plug may be rotated in the crankcase section until its slot is parallel with that of the guide. Then insert the Nigning Plate in the slots of the Aligning Plug ancl guide. After driving home the first guide, the next guide can be aligned from it, and the same procedure followed until all the guides are installed. After installation, the guides should be locked in place with the tappet guide locking screw or with the tappet locking pin as the case may be. Valve tappet guides should be reamed with the Valve Tappet Guide Rough and Finish Reamers. The Rough Reamer is used to make the first cut and is run completely through the guide. Prior to using the Finish Reamer the Valve Tappet Guide Reaming Clamp should be placed on the slotted end of the guide to prevent it from spreading while being reamed. Then the Finish Reamer should be run through the valve tappet guide. A |rA standard 10 flute straight ieamer may be used to remove any high spots which remain in the guide. Intermedlate Governor Drlve Gear Bushlng (Hornet Englnes)-If it is desired to replace the intermediate governor drive gear bushing, remove the retaining screw and washer. Drift the bushing from the bearing support plate. Clean up the hole with crocus cloth and install a new bushing. Should it be desired to fit an oversizebushing, the hole should be reamed with the Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Reamer. The Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Reaming Fixture should be used to guide this reamer and the Aligning Bar used to align the fixture. The bushing should be installed from the front of the bearing support plate with a suitable drift. It is important to line up the oil holes in the bushing with those in the plate. When properly installed the slot in the bushing and the slot in the plate will be aligned. Install the washer so that the key of the riasher will be inserted in the slots of both the bushing and the bearing support plate. Tighten down the washer with the retaining screw. The head of the screw should be staked to prevent it from backing out. to Maln Improved Otl Transfer-Blower Case (Wasp Jr.)-To provide an oil tight seal between the blower and the main crankcase sections, a new method of oil transfer was incorporated in the Wasp Jr. engines starting with engine #279. The ferrule formerly used to transfer pressure oil from the blower to main caseon early Wasp Jr. engines was replaced by a flanged fitting and bracket located inside the pilot of the cases. The former type main crankcase and blower section can be reoperated at the factory to accommodate this improvement if desired. However, on account of the special fixtures required in remachining, it is not recommended that this change be attempted in the field. When ordering a new blower or main crankcase section for Wasp Jr. engines, it is necessary to specify the type required.

DRILL AND TAP NO.8-32 NC-3 4- H OLE S

Fig. 510 -

Installing on Sump

Mounting

Disc for Name Plate

5L4

REPAIR AND ^ASSEMBLYOF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES


of the sump. Drill and tap four No. 8-32 NC-3 holes as shown in Fig. 510. Install the mounting disc, being sure to align the wing slots of the disc with those of the sump. Secure disc with four screws and stake securely. Install name plate and peen down the edge of the disc around the plate.

Installlng Mountlng Dlsc for Name PlateLater models of the Wasp Hl and Hornet E engines with magnesium sumps use a brass mounting disc to hold the Pratt and Whitney name plate securely. To incorporate this new method of securing the name plate, remove the name plate and all rough edges left on the boss

CYLINDERS exBarrel Reconditioning-As Cylinder plained in "Inspection of Cylinder Barrels", Chapter IV, there are limitations on regrirrding cylinders. Special equipment is required for regrinding cylinder barrels and if this is not available, cylinders should be returned to United Airports Division, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Connecticut, for this operation. Honing of choked cylinder barrels at overhaul is not recommendedas a general practice. Honing tends to decreasethe choke, and usually removes material unnecessarily from the cylinder walls in general. If it is desired to hone as a means of correcting cylinder banel out-of-roundness which exceeds .006", or to remove a step exceeding .006", the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Service Department should be consulted. Honing should not be substituted for lapping cylinder walls and piston rings, as described elsewhere in this chapter. Chrome-molybdenum barrels may be reground straight, although this operation destroys .the choke feature and its advantages,but the regrinding of nitralloy barrels is not recommended. If a step of .006" or more has resulted from wear at the top of the piston stroke (seeInspection Chapter) in either chrome-moly or nitralloy barrels, but the barrel is not worn to the replacement limit, the step may be removed by one of several methods. It is sometimes possible to remove or blend a small step satisfactorily in chrome-molybdenum barrels by simply using a hand stone. Another method is to use a small portable grinder equipped with a small wheel, in which case care musf be exercised to grind only the part of the cylinder wall above the travel of the top _piston ring. One of the most satisfactory methods is to mount the cylinder in a grinder, such as the Heald No. 73 (Red Head) or Heald No. 50, with the barrel enough off center that the stepped portion may be ground without removing much mate-rial from thelest of the top of the barrel bore. When using this procedure, the grinding shoul4 b. done witti a standard grinding wheel which has been undercut for parf of its width, the width of its remaining standard diameter being a-pploximately the same as the part of the barrel which extends beyond the upper end of the top ring travel. After the step-has been removed, the reground surlhce should be blended with the adJacent part of the cylinder wall as well as possible. Still another method is to use a tapered grinding wheel which conforms to the angle bf the choke, iemoving the same amount of material all around the top of the barrel bore until the step has been eliminated. The grinding wheel should then be manipulated in such a way as to blend the reground surface with the adjacent part of the cylinder wall. For service operations, the followlng cylinder barrel regrinding equipment has been found satisfactory. Heald No. 73 (Red Head) Grinder with Norton 3860-I8BE (for Chrome-Moly barrels) or Norton 3?60-I (for Nitralloy barrels) grinding wheel R.P.M. with a chuck turning at 4600 to SZOO speedof 280 to 360 R.P.M. Heald No. 50 Grinder with same grinding wheel turning at same speed as Heald No. 73, and with

Fig. 511 -

Drilling Out Valve Guide

AID

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 512 -

Reaming Valve Guide

Fig. 513 -

Removal of Inlet Valve Seat -

Boring

arm of grinder turning at approximately 75 R.P.M. Bryant No. 24 with same grinding wheel and samewheel and chuck speedas Heald No. 73. The grinding fluid recommended for use in conjunction with the Norton Wheel is No. l4l International Chemical Compound, manufactured by the International Chemical Company of Philadelphia, Pa. Under no circumstances attempt to grind cylinders dry. When determining the proper oversize to which a chrome-molybdenum eylinder should be ground, the diameter of the cylinder at the point of greatest wear should be taken. Add .002" on either side or a total of .004" to the present cylinder bore to allow for cleaning up, and grind to the nearest oversize above this diameter. When grinding, cuts of .001" may be taken at first, gradually decreasing the amount as the desired oversize is approached. The last cut of the grinder should remove a negligible amount as it passes through. This technique should provide a smooth satin finish, free from heavy grinding marks or scratches. remove a valve guide, the Valve Guides-To cylinder should be mounted on a suitable fixture under a drill press. Using the proper Valve Guide Drill, drill out the old guide to a thin shell, inserting the drill from the valve spring end and drilling to within approximately rA"

of bottom of guide (see Fig. 511). When the drill passesunder the shoulder of the valve guide where there is an undercut, the head of the guide may be removed from the valve spring end. Insert the proper Valve Guide Drift, and drive out the remainder of the guide towards the valve seat. After removing the old guide, check the hole in the cylinder head for damage and out-of-round condition, particularly at the bottom. If necessary to clean up the hole in the cylinder head, it should be reamed oversize with the proper Valve Guide Hole Expansion Reamer. The hole should be enlarged only enough to make it round, and the O.D. of an oversize guide should be turned down to obtain the desired fit in the cylinder head. Heat the cylinder head to about 2A0"F. (93' C. ) (see Page 501-). Smear the guide with a light coating of oil and graphite and install in position using the proper Valve Guide Drift. After installation, the guide should be reamed to size with the proper Valve Guide Reamer, (see Fig. 5L2). Subsequent to reaming, the guide should be checked with the proper Valve Guide Plug Gage. remove the bronze Bronze Valve Inserts-To inlet valve seat inserts, mount the cylinder on an angle plate in a lathe or drill press in such a way that the centerline of the valve guide is in

516

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 514 -

Facing Valve Seat

Fig. 515 -

Refacing Valve

alignment with the chuck of the machine being used. Using the Valve Seat Remover, bore out the old valve seat (see Fie. 513). This tool consistsof three cutters for the Wasp and Hornet engines and two cutters for the Wasp Jr. engine. The first cutter removes the major part of the insert, the others take light cuts which reduce the insert to a thin shell which may then be removed by collapsing with a sharp tool. No attempt should be made to remove the old valve insert by driving or pulling, as aluminum tends to adhere to bronze and damage to the cylinder head may result. Heat the cylinder to approximately 400" F. (204" C.) and, using the Valve Seat Holder, install a new seat in the cylinder head. care to prevent the cylinder Caution-Take head from turning on the banei when it is hot. After installation, the seat should be resurfaced so that the proper valve seat angle and surface are obtained. The resurfacing of valve seats should be done at every overhaul, regardless of whether or not the inserts have been removed. It is important, however, that the valve guides "bellare in good condition and not excessively mouthed." Otherwise new guides should be installed before facing the seats. There are three kinds of cutters provided for the Wasp and Hornet engines and two for the Wasp Jr. The Valve Seat Roughing Facer is

used for taking the first cut and the Valve Seat Finishing Facer is used for further cleauing up the seat. It is important to seethat the valve seating surface on the insert is slightly narrower than that on the valve. The third cutter on the Wasp and Hornet enginesis a 35' Relief Facer and is used for cutting back the seats (see Fig.

5r4).

It is possible to reface bronze valve seats by grinding. Rough and finish grinders suitable for this operation are on the market and may be used in conjunction with any suitable powerdriven tools such as those recommended under "Steel Valve Seat Inserts". The rough wheel is used just enough to obtain an evenly ground surface the full width of the seat and is followed by the finish wheel. The latter wheel is used to insure smoothnessof the seat's surface. Whichever method is used, care should be exercised to see that no more metal is removed from the seats than is necessary to accomplish the desired results. is exExhaust Valve Seat-Replaeing-It pected that the steel exhaust valve seat will last the life of the cylinder and will not need replacing. If experienceshould prove that these seats need replacing, the cylinder should be returned to the factory, or special instructions for doing this work will be issued by the Service Department. Refer to the Inspection Chapter for determining when seat replacement is necessary.

5L7

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES Steel exhaust valve inserts should be ground to obtain a true surface. Special equipment for grinding these seats may be obtained from the following manufacturers : Black & Decker Manufacturing Co., Towson, Maryland, Van Dorn Electrical Tool Co., Towson, Maryland, Albertson Manufacturing Co., Sioux City, Iowa, Wadell Engineering Co., Newark, N. J., HaIl Manufacturing Co., Toledo, Ohio. The first three named companies manufacture light equipment of the concentric grinding type. The fourth company manufactures a heavy shop or manufacturing machine of the eccentric grinding type. The last named company manufactures a light portable grinder of the eccentric grinding type which may be used for both exhaust and inlet seats. The same wheel is used for both seats. The steel insert is very durable and requires No more metal very little reconditioning. should be removed than is necessaryto clean up the seating surface of the insert. In cleaning up the surface, it is not necessaryto remove small isolated dark spots entirely, particularly if they are not at the edge of the valve seating area. The valve seating surface should be slightly narrower than the corresponding surface on the valve. The width of the surface on the inserts may be reduced by cutting with a wheel dressed to 35o. However, they should not be more than .020" narrower than the valve face width. seating surfaces of the Valve Refaclng-The valves should be dressed on a valve refacing machine at each overhaul (see Fig. 515). The refacing machine should be set for an angle-cut ofexactly 45". The most important factor in the use of the above machines for grinding the valve surface is in the proper dressing of the grinding wheel to insure the accuracy of the 45" face angle and the desired condition of the ground surface. The wheel should be run across the valve surface evenly and only enough material should be removed to clean up the surface. This is particularly true on the exhaust valve, as the stellited coating is relatively thin and it is desirable to retain as thick a coating as possible. When it has become necessary to reface an intake valve to the extent that a knife edge has resulted at the outer periphery of the head, the valve should be replaced. An exhaust valve should be replaced when there are indications that it has been refaced to the depth of the stellite face, which averages about .040" in thickness. The following companies manufacture machines suitable for this purpose: Black & Decker Manufacturing Co., Towson, Maryland, Cedar Rapids Engineering Corporation, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Albertson Manufacturing Co., Sioux City, Iowa, Van Dorn Electrical Tool Co.,Towson, Maryland, Hall Manufacturing Co., Toledo, Ohio. will be found that if valve Valve Lapplng-It seats are properly resurfaced and the valves accurately ground, very little lapping of the valve will be necessary to insure a good seal. Place a small amount of lapping compound, Clover 2A or its equivalent, on the seating surface of the valve, and insert the stem of the valve in its gurde. Care should be taken to see that no lapping compound is allowed on the valve stem. Using the Valve Lapping Tool, lap the valve with an oscillating motion, Iifting the valve every few turns to a new location, until it can be felt that the lapping action has ceased. Remove the valve, wipe off the compound and examine the seating surface to determine if it has a dull satin finish all around. After lapping, Prussian Blue may be used to determine if the valve is seating properly, or the sealing efficiency may be checked by partially fi.lling the cylinder with gasoline while the valves are in place, and noting whether any of the gasoline leaks through into the ports. Wash thoroughly to remove all trace of the lapping compound. Spark Plug Bushlngs-'Spark plug bushings in mbst casesmay be removed with the Spark Plug Bushing Remover. However, in some cases it may be necessary to mount the cylinder on a drill press and counterbore the bushing with a t pilot and a Lyr6" diameter cutter. Make ,{ 6drtain that the counterbore is centered in the spark plug hole during this operation. With a hack siw 6tade, cut thiough tlie remainder of the bushing in two places about rf" apart, using great care not to saw into the threads of the cylinder heads. Drive out the small segment and collapse the shell. If necessary,the threads in the casting may be cleaned up with the Spark Plug Bushing Taper up onlv eno.ugh enoush to clean up Insert tJtq. the tup tap otly Tan. Insert T"p,. the threads. A Iight cutting oil should be used to lubricate the tap. The new bushing may be installed with the Spark Plug Bushing Pusher. This bushing has a Ieft hand tapered thread on the outside diameter. The threads should be covered with grease, and the bushing screwed into place with the pusher. After installation, a sharp blow of the hammer in the reverse direction will break the pusher loose from the bushing. Face off the inner and outer ends of the bushing using the Spark Plug 'Ihe inside should be faced Bushing Facers. head and the outside cut cylinder flush with the back enough to make the finished thickness of the bushing r/2" ott the Wasp and Wasp Jr. and 3,/+" on the Hornet. After this operation, tap out the bushing with an 18 mm. tap. order to replace the Roeker Shaft Inserts-In rocker shaft inserts, the section around the insert hole should be heated to 250" F. (121'C.) (see Page 501) and the inserts drifted out. Rocker Shaft Insert Drifts are available for this

518

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES operation. To install new inserts, reheat the h-ead and drift them into place. These inserts are line reamed with the Rocker Shaft Insert Reamer. This is a stepped tool and reams both inserts at the same time (seeFig. 516). Rocker Arm Ball End Socket-To remove the baII end socket, drill a rf" diarneter hole in the top of the rocker directly over the cup. Be careful not to force the drill too deep on the rocker ball cup. With a punch drive out the old cup. Countersink the drilled hole on inside of rocker with the point of a large drill to remove any burrs. PIug the drilled hole with a piece of ttght fitttng brass and peen over at both ends to secure. Make sure the plug is flush on the inside. Press the new cup into place with the in rocker. oil hole lined up with the passage The hydraulic Rocker Arm Ball End Socket Disassembly Fixture may be used for this operation if available. To use this hydraulic tool, plug the oil hole in the worn cup with a tapered steel pin and place the rocker arm in in the tool the tool (seeFig. 5I7). The passages should then be filled with heavy oil, expelling the air from the passages. Give the plunger of the tool a sharp blow with a heavy hammer which will expel the socket from the rocker arm. As the socket is ejected with considerableforce, it should be covered with a heavy cloth to prevent it from causingany damage. Push Rod Tube Packlng Glands-The push rod tube packing glands contain right hand threads and are screwed into the head casting cold at the time of manufacture. If necessary to replace in case of leakage or damage to the threads, a Push Rod Tube Packing Gland Puller is available for removing a gland. A new gland may be installed with the Push Rod Tube Packing Gland Pusher. Replacement glands should be .004" oversize to insure a tight fit and prevent oil leakage. Push Rod Ball Ends and Spacers-Ball ends may be replaced once, but it is not feasible to use the same set of tubes for a third set of ball ends. The ball ends may be removed by placing the rod in a soft jawed vise and driving the ball end from the rod with a tool shaped to fit the contour of the rod (seeFig. 518). The push rod may be lengthened by placing ONE spacerunder the ball end. Only one spacermay be used under a ball end, but it is permissible to use spacers at both ends of the rod. New ball ends are pressed on the rod with an arbor press. Each spacer is .040" thick and will change the position of the valve adjusting screw approximately one and one half turns. L'he proper position of the valve adjusting screw is from one thread minimum to five threads maximum projecting beyond the locking nut, and the length of the push rod should be so adjusted as to have the screw in this position. Less than one thread projecting from the locking nut will not give adequate locking. More than five threads projecting from the locking nut will cause misalignment of the oil passagesin the rocker arm and the valve adjusting screw. Cyllnder Barrel Flanges-The cylinder barrel flanges should be lapped to a perfectly flat surface on a surface plate having a hole which will accommodate the skirt of the banel (see Fig. 519). Refer to Chapter IV for inspection of cylinder barrel flanges previous to lapping. Push Rod Cover Tubes-To prevent partial collapse of the push rod cover tube ends and subsequent oil leakage, steel ferrules are used in the ends of the push rod cover tubes. This improvement can be made on the older push rod cover tubes as follows: Each tappet assembly should be taper-ground on the cup end as shown in Fig. 520. On the upper end of the push rod covers, the lip which is formed inward should be removed so that a ferrule may be installed. This may be accomplished by cutting off the lip in a lathe. A ferrule should be pressed in place at each end of the push rod cover. Then lightly stake the covers, to preclude any possibility of the ferrule becoming dislodged in case of loosening. One staking operation at each end of the cover assembly will be satisfactory. When staking the covers care should be taken not to puncture

Fig. 516 -- Reaming Rocker Shaft Inserts

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF IVIAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

519

Fig. 517 -

Removing Rocker Arm Ball Cup

Fig. 518- Removing PushRod Ball End Exhaust Port Llner Replacernent (Wasp and Eornet)-The removal of the exhaust port Iiner may be accomplished with the Exhaust Port Liner Puller. To use, insert it in position and heat the area of the cylinder surrounding the exhaust port and withdraw the liner from the head. Clean up the bore of the exhaust port and, using a suitable drift, install the new liner in the head while it is still hot. It is important that the replacement liner be well seated in the head while the metal is still hot. Spare Cyltnde_Ig-Cylinder assemblies shipped as spares for Wasp H1 and Hornet E s-ei{es engines, will have the rocker box cover studs shipped loose to enable the operator to install cap screws or.qtuds depending where the cylinder is to be installed. Cap screws must be rised on the rocker box adjacenl to the sump on cylinders Nos. 5 and 6. When a used cylinder is chosen for Nos. b or 6 location and has previously had studs installed, it will be necessary to remove the studs from the aforementioned rocker boxes and use oversize cap screws.

them. Fig. 520 shows the exact position of these ferrules and where they shoultl be staked, as well as the angle of the taper on the tappet assemblies. Cautlon-If it is found necessary to replace a tappet cup socket on engines having reinf,orcedpush rod covers, it is important tf,at the diameter of the replacement sbckets does not exceeda%a". Rocker Box Covers (Wasp Jr. 82, 88, Wasp -covers and Hornet)-Rocker box should 6e faceh off on a lapping plate with a small amount of lapping compound. This precaution is to insure that the cover will bear evenly on the gasket, thus preventing oil leakage. Be sure that the covers are washed thoroughly to remove all traces of the lapping compound. Inter_-cyllnd_er and Inter-ear Draln PlpesAry damaged or bent pipes should be replaced Fy new pipes. Loose pipes should be tightened, but unnecessary tightening should be avoided as it might result in cracked cylinder heads. fntake Plpes and Push Rod Cover TubesIntake pipes and push rod cover tubes should have any dents and scratches removed. Repaint wherever necessary.

520

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

REMOVE THIS LIP

STAKE AS INDICATED TO HOLD SLEEVE tN POSITION.

y9282 PACKtNGI rt4096

(ulcnrrue ro Mrss i.o. or coven)

1go--------J

Fig. 519

Lapping

Cylinder

Barrel Flange

Fig. 520 -

Valve Tappet Reworking

PISTONS AND PISTON RINGS Plstons-In the event that it was found necessary, at inspection, to install overwidth piston rings, the piston ring grooves should be recut to the size necessary to afford the desired side clearance. When recutting a top piston ring groove, most of the material should be removed from the top of the groove rather than from the lower side. It is also important to maintain the radii at the bottom of the grooves. of piston rings to Plston Rlngs-Grinding obtain the desired side clearance is not recommended as a general rule due to the possibility of distorting the ring. In some cases,however, it will be more practicable to remove a small amount of material by grinding rather than to recut the grooves in the piston. If this becomes necessary, it is important that the grinding be done on a magnetic chuck surface grinder taking very tight cuts to prevent excessiveheating with resultant distortion of the ring. When grinding a tapered ring, the grinding should be done only on the top of the ring, as otherwise the ring's scraping edge will be destroyed and the efficiency of the ring reduced. It is suggestedthat a carborundum Aloxite Wheel 50-L or the Norton 1906-L be used. For best results the wheel should have a speed between 5,500 and 6,000 surface feet per minute. It is not posslble to grlnd wedge-type rlngs ln the ffeld. End or gap clearance may be determined by inserting the piston ring in a Master Ring having a diameter equivalent to the standard cylinder bore (see Fig. 52L). Then, using a feeler gage, the gap may be determined. If necessary to increase the gap, it may be accomplished with a fine file. Where master rings are not available, the bore of the cylinder may be used in the same manner. Remove any sharp edges of the ring which may have resulted from the filing. Later engine models incorporate an improved type piston having wedge-type rings in the three upper grooves. This new type piston and ring assembly is directly interchangeable with the former type and does not have to be changed in complete sets in an engine. Note-Refer to Page 409. "Inspection" for method of checking side clearance of wedge-type rings. Figures 520A and 520B show piston ring arrangements recommended for the various engine models. Rfngs tn . Cylinders-To I,apptng Ptstol insure proper seating during engine run-in, piston rings should only be lapped in the cylinder barrel in which they are to be installed. The number of strokes required for seating rings properly varies with the method employed and the consistency of the lapping compound. Therefore, it will be necessary for each operator to develop the proper technique for the equipment and method he is using.

52L

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

PIS TON R IN G A R R A N GE ME N TS WASP JR. WITH WEDGE-TYPE RINGS AND CHROME MOLYBDENUMSTEEL CYLINDER BARRELS.
END GAP .o5r5-.0585 .o5r5-'0565 .o5t5-.0585 CLEARANCE .o02-.OO4 'o02-.OO4 .OO2-.OO4

W A S P JR . W ITH W E D GE -TY P E R IN GS A N D N ITR A LLOY S TE E L C Y LIN D E R B A R R E LS .


ENO GAP .05t5-.0585 o5r5-.o585 .05r5-.o585 SIDE CLEARANCE .o02-.OO4 .OO2-.OO4 .OO2-.OO4

SIDE

. o5r 5- . o5 8 5 .o5r5-.o585

o5t5-.o585 .oo35-0065 .o5t5-.o585

.oo35-0065

. o5r 5- . o5 8 5

.oot-.oo3

.oils -.0185

.OOl-.OO3

RINGS WASP JR. WITH STRAIGHT-SIDED AND NITRALLOY OR CHROME MOLYBDE NUM S T EE L C YL IN D E R B AR R E L S .
SIDE CLEARANCE .o07-oo9 oo5s-.oo75 .oo3-.oos
LEGENDTHIS FACE/SHOULD BE FLUSH WITH THIS SURFACE/WHENMEASURING SIDE CLEARANCE OF WEDGE.TYPE RINGS.

FEELER GAGE

END GAP .o515-.o585 .05r5-.o585 .o5t5-.O585

.o5r5-O585 .o5r5-.O585

.oo35-0065

c - S T R A I G H T C O M P R E S S I O NR I N G - CW -coMPREssloN RING-wEDGE-TYPE TCW -TAPERED COMP RING.WEDGE.TYPE D O -DUAL OIL CONTROL RING S -SCRAPER RING TC -TAPERED STRAIGHT COMP. RING

.oil5-.O185

.oor-.oo3

Fig. 520.4'-

Piston Ring Arrangements (Wasp Jr. Engines)

522

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

PISTON RING ARRANGEMENTS

WASP WITH STRAIGHT-SIDED RINGS AND CHROMEMOLYBDENUM STEEL CYLINDER BARRELS.


SIDE CLEARANCE .oo7-.oo9

H OR N E T W ITH W E D GE -TY P ER IN GS A N D N ITR A LLOY S TE E L C Y LIN D E R B A R R E LS . SIDE CLEARANCE .oo2-.o04 oo2-oo4 oo2-.oo4 oo35-oo55

END GAP '0665-.O735 o665-.O735 o665-O735

END GAP .o7r5-.o785 .07t5-.o785 .o7t5-.0785 .o665-.o735

o o 5 -.o o 7 .o o 3 -.o o 5

o035-.0065

.0265-O335

.o o r-.0 o 3

.o145-.o215

oo35-o055

HORNET WITH STRAIGHT-SIDEDRINGS A ND NI T R AL L OY S T EE L C Y L IN D ER B A RRE LS.


SIDE CLEARANCE .o085-oto5 .0065-oo85 oo45-.o065 oo35-.o055
LEGENDT H I S F A C E /S H O U L D BE FLUSH WITH THIS URING SIDE CLEARANCE OF WEDGE.TYPE RINGS.

FEELER GAGE

END GAP .o7t5-.o785 'o7r5-o785 .o7t5-o785 .o665-.O735

RING c-srRArGHT COMPRESSION TYPE cw-coMPREssloN RING-WEDGETYPE RING.WEDGETCW-TAPEREDCOMP RING DO-DUAL OIL CONTROL S-SCRAPER RING COMPRING TC-TAPEREDSTRAIGHT

or45-o2r5

.oo35-oo55

Fig. 5208 -

Piston Ring Arrangements (Wasp and Hornet Engines)

523

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES The amount of lapping is judged by the condition of the ring surface rather than the inside surface of the cylinder. The compression rings should be lapped until the original tool marks on the outsid-e surface have practically disappeared and the surface assumesa smooth satin frnish around the periphery of the ring. If a ring does not appear-to ha-vea true surface after the usual amount of lapping, the ring should be discarded and a new ring used. With the lapping machine illustrated (see Fie. 522), a satisfactory ring condition may be obtained for the various type rings with the proper number of strokes as shown in the following table Duar oil, Scraper and Cornpresslon Tapered Type of Barrel 30 to 50 200 Nitralloy 15 to 25 100 Chrome-Molybdenum The lapping compound used for this oper,ation is Clover 2A diluted with keroseneand a little oil. The lapping compound should be used sparingly and coarse compounds avoided. It is common practice to use a discarded .010" oversize piston for holding the 1ings. In some casesa special plug is made up for the purpose. In any case, however, a lapping piston should have a guiding skirt equal in length to the skirt of the conventional piston. A piston or plug should not be used after its diameter is reduced to a point where the piston is a sloppy fit in the cylinder or where the ring grooves have worn excessively, as qgch will not hold the piston rings in proper alignment for Iapping an-dthe ring will tilt back and forth with e"ch s"troke, thus causing the rings to become crowned. It is immaterial whether the rings are held in individual grooves or held in a common groove as long as they have no more side play fhan is necessaryto allow them to expand io fhe cylinder walls. If a lapping piston having a groove wide enough to accommodate all compression rings or the tapered and oil control iings, is employed, fittings rings should be usedto control tho side clearance of the rings in the groove. During the lapping operation, _tb. valves should be in place in the cylinder, and durilg the subsequent washing operation, the cylinder shoulcl be held in the vertical position and every effort made to remove all trace of the lapping compound without permitting any_of it to be washedup into the head of the cylinder. After lapping, any feather edgesthat may have resulted should be removed with a fine stone, being careful not to form a radius on the edge of the ring. ROD ASSEMBLY

CRANKSHAFT AND ARTICULATING has shown that little Crankpln-Experience or no wear ts rrrcurred on the crankpin with the use of leaded silver master rod bearings. The crankpin, however, may become scratched or scored by foreign particles entering with the pressure oil. It is usually possible to remove these scratches by such a method as coating the crankpin with cutting oil, wrapping a long strip of old-and worn No. 240 emery cloth once around the crankpin, and, by pulling alternately on the ends, cause the cloth to rotate around the crankpin. A final polish may be obtained by repeating the operation with ciocus cloth and oil. If inspection has revealed the necessity- of lapping fhe crankpin, it may be accomplished as follows: Assemble crankstiaft front and rear sections toeether and mount the assembly in the Crankstrift Holding Fixture fitted wiltt -thg proper Adapter. Plug the crankpin oil holes with heavy grease 6r wax and imear the crankpin surfalein'itft a very fine lapping compound. It is most important to use u "*V fine-grade of compound, as damage can be done to the crankpin if too coarse a -grade is used. With the lap ietaining screws loose, install the Crankp.in Lappine" Tool on the crankpin and adjust the tension"of the lap collar so that t[9 Lapping Tool mav be turnea witfr one finger. This adjustment strould not be so tight thaf a pressureis required

Fig. 521 --- Checking

End

Clearance of Piston

Ring

524

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 522 -

Cylinder and Piston Ring Lapping Machine

to turn the tool, nor should it be so loose that it can be spun easily. When the adjustment of the collar has been completed, tighten the lap retaining screws. Revolve the Lapping Tool and, at the same time, work it back and forth over the Iength of the crankpin. When the Lapping Tool begins to turn freely, the crankpin should be cleaned and measured with a micrometer for out-of-round and taper. If the measurements indicate that the out-of-round or tapered condition still exists, the lapping should be continued for a period of time and measurements again taken. Measurements should be taken in at Ieast four different positions to obtain the exact diaineter. After lapping is completed, remove all compound and polish the pin with crocus cloth and oil. An improper lapping procedure may aggravate the out-of-round condition and may produce a taper on the crankpin. The tool should be oscillated back and forth and at the same time slowly revolved around the crankpin in order to Iap uniformly. To prevent the parting surfaces of the laps from contacting each other as the bore of the laps wear, they should be lapped down on a surface plate. Lap these faces parallel, so that il bV chance,the laps touch, they will not be thrown offcenter. leaded silMaster Rod Bearlngs-"Prefitted" ver master rod bearings are supplied on the sub-

ject engines, and are directly interchangeable with the bearings used in early models. They require no boring or fitting to individual master rods. The shape and tolerances of "prefitted" master rod bearings are held to extremely close limits and when being assembled in the master rods should in no way be altered. Cautlon should be exerclsed, durlng handllng and assernblltg, not to dlsturb the Iead coatlng of the bore. Due to the relatively wide spread of allowable clearance between this type of bearing and the crankpin, the standard size is satisfactory for normal replacements and will be supplied for spares unless otherwise specified. Where crankpins have been lapped to the extent that a standard size bearing does not give the desired clearance,a .002" undersize bearing is available. In exceptional cases where the crankpin has been reground to a size where the above bearings do not give the recommendedcrankpin clearance, special bearings will be furnished on request. In this latter case, it is essential that the diameter of the crankpin, not the bearing bore, be specified. An approved method of removing a master rod bearing is as follows: Mount the master rod under a heavy duty drill press or milling machine, or in a boring mill. The bore of the master rod should be ac-

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES curately centered by the use of a dial indicator. Using an eccentric boring tool, bore out the master rod bearing until only a thin shell reto cut into the bore of mains, using great care not 'fhe bearing can be rethe master rod, itself. moved from the master rod by hand, or by tapping it lightly, after it has been reduced to a thin shell. An alternate method of removing a master rod bearing is to make two cuts in the bearing about rf" apart and just deep enough to cut into the steel back of the bearing. Caution-Extreme care must be exercisednot to cut into or damagethe master rod. Remove the small section, then collapse and remove the remainder of the bearing. With the bearing removed, the bore of the master rod should be measured. It is well to reinstall the knuckle pins in their holes as the press fit of the pins is apt to affect the rod bore measurements slightly. If enlarged so that a new standard size bearing will not give the proper fit, the master rod should be reground to the nearest oversize. This is normally a factory job and rods should be returned to the United Airports Division, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Connecticut, for reoperation. The bore of the master rod should be magnafluxed whenever a bearing is removed. It is recommended that the bearing be removed and the rod bore magnafluxed at about 2500 hours whether or not the bearing requires replacement. See Chapter IV for nrethod of Magnaflux Inspection. To install a new bearing, first heat the master rod in an oil bath to 425oF'.-450o F., (218' C.232 C.) preferably keeping it to the higher limit. Next, put the bearing in position on the Master Rod Bearing Assembly Arbor. It is well to put a piece of paper between the arbor and the bearing to protect the soft lead surface of the latter. Tighten the handle lightly to avoid difficulty in removing it after the heat expands the bearing, and chili both the bearing and the arbor with dry ice (COr). The bearing should be assembled with the flange at the rear side of the master rod. After heating for twenty minutes, remove the rod from the tank and allow the surplus oil to drain from it. Quickly press in the new bearing by hand (see Fig. 523). Due to the length of the bearing and its tightness in the rod, it is important that the bearing be pressedin as rapidly as possible. The bearing must be started straight with the slot in the flange perfectly aligned with the lug on the master rod, and pressedhome so that the flange of the bearing seats firmly against the face of the master rod. After the master rod has cooled down to approximately room temperature, put the master rod and bearing under an arbor press

525

and, using the same arbor as for installing the bearing, press the flange of the bearing against the master rod. This is necessary due to the fact that when the bearing cools there will be a slight clearance between the bearing flange and the master rod. Knuckle Ptrrs-At overhaul, knuckle pins and knuckle pin holes should be cleaned up and polished. All traces of galling should be removed from the knuckle pin holes. Any score marks on tlrg pins and holes should be cleaned up by polishing off the high areas enough to obtain an even surface. Mount the knuckle pins in a Iathe and polish with crocus cloth and oil. The holes in the master rod may be cleaned ,rp with a flexible shaft polisher, or with crocus cloth and oil. The cleaning and polishing of knuckle pins and knuckle pin holes is likely to affect the fit of the pins in the holes. The fit of each knuckle pin in the master rod should, therefore, be chec[ed after these operations have been completed. Measurements of the pins should be made with a micrometer and of the holes with a telescopic gage. Knuckle pins and knuckle pin holes are graded and marked with relation to their sizes. Each knuckle pin and each hole in the master rod has a letter designation. A, B, and C designate standard size knuckle pins, and D, E, and F are used where oversize pins are necessaryto maintain the desired fits. The sizes varv in steps of .0003". The knuckle pins and knuckle pin holes should be of the same classification size. If it is found that one end of a knuckle pin hole varies in classification size from the opposite end, the diameter of the smaller should be increased so that the classification of both ends is the same. When the holes vary by one or two sizes, this may be accomplished by lapping; otherwise the holes should be honed. The number and classification sizes should be etched on both the pin and the master rod. When classification sizes are changed the etched letter should also be changed. Replacement knuckle pins for Wasp and Hornet qngines are now made from nitralloy steel. These pins are directly interchangeable with_the previous type and may be identified by the Number "249" stamped on one end. Replacement.l<nuckle pins for the Wasp. Jr. engines are available in either chrome vanadium or nitralloy steel. it is desired to change from Cautlon-If chrome vanadium to nitralloy knuckle pins it is important that the crankshaft be properly balanced. Refer to "Nitralloy Knuckle Pins", Chapter XVIII, "Miscellaneous Conversions".

526

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

of Fig. 523- Installation

Master

Rod Bearing

Platlng Knuckle Plns-To provide an antigalling surface and to prevent picking up at assembly and disassembly it is recommended that chrome vanadium knuckle pins be flash tin plated and nitralloy knuckle pins be flash copper plated at the time of overhaul. Nitralloy pins "249" stamped may be identified by the number on one end. Before plating, knuckle pins shoutd be thoroughly degreasedand cleaned of all carbon. This may be done with pumice powder and a scrubbing brush or if equipment is available, nitralloy pins should be cleaned in a hot alkaline electro-cleaner (one minute cathodic and one minute anodic). As the plating solution tends to corrode aluminum, it is recommended that any aluminum plugs or inserts be removed. The inserts are pinned in position, and it will be necessary to drill out the staking pin before attempting to remove the insert. This operation will damage the insert and will necessitatereplacement with a new insert after plating. Using Scotch paper masking tape, mask the bearing surface of the pin, i. e. the surface of the pin which is located between the inner faces of the master rod webs when the pin is installed. Plug all openings with suitable plugs so that only the outside surface comesin contact with the plating

solution (see Fig. 524). Drill out rivets, or remove the threaded Allen plugs and press out the aluminum plugs. Replug the holes with temporary plugs. Rinse in cold water and, for nltralloy plns only, dip in a L\/o solution of hydrochloric acid at 160' F. (71" C.) for ten seconds and rinse in cold water again. The plating of chrome vanadium pins is accomplished by the use of sodium stannate acetate solution which is manufactured bv the DuPont Products Corporation. The composition of this solution is as follows: Bath Composition: Sodium Stannate Caustic Soda Sodium Acetate Hydrogen Peroxide (100 Vot.) L2 oz. per gal. 1 oz. per gal. 2 oz. per gal. Xo oz.per gal.

Bath Temperature: F.-160" F. (60'c.-71'C.) 140o Cunent: 6 Volts, D. C.-5 amps. per pin Plating Time: * 3 min. per .0001" of plate The plating of nitralloy knuckle pins is accomplished in Rochelle Salt copper cyanide bath as follows: Bath Composition: Metallic Copper 2-4 oz. per gal. Copper Cyanide 3-6 oz. per gal.

527

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

T H E S E C A P SA R E M A D E O F ALUMINUM AND SHOULD BE USEDAS A GUIDEFOR TAPING THE UNPLATEOPORTIONOF THE PIN AT THE BOUNDARY oF THE PLATED (NoN-snouuDERED)ENDS.

TAPE THIS

seeruore @

METHODS OF PLUGGINGAND TAPING TYPICAL KNUCKLE PINS BEFORE PLATING


uore @ T H E P L U G SF l r r E D T o r H E E N D S THRU THE INTER. AND INSERTED S E C T I N GH O L E SO F T H E K N U C K L E PINS SHOULDBE MADE OF CLOTH M|CARDA,GRADE t+agt. tnts uetE R I A L I S A V A I L A B L EI N 4 E T . R O D S DtAs. oF t{' t" oR $" eruo ts HAvTNG MFG.BY THE WESTINGHOUSE C O . , T R A F F O R D ,P E N N . ELECTRTC
CAUTION: PLATING WHICH ADHERES TO AREAS OTHER THAN THOSE FOR WHICH ITS APPLICATION IS SPECIFIED MUST BE REMOVED BY BUFFING.

Fig. 524 -

Methods of Plugging and Taping Knuckle Pins Before Plating

528

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 525 _- Installing Piston Pin Bushing

Sodium Cyanide lTotal) Sodium Cyanide (Free) Rochelle SaIt Sodium Carbonate

4-7 oz. per 0.5-1.0oz. per 3-8 oz. per 2-8 oz. per

gal. gal. gal. gal.

140" F. (60" C.) Bath Temperature: 5 amps. per pin Current: Plating Time: x 3 min. per .0001" of plate *The maximum thickness of plate should not exceed.0001". After either type of plating the pins should be rinsed in cold water, unmasked, rinsed in hot water and dried. The pins should next be baked in accordance with the procedure outlined in the paragraph "Plating" (page 501), before being reinstalled in the master rod. Note-Hydrogen Peroxide should be added to the tin plating solution daily, or when necessary, in the amount of /s to % ounce per gallon of solution. 'lhis will tend to keep all of the tin in solution, and superior plating will be experienced. Rod Bushlngs-Should inspecArtleulatlng tion have revealed the necessity of replacing either or both of the articulating rod bushings, or should oversize knuckle pins have been fitted, making it imperative to replace knuckle pin bushings, the operation should be performed as follows: Mount the articulating rod under an arbor press and, using the Piston Pin Bushing or Knuckle Pin Bushittg Drift, press the bushing from the rod. When forcing a piston pin bushing from a rod, the staking pin, which securesthe bushing in the rod, will be sheared off. The

edges of the staking hole in the rod should be stoned to remove any burrs which may have been caused by the shearing of this pin. No pin is used to secure the knuckle pin bushing in position. New bushings may be installed with an arbor press, using the Piston Pin Bushing Drift (see Fig. 525), or the Knuckle Pin Bushing Drift and Plate. The knuckle pin drift shotild be pressed down against the shoulder of the articulating rod, which will cause the bushing to project approximately .003" on each end. Check the knuckle pin bushing end clearance in the master rod with a feeler gage (refer to the Table of Clearances). If necessary, face off the longer end with the Knuckle Pin Bushing Facing Cutter, used in conjunction with the Knuckle Pin Bushing Facing Holder, and the Knuckle Pin Bushing Facing Bushing. When installing a piston pin bushing, insure that the oil holes in the bushing are properly aligned with those in the rod. Each end of the bushing should protrude the same distance from the side of the rod. This should be checked with a scale. After installation of the bushing, transfer-drill the dowel pin hole in the bushing with a #t9 (.166") drill. The drill should extend %t" deep into the bushing. Place the dowel into the hole and expand with several sharp blows of a hammer, at the same time preventing the bushing from collapsing by placing the Piston Pin Bushing Expanding Mandrel inside the bushing, (seeFig. 526). If the inside of the bushing is not properly supported during this operation,

529

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 526 -

Pinning the Piston Pin Bushing

the bushing will collapse slightly so that the dowel will be pushed out when the engine is run. The excessmaterial of the dowel pin should then be filed offflush with the contour of the rod. After installation in the rods, these bushings should be bored out to the desired size (see Fig. 527). For overhaul shop use, the Wadell Boring Fixture, manufactured by the Wadell Engineering Co., 354 Mulbemy St., Newark, N. J., has proven satisfactory for performing this operation. Special operating instructions are furnished with each fixture. When ordering, the purchaser should specify the engine type and model being overhauled, so that the proper instructions and special mandrels may be furnished. The following precautions should be taken when placing an articulating rod in the fixture. Before clamping the rod in place, a trial should be made to see that the rod fits up against the two aligning plates without rocking. If the rod rocks slightly on the aligning plates, the two edgesof the flanges are not parallel. It is permissible to use a fine file or stone on the edges of the flanges to make them contact the plates evenly and eliminate the rocking. If this precaution is not taken, the rod will spring slightly when it is clamped in the fixture. When the bushings are bored, and the rod released from the fixture, it will return to its original shape and the two bushings will not be parallel.

\-,

\-

Subsequent to the installation and boring of new bushings, the alignment of the master and articulating rods should be checked on the Master Rod and Articulating Rod Aligning Fixture, "Inspection". as describedin Chapter IV, Plston Plns and Plugs-The piston pin plugs, which were removed to facilitate inspection, should be reinstalled in the piston pins if undamaged, or new plugs install-ed. R-efer to the Table of Clearancesfor the proper fit. It is recommended, if not already accomplished, that the latest type of Wasp Jr. piston pin be installed at overhaul. SeeChapter XVIII "Miscellaneous Conversions" for instructions for making this replacement. Wasp H1 and H1-G engines,starting with Nos. 6244 and 6223 respectively, incorporate a heavier section piston pin. If it is desired to incorporate this new type pin in engines manufactured previous to this change, the crankshaft requires rebalancing to offset the increased weight of the piston pins.. Directions for qgLi$-!his-change "Miscellaneous are given in Chapter XVIII Conversions". Flywelghts (Wasp and Hornet)-If for any reason, it is desired to remove a riveted-type flyweight, it should be accomplishedas follows: Drill a hole in the inner flyweight stem, using a drill of 14" less diameter then the stem, to

530

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 527 -

Wadell Boring Fixture -

Articulating

Rod

of the inner flyweight against relieve the pressure the outer. Chamfer the rivet end sufficiently to weaken the rolled over portion of the rivet. Separate the two halves of each flyweight by ins-erting a suitable drift in the drilled hole and oressing out with an arbor press. The riveted typ" should be replaced by the demountable type as follows:

As replacement flyweights are all of the "removable type:' it is necessary to reoperate the flyweight liners when changing from the "riveted type" to the "removable type" on Wasp and Hornet engines. For complete information in regard to replacing flyweights on Wasp Jr., "Flyweights" Wasp and Hornet engines, refer to "Miscellaneous Conversions". Chapter XVIII,

BLOWER AND REAR SECTIONS Note-The jet in the hole to be bored should Irnpeller Shaft Bearlng Cage (Steel Cage) be examined to determine if it is sunk (Wasp Jr.)-The impeller shaft bearing cage is 'position far enough so that the cutter will not with a lug-headed loc\ing locked in touch it. If it is found to be protrudscrew. To remove the cage, bend back the lugs ing, a small hand grinder may be used on the locking screw and remove the screw. to grind the face of the jet enough to Heat the blower section (seePage 501) and then clear the boring tool. Blower the using out the cage, drift immediately Cage Disassembly Drift. After removal of the Before boring out the hole for the oversize caie, the hole in the blower section should be bearing cage, the oversize cage should be measmdasured for wear and out-of-round condition ured with a micrometer, to determine to what to ascertain if it should be reworked to accomdiameter this hole should be bored for the demodate an oversize cage. sired fit. A standard boring tool, using kerosene To rework the section to accommodate an oil as a cutting fluid, should be used with oversize cage, mount the crankcase blower seca lathe speedof between 150 and 200 R. P. M. tion with the front face against a suitable holding Scribe a line lengthwise in the new hole, interfixture in a lathe capable of swinging a section secting the centerline of the oil jet hole. Scribe of tlis size. With an indicator at the rear face a similar line on the O.D. of the new cage. Using and on the rear flange diameter, indicate the these lines as a guide, drift the cage into the blower section to run true within .001-", full blower section using the Blower Bearing Cage indicator reading. Thts ls funportant.

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES This operation will be faciliAssembly Drift. tated by heating the blower section. Make sure that the oil jet hole in the cage is lined up with the oil jet in the blower section. After installation of the cage, the locking screw hole should be drilled and tapped in the new cage. A #4 (.209") drill, which has been ground down so that only rA" of the flutes remain and which has been fitted with an extension, should be inserted in the tapped hole in the blower section and used to drill this hole. The smooth shank of the drill will act as a pilot for the drill in the tapped hole and will not damagethe threads, provided caution is exercised in using the drill. After drilling, tap out the hole with a rZ" -24 N.F. tap. Remove any excessmaterial or burrs from around the newly tapped hole. Insert the locking screw in the hole and bend over the locking tabs. If the screw projects through the cage, it should be removed and enough material removed from the end of the screw to provide a flush surface. knpeller Shaft Bearlng Cage Lock-In cases where the old type impeller bearing cagelocking screw is used on Wasp Jr. engines, it is recommended that the new special blower bearing cage locking screw with two lugs protruding from the head be used. To effect this change, the two staking slots in the blower section should be enlarged by means

531

of a small cape chisel having approximately s4nt'to r/16" radius on the point. 'fhis can be done quite readily without danger of chips getting into the parts or into the screw hole by performing the operation before removing the-old screw. The screw will project in the correct distance if it is screwed down until the outer ends of the two lugs are approximately flush with the casting. In some casesit may be found that the screw will bind a thread or two before this point is reached. The lugs can be bent into the slot making a very secure fastening. Irnpeller Shaft Bearlng Cage (Outboard Bearing) (Wasp and Hornet)-The impeller shaft bearing cage is secured in the blower section by nine screws. To remove the cage, these screws should be removed, the blower section heated (see Page 501) and the cage driven out with the Blower Bearing Cage Disassembly Drift. The hole should then be inspected for scoring and measuredfor out-of-round condition. Inspect the flange seating surface for general condition. Should it be desired to fit an oversize blower bearing cage, mount the front face of the blower section against a suitable holding fixture in a lathe Iarge enough to swing a piece of this size. With an indicator at the rear face and on the rear flange diameter, indicate the blower to run true within .001", full indicator reading. This ls irnportant. Note-The jet in the hole to be bored should be examined to determine if it is sunk far enough to clear the cutter. If there is not sufficient clearance, a small hand grinder may be used to grind the face of the jet enough so that the cutter will clear it. If any score marks or excessivenicks are found on the flange seating surface, this should be faced off, as the first operation, to assure proper seating of the cage. Before boring out the hole for the oversize bearing cage, the oversize cage should be measured with a micrometer to determine to what diameter the hole should be bored for the desired fit. A standard boring tool, using kerosene oil as a cutting compound, should be used with a lathe speed of between 150 and 200 R. P. M. The new cage should be installed, after the blower section has been heated, with the Blower Bearing Cage Assembly Drift. When installing, take care to see that the screw holes in the cage are properly lined up with those in the blower section. Secure the cage in position with the nine locking screws. Interrnedlate Shaft Rear Bearlng LlnerShould it be necessary to replace this liner, it may be removed by drifting from the blower section with a suitable drift. Although this liner

Fig. 528 -Removing

Oil Pressure Pipe from Rear Section

532

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 529 -

Reaming Magneto Shaft Bushing

is staked in place with a No. 24 pin, the pin will normally remain in the case when the liner is removed. Clean up the bore of the hole, if necessary, and drift in a new liner making sure that the notch in the edge of the liner coincides with the staking pin. maintain Starter Shaft Bearlng Liner-To the specified clearance of the starter shaft ball bearing in the crankcase blower section, a steel or bronze liner may be installed in the starter shaft bearing hole. This is a factory operation for which the blower section should be shipped back to United Airports Division, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Conn. Bearlng Bolt Intermedlate Blower The blower intermediate bearing bolt used on later Wasp and Hornet engines has a land, \f" wide, in the center of its necked portion to dampen any vibration which might occur. Old type bolts, not having this land, may be utilized by wrapping a piece of %2" shim stock or wire around the center portion of the bolt so that it is fairly snug in the hole through the gear. The shim stock or wire may be secured with solder. Blower Bearlng Cover-Should the hole in the blower bearing cover be excessively worn necessitating replacement of the impeller shaft rear bearing spacer with a .010" or .020" oversize spacer, it may be accomplished as follows:

Assemble the cover to the blower section and, using the Blower Bearing Cover Reamer, ream out the cover to .978" for the .010" oversize spacer and to .988" for the .020" oversizespacer. The adapter used in conjunction with this reamer fits into the rear of the impeller shaft bearing cage and guides the adjustable blade. The blade is fed with a knurled knob and care should be taken in adjusting this knob to seethat too deep a cut is not taken. Oll Pressure Ptpe-Should the oil pressurepipe, which is located in the rear section, require replacement, it may be removed with the Oil Pressure Pipe Puller (see Fig. 528). If a new standard size pipe affords the proper fit, it may be installed in the rear section using the Oil Pressure Pipe Drift. This drift is designed to facilitate installing the pipe to its proper depth. In the event an oversize replacement pipe is required, the blower and rear sections should be reamed oversize. To accomplish this operation, the blower and rear sections should be temporarily assembled. The Oil Pressure Pipe Reamer should then be introduced into this fixture and the blower and rear sections line reamed. The total depth to which this reamer should be entered should not exceed416" on the Wasp Jr., Wasp, and Hornet E and E-G engines and 531" on the Hornet Ez-G and E3-G engines.

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SIIB.ASSEMBLIES

533

Fig. 530 -

Facing Magneto Shaft Bushing

Magneto Shaf t Bushlngs-If it has beenfound ncessaryto replace the magneto shaft bushings. the section in which the bushing is located should be heated (see Page 501) and the bushings drifted out with the Magneto Shaft Bushing Disassembly Drift. The removal of one magneto shaft bushing necessitates the removal of its mating bushing, as new bushings must be line reamed after installation. After removal of the bushings the hole should be checked for out-of-round condition and scorirg, and, if necessary, cleaned up with crocus cloth and oil or with the standard size Magneto Shaft Bushing HoIe Reamers. If difficully is experienced irr cleaning up or if it is desired to fit bushings oversize on the O.D., oversize reamers are available. In reaming these holes, it will be necessaryto temporarily assemblethe blower and the rear sections. The Magneto Shaft Bushing Hole Reamer should be inserted from the front side of the blower section after installation of its adapter on the magneto mounting pad to guide the reamer pilot. After the holes in the case have been reamed, the blower and rear sections should be reheated and the new bushings installed with the Magneto Shaft Bushing Assembly Drift. Assemble the

Magneto Shaft Bushing Reamer Guide Plate on the magneto mounting pad and iine ream the bushings, (see Fig. 529). After reaming. make sure that all chips are removed from the blower or rear sections, and check the rear flange clearance of the long magneto shaft bushings. This is accomplished wlth the Magneto Shaft Bushing End Clearance Gage which consists of a stepped "GO" and "NO GO" block and a bar. The bar should be inserted down through the vertical accessory drive shaft bushing. Then insert the stepped block through the oil pump or fuel pump recess and over the bar, and with the ((GO" and "NO GO" step, check the flange end clearance. Should the end clearance be insufficient, face the bushing with the Magneto Shaft Bushing Facing Tool (see Fig. 530). After the bushing is properly faced, temporarily assemble the magneto shaft and check the end clearance between the magneto shaft and the rear magneto shaft bushing. Starter Shaft Bushing-If necessary to replace a starter shaft bushing, the rear section should be heated tsee Page 501) and the bushing drifted out with the Starter Shaft Bushing Disassembly Drift. After removal of the bushing, the hole should be checked for out-of-round condition and scoring and should be cleanedup with crocus

534

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES


one not reamed to standard size. Assemble and line up the blower and rear sections; then line ream this hole. Disassemble the two sections and install the new bushings, then reassemble. Align the tw_osgctions and line ream the bushings to size. Wash both sections thorougtrly to remove all chips. Note-The methods and tbols for line reaming bushings and cases,and removing andl inslalling bushings are described in the foregoing paragraphs for the separate items involved. If the oil pressure pipe in the old rear section is oversize, it will be necessary to ream out the oil pressure pipe hole in the new blower section to accommodate the oversize pipe. This may be satisfactorily done by removing the oil pressure pipe from the rear section; temporarily assemble the blower and rear section and ream out the oil pressure pipe hole in the blower section to the desired oversize using first an oversize Oil Pressure Pipe Hole Reamer with a pilot, then a plain oversize Oil Pressure Pipe Hole Reamer. Installlng a New Rear Sectlon on an Otd Blower Sectlon-When a new rear section is received from the factory the bushings and oil pipe will not be installed. In order to insure alignment of the blower and rear sections and permit line reaming the bushing holes in the rear section, it *ill be necessary to remove the magneto shaft bushings in the blower section as previously described. Assemble and align the two sections, and line ream the bushing holes in the rear section. The pressure pipe hole in the blower will act as a pilot for reaming the hole in the rear. If any oversize bushings have been installed previously, ream the holes in the rear section to the required oversize. Install the bushings in the blower and rear sections and line ream to size. Install the oil pressure pipe in the rear section. Wash both cases thoroughly to remove all chips. Note-The methods and tools for line reaming bushings and cases, and installing aud removing the bushings and pipe are described in the foregoing paragraphs for the separate items involved. Vertlcal Accessory Drlve Shaft Bushlng To remove this bushing, drive out the brass pin which stakes the bushing in place using a small steel drift. Then, with the Vertical Accessory Shaft Bushing Disassembly Drift, drive the bushlng fro;n tbe rear section, and clean up the bushing hole. If necessary,an expansion reamer may be used to enlarge the hole to accommodate an oversize bushing. Install the new bushing with the Drift and transfer-drill the staking pin hole with a No. 20 (.t6L" ) drill. Insert a steel bar into the bushing bore to prevent the bushing from collapsing and drive home the staking pin. The hole should then be reamed to the proper size

cloth and oil or the standard size Starter Shaft Hole Reamer. If difficulty is experienced in cleaning up or if it is desired to fit bushings oversize on the O.D., oversize reamers are available. After reaming the hole, reheat the case and install the new bushing with the Starter Shaft Before reaming the Bushing Assembly Drift. new bushing with the Starter Shaft Bushing Reamer, place the reamer guides in the starter mounting pad and in the starter shaft bearing boss and temporarily assemble the blower and the rear sections. Then ream the starter shaft bushing (seeFig. 531). Installatlon of a New Blower Sectlon on an is considered good pracOld Rear Section-It tice, when installing a new blower on an old rear, to replace the two magneto shaft and starter shaft bushings in the rear. If the oil pressure pipe is in good condition it need not be replaced; however, should it be oversize, the corresponding hole in the blower will have to be lined reamed with the rear section to accommodate the oversize. Remove the bushings from the rear section and clean up the bushing holes. If any of these bushings were previously installed oversize, the corresponding bushing hole in the blower will have to be reamed to the same oversize. When a new blower section is received from the factory the starter shaft bushing hole is the only

Fig. 531 -

Reaming Starter Shaft Bushing

REPAIR AND ASSEIIIBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES


with the Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft Reamer. This reamer is used in conjunction with a pilot which is mounted on the gun synchronizer mounting pad. Vacuum. Purnp l)rlve Llner-The Vacuum Pump Drive Liner Puller should be used for removing this part from the engine. With a suitable drift, drive the new liner into the hole until the flange of the liner seats on the shoulder in the hole, taking care to press the liner down evenly. Cocking will prevent proper seating. To determine if this liner has been properly bottomed, measure the distance from the flange of the liner to the face of the vacuum pump mounting pad with a depth gage. This depth should be .802" to .824". Intake Alr Ternperature Therrnorneter Interference-On Wasp Jr., Wasp, and Hornet E and E-G engines on which the intake air temperature is measured at the mixture duct of the rear section, the diameter of the hole in the upper vane of the mixture duct has been increased from Yta"to 2%2". In caseswhere this has not already b,eenaccomplished, this hole should be enlarged. r counterbore with a Use a 2yur %0" pilot, suppbrting the vane during this operation by means of a wooden block placed between it and the next lower vane. After boring, remove all sharp edges. Extreme care should be taken to remove all chips from the air intake passage. inspection has revealed the necesOtl Pump-If sity for replacement of any one section of the oil pump housing, it will be necessary to replace the entire housing assembiy. Scratches and burrs in any section of the housing, not serious enough

535

to cause rejection of the casting, should be removed with a small triarlsul?r scraper, as emery should not be used on aluminum. Where insufficient clearance between t_hegeqrs and housing has caused the ggars to 4rb_ on the casting, this condition should be rectified by scraping enough "specifi6d material from the casting to Srlr" the clearance at this qoint, pro-viding lhe iubbing is not a result of some abnormal condition. Scratches and buns on the shafts should be removed by mounting the shaft in a polishing lathe and - pplislring -wit-h ^elnety._ After polfuhing, check the fit of the shaft in the housing. If necessary to replace idler shaft use a solid steel drift that fits snugly into the hollow sear shaft to shear the pin from the inside of the sliaft. Drift out the part of the pin that extends through the gear on one side. Mount the gear and shaft in a drill press and drill out the remliniqg. put! of the qi4 to 1 deplh of,ap,proximately %a" inthe gear with a #31 (.120") drill-. The hol-e tfrougb_the gear and sha& is used as a guide for the driiligg operation. Remove the gear and clean up the pin holes. Pratt and Whltney Valve Lubrleator (Wasp Jr. B an$ B2)-In order-to prevent delivery oT an excessiveamount of oil to-the valve mec6anism, it is important that the clearance between the lubricator gear plunger and the housing be maintained within the specified limits. As o-versize plungersr are not available, excessive clearance will entail replacement of the housins. In caseswhere the angular end surface of thelubricator plunger shows signs of wear, it should be lapped smooth. Wlqere signs of flaking - are observed, the plunger should be renewed.

ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES General-The assembly methods and procedures listed below, although playing an important part in efficient engine overhaul, will not be specifically mentioned in the "Detail Instructions" of this Assembly Section and the Final Assembly Chapter which follow. Although these items may seem of minor importance, the ultimate life and performance of the engine may be seriously affected if they are slighted through carelessness or neglect. 1. During assembly operations, care should be taken to prevent dirt, dust, cotter pins, safety wire, nuts, washers, and any other parts from entering the engine. Suitable plugs and coverings to fit all openings should be improvised and used. 2. All bearing surfaces, anti-friction bearings, and movable parts should be thoroughly coated with oil. 3. All gaskets, packings and oil sealsshould be replaced at each overhaul. 4. A torque indicating wrench should be used when tightening the nuts which have recommended torques listed in the Appendix. 5. In all assembly operations refer to the Table of Clearances for the desired fit or clearance. 6. New safety wiring, tab washers, cotter pins, fiber nuts and palnuts should be installed where necessary. It is important that cotter pins and safety wire fit snugly in the holes for which they are intended. Always install the head or loop end of the cotter pin to fit in the castellation of the nut and not outside. The ends should be bent, one up and back over the stud or bolt end, and the other down flat against the hexagon flat ofthe nut.

536

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF ITIAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES DETAIL INSTRUCTIONS FRONT (Nose) SECTION-WASP Tappets and Rollers-Prior to the assembly of tappets and rollers in the front section, the tappets should be coated liberally with oil. For Wasp Jr. B and 82 engines insert the spring into the tappet, slide the tappet into the guide, and secure it in position with the combination tappet and tappet guide locking screw. For the Wasp Jr. B3 engine, the rocker oil manifold should be placed inside the front section and secured to the tappet guide bosseswith the L8 combination locking screws. Then coat the tappets with oil and insert each in its respective guide. Draining type tappets should be installed in the following tappet guide locations: 1 In., 1 Ex., 21n.,28x.,3 Ex., 8 In., 9 In., and 9 Ex. After installation, the tappets should be depressed until roller pin hole clears the inner end of the tappet guide. Insert the roller in the tappet slot and slide the roller pin into position, making sure the ends of the roller pin are inside the tappet guide when the tappet is allowed to return to its normal position. FRONT (Nose) SECTION-WASP Propeller Otl Feed Plpe-Insert the propeller oil feed pipe through its hole in the front section and into the hole in the thrust bearing liner. Governor Drlve Gear (Wasp Hl only)-Coat the inside diameter of the governor drive gear bushing with oil and place the governor drive gear in position in its bushing. Secure in position with the locking ring. Intermedlate Governor Drlve Gear (Wasp El only)-Place the intermediate governor ilrive JR.

Front Breather Assembly (If Provlded)Remove the cap flom the breather assembly dnd install the assembly -in the- nose section, turning it by means of a lever inserted between the screw bossesin the body of the breather. Install cap and secureit with the two screws. Propeller Regulator Valve (If Provtded) Prior to installation of the propeller regulator valve in the nose section on Wasp Jr. B ind 82 or the prgpeller oil stlnnly fttting on Wasp e_ngr.lgs Jr. 83 engines, the pipe leading from the resulator valve boss to the thrust bearing liner strbuld be installed. If a new valve and shaft is to be installed in !h9 pTopellgr regulator valve, it should be lapped into the valve seat with a fine lapping compound. -of After lapping make sure that all traces the compound are washed from the valve and seat. A +* pagkigs should be installed in the cover by twisting in the direction of the thread until it is bottomed. Slide the shaft through the cover from the bottom and install the packing nut in the cover. Install the lever on the outer end of the shaft and secureit in position with the taper pin. Fit the assembly in the case and secirre with three nuts. Hl AND EORNET E (Dlreet Drlve) gear il tbq intermediate-governor drive gear support bushing. Assemble the pinion diive sear on the end of the shaft and lock in position i'ith the washer and nut. Assemble the support inside the front section and secure with ihree retaining nuts. Instructions for adjusting the backlash between the intermediate governor drive gear and the governor drive gear are contained under the heading "Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing" in the Repair Section of this Chapter.

FRONT sEcTIoN (Reductlon Gearlng and Houslng Assernbly) wasP El-G, HORNET E-G AND Ez-G Flxed Gear-Install the fixed gear in the front of the reduction gear housing and secure with the hold-down nuts and washers. For the Wasp H1-G engine, the propeller oil feed pipe should bb inserted in the oil pipe hole in the gear, prior to the assembly of the gear in the nose section. Secure in position with its hold-down clip after the fixed geaxis in place. When installing the fixed gear.on Hornet engines, see that the propeller oil feed pipe hole in the gear is properly aligned with the hole in the housing to permit subsequent installation of the propeller oil feed pipe. lropel[e.r Otl Feed ltp" (Eornet Engtnes)Insert this pipe into the nose section and-into ihe oil pipe hole in the fixed sear; then secure it in pgsition by screwing the nose section oil passage plug into the pipe hole. Ptrlton_C"gg (tVasp Hl-G)-The pinion shafts, pinio3 shaf-t holes, pinion races, and pinion gears are all numbered. When these parts are proferty assembled,--the numbers of the various mitin! parts should correspond. . Place the pjnion shafts in their proper holes in the rear half of the pinion cage ana phce the

537

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES cage under an arbor pJess. Press each pinion shaft into the cage (seeFig. 532). In performing this operation, see that the flats on the pinion shafts are lined up with those in the cage. Install the race on each pinion shaft and coat it with oil; then install each pinion gear over the race. Insure that aII gears have their identifying numbers facing to the rear. Place the front half of the cage on the rear half with the numbers on the pinion shaft holes and shafts corresponding. Assemble and tighten the pinion shaft nuts; then install the pinion shaft plugs in the shafts. Before installing pinion shaft plugs, run a tap (SAB-%6"-20 N. I'.) through the threads in the shaft to clear out the burrs and small plug slivers caused by the edges of the cotter pin holes when the plugs were removed. Line up the plugs with the cotter pin holes and secure with steel cotter pins. Secure the two halves of the cagewith 18 cage bolts and nuts, making sure that bolts are installed with heads toward the front. Plnlon Cage (Hornet E-G and E2-G)-When assembling the pinion cage, the numbers etched on the pinion shaft holes, pinion shafts and pinion gears should correspond on the various mating parts. Align the oil holes in the shafts and cage and press each shaft into its respective hole in the cagewith an arbor press. Install the race on each pinion shaft. Coat the races with oil and install each pinion on its respective race. Assemble the front half of the pinion cageto the rear half, correctly positioning the shaft holes to mate with their corresponding pinion shafts, and securewith L8 bolts and nuts. These bolts should be installed with the heads toward the front of the engine and secured with nuts and cotter pins. Ottly steel cotter pins should be used. Install the pinion -cage shaft washers and bolts in the pinion from the rear, assemble the lock washers on the ends of the bolts, and securewith retaining nuts. certain that the oil holes in Cautlon-Make the pinion shafts are aligned with the oil holes of the rear pinion cage. Propeller Shaft-On engineshaving the hydromatic propeller oil tube and plug assembly, insert the rear of the propeller oil tube in the plug in the propeller shaft. Install the gasket and support over the front end of the tube, insuring that they seat evenly on the shoulder in the shaft. Assemble the gasket, shaft plug and plug nut. Tighten the nut and place the lock washer over the nut, securing it with three screws and washers. Checklng Plneh Ftt of Thrust Bearlng Cover-Before assembling the propeller shaft assembly in the reduction gear housing, it is important to check thg ninch fit of the thrust bearing cover against the outer race of the thrust bearing as follows: Install cover in position on front section and tighten nuts only finger tight. Turn the front section over and measure at several points the distance from the shoulder of the liner where the rear face of the thrust bearing rests to the point on the cover directly forward. Next measure the width of the thrust bearing outer race and the tab spacer which rests against this race. The total of these two measurements should be from .004" to .008" greater than the distance from the cover to the rear shoulder of the Iiner. Adjustment may be made by either grinding the present spacer or installing a new thicker spacer. On engines having the steel ring riveted to the rear of the cover, the pinch fit may be reduced by removing the rivets which hold the steel ring to the cover and wet grinding the face of the ring which mates with the cover. The pinch fit may be increased by facing the flange of the cover sufficiently to afford the necessaryfit. Assembly of Propeller Shaft and Reductlon the propeller governor Gear Eouslng-Oil drive gear bushing (if provided) and insert the governor drive gear into position in its bushing. Securein place with the snap ring.

@
Fig. 532 Assembly of Pinion Shafts into Cage

538

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES Place the reduction gear housing on two wooden blocks, front up, on a bench and install shaft and thrust bearing in position the propeller -housing. Assemble the thrust bearing in the cover spacer (i-f provided), oil slinger, thrust nut and thiust bearihg cover and fasten temporarily with the thrust bearing cover nuts. Place the propeller shaft in the Holding Fixture tlie pinion cage in positi-on with the and assembl-e (seeFig. 533). Secure with Push-er Cage Pinion the tab lock washer and lock nut. E3'G

Install the thrust bearing in position on the oroneller shaft with the Thrust Bearing Assembly St"d'rre. Place the propeller shaft in the Holding Adapter and with a Fi*trte fitted with fhe proper -assemble the oil transsuitable sleeve-type drift, fer ring carrier in position ol the shaft. Insure tttut tfre oil hole iri the carrier lines up with the oil hol" in the shaft. Install the oil transfer grooves of the carrier with the rinqs in the"PYre$s", facing the oil groove around sid6smarked the middle portion of the carrier.

FRONT SECTION (Reductlon Gearlng and Ilouslng Assernbly) HORNET the hydromatic proPropeller Shaft-Install as.previously plug-assembly ald tube ;;f"-r-;ii engines' E2 E and Hoinef i"t.tiU"a for the pinion- gears, pilion shafts Plnlon Cage-The -tnuft in the two halves of the holds ""a-pi"iott pi"i"" cage are numbered. It is important at lssemblv ihat the numbers on. adjacent parts thg pinion shafts when assembling. ."rr.rp""a in the shafts must oil.holqs the pinion cag9, in ttte i;;-ii;6d up wilh'those in the rear half of the "i"io" .ug; which is integral with the propgller |h;?l: tfi" pinion shafts should be pressed into

the front half of the pinion cage using an arbor press. Alien the slots in the shaft with those in the cuge by turning them to the desired position with i ,4'' square shank after insertion in the cage. Place the front cageon a bench and install each race and each pinion geat,with its number to the rear, on its respective shaft. Then insert the propeller shaft, front-end down, t-hroggh the hole bf ttte cage. Raise the cage so that it meets the rear halfbf the pinion cage, turn pro!'eller shaft end for end, and- assemble the two halves of the cage. Assembly nlay be facilitqted by.tapplng th6 front cagelightly with a leather mallet. Install the froit and rbar pinion shaft washers and retaining bolts and tighlen nuts lightly. These bolts sn5ula be installed with their heads toward the rear of the engine in order to prevent.loss of oil pressure to the gearing. Install the^eighteen through bolts that hold the two halves of the-ca-ge toget6er and tighten. The heads of these bolts sh6utd be installed so that they are toward the front of the engine. Tighten the pinion shaft bolts and securewith steel cotter pins. Assernbly of Reductlon Gear EouslngCheck the clamp fit of the thrust bearing cover as describedfor the Hornet E-G and E2-G. Oil the propeller governor drive ge?r bushing and then plac,i the governor-dri-vegear in position in its buihing. Seiure with the governor drive gear snap ring. on Install the oil transfer rings in their carrier "Press" the propeller shaft with the side marked i""i"g fhe oil groove- With the propeller shaft iront"end up, iistall the reduction gea!housing ir] Coaf the thrust bearing- with oil and nlace. ^assemble in the housing, beveled side down' Drift it into place with-a suitable sleeve-type drift. Assemble the thrust bearing spacer and cover and secure with the nuts and washers. Install lhe oil seal rings in their groove iq the thrust bearing nut. Alssemblethe nut on the propeller shaft finger tight.

Fig.533-AssemblyofPinionCageonPropellerShaft

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES


BEARING SUPPORT PLATE

539

Carn Reductlon Gear-Coat the inside diameter of the cam reduction gear bushing with oil and then place the gear in its bushing. The governor drive gear, (geared Hornets only) should then be placed in position on the front end of the cam reduction gear shaft and secured with the nut and washer. Propeller Governor Idler Gear (Ilornet E-G, idler gear bushing Ez-G, and E3-G)-Drift through front of anchor plate so that locking

grooves are in alignment with each other. Install idler gear lock plate and bolt, and stake head of bolt. Place idler gear on its bushing at the same time meshing it with the idler drive gear. Governor Otl Feed Plpe (Hornet E-G, Ez-G, the governor oil feed pipe and E8-G)-Install in place on the bearing support plate and secure the pipe with its retaining bracket and clip. JR.

MAIN CRANKCASE SECTION-WASP Carn Reductlon Gear-Prior to assembly of the cam reduction gear on the engine, the cam reduction gear locking nut should be tried in position on the gear to make sure that it seats oroperlv in the end of the shaft. Then oil the iatti reduction gear bushing and place the cam reduction gear in position in its bushing. Place the Cam Reduction Gear Holder over the front

of the gear and then assemble the cam reduction gear locking nut in place on the rear end of the shaft and tighten with the Cam Reduction Gear Nut Wrench. Check the clearance between the lock nut and the bushing and if insufficient, face the bushing enough to give the required clearance with the Cam Reduction Gear Bushing Facer. Hl AND HORNET E SERIES

MAIN CRANKCASE SECTION-WASP Front Maln Bearlng Outer Race and Rollers-Coat the front main bearing outer race and rollers with oil and insert into the front main bearing liner. On geared engines the front main bearing outer race and rollers should be secured in position with a retaining nut. This nut contains left hand threads and should be turned to the left with Front Main Bearing Retaining Nut Wrench. Adjustment for the proper clearance between this nut and the front main bearing outer race may be made by grinding the rear face of the nut. Tappets and Rollers-Prior to assembly of the tappets and rollers in the front half of the main crinkcase section, the tappets and guides should be given a liberal coating of oil. Then insert each tappet in its guide and depressuntil the roller pin holes clear the end of the tappet guide. Insert the roller in the tappet slot and slide the roller pin into position, making sure that the ends of the roller pin are inside the tappet guide when the tappet is allowed to return to its normal position.

The valve tappets usgd on early Wasp and H_ornet engines incorporated only two oil drain holes. When installing this type of valve tappet, care should be taken to align these holes with the grooves in the tappet guide. The valve tappets used on later Wasp and Hornet engines have four oil drain holes, thereby eliminating the possibility of installing the tappet so that oil will not drain through. Draining type tappets should be installed in the following tappet guide locations: 1 In., 1 Ex., 2In.,28x.,3 Ex., 8 In., 9 In. and 9 Ex. Carn and Otl Feed Bracket-Assemble the cam bearing on the cam shelf, making sure it is thoroughly seated by tapping lightly with a fiber drift. Coat the inside of cam with oil and assemblethe cam over the cam bearing. Assemble the cam oil transfer bracket and the cam retainer plates and securewith the necessarynuts. The cam end clearance should be checked by inserting a feeler gage between the cam retainer plate and the cam.

CYLINDERS Rocker Arm Bearlngs-Install the rocker arm bearings in the rocker arms with the Rocker Arm Bearing Assembly Drift and Base (see Fig. 534). The bearings of the early SKF type, having a single piece inner race for both sets of balls, should be installed in such a manner that the side thrust is not taken by that portion of the inner and outer race which contains the loading notches. The position of the loading notch is located by a stamped "O" on the inner and outer races. The marking on the outer race also indicates the position of the oil hole and should be placed toward the adjusting screw end of the rocker when the bearing is installed in the rocker arm. The markings on the inner race should be placed toward the push rod end of the rocker when the rocker arm is installed in the cylinder. For rocker arm bearings having independent inner races for the two sets of ball bearings, the foregoing instructions are not necessary. The bearings are installed originally \{rith the grooved

540

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

,
Fig. 534 Installing Rocker Arm Bearing F ig. 535 -

Installing Knuckle Pins in Master Rod

side outward. lt is permissible to reverse the positions of these bearings in the rocker arm and also to shift exhaust bearings over to the intake and vice versa, bearing in mind that the exhaust is the more heavily loaded. Rocker Arrns and Shafts (Wasp Jr.)-Place the rocker arms in their respective locations. Place the copper gasket on each rocker shaft with the smooth side of the gasket facing out. Insert the rocker shaft through the larger insert and rocker bearing. Install the rubber oil seal, steel washer, and oil fitting in place on the small end of the shaft and tighten. It is important to tighten the oil fitting prior to assembling the nut on the opposite end of the shaft in order to prevent rocker bearing side play. Place the rubber oil seal over the large end and install the oil seal lock nut, charnfer end in, and tighten in position. The coruect procedure for tightening rocker shaft nuts is to tighten snugly (approximately 35 inch-pounds on a torque indicating wrench) and then turn to the next cotter pin hole. A maximum torque of 135 inchpounds should not be exceeded. Later model engines incorporate valve rocker shafts having two 7(4" drameter cotter pin holes at right angles to each other, through the small end. Former shafts had only one such hole. The additional hole permits much closer adjustment when tightening the rocker shaft nuts to the desired torque.

Shafts in use with but one cotter pin hole may be reoperated by drilling d %t" diameter hole at right angles to and intersecting the original hole. Roeker Arrns (Wasp and Hornet)-Place the rocker arms in their respective locations. Insert the rocker shafts through the large diameter holes and into position in the rocker bearings. Place the rubber oil seal, steel washer, and castellated nut in position on the small end of the rocker shaft and tighten this nut. Install the oil seal washer on the large end, then the copper gasket and the castellated oil seal locking nut and secure in place. Valves and Valve Sprlngs-Prior to assembling the valves in the cylinders, the valve guides and valve stems should be cleaned and oiled. Then install each valve in position. When installing the safety circlets be careful not to damage the lock grooves in the valve stems. Should the grooves become damaged, the locks will not seat properly and a valve failure may result. Then insert lower washers and springs in the rocker box housings and fit the upper washers over the springs. Place the cylinder over a piece of wood, having the same contour as the inside of the head, in order to hold the valves in place when the springs are compressedfor the installation of the split locks. Using the Valve Spring Depressor, depress the springs and install the split locks which secure the upper washers in place.

54L

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES

FILE TO FIT

BEVEL TO
CLEAR FILLET

SECTION OF MASTER ROD SHOWING KNUCKLE PINS AND LOCK.


@ Fig. 536 -- Section of Master Rod Showing Knuckle Pins and Lock Fig. 537 Assembly of Crankshaft

ARTICULATING Assernbly of Artlculatlng Rods-The Knuckle Pin Press Fixture and Spacer should be used for installing knuckle pins in all single row engine models. A Bushing is used in conjunction with the fixture to accommodate Wasp and Hornet master rod bearings, the pilot of the fixture being the correct size for all Wasp Jr. bearings. On Wasp Jr. R, early Wasp Jr. F.2, Wasp, and Hornet engines, place the master rod, with the side marked "Front" facing down, on the spacer with the pilot of the fixture extending through the master rod bearing bore. Coat the knuckle pins and hoies with heavy oil such as Kendall No. 400 Gear Lubricant and insert an undersize dummy knuckle pin in a knuckle pin hole adjacent to the rtl" section of the master rod. Fasten the knuckle pin to be installed to the Knuckle Pin Setting Block and inserL it in the hole adjacent to thd dummy knuckle fiin, pushing it through the knuckle pin bushing of the proper articulating rod. The pilot on the Setting Block should then fit into the hole of the dummy knuckle pin. Locate the "L" head plunger over the Setting Block and force the knuckle pin into its hole by applying pressure to the handle of the fixture (seeFig. 535). Install the adjacent knuckle pin and articulating rod in a similar manner, inserting the pilot of the Setting Block in the first

ROD ASSEMBLY knuckle pin instead of in the dummy knuckle pin for alignment. Repeat the above procedure to install the remaining knuckle pins and articulating rods. On late Wasp Jr. 82 and all Wasp Jr. 83 engines, the same procedure applies except that the alignment of the knuckle pins is achieved by the use of the Knuckle Pin Assembly Fixture. Set the Knuckle Pin Assembly Fixture (instead of the Spacer) on the Knuckle Pin Press Fixture so that the slotted front ends of the knuckle pins are resting in the projecting tongues on the aligning plungers in the Knuckle Pin Assembly Fixture. After all the knuckle pins have been properly aligned, press them in place in the master rod. On Wasp Jr. B, early Wasp Jr.B,2, Wasp, and Hornet engines the knuckle pins are held in position by locking plates on the rear of the master rod. These plates are held in position by a single screw. Locking plates are always furnished oversize and must be filed down so that they are a light drive fit between the flat surfaces of the adjacent knuckle pins (see Fig. 536). During the filing operations a small square should be used frequently to insure that the filed surface is square with the locking plate. When a new locking plate has been fitted, it should be etched with the numbers of the two pins that it holds

542

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

Fig. 538 -

Diagram Showing Direction of Thrust of Impeller Shaft and Intermediate Shaft Bearings - Steel Cage Type

Fig. 539 -

Diagram Showing Direction of Thrust of Impeller Shaft and Intermediate Shaft Bearings - Outboard Support Type

in place. On late Wasp Jr. 82 and B3 engines the knuckle pins are held in place by locking bars on the front ends of the knuckle pins. CRANKSEAFT Artleulattng Rod Assembly-Coat oil on the front and rear sections of the crankpin and apply a mixture of white lead and oil on the crankpin splines. Place the front portion of the crankshaft in the Crankshaft Holding Fixture fitted with the proper Adapter and mount the articulating rod assembly on the portion of the crankpin integral with the crankshaft fopward section, making sure that the side marked "FRONT" is placed towards the front of the crankshaft. Engage the ends of the crankshaft splines so that the two sections of the crankshaft are properly aligned. Using the Crankshaft Assembly Puller, assemblethe two sections together (seeFig. 537). Thoroughly oil the crankshaft through bolt and screw it into the shaft, tightening it with the Crankshaft Bolt Wrench to the recommended torque specified in the Appendix. After tightening the bolt, secure it with a cotter pin fitted through the holes in the crankshaft rear cheek and the bolt head. It may be necessary to drill a new hole in the bolt to accommodate the cotter pin, but not more than three holes should be drilled in a bolt head.

These are held in place by two screws and safety wire for each pair of knuckle pins. ASSEMBLY Flywelghts-To assemblethe demountable type flyweights use the Flyweight Assembly Puller. Before installing the expander, tighten the flyweight through-bolt with a torque of 1,300 inch pounds. Then screw the expander into place and tighten with a torque of 200 inch pounds. A 10-inch extension on the Allen PIug Wrench will facilitate this tightening. The end clearance of the assembled flyweight should be checked. If this end clearance is excessive, grind the rear face of the outer flyweight to obtain the necessaryclearance. Crankshaft Plug-,Screw the crankshaft plug into the tapped hole in rear side of crankshaft forward section, using the Crankshaft Plug Wrench. After tightening, stake into recess provided for this purpose. Front and. Rear Maln Bearlng Inner Races -Apply white lead or a generoun amount of oil to the main bearing seating surfaces on the crankshaft and on the I.D. of the bearing inner races. Install the races on the crankshaft using the Front Main Bearing Assembly Sleeve, and the Rear Main Bearing Assembly Pusher.

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

543

Fig. 540 -

Assembly of Impeller with the Pusher

BLOWER SECTION (Steel Cage Type) WASP JR. Gear Assernbly-Assemble the Intermediate Iarge front ball bearing in position on the interme-diate gear shaft with the thrust side toward the front-(see FiS. 538). Place the intermediate gear and front bearing in the main cage and assemble the cage and intermediate gear in the blower, securing the cage with its retaining screws. Press the bushing into the rear ball bearing and assemblethe bearing,to the rear of the in[ermediate gear shaft, with its thrust side toward the rear. Screw the retaining nut on the rear end of the shaft and tighten finger tight. Floatlng Gear-Install the floating gear inner race ovei the front of the main cage and place the rear thrust plate in position, bevel side down over this race. Insert the roller pins in position in the gear using heavy oil to hold them in place. There are79 of theserollers used in each gear and, when installed, there should still be a space equal to slightly less than an additional roller pin. Assemble the floating gear over its inner race so it rests on the rear thrust plate. Place the front thrust plate over the floating gear, bevel side up. Then assemblethe lock plate,an_dnu!, tighten the nut, which has a left-hand thread, with the Floating Gear Nut Wrench. Check the end clearance between the floating gear and rear thrust plate. Should the clearance be excessive, the use of new thrust plates will bring it to If the clearance within the desired limits. is insufficient the rear face of the floating gear may be ground off the necessary amount. Assemble the Blower Gear Holder on the floating gear and turn the blower section over. Tap th6 intermediate shaft rear bearing with a fiber drift to insure proper seating and then tighten the intermediate shaft nut, using the Intermediate Shaft Nut Wrench. Lock with a cotter pin. the front knpeller Shaft Assernbly-Install beaiing on the impeller shaft, with its thrust side in the position shown in Fig. 538. Install nut, tighten and secure with locking pin. Remove the floating gear lock nut and lock and place the shaft in the cage from the front; then install the two rear bearings with their thrust sides in the positions shown in Fig. 538. Assemble the closure over the rear bearing and determine the pinch fit of the blower bearing cover against the closure. This may be done by placing a straight edge on the rear surface of the closure and measuring the clearance between the straight edge and the surface of the blower section where the blower bearing cover rests. This clearance should be from .002" to .003".

544

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES Adjustment may be made by grinding the closure or installing a new, thicker closure. Temporarily assemble the blower bearing cover gasket, impeller shaft spacer and blower bearing cover. Install impeller and measure the clearance between it and the blower section. Adjustment may be made by grinding the impeller shaft spacer or replacing with a new spacer. After grinding, install the spacer on the shaft and check with a dial indicator to ascertain if it is running true within .001" full indicator reading. Try the spacer at various positions on the shaft until this condition is obfained. At this time also check the end clearance of the impeller shaft and bearing assembly. An end pliy of .010" with new bearings is permissible. If excessive, new bearings should be selected. Install cover plate gasket and cover plate, securing with eight screws. Check the clearance between the spacer and the blower bearing cover plate with a feeler gage. Then install the impeller on the impeller shaft using the Impeller Pusher. Tighten nut using the Impellef Nut Wrench and lock ryith locking pin. Use Impeller Nut Locking Tool for the new type impeller nut and locking pin. AND HORNET

BLOWER SECTION (Outboard Support Type)-WASP Interrnediate Gear Assernbly-Place the blower section on the bench or engine stand with the rear side down. Install the intermediate blower drive shaft front bearing on the shaft with the thrust side in the position shown in Fig. 539 and place the intermediate gear in its recessin the blower section. Floatlng Gear-Place the floating gear inner race over the splines on the blower bearing cage so that its oil hole faces the right magneto shaft bushing when viewed from the rear. Measure the floating gear end clearance as follows:

With the front and rear floating gear thrust washers assembled, flanges togethei and the large flat face outermost, measure the total thicknesswith a micrometer. Then measure the thickness of the face of each washer. Subtract the sum of the individual measurements from the previously obtained overall measurement. By subtracting lhe thickness of the flange on th-e front end of the floa_ting gear from this figure, the floating gear end clearance may be determined. If the end clearance is not within the desired^Iimits, it may be corrected by selecting a pair of thrust washers having the necessary overall measurement. Place one thrust washer, face down, over the bearing _rn4e{ race with the oil slot facing the starter shaft hole. Insert the 82 needle bearings into positiot in the _floating gear, using heavy oil to hold them in place. Assemble the-floating gea{ in position and place the remaining thrust washer over the floating gear, with the-oil slot matching the slot in the rear thrust washer. Place the floating gear lock nut spacer over the front thrust washer and install the locking nut temporarily. Assemble the intermediate blower gear rear bearing sqpport plale, tapping it into position over the bearing. Secure it with nine screws finger tight. Turn the blower section over. Press the intermediate shaft rear bearing bushing into the bearing with the flange of the bushing opposite the thrust side of the bearing (see Fig..539). Using a suitable drift, tap the intermediate shaft rear bearing into position on the shaft and into the liner in the blower section. Insert the intermediate shaft bolt throueh the shaft from the rear and assemble the washlr and nut on the end of the shaft. Turn the blower section over and tighten the nine screws securing the intermediate shaft front bearing support plate.

Fig. 541 -

Checking Clearance Blower Case

Between

Impeller

and

Impeller Shaft-Assemble the oil baffie with the plain side towards the gear on the front of

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

545

BLOWERBEARINGCOVER

202 7-SCREWS TO BE S A F E T YW I R E D AT ASSEMBLY.

27297---" I - S C R E WN . O SAFETY W I R EN E C E S S A R Y .

,/ /'

FILE OR GRTND ./. T H E H E A DO F , / THls scREgl---" , F L U S HW | T H T H | S / B E V E L E DS U R F A C E AT ASSEMBLY

h-ig 542 -

Blower Bearing Cover Assembly Showing Location of Securing Screws

the impeller shaft. Then assemble the two front bearings with thrust sides as indicated in Figure 539. Secure the bearings with the nut and pin. Remove the floating gear lock nut and inslall the impeller shaft and bearing assembly. Place the floating gear lock nut spacer over the front bearing, aqsemblethe lock and floating gear lock nut. Tighten and secure in position-. With a feeler gage check the clearance between the lock nut and lock. The lock nut spacer may be ground on a surface grinder to obtain the desired-clearance. Again turn the blower section over. Assemble the oil baffie at the rear of the impeller shaft, bevel side down, and then install lhe impeller shaft rear bearing with the thrust in the position as shown in Fig. 539, using a suitable drift. Assemble the small oil baffie, the large oil baffie, and the laminated shim over the- rear bearing, thgn place the steel spacer in position on tbe impeller shaft. Place a small straight edge on the rear surface of the laminated sliim and determine the clearance between it and the surface of the blower section where the blower bearing cover rests. This clearance should be from .002" to .003". Adjustment may be made with the laminated shim. Temporarily assemble the blower bearing cover gasket and cover, and tighten with eighi screws. Assemble the impeller with the Impelier Pusher and measure the clearance between the

impeller and the blower section (seeFigs. 540 and 54L). Adjust to proper limits by removing the impeller and cover and grinding the impeller shaft rear spacer on a surface grinder. After grinding, install the spacer on the impeller shaft and check with a dial indicator to insure that it is running true within .001" full indicator reading. Try the spacer on at various positions on the shaft until this condition is obtained. At this time also check the end clearance of the impeller shaft and bearing assembly. An end play of .010" with new bearings is permissible. If excessive, new bearings should be selected. Install blower bearing cover gasket and cover, and secure with the eight screws. On Hornet Ez-G and E3-G models, seven of these eight screws are of one type, while the eighth may be identified by the absenceof the safety wire hbles. It is important that this latter screw be installed in the correct position as shown in Fig. 542, otherwise the diffuser may be damaged. If the'head of this screw projedts above ihe flat beveled surface of the cover assembly, it must be filed or ground flush to prevent interference with the diffuser. After installing all eight screws, secure the seven like screws with safety wire. Due to the location of the eighth, in relation to one of the diffuser vanes, this screw cannot back out when the diffuser is in position and ther,efore no provision for safety wiring has been made.

546

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES


Check the clearance between the O.D. of the and the I.D. of the blower bearing cover _sp?cer hole (seeFig. 5a3). Install the impellerbn the impeller shaft. Tighten the impeller nut with the Impeller Nut Wrench and lock with the locking pin. An Impeller Nut Locking Pin Flaring Tool is available for this pin.

REAR SECTION Generator l)rlve Assernbly (Wasp Jr., Wasp Hl, III-G, and Ifornet E. E-G)-Place tlie geaTin a softjawed vise and drift the bearing into position on the gegr shaft. Install the genelator drive gear nut. Using the Generator Diive Gear Nrt Wrench, tighten the nut taking care to align one of the holes in the nut witli the hole in the gear shaft. Secure the nut with a cotter pin. Assemble the unit in the bracket, and install the bearing retaining plate. Fasten the retaining plate with screws and safety wire. Drive the cork into the hole in the large.end of the generator drive geal. Where excessive generator drive spline wear has been encountered, it is recommended that old style cork plugs be replaced by those of a new type which ihcolporates a hollow tube for permitting oil or oil vipor to reach and lubricate the splines. Generator Drlve Assernbly (Ifornet E2- G and E8-G)-Drift the inner bearing into position on- the gear sbaft and assemble the geherator drive gear and bearing in the bracket. Place the spacer in position on the gear shaft and assemble outer bearing. Place the lock washer and nut over the shaft and tighten the nut with the Generator Drive Gear Nut Wrench. Bend up the tab on the lock washer. Install the inner bearing retaining plate and fasten it with screws and safety wire. Drive the cork into the hole in the large end of the ge4elator drive gear. Where excessive generator drive spline wear has been encountered, it is recommended that a rZ,, hole be drilled through the ce-nter of the plug to permit glt gq oil vapor to reach and lubricate the rptitto. If this is to be .done,care should be taken fo prev-ept thp plW,from turning in the gear and biass shims should be used when clamping the gear to lvoi-d damage to the bearing sgat. After iiri[ing the hole,. remove all burrs and clean thorougHt before reinstalling in the engine. Oll^ Purnp _AsFerrrbly-I_nsert the drive gear qhaft through the cap of the oil pump. Fiithe key in the keyway on the drive shaft lnd assemble- the lF g" drlrr_" g.ear._ Place the idler gear and shaft assembly in- the .cap. Install large scavenge section over the drive and idler shafts and fit it to the cap. If the oil pu4p contain-s lhree sections, place tfe kgV itl_ tltg keyw_ay_ of the drive gear shaft; then install drive and idler ge,4rson tlieir respective shafts. Install the small scavenge sec-tion over the drive and idler shafts and fif it to the large scavenge section. If the oil pump contains only two stages the latter paragraph does not apply. Fit the key i! _the_ keyway of the drive gear shaft and assemble the drive and idler sears on their respective shafts. Install the basetr pressure section of the pump over the drive- and idler shafts and fit it to the adjacent scavenge section. Fasten the pgmp together by inserting the two lgo,sefitting bolts and-tightening the nuts finger tigbt. Iqqert the two tight fitting bolts and tlien tighter_ra! four nuts securely. TLe gears should -is turn {r-eeJvby hand if the pump correctly assembled. Cautlon-Do not tighten the nuts excessively as the pump sections will be distorted and binil on the gearc. Pratt and Whltney Valve Lubrlcator-Place t!,e drive gear in position in the bracket, and drive the shaft into position with a brass'drift. Place the two ball bearings in position in the bracket and insert the shift and spring assem-

!'ig. 543 -

Checking Clearance Between O.D. of Spacer and I.D. of Blower Bearing Cover Hols

547

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES


bly. Fasten the cover plate, with its,gasket, in position with the propef nuts and washers. When installing the valve lubricator, it has been found that lhe marks on the sliding plate should be set at a point somewherebetween one, and one and three-quarters (L%) on the scale. However, this may not be a perrnanent settiqg' although'it may be used dui{ng- run-in of the engine] As a precaution, it is well to remove the rodker box covers after about ten (10) minutes of running and check to see if sufficient oil is beine furnfshed to the rocker mechanism of each cylinlder. If an ever-supply is being fqnishe-d, wnicn is hkely to cause sfiSht smoking from the exhaust, it tituy be overcome by setting the pointer at a lower position on the scale. If there is not enough oil found in the rocker boxes, that is, if the springs, washers, and rockers are not moist with oil, adjustment should be made toward the higher end of the scale. the inner Stde Vacuum Pump Drlve-Drift bearing into position on the vacuum pump drivesear shaft. Place the spacer over the gear Jnaft and assembleouter bearing over the spacer. Install and tighten the nut which secures the bearing on the shaft. Insure that the hole in the nuT ahgns with the lock pin hole in the shaft. If a new sf,aft is installed, a hole must be drilled in the shaft with a No. 40 (.098") drill, using the hole in the nut as a guide. Pin the nut to the shaft with a No. 8 cotter pin. Starter Shaft and Bearlng-Place the starter shaft on a clean wooden bench (gear end down). Assemble the bearing spacer, bevel side down, over the shoulder on the shaft. Push the bearing into position on the shaft. Otl Screen and Check Valve AssemblyInsert the oil scr@n and check valve assembly in the chamber of the rear section; then screw the oil screen chamber plug in place. sure that the rubber oil Cautlon-Make seal is correctly positioned between the valve assembly and the screen body.

548

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES

TOOL LIST
Wasp Jr.
Tool Narne
ADAPTER ADAPTDR ADAPTER -

Wasp
B3 EI ET- G

Eornet E x
E . G E2- G E 3 - G

Tool No.

82

Crankshaft Holding Fixture. . .PWA-1919-1 Propeller Shaft Holding ture.. Fix.PWA-1919-1

x x x x x x

Crankshaft Holding Fixture. . .PWA-19L9-2 Crankshaft Holding Fixture. . .PWA-1919-3 Crankshaft and Propeller Shaft Holding Fixture ..PWA-1919-4 Face Plate, Crankcase Holdins. . . .12950-T-11 Magneto Reaming Shaft Bushing, ....PWA-820 PWA-608-1

ADAPTDR ADAPTER ADAPTER -

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x x

x x x x

ADAPTDR ARBOR ARBOR ARBOR ARBOR BAR -

Inlet Valve Seat, Removing

Master Rod Bearing, Assembty..TAM-315 Master Rod Bearing, Assembly. .TAM-267 Master Rod Bearing, Assembly. .TAM-270 Aligning, Cam Reduction Gear and Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing, Reaming... PWA-959 A[gning, Magneto Shaft Hole. . . . PWA-1981 Reamer, Bushing Cam Reduction Gear PWA-970

x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x

x x x

BAn BAR

BUSEING

Knuckle Pin Bushing Facing (Use with PWA-860 and PWA861) . . PWA-862-3 Knuckle Pin Bushing Facing (Use with PWA-860 and PWA861) . . PWA-862-6 Knuckle Pin Bushing Facing (Use with PWA-860 and PWA861). .PWA-862-1 Knuckle Pin Press Fixture. . . . PWA-810-1 Knuckle Pin Press Fixture. . . . PWA-810-3 Starter Shaft, Reaming with PWA-60) Tappet Guide, Reaming Tappet Guide, Reaming Tappet Guide, Reaming (Use . PWA-819 . PWA-1369 . PWA-1370 . PWA-1371

BUSEING

BUSEING

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

BUSHING BUSEING BUSEING CLAMP CLAMP CLAMP -

x x

x x

x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

CUTTER -

Knuckle Pin Bushing, Facing. . . PWA-861 Spring ...PWA-459

DEPRDSSOR -Valve DRIFT AND BASE

Rocker Bearing, Assembly and DisasPWA-614 semblv

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES TOOL LIST (Contlnued)


Wasp Jr.
Tool DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT AND PLATE AND PLATD AND PLATD Narne Tool No. B 82 B3 EI

549

Wasp
EI.G E

Ilornet
E . G D2. G 8 8 . G

Knuckle Pin Bushing, Assembly . PWA-2SSL-4 Knuckle pin Bushing, Assembly. PWA-2551-3 Knuckle Pin Bushing, Assembly . . . . .PWA-2SSL-6

x
x

x x x x x

DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT -

Blower Bearing Cage, Assembly pWA-64 and Disassembly Blower Bearing Cage,Assembly. . . pWA-lgZb Blower Bearing Cage, Disassembly . .PwA-r976 Blower Bearing Cage, Disassembly PwA-2881 Exhaust Valve Guide, Assembly. . pWA-94 Exhaust Valve Guide, Assembly . pWA-Zgg Exhaust Valve Guide, Disassem-

x x x x x x x x x x x x x

DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT -

x x x x x x x

PWA-279
Exhaust Valve Guide. Disassem-

x x x x x x x x x x x x x

blv .
Exhaust Valve Guide, Disassembly PwA-421 Inlet Valve Guide, Assembly PWA-95

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x

x x

x x

Inlet Valve Guide, Disassembly . . .PWA-277 Knuckle bly . Pin Bushing, DisassemPWA-1493

DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT -

Knuckle Pin Bushing, Disassembly. . .PwA-2402 Knuckle Pin assembly Magneto Shaft D i s a s s e m b l y . . .. Bushing, Long Dis...... PWA-1749 PWA-1?42 Bushing, PWA-1?48

x x x x x
x

x x x x x x

x x x x x x

Bushing,

x x x x

x x x x

x x x x

x x x x

x x x x x

x x x x

DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT -

Magneto Shaft Short Disassembly....

Magneto Shaft Long and Short Bushings, Assembly ..PWA-1?46 Oil Pressure Pipe, Assembly PWA-261

x x

Pinion Gear Bushing, Assembly and Disassembly PWA-1522 Piston Pin Bushing, Assembly and Disassembly.... PWA-1641 Piston Pin Bushing, Assembly and Disassembly.... PWA-1494 Piston Pin Bushing, Assembly . . PWA-2149

x x x
x

DRIFT -

550

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES


TOOL LIST (Contlnued)

Wasp Jr.
Tool DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT Narne Tool No. B 82 B3

Wasp
E1 El.G E

Ilornet
D . G E2- G E3. G

Piston Pin Bushing, Disassembly PWA-2092 Propeller Governor Driven Bushing,Assembly Propeller Governor Driven B u s h i n g ,D i s a s s e m b l y . . . Gear . .PWA-1512 Gear ..PWA-1191

x
x

x x

x x

x x x x x
x

DRIFT DRIFT -

Propeller Governor Driven Gear Bushing, Disassembly.. .. . .PWA-1961 Propeller Governor Bushing, Assembly Drive Gear . .PWA-1193 Gear . . .PWA-1194 Gear .PWA-2377 Gear ...PWA-2378 PWA-1466 (Large) PWA-1279 (Smalt) PWA-1776 (Small) PWA-757 Insert, Insert, (Large) PWA-758 (Large) PWA-759

DRIFT DRIFT -

Propeller Governor Drive Bushing, Disassembly. . . Propeller Governor Drive Bushing, Disassembly... Propeller Governor Bushing, Assembly Drive

x
x

DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT -

Rocker Shaft Insert, Disassembly.... Rocker Shaft Insert, Disassembly.... Rocker Shaft fnsert, Disassembly.... Rocker Shaft Assembly Rocker Shaft Assembly Rocker Shaft Assembly fnsert,

(Large)

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x

x x x
x

x x x

x x x

x x x x x

x x x x
x

Starter Shaft Bushing, Assembly. . PWA-762 Starter Shaft Bushing, Disassembly . PWA -r7 49 Vacuum Pump Drive Gear Bushing, Disassembly PWA-1460 Vacuum Pump Drive Gear Bushing, Assembly PWA-1648 Valve Tappet Guide Assembly. . . PWA-908 Valve Tappet Guide Disassembly. PWA-2362 Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft Bushing, Assembly and Disassembly ....PWA-1800 Valve Guide, Exhaust Valve Guide, Exhaust Valve Guide, Exhaust Valve Guide, Intake PWA-822 PWA-801 PWA-643 PWA-166

x x x x x

DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT DRIFT -

x x x x

x x

x
x

x x

DRILL DRILL DRILL

x x x x x x x x

DRILL -

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES TOOL LIST (Contlnued) Wasp Jr.
Tool FACER FACER \FACDR Narne Tool No. B 82 B8

551

Wasp
E1 El- G E

Hornet
E . G 82. G E8-e

Cam Reduction Gear Bushing. . . . PWA-62 Complete, Inlet Valve Seat Re(Use with surfacing PWA-6 Holder) . . .PWA-226-29 Complete, Inlet Valve Seat Re(Use with surfacing PWA-6 Holder) ...PWA-25L-24 FrontSpark Plug Bushing. . . . . . . . 1008-T-b Rear Spark Plug Bushing. . Governor Drive (Use Bushing, PWA-861) . 106g-T-g Gear with . . .PWA-1783

x x x x x x x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

FACER \tr.ACER -

FACINGI TOOL -

x x x x

FIXTURE FIXTURE

Cam Reduction Gear Bushing, Reaming ....L62L-T-L7 Cam Reduction and Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushings, Reaming... . .PWA-708 Cam Reduction Gear Bushing, Reaming ....PWA-615 Cam Reduction Gear Bushing, Reaming ....PWA-214 Cam Reduction and Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushi n g s ,R e a m i n g . . . ..PWA-1341 Crankshaft and Shaft, Holding Governor Driven ing, Reaming... Propeller ....TAM-206 Gear Bush..PWA-1039 (Use ...PWA-2557 PWA-296

x x x

FIXTURE FIXTURE \FIXTURE

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x

x x x

x x x

FIXTURE I'IXTURD FIXTURE FIXTURE FIXTURD \FIXTURE GAGD GIAGE GAGTD\GAGE GAGD GAGD GAGE l-

x x

Knuckle Pin Assembly withPWA-296\ Knuckle Pin, Press

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

Master Rod and Articulating Rod, Aligning. ....PWA-1781 Rocker Arm Ball End Socket Disassembly.... PWA-1352 1516-T-10 .45639-T-2 . 17101-T-1 23408-T-1 . . .1516-T-11 End . .17216-T-I Shaft ...PWA-1451

Exhaust Valve Guide, Plug. Exhaust Valve Guide, Plug. Exhaust Valve Guide, PIug. Exhaust Valve Guide, Plug. Inlet Valve Guide, PIug. Magneto Shaft Clearance Maximum Bushing Wear, Bushing, Magneto

x x x x

x x x x

x x
x

552

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES TOOL LIST (Conttnued)


Eornet TooI Narrre
GAGE Maximum Bushing Wear. Starter

Tool No.
Shaft . PWA-145I-28 . PWA-398

EOLDDR EOLDDR EOLDER -

Blower Gear (Steet Cage)

Blower Gear (Outboard Bearirrg).. ..pwA_609 Cam Reduction Gear (Use with PWA-7) PWA_248 Knuckle Pin Bushing Facing. . . PWA-8G0 Valve Seat, Inlet. Valve Seat, Inlet. Valve Seat, Inlet. . .3b80-T-2 . .L2794-T-B .8692-T-8

EOLDDR EOLDDR EOLDER EOLDER MANDRDL PILOT -

Expanding, Piston Pin Bushing, Pinning... . .PWA-L777

Starter Shaft Bushing, Reaming. . PWA-815 Starter Shaft Bushing, Reaming. . PWA-812

PLATE PLATD PLATD

-TappetGuide,Aligning -TappetGuide,Aligning Piston Ring. Guide, Aligning Guide, Aligning Guide,Aligning

. . .PWA-82? . . .PWA-1302 . .PWA-1791 ...PWA-828-1 ...PWA-828-3 ...PWA-828-2 . . .2733-T-2

PLIERS PLUG PLUG PLUG PLUG

-Tappet -Tappet -Tappet -

Tappet Guide, Aligning

PULLER AND PUSEEB -

Cam Reduction Gear Bushing, Assembly and Disassembly. . . PWA-220 Cam Reduction Gear Bushing, Assembly and Disassembly. . . PWA-624 Impeller. . .. . . .PWA-1306 . . . .PWA-1065 . . .PWA-604 .. . .PWA-510 . PWA-1775 ...PWA-1067 . . PWA-760

PULLER AND PUSEER -

PULLER AND PUSEER -

PULLER -Crankshaft,Assembly PULLER -Crankshaft, PULLDR -Crankshaft, PULLDR Assembly Assembly

Exhaust Port Liner Assembly

PULLER-Flyweight, PULLER PULLDR PULLER -

Oil Pressure Pipe.

Propeller Governor Driven Gear Bushing, Assembly .PWA-1190 Push Rod Tube Packing Gland PWA-849

DD.J

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES TOOL LIST tContlnued) Wasp Jr.
Tool Narne
PULLDR PULLER PULLER Vacuum Pump Drive Liner

W asp
B3 E1
El-G

Ilornet
E x E - G E2. G E 3 . G

Tool No.
pWA-1881

82

x x
x x

x
x

x x x x x

x x x

ValveTappet BallSocket. . . . . . .pWA-1081 Valve Tappet Guide pWA-254 . .pWA-1068

x x x

x x x x x

x x

x x x

x x x

PUSEER -Flyweight,Disassembly PUSEDR PUSEDR -

Front Main Bearing, Assembly pWA-66b Impeller, Assembly.... . .PWA-1882

x x

PUSEER-Pinion PUSEDR PUSEER PUSEER PUSEER PUSEDR PUSEER -

Cage

..PWA-4G6 PWA-859

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x

Propeller Shaft Rear Bearing

Propeller Shaft ll,ear Bearing.. . . 14088-T-19 Push Rod Tube Packing Gland. PWA-491 Rear Main Bearing, Assembly. . PWA-208 Rear Main Bearing, Assembly PWA-O19

x x

x x

Rear Main Bearing, Assembly. . PWA-GG6 . . .3510-T-16 . . PWA-818

x x x
x

x x x x x

PUSEER -SparkPlugRushing... REAMER Blower Bearing Cover

x x x x

x x x x

x x x x

x
x

RDAMDR -

Cam Reduction Gear Bushing, Rough PWA-210 Cam Reduction Gear Bushing, Finish . . PWA-711 Exhaust Valve Guide Exhaust Valve Guide Valve Guide Exhaust Exhaust Exhaust . PWA-299 PWA-806 ...PWA-1050 Valve PWA-302 Valve PWA-303 Valve .PWA-417

x x x

x x

BDAMER

REAMER RDAMDR -

RDAMER -Exhaust REAMER RDAMER REAMDR -

x x x
x

Expansion, Guide Hole. Expansion, Guide Hole. Expansion, Guide Hole.

x x
x

x
x

x x x x

REAMER

Expansion, Inlet Valve Guide Hole. . PWA-301 Governor Driven Gear Bushing (Use with PWA-1039) PWA-1040 Inlet Valve Guide . PWA-298

x
x

REAMER

x x x

REAMER REAMER -

x
x

Intermediate Governor Drive GearBushing,Rough.... PWA-710 Intermediate Governor Gear Bushing, Finish f)rive . PWA-711

REAMER

554

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES


T OOL LIS T (C ontl nued) Iilasp Jr. Tool Narne T o o l N o.
B B2 B3

Wasp
E1 H T -G E

Ilornet
E . G E2-G 83. G

REAMDR -

Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Hole, Rough + 10 (Use with PWA-1341) . PWA-1339 Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Hole, Finish * 10 (Usewith PWA-1341) . ..PWA-1940 Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Hole, Rough + 20 (Usewith PWA-1341) PWA-1349 Intermediate Governor Drive Gear Bushing Hole, Finish * 20 (Use with PWA-1341) . PWA-1350 Magneto Shaft Bushing Hole. . PWA-61 Magneto Shaft Bushing Oil Pressure Pipe, Blower Hole . PWA-57 to PWA-171

REAMER

REAMER

REAMER -

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x x x x x x x

x x x x x x x x x

REAMER REAMER

RDAMER REAMER REAMER -

Oil Pressure Pipe Hole Reaming.. ...PWA-2071 Oversize Oil Pressure Pipe, HoIe to Blower . . PWA-171 + 10 Oversize Oil Pressure Pipe, Hole to Blower PWA-171 + 20 Oversize Oil Pressure Hole Reaming. . Pipe PWA-2071+10

REAMDR RDAMER RDAMER REAMER -

Oversize Oil Pressure Pipe Hole Reaming. . . PWA-2071 +20 Starter Shaft Bushing (Use in conjunction with PWA-815, PWA-917, PWA-919, PWA820) PWA-58 Starter Shaft Bushing Hole. . . . PWA-60 Stepped, Rocker Shaft Insert . PWA-1682

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x

x x

x x

REAMER REAMER

REAMDR REAMER REAMER -

Stepped, Rocker Shaft Insert. . . 13824-T-3 Valve Tappet Guide, Firsr Cut. PWA-1347 Valve I'appet Guide, Spiral . . . PWA-1348 Valve Tappet Guide, First Cut. PWA-1368 Valve Tappet Guide, Second Cut PWA-1346 Vertical Accessory Drive Shaft Bushing.....1171-T-1

x x
x

x x

x x x x x x x
x x

RDAMER REAMDR -

x
x

x x

REAMER AND FIXTUBD

x x

x x

x x

REMOVER -

Intake Valve Seat (Use with PWA-608-1) . . PWA-329

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES


TOOL LIST (Contlnued) Wasp Jr. Tool Narne
RDMOVER REMOVDR -

555

W asp
B3 E1 El- G E

Hornet E - G 82. G E 3 . G

Tool N o.

B2

Intake Valve Seat (Use with PWA-322 PWA-608-1) Intake Valve Seat (Use with PWA-323 PWA-608-1) . . . .PWA-1262

x x x x x x x x

RDMOVER -SparkPlugBushing RING RING RING -

x x

x x

Master, for Setting Block and In....3472-T-3 dicator Master, for Setting Block and In....1313-T-5 dicator Master, for Setting Block and In....2733-T-12 dicator Knuckle Pin Pin Pin . .PWA-1769 ...PWA-715 ...PWA-713

x x x x x x x

SDTTING BLOCK -

x x x x x x x

SETTING BLOCK -Knuckle SDTTING BLOCK -Knuckle SLDEVE SLDDVE SLEEVE SLEEVD SLEEVD SPACDR SPACER SPACER TAP -

Front Main and Thrust Bearing, PWA-79 Assembly Front Main Bearing, Assembly . .PWA-622 Front Main Bearing, Assembly. . PWA-701 Thrust Bearing Assembly Thrust Bearing Assembly . . PWA-156 . . PWA-536

x x x x x x x x x x

Knuckle Pin (For use with PWAPWA-2093 296). Knuckle Pin (For use with PWA...PWA-2252 296). Knuckle Pin (For use with PWA. PWA-2530 296) .

x x x x x x x x x x x x x

Spark Plug Bushing Hole in Cylinder. PWA-334 Plug Bushing... . .PWA-1526 .PWA-981-1 .PWA-981-3

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x

x
x

x x

TAP -Spark

TOOL-CrankpinLapping.... TOOL-CrankpinLapping.... \TOOL TOOL TOOL -

x x x x x x
x x

Crankpin Lapping (Use with PWAPWA-981-6 980). Impeller Nut Locking Pin. . : . . .PWA-1558 Magneto Shaft Bushing, Facing. . . . PWA-55 L a p p i n g ,E x h a u s t L a p p i n g ,E x h a u s t ....PWA-ll ....PWA-117 PWA-10 PWA-991

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x
x

TOOL -Valve TOOL -Valve TOOL -

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
x

x x x

x x x

x x x

Valve Lapping, Inlet.

WEDGE -Expandittg... WRENCE WRENCE -

C a m R e d u c t i o nG e a r N u t . . . . . P W A - 7 Crankshaft BoIt (Ir4" hex.) . . . PWA-1914

oDo

REPAIR AND ASSEMBLY OF MAJOR SUB.ASSEMBLIES TOOL LIST (Conttnued) Wasp Jr.
Tool Narne
WRENCH WRDNCE WRENCH WRENCE WRENCE WRDNCH WRENCE WRENCE WRENCE WRDNCE WRDNCE WRDNCE WRENCE WRENCE Crankshaft Bolt Crankshaft Bolt Crankshaft Plug

Wasp
B3 ET HT- G E

Hornet
E . G D2. G 8 3 . G

Tool No.
. PWA-603 PWA-106 . . PWA-7

82

x
x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x

x x

x x

x x

x x x

x x

Floating Gear Retaining Nut. . PWA-345 Front Main Bearing Retaining PWA-648 Nut. . Front Main Bearing Retaining PWA-659 Nut Generator Drive Gear Nut Impeller Nut PWA-174 PWA-1269

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x

x x x

Intermediate Blower Gear Nut . PWA-347 . (Steel Cage) Pinion Cage Lock Nut. . Pinion Cage Lock Nut. . Reduction Drive Gear Nut PWA-502 PWA-660 . . PWA-487 PWA-660

Reduction Drive Gear Nut. .

x x

x x

Spring BlowerDrive Bolt. . . . . .PWA-1195

601

CHAPTER VI

FINAL ASSEMBLY
GENERAL INFORMATION After the sub-assembliesand accessorieshave been cleaned, inspected, repaired and reassembled as described in the previous chapters, they should be forwarded to the final assembly line for assembly. The instructions in this chapter are written with the assumption that new gaskets and rubber seals will be installed where they are required, replacing those which were removed at disassembly; all mating gears, shafts, bearings and fitting surfaces on oil pipes will be adequately oiled prior to installation; all safety wiring, palnuts and cotter pins will be installed where necessary, following the final assembly of each part; and all the necessary fits and clearances will be checked for the required limits contained in the Service Table of Clearances.

FINAL ASSEMBLY the swivel Blower and Rear Sectlons-Turn top of the Engine Overhaul stand to a horizontal position and attach the blower section to the top of the Mountilg Plate with the impeller facine downward. Then secure blower section to stand-with at least five mounting bolts. Turn the blower section so that impeller is facing upward. Fit gasket over studs and on the parting face of blower section, where it joins the rear section. Then assemble rear section to blower and secure with the necessary nuts and washers. It may prove necessary to lightly tap the rear section irittr a fiber drift at the magneto and starter drive shaft locations. Be sure case or bushings are not distorted or damaged. rear section should be pushed Cautlon-The evenly on the blower to prevent damaging the oil pressure pipe and horizontal drive shaft bushings. Turn the accessory section with the stand so that the rear section lies in its normal flying position and proceed with the installation of the following: each Vertlcal Accessory I)rlve Shaft-Insert shaft through its respective bushing in the rear section. Fit ball bearing (and gun control gear, if provided) over upper end of each vertical drive shaft and secure with nut. Each nut should be tightened only finger tight on its respective shaft at this time. tachometer shaft Tachorneter Shafts-Insert into its respective hole in the rear section and ensase its gear teeth with those on vertical acdeslory diive shaft. Place gasket against tachometer coupling mounting pad on rear section. Then secure tachometer shaft in position by fastening tachometer drive coupling to rear section with two fillister head screws. The tachometer shaft or shafts may be installed on left and/or right side of the rear section, depending upon whether one or two shafts are used. In this connection, it is important to install each tachometer drive coupling on its particular side of the engine. Each coupling has a spiral oil groove in its bore to provide a return for the oil which leaks past the bushing. If installed on the wrong side, this groove would assist oil leakage rather than prevent it. On engines shipped from the factory the tachometer drive pads on "1" for the right the rear section are marked No. "2" for the left side (viewed fror^r side, and No. the rear). The couplings are similarly marked and the numbers on the rear section and coupling should correspond when properly positioned. starter shaft Starter Jaw and Shaft-Insert through its bushing so that the splined end of the shaft protrudes into the rear section. If necessary, tap shaft with hammer and fiber drift and drive ball bearing completely into recess of blower section. Fit starter jaw and washer over end of starter shaft in the order mentioned; then screw nut on end of shaft and tighten. Starter Shaft End Clearance-After installation of the starter shaft, the clearance between the starter jaw and the face of the starter shaft bushing should be checked. As all engines are carefully checked before leaving the factory for the desired starter shaft end clearance, it should never be necessary to increase this clearance except when new parts are installed, or unless a gasket of abnormal thickness is used between the blower and rear section. However, if less than the minimum clearance is found with the original parts installed, check to see that the bushing has not worked backwards in the rear section. Should the end clearance be excessive, the flange of the starter shaft bushing should be

602

FINAL

ASSEMBLY

Fie. - 601 -

Checking Starter Shaft Bushing with Flush Pin Gage

Fig. 602 -

Checking Backlash between Generator Drive Gear and Starter Jaw Gear

checked for wear using the Flush Pin Gage (see Fie. 601) to determine if its thickness is within th6 desired limiting dimensions. This is very important as the backlash between the generator drive gear and the starter jaw gear is controlled bv the end clearance of the starter shaft. If the birshing flange is worn excessively, installation of a new bushing should, in most cases,correct the See Chapter V for instructions on difficulty. installing a new bushing. If, after a new bushing is installed the de.sired clearance cannot be obtained, further adjustment may be made by changrng the thickness of the rpu-c"r located iir fronfof-the starter shaft ball bbaring. This may be done by installing a thicker spacer or by grinding down the present one, d-ependingwhether it is necessary to increase or decrease the clearance. Starter or Starter Cover-Place gasket against starter mounting pad on rear section; then fasten starter or starter cover to rear section with the necessary nuts and washers. the generGenerator Drlve Assembly-Install ator drive assembly in position on the rear section and insure that the gear teeth of the generator drive gear and the qtarter -ju* gear are properly engaged. A rubber oil seal is required between the flange of the generator beiring housing and the mounting pad of the rear section. Check the backlash between the

generator drive gear and starter jaw gr, usi4g a dial indicator. The dial indicator should be mounted on a stud of the starter drive pad with the plunger resting on a generator drive gear tooth (see Fig. 602). This backlash should be checked first with the starter jaw pushed as far forward as possible and then again with it pushed as far to the rear as possible. When in the forward position the backlash should not be less than the minimum specified while in the rear position it should not exceed the replacement limit. If this backlash exceeds the replacement limit, the teeth on the generator drive pinion and starter jaw gear should be carefully examined for pitting and wear. If the excessivebacklash cannot beadjusted through the starter shaft and bushing, it is prmissible to machine the lower face on the flange of the generator bearing housing, until the proper backlash is obtained. Should the backlash be found insufficient, it should be increased to the proper value by installing one or more steel shims between the flange of the generator bearing housing and the mounting pad on the rear section. This should be done only when no further adjustment can be made through the starter shaft assembly. Place the gasket and cover over top ofgenerator drive assembly and secure with four nuts and washers.

FINAL ASSEMBLY
Magneto Drlve Shafts-Insert each magneto drive shaft (from forward side of blower section) into its respective bushings in blower and rear sections. Before the shaft is pushed completely through its bushings, the pump and gun control gear should be held against the face of rear magneto drive shaft bushing. Then the shaft may be pushed through the gear and into position. Drive key into keyways of the pump and gun control drive gear and magneto drive shaft, using a hammer and brass drift if necessary. Insert magneto drive shaft oil shield through hole in magneto drive cover mounting pad and into position. Fasten magneto drive cover and gasket to its respective mounting pad on rear section, using four fillister head screws. Be sure that a gasket is fitted between each cover. The leather oil seal incorporated on each magneto drive cover should be in good condition, or the cover should be replaced. Fit each magneto coupling flange over end of magneto drive shaft, lining up the keyway with the key which is already in place in the drive shaft, and secure in position with screw. Lock the magneto drive shafts and tighten screws which fasten magneto coupling flange to each shaft. gasket over mounting flange on OII Pump-Fit oil pump housing. Insert body of oil pump into its bore in the lower right hand side of the rear section and engage teeth of oil pump drive gear with those of the bevel pump and gun control gear. The oil pump assembly should then be fastened to the rear section with the necessary nuts and washers. Check the backlash between the oil pump drive gear and the pump and gun control gear. Adjustment of the backlash between these gearsr may be made by facing the magneto drive shaft bushing in the rear section, or by installing a new bushing, but it must be remembered that the backlash of the vertical accessory drive shaft will also be affected. See instructions on this subject in Chapter V. Fuel Pump l)rlve and Fuel Pump-Insert fuel pump drive gear shaft through hole in boss of fuel pump drive gear bracket, Install fuel pump drive gear bracket and gasket on lower left hand side of rear section, and engage teeth of fuel pump drive gear with those of bevel pump and gun control gear. Be sure that the proper backlash is obtained. As described for the oil pump, adjustment may be made by facing the, magneto drive shaft bushing flange. Place gasket over mounting flange of fuel -drive pump and engage pump shaft with fuel pump geqr shqft. _Fastenpump into place on fuel pump drive bracket with the necessary nuts anii washers. Pratt and Whttney Lubrlcator Pump (Wasp Jr. B and B2)-As this unit is integral with the fuel pump drive, it is installed at the same time
Fig. 603 -

603

and in accordance with the same procedure as that specffied for the instaliation of the fuel pump drive. Conhect lubricator pump oil supply pipe to oil _inlet _and pressure holes in lubricatoi pump body and rear section respectively. Gun Drlve or Accessory Drlve Covers-Place gasket on each vertical drive pad on top of rear section, then secure each cover to its respective pad with four nuts and washers. If gorr synchronizers or other accessoriesare to beinstafed in lieu of gun drive covers, make sure that the proper backlash is obtained between the two mating gears. Vacuum Pump_ Drlve-Insert vacuum pump drive shaft and bearing assembly into b6re of liner on left side of rear section. Be sure teeth of vacuum pump drive gear and fuel pump drive gear are properly meshed. Place gasket over inner face of mounting flange on vacuum pump drive housing, and then push housing into position in the rear section. Install spacer and oil seal in vacuum pump drive housing. Check backlash between vacuum pump drive gear and pump and fuel pump drive gear (see Fig. 603). I_nstall gasket and vacuum pump (or cover) over flange of vacuum pump drive housing and secure with nuts and washers.

Checking Backlash between Vacuum Pump Drive Gear and Fuel Pump Drive Gear

604

FINAL ASSEMBLY

rff ore.

c d rr ^ A o. o o
o,a

rfi brn)

l'5toos

il

INSTALL ONLY BETWEEN REAR S E CT I O N A N D V AC U U MP U MP D R IVE HOUSING.

INSTALL ONLY BETWEEN VACUUM PUMP DRIVE HOUSINGAND VACUUM

(On cOven). PUMP

Fig. 603,4.-

Vacuum Pump Gaskets

Refer to Figure 603A which shows the gasket used between the rear section and the vacuum pump drive housing, also the one used between the vacuum pump drive housing and the vacuum pump (or cover). Reversing the location of these gaskets may result in improper backlash ,and blanking off the oil supply to the pump, causing subsequent failure of the pump. Special care should be taken to insure the proper installation of these gaskets. Note-Misalignment of oil holes in rear section mounting pad and gasket up to one half the hole diameter is permissible and will supply vacuum pump with ample lubrication. Otl Dratn Plpe-Place gasket against pads of oil drain pipe ports on blower and rear sections, then attach drain pipe to pads with the necessary nuts. Oll Pressure Rellef Valve-Insert plunger and spring in the oil pressure relief valve cage. The oil pressure relief valve is located in either of four positions; the oil pump housing; the right side of the accessory section, just above the oil pump; the sump; or at the left side of the pressure chamber. Be sure the plunger seats properly in its cage. If it is evident that the plunger seats improperly, it should be lapped with a very fine grade of grinding compound. After lapping,

the plunger should be blued and checked for even seating. Fit gasket under flange on oil pressure relief valve body, then screw body into case. Be sure that lock nut on valve adjustment screw is tight. not disturb setting of adjustCautlon-Do ment screw in oil pressure relief valve body, However, it may be necessary to alter setting of the screw during first engine run-in to maintain the desired oil pressure. Refer to Chapter VII. Install gasket, and screw acorn shaped cap on outer end of oil pressure relief valve body. Carburetor Eotspot or Adapter (ff Provtded) -Fasten carburetor hotspot or adapter to carburetor mounting flange on rear section with the necessarynuts and washers. Turn the accessory section with stand so that the rear section is facing the floor, then proceed with the installation of parts, as specified in the following: Maln Crankcase Sectlon (Rear Half )-Fit rubber oil seal in groove which is cut in parting face of blower section. Pour a generousamount of engine oil on gears of blower section. Install washers beneath the heads of their respective The lifting links crankcase through bolts. should be fitted on the two longest bolts, at either side of No. 1 cylinder opening. Insert

605

FINAL ASSEMBLY

Fig. 604 -

Checking Clearance between Bottom of Cam Spacer and Top of Cam Hub -

Wasp Jr. Engine

through bolts into their respective holes in rear section of main crankcase, making sure that the longest bolts are fitted through holes on each side of number one cylinder pad. Heavy rubber bands should be wrapped around the bolts to prevent them from dropping through the holes. Mount rear section of main crankcase on blower section, being careful not to damage the oil transfer pipe on Wasp Jr. engines. Fasten rear section to blower section with the necessarv nuts and washers. Crankshaft and Artlculatlng Rod Assernbly - Screw Lifting Eye on the forward end of the crankshaft, and attach the hook of a chain hoist to the eye, then lower the complete assembly into the rear section of the main crankcase so that the crankshaft gear engages with the starter and magneto drive shaft gears. When lowering the complete assembly it should be turned in such a manner as to permit the master rod to fit in its opening, No. 5 on Wasp Jr. and Wasp engines and No. 7 on Hornet engines. The eight articulating rods should also be positioned to occupy their respective openings in the crankcase. Before the assembly is completely lowered, it should again be turned so that No. 1 articulating rod is fnlly extended through its respective opening. Maln Crankcase Sectlon (Front Half )Lower this section over forward end of crank-

shaft to the parting surfaces of the rear half of main crankcase. It may be necessary to drive this section downward (alternately on opposite sides) with a hammer and fiber drift to bring it in contact with the rear half of main crankcase. forward section of the main Cautlon-The crankcase must be installed in a level position to prevent cramping of the front main bearing. Force the nine through bolts upward through their respective holes in both crankcase sections, using a pry-bar. Cautlon-Do case. not pry against the blower

Install the necessary nuts and washers. Carn l)rlve Gear (Wasp Ifl and Hornet E)Smear oil in the bore of the cam drive gear and then slip the gear over splines on forward end of crankshaft until it seats on front main bearing. When the gear is being installed it must be turned so that its large spline engages with the large spline on the crankshaft. Care must be taken to see that the oil transfer rings are not damaged while entering the liner of the oil transfer bracket. Carn Drlve Gear (Wasp Jr. Engtnes)-First insert cam drive gear key in the slot provided in the crankshaft, using a hammer and brass dnift. Then slip gear over shaft so that its keyway aligns

606

FINAL

ASSEMBLY Cam Reductlon Gear (Wasp and Eornet)Install the cam reduction gear in its bushing in the front section of the main crankcase with spacer between it and the bushing flange. It is important to mesh the cam driv_egear,,cam_reduction gear and cam in correct relationship. The marked tooth on the cam drive gear engages with the two marked teeth on the cam reduction gear. The two marked teeth on the_cam engage the marked tooth on the cam reduction gear pinion. Bearlng Support Plate (Geared Englnes)Smear oil around inside of reduction drive gear liner and then install bearing support plate on front parting face of forward crankcase section. When assembling this plate on Hornet engines having a governor drive gear attached to the forward end of the cam reduction gar, it is gear as important to mesh the cam reduction "Cam Redescribed in the paragraph entitled duction Gear". Insure that bearing support plate is evenly seated, and secure it in position with three flat head screws. Reductlon Drlve Gear (Geared Englnes)Smear internal splines of reduction drive gear with oil and assembleon the front of crankshaft, using the Reduction Drive Gear Pusher (see Fig. 605). Install reduction drive gear lock washer and lock nut, and tighten, using the Reduction Drive Gear Nut Wrench. Lock nut in position by bending up tab of washer. Checklng Plnch Ftt of Thrust Bearlng Cover (Direct Drlve Englnes)-Before assembly of the front section on the engine, it is important to check the pinch fit of the thrust bearing cover against the outer race of the thrust bearing, unless this has already been done during inspection and the same thrust bearing is to be rrsed. The following procedure should be followed: Install cover in position on front section and tighten the nuts. Turn the front section over and measure at several points, the distance from the shoulder of the liner, where the rear face of the thrust bearing rests, and the point on the cover directly forward. Next measure the width of the thrust bearing outer race and the tab spacer (if used) which rests against this race. The total of these two measurements should be from .004" to .008" greater than the distance from the cover to the rear shoulder of the liner. Adjustment may be made by either grinding the present spacer or installing a new thicker spacer. On engines having the steel ring riveted to the rear of the cover, the pinch fit may be reduced by removing the rivets which hold the steel ring to the cover and wet grinding the face of the ring which mates with the cover. The pinch fit may be increased by facing the flange of the cover sufficiently to afford the necessaryfit.

with key in crankshaft and, at the same time, -"rtr th"e cam reduction gear so that its marked l"otft lutt* tr"t*een the t*o marked teeth of the cam drive gear. Cam Otl Feed Braeket (Wasp Jr. Engl+el)Stio tt ir bracket over for*ard end of crankshaft it to the forward section of the main ;A il*e with the necessary nuts or fillister "ru"["ut" A gasket shoulcl be used where the ft"ua ."t"*t. oil feed pipe attaches to the crankcase. Carn and Cam' Spacer iWasp Jr. Englnes)S*"ut oit in the bole of the cam drum; ther! slip "urn on"t forward end of crankshaft and sleeve drive gear un!il it is properly seated' ;f-;fi The two mark-ed teeth on the cam rim must ""n"e" *itft the marked tooth on the piryorl of the gear while No. 1 articulating -rod ""il?"a"ction i" il r""tt a position that No. 1 piston would be at top dead center. If a floating ring type cam oil feed bracket is used, be sure that the oil transfer tFqt are.prPperly centered in bracket before cam is installed' Smear oil in the bore of the cam spacer-; then spacer over forward end of crankshaft until slip ^reais on top of cam drive gear sleeve. Check it betiveen bottom of cam spager-?nd .i"uiu"." hub, using feeler gage (seeFig. -60+). cam of top Adj".tt"ent of this clearance may Ue madg .bI srinaine spacer on cam drive gear upon which 6am hub r6sts or by installing a thicker spacer'

Fig. 605 -

I'nstalling Reduction Drive Gear

607

FINAL

ASSEMBLY

Fig. 606 -

Installing Cylinder

Front Sectlon (Dtrect Drlve Englnes)-Smear oil on front main bearing, propeller oil transfer rings (if provided), and cam lobes. Place front section over forward end of crankshaft, and rest it on parting face of main crankcase. It may be necessary to drive the section downward (alternately on opposite sides) with a hammer and fiber drift to bring it in contact with the main crankcase. front section must be installed Cautlon-The in a level position to prevent the propeller oil feed pipe (if provided) from being damaged. On the Wasp Jr. B3 insure that the two ends of the rocker oil manifold fit into theif holes in the front section. On Wasp H1 and Hornet E engines, it is very important that the propeller oil transfer rings do not become damaged when installing the front section. In some cases it witl be necessary to insert a long thin rod between the parting surfaces of the front section and the front section of the main crankcase to compress the oil seal rings so that they will enter the liner in which they bear. Fasten front section to main crankcase with the necessary nuts and washers. Thrust Bearlng and Sllnger (Dlrect Drlve Englnes)-Install thrust bearing in position in

its liner. On Wasp Jr. engines the small spacer should first be inserted between the thrust bearing and the propeller oil transfer ring carrier. Screw Lifting Eye on forward end of crankshaft and attach the hook of a chain hoist to the eye. Raise the crankshaft slightly, then insert a piece of fiber between the rear crankshaft counterweight and rear section of main crankcase. Remove chain hoist hook and Lifting Eye, then drive thrust bearing into liner, using a suitable sleeve type drift. Place the thrust bearing slinger over forward end of crankshaft and seat it against the bearing. srrre that slinger is properly Cautlon-Be centered over the shoulder on the crankshaft. Thrust Nut (Dlrect Drlve Englnes)-Screw thrust nut on crankshaft and tighten it securely with the Thrust Nut Wrench. The crankshaft may be prevented from turning by using the Crankshaft Spline Wrench. Remove fiber which was inserted under counterweight of rear crankshaft. crankshaft Plstons and Cyllnders-Rotate until articulating rod of the master rod cylinder is at its top dead center position. Fit rubber oil seal around radius under cylinder hold-down flange of each cylinder. Insert correct piston

608

FINAL ASSEMBLY

Fig. 607 -

Installing Oil Sump

pin through piston and bushing in arJiqulatlng iod. The piston pin should be well oiled before insertion. It is important that each piston and piston pin bear the same number as that of the -ylinder in which the piston is to be installed. Each cylinder is numbered on the forward side of the hold-down flange, and each piston is numbered on one of the piston pin bosses. Each piston pin is numbered on one of the plugs at the end of the pin. It is common practice to install the piston and pin with their numbered sides toward the front of the engine. In any event, a uniform procedure should be adopted. Coat the cylinder walls, piston and rings with a generous amount of oil. Stagger the ring gap_s around the circumference of the piston. Lock the Ring Clamp over the piston and rings and slide cylinder over piston and into place against its mounting pad. The cylinder should be fastened to the crankcase with at least one nut before installing other cylinders (seeFig. 606). After installing the master rod cylinder, the remaining cylinders should be installed in the same manner, following around the engine in a Screw cylinder counter-clockwise direction. hold-down nuts on studs, then check alignment of each pair of adjacent cylinders, by placing a straight edge across their exhaust and intake port flanges. The four ports on each pair of cylinders should be within Yn" alignment.

Tighten the cylinder hold-down nuts, using the Cylinder Hold-down Nut Wrench. not tighten nuts excessively, Cautlon-Do as in so doing the studs may be stretched or broken. The recommended torque for tightening cylinder hold-down nuts is 300 in lbs. for both the necked and the unnecked type studs. For engines which incorporate inter-cylinder oil drain pipes or oil pressure pipes, slip the hose connection into position, and secure with clamps or wrap lock. Oll Surnp-Place a gasket cn each mounting flange of the oil sump; then secure sump to its resp-ective mounting pads, using four washers anil nuts (see Fig. 607). The proper spacers if used, should be placed under the washers on the two rear studs. Screw oil drain plug into bottom of sump and tighten. Oll Suctlon Ptpe-Insert oil strainer into oil suction port at rear of sump. Place gasket over oil suction pipe mounting pads on rear section and sump, then fasten the pipe in position. On Wasp Jr. 83, Wasp H1 and Hornet E engines, this will also apply to the rocker box scavenge pipe from the lower compartment of the sump, excepting that there is no strainer at this location.

609

FINAL ASSEMBLY a shroud is used Cyttnder l)eflectors-Unless for cooling purposes during the run-in of an engine after overhaul, it is recommended that the cylinder deflectors be left off until after runin of the engine. For complete instructions on installing cylinder deflectors see Chapter VIII. both front and rear Ienltlon Manlfold-Attach sf,ielding manifolds to the main crankcase with the necessary nuts or cap screws. On the rear manifold, it is first necessary to disjoin the two sections before installing it on the engine. After the manifold has been installed in position, the two parts may be joined together with the large union nut. Intake Ptpes-With the necessaryflange, gland nut and rubber packing in place on the intake pipe, place pipe in position and screw gland nut Ioosely into the blower. Install copper gasket at cylinder intake port with the split side toward the port, then fasten intake pipe flange to cylinder heaii with cap screw and nuts. screw and nuts evenly to Cautlon-Tighten prevent distortion at the flange. Tighten gland nut at blower end of pipe, using the Intake Pipe Nut Wrench. not tighten excessively, as in Cautlon-Do so doing the end of the intake pipe may neck down. Push Rods and Covers-Wasp Jr. engines, which incorporate either on Automatic Valve Lubricator or the One-Shot System, require the use of a drilled type push rod ball end at the tappet ends, only, of the push rods for the following cylinders: Inlet #L,2,3, 8, and 9 cylinders; and Exhaust #L, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 cylinders. Plain type ball ends should be used on both ends of the remaining push rods. Smear oil on the ball ends of each push rod, and then insert push rod in cover. Rotate crankshaft until tappet which actuates push rod to be installed is fully receded in its respective guide. Depress rocker arm with the Rocker Arm Depressor, and fit push rod and cover into proper position. Be sure that push rod is properly marked and inserted in its correct position with respect to the cylinder number. Tighten gland nut on each end of cover using Push Rod Gland Nut Wrench. The gland nut at the tappet end of the cover should be tightened first. Cautlon-Tighten excessively. these nuts snugly but not pressure pipe to the tee connection at No. 1 cylinder and to the oil outlet at the lubricator pump on the rear section. Timing Pointer Checklng Valve Tlmlng-Fit over propeller shaft of direct drive engine and to reduction drive gear of geared engines. With CrankshaftWrench, turn crankshaft anticlockwise until the piston in No. 1 cylinder is at the exact top dead center of the compression stroke (both valves closed). Set the clearance between adjusting screw ball and valve stem to .060" for Wasp Jr. and Wasp engines and .078" for Hornet engines, for both inlet and exhaust valves in No. L cylinder. To perform this operation, use Valve Adjusting Screw Wrench and feeler gage. Turn crankshaft anti-clockwise nearly one revolution until pointer is near inlet open mark (I.O.) on front section of direct drive engines and bearing support plate of geared drive engines, then insert .0015" feeler gage between adjusting screw ball and stem of No. 1 inlet valve. Tap Crankshaft Wrench in an anti-clockwise direction until a slight pressure is exerted against feeler, or until inlet valve is just ready to open, then note position of pointer with respect to inlet opening mark. Turn cranlcshaft anti-clockwise until pointer passesexhaust valve closing mark (8.C.), then insert .0015" feeler gagebetween adjusting screw ball and stem of number one exhaust valve. Next turn crankshaft clockwise until pointer is in a vertical position. Tap wrench in an anticlockwise direction until pressure on feeler begins to release, then note position of pointer with respect to exhaust closing mark. The following table contains the opening and closing positions of the valves.
Engine Tipe Inlet Opens (in degrees before top center) 20" E. Inlet Closes (in degrees after bottom center) 77" L. Exhaust Opens Erhaust Closes (in degrees (in degrees before bottom after top center) center)

Hornet

waspJr. 26"^Eie?n. wil-

zsir. rcir*

zri n. zrl n.
76" E.

srl l. eri r,.


21" L.

Prlmer Llnes and Cyllnder Otl Feed PlpesScrew primer line distributor into top of blower section and attach necessary primer lines. Connect primer lines to their respective elbows at the cylinder heads. On Wasp Jr. B enginm, having a valve lubricator system, attach the

Adjustrrrent of Valve Clearances-The valve clearances are adjusted in a sequencewhich conforms to the firing order of the cylinders, (i.e. 1, 3, 5, 7,9, 2, 4,6, 8). Turn the crankshaft anti-clockwise until both valves of cylinder No. 1 are closed and the piston is at the exact top dead eenter of the compression stroke. Insert a .010" feeler gage between the valve tip and the adjusting screw ball. Loosen lock nut and back off or turn down on valve clearance adjusting screw, using Valve Adiusting Screw Wrench, until .010" clearance is obtained. Retighten the lock nut, being careful not to turn the adjusting screw. the adjusting screw lock nuts Cautlon-When are tightened an excessivepressure should not be exerted as such will pre-load the adjusting

610

FINAL ASSEMBLY

Fig. 608 -

Timing Marks on Scintilla SB-9R Magneto

Fig. 609 -

Timiig Pointer for Timing ing Magnetos

and Synchroniz-

screw and breakage is apt to occur in subsequent running. 275 in.-lbs. is considered the proper torque limit for tightening. Do not strike wrench with any object while tightening. After adjustment of the valves in Number 1 cylinder, the crankshaft should be turned with the CrankshaftWrench so that the piston in Number 3 cylinder is at top dead center of its compression stroke. Adjust valves in same manner as described for Number 1 cylinder. This should be accomplished at the remaining cylinders in the firing order previously given in this section. Be sure that each plston ls at exact top dead center. After completion, rotate the crankshaft two complete revolutions and recheck the clearances. Any valve clearancesfound below .010" should be reset to this figure, but.a greater clearance should not be disturbed unless obviously excessive. Tfunlng and Synchronlzlng Magnetos to Timing Pointer over propeller shaft Englne-Fit of direct drive engines and to reduction drive gear of geared engines, if not already installed. With Crankshaft Wrench turn crankshaft anticlockwise until the piston in Number 1-cylinder is on the compression stroke, (both valves closed) and the Timing Pointer aligns with the specified spark advance mark on the nose section or the bearing support plate.

Turn magneto shaft until timing marks on the large distributor gear align with the timing marks on the inside of the front end plate. At this time the running segment on the distributor or rotor should be in a position opposite the Number 1 distributor block electrode, and the breaker contact should be just opening. Connect the Timing Light across the breaker contacts of the magneto or insert a .0015" feeler gage between the breaker contacts. Turn magneto shaft slowly until the breaker contacts begin to open and the timing light goes out, or the feeler gage can be removed with a slight pull. This should occur when the straight edge against the cam step falls in line with the marks on the breaker housing (see Figs. 608 and 610). The straight edge should coincide with the timing marks on the breaker housing, when the contacts are just breaking. However, a distance of Ysz"between the straight edge and the timing marks is permissible. If this distance is exceeded, refer to the instructions in Chapter XIV, "Magnetos". Turn magneto drive rubber coupling until it can be engaged in its mating flanges without causing the rnagneto shaft to turn. Engage rubber coupling and fit magneto over dowel pins in mounting pad and fasten magneto to engine rear section with the necessary cap screws. When both magnetos have been installed, turn crankshaft 90' in a clockwise direction, then reverse rotation until the feeler gage can be removed from between the contact pdints with a

611

FINAL ASSEMBLY slieht pull, and note the position of the Timing Po-intei with respect to the specified advance mark on the front section or bearing support plate (seeFig. 609). The contact points of both magnetos should break simultaneously when the mark on Timing Pointer aligns with the timin_gthe front section or support plate. If the contacts do not break at this point, adjustment should be made in accordance with instructions in the next paragraph If the contact points break before the pointer aligns with the timing mark on the front section, remove magneto, turn rubber coupling clockwise one or two notches; refasten magneto to engine rear section; recheck timing as previously out Iined. If the contact points should break after the the pointer aligns with the timing mark o_nfront section, the above procedure should be followed except that the rubber coupling should be turned anti-clockwise one or two notches. Due to the fact that the coupling has 19 notches on one side and 20 notches on the other, a very fine adjustment can be made. Make a final check to see that the straight edge is in line with the step of the cam and the marks on the breaker housing when the points are just starting to open. no circumstances should an Cautlon-Under American Bosch magneto and a Scintilla magneto be used together on the same engine. Magnetos wtth Steel Coupllngs=Mqgnetos which have steel couplings should be timed to the engine as previously outlined for the rubber type coupling, with the following exceptions: To engage and fasten each coupling, turn it around until it slips into place over the coupling drive gears and secure with lock ring. To disengageeach coupling, remove lock ring and slip the coupling backward toward the magneto. . This operation may be performed without removing magneto from rear section. To retard magneto timing by means of the coupling (when breaker contacts open early) disengage coupling, turn it anti-clockwise one or two teeth, engage coupling and secure it with lock ring. To advance magneto timing by means of the coupling (when breaker contacts open late) the instructions in the preceding paragraph should be complied with except that the coupling should be turned clockwise one or two teeth.

\-

\-

t-

R e d D o t o n C a m Indicates No. 1 Lobe

\-

Edge Straight Placed Acros Step of Timing Muet Collar Coincide Marks "T" with Timing when Contact Points "E" give correct Gap. limits Permisible are on either side of l;!" "T". Timing Marks

&i,I';,fi B'i*f"f,B.""

YIEW L@KINO AT UAaNE|O ENO FIRINO OPzEP- l-3-5-7-9-2-1-6-A

Fie. - 610 -

Rear View of American Bosch SB9RU-3 Magneto Showing Timing Marks

Fig. 611 -

Wiring Diagram

6L2

T.INAL ASSEMBLY FINAL

OPERATIONS shaft and screw Lifting Eye to the end of propeller shaft. Attach the hook of the chain hoist to the eye. Pour a liberal coating of oil on reduction drive gear and intermediate governor drive gear assembly, (if provided). On Wasp and Hornet engines, install tee pipe connection and oil pipes connecting front of sump to oiler bracket. On Hornet EG series engines used in installations where the propeller blades pass close to the ship, lower reduction gear housing on to front rnain crankcase so that wide spline on propeller -location; shaft is 20" ahead of the master rod that is, between numbers 7 and 8 cylinders. It is recommended that the Superintendent of Overhaul be consulted in this respect. Rock propeller slgft slighlly to jnsure proper meshing of gears. Secure with hold-down nuts. Instaii propeller shaft oil feed pipe and locator, and screw on locator cap. Propeller Otl Fe_edPtpe-When assembling the nose section on Wasp H1 engines, trouble has been experienced because the propeller oil feed pipe has been forced into the nose section, thus cutting off the supply of oil to the tappets. To prevent this, an additional shouldei has been added to the pipe and it is recommended that the new type pipe be used on all earlier models. On all other Wasp and Hornet engines the propeller oil feed pipe should be aligned with the oil pipe hole in the nose section so that it will not become damaged when nose section is lowered onto the front main crankcase section. Spark Plugs-Install spark plugs in front and rear of each cylinder -Attach and tighten with Spark Plug Wrench. each i[nition wire tb its respective spark plug. I4spectlon of Assernbled Engtne-It is considered a good practice to make a thorough visual i{rgpection of the assembled engine. See that all external nuts and fittings are tight, and that no gaskets or safety wires have been omitted.

Remove Timing Pointer and Crankshaft Wrench from propeller shaft of direct drive engines, and the Timing Pointer and the Reduction Drive Gear Timing Wrench from geared engines. On direct drive engines fasten propeller thrust bearing cover to the front section with the necessary nuts and washers. installing cover plate, be Cautlon-When sure that the drain holes in the plate match up with those in the nosesection. Magnetos-Assemble the breaker covers on the magnetos, and fasten with the knurled screws. Secure the fastening serews with wire clips. Install the distributors in their correct positions on the magnetos. To insure correct positioning, the numbers "4 and 6" on the righf distributor block should be next to the numbers "4 and 6" which appear on the main cover. Fasten blocks with the metal straps and lock with wire clips. Ignltlon Wrlng-It is irnportant to check the ignition wiring. The numbers on the distributor blocks indicate the serial firing order of the magneto. The firing order of the engine is 1, 3, 5,7, 9,2, ((1" 4, 6, 8. Therefore, the cable from terminal connects with No. 1 cylinder; the cable from terminal "2" connects with No. 3 cylinder; the cable from terminal "3" connects with No. 5 cylinder, etc. The right magneto fires the front spark plugs, and the left magneto fires the rear spark plugs (seeFig. 611). The booster ((H" wire is connected to the terminal marked on the top of the main cover, and the ground wire from the magneto switch to the terminal marked ttP". Rocker Box Covers-Fit a gasket on the mounting face of each rocker box cover. Fasten covers on the rocker box housings with the spring clamps or nuts. Reductlon Gear Eouslng (Geared Englnes)Place the Crankshaft Wrench on the propeller

613

FINAL ASSEMBLY

TOOL LIST
Wasp Jr.
Tool Nanre

Wasp
B8 EI x x
ET. G

Ilornet D E . G 82. GI D 3 . G x x x

Tool No.

82 x x

\-

.PWA-2240 x ADAPTER _ (Usewith PWA-2239) .. x . .PWA-249 . . Compressing. Ring Piston CLAMP . .PWA-13 Compressing... PistonRing cLAMP Piston Ring .- Compressing. . . . .PWA-184 CLAMP x ....PWA-455 DEPRESSOR - R o c k e r A r m .
DYE DYE DYE DYE -Lifting, . . . .PWA-1333 DYE #50 Spline. . .. - Starter Shaft Bushing Flush Pin. TAM-1113 GAGE EANDLE - Cylinder Hold-down Wrench (Use
EANDLE with PWA -2299 and PWA-2240) . PWA-2398 Cylinder Hold-down Wrench (Use with PWA-2239 and PWA-2240). PWA-241L 1 3 0S p l i n e . . . . . 140Spline... . . ...PWA-85 . . .PWA-115 ' .PWA-535 . . .PWA-465 .PWA'24L7 ....PWA-112 ... .PWA-155 .. . .PWA-197 . . PWA-186 Lifting, for Geared Crankshafts. . PWA-662 Lifting, for Geared Crankshafts. . PWA-1079 -Lifting, . . . .PWA-520 #30 Spline. . . . - Lifting, #40 Spline. . . . . . . .PWA-1332

x x

x x

x x
x

x
x

x x x

x x

x
x x

x
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x
x

x x

x x
x x

x
x

x
x x

x
x

x x

POINTDR -Timing, POINTER -Timing,

x
x

POINTER -Timing, (3:2 red.). PUSEER - Reduction Drive Gear. TIMING LIGET-Magneto.... WRENCE - Crankshaft, #30Spline WRENCE - Crankshaft, #40 Spline WRDNCE - Crankshaft, #50 Spline WRENCE WRENCE WRENCE WRDNCE Cylinder Hold-down Cylinder Hold-down with PWA-2239 and Cylinder Hold-down with PWA -2239 and Cylinder Hold-down with PWA-2239 and Nut

x x
x x x x

x x

x
x

x x x
x x x x x x

x
x

x
x

x x
x x x x x x x x

x
x x

x x
x x

x x x
x

Nut (Use PWA-2240). PWA-2006 Nut (Use PWA-2240) . PWA-2397 Nut (Use PWA-2240). PWA-2399

x x
x

x
x x x x

x
x x

x x
x

x
I

WREITCE WRDNCE WRENCE WREITCE WRENCE -

. . PWA-237 Intake Pipe Packing Nut . . PWA-144 Intake Pipe Packing Nut Push RodTube Gland Nut. . . .' .PWA'2434 Reduction Drive Gear (Timing) . .PWA-1636 ..PWA-1093 ..PWA-1092 ..PWA-1084 . .PWA-1094 . .PWA-1095 PWA-2239

x
x x

x x
x x x

x
x

x x

x
I

x x x
x

Thrust Nut. . Nut.. WRENCE-Thrust \PRENCE -Thrust Nut.. WRDNCE WRENCE WRENCE WRDNCE WRDNCE WRENCE Thrust Nut. . Thrust Nut. . Torque (600 in. lbs.) .

x x x x x

WRENCE WRDNCE WRDNCE WRDNCE -

. . . .PWA-1075 Valve Adjusting Screw . . .PWA-1398 Spark Plug - ry*" hex. Bendix Plug 7B - V8" hex.. . . . .PWA-1441 B e n d i x P l u g 6 S 6- 1 4 " h e x . . . . . . P W A - I 4 7 4 ..PWA-1684 hex.. BendixLS1O - r'/8" . PWA-1696 hex. . LS L,4'8 Aero ,4" LS hex. BG LS 3AB Aero 94" 321- !,4" hex., and AN tYPe . -PWA-2254 plugs - ,4" hex...

x x x
x x x x

x x x x
x x x

x x x x

x x x

x
x x

x
x x

x x
x

x x x x

x
x x

x
x x

x
x

x x x x x x x

x
x x x

x x
x x

x x x

701

CIIAPTER VII

RUN-IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL


GENERAL After an engine has been overhauled it is essential that it be run-in to seat the piston rings, burnish certain other new parts which may have been installed and, at the same time, to insure that the engine's performance is satisfactory. In most casesit is neither necessarynor desirable to endeavor to measure horsepower to a fine degree in the field. There are many variables which affect horsepower, and it is not feasible for the average overhaul base to set up the complete equipment and the personnel necessary for very close horsepower measurement. Where an engine has been overhauled as recommended in the preceding chapters of this Manual, and if the carburetor and magnetos have been overhauled, and tested previous to installation on the engine, it should develop essentially the same horsepower as when new. A check on manifold pressure and R.P.M., using a calibrated test propeller and correcting for carburetor air temperature, will render a sufficiently close check on horsepower for mnst purposes. By the same token, it is not generally practical fuel or oil consumptlgn to tiy to measure specific (lbs./H.P . /br.) in the field. It is advisable, however, to check the grosstfuel consumption in gallons (or pounds) pei hour, and the gross oil consumption in quarts (or pounds) per ho_ur,at cruising horsepower (fuel consumption also at rated power) to make sure that these consumptions are within the normal range. Measurement of the oil flow through the engine is not considered necessary after overhaul, as the flow will automatically fall within the proper limits, if various fit and clearance recommendations are followed. An oil constumption and temperature check is considered sufficient. In the event that it is desired to attempt an extremely close measurement of horsepower on field test stands, the various correction factors and detailed procedures are described in this chapter.

TEST HOUSE The test house may be segregated into the following three parts from a design standpoint: engine compartment with mounting stand, cooling air intake and exhaust stacks or ducts, and control room. Mountlng Stand - It is desirable that the mounting stand be enclosed. An enclosed stand is advanfageous, not only from the standpoint of quietness and convenience, but also because it affords protection to the workmen who mount and dismount the engine. In addition, it is of distinct advantage, particularly in cold climates, for ready engine starting and proper temperature control. Torque stands are not recommended as overhaul test equipment, in view of the necessity of continual calibration and because measurement of the actual horsepower output is not essential. It is also difficult and expensive to construct a torque stand which is entirely free from excess rigidity. Severe rigidity of mounting stand structure should be avoided. The construction should simulate, as nearly as possible, the flexibility inherent in the average airplane structure. In this connection, the suspended type mounting has been found very advantageoust. With this design the entire assembly of engine mount 4qd a supporting drum is suspended by means o{ fbur Ioops of slranded steef cable, two at each end of [he drum. Each loop is attached to anchors with rubber blocks set in the corners of the roof and side walls. The anchoring of the engine mount assembly is effected by two loops of similar cable, one at each end of the drurrr. These loops are also attached to anchors with rubber blo-cksset in the floor, directly under the assembly. Turnbuckles are provided in each loop of cable so that the propel tension for the desired rigidity may be obtained. In order to hold the engine mount assembly against the propelle-r thiust, the two anchoring cable loops on each end of the test stand are crossed; that is, the loop from the rear of the drum is anchored at the front of the test house and the loop from the front of the drum is anchored at the rear of the test house. This arrangement is illustrated in Fig. 701. The engine mount assembly is constructed in two parts - the engine mount prope-r and the supporting drum. The supportin-g drum- consists of a liollow steel cylinder, 8 ft. long andS9th in. in diameter, constructed of r/z in. steel. The ends of the cylinder have a 4 in. inner circular flange made from lft in. steel to strengthen the ends and form an anchorage for the tubular engine mount. The engine mount is made of welded steel tubing and designed to accommodate adapter mount plites for di-fferent models of engrnes. The adapter mount plate for single row engines (Part No. TC-51259) is illustrated in Fit. 702. This construction per-it.- a ruggg.d engrnemount and also the maximum of accessibilitf to the accessory sggtio.nof the engine. This engine mount assembly is heavier than is required for single row engines but with the trend tbward highei power an-d larger engines a stand

\_

702

RUN-IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVEREAUL

Fig. 701 -

Typical Engine Test Chamber

703

RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL


of this type, if constructed, will be found advantageous for testing larger engines. If the test stand is intended to support only single row engrnes during test the supporting drum may be of lighter construction, consisting of a hollow steel cylinder, 6 ft. long and 30 in. in diameter made from % in. steel. The ends of the cylinder may be closedwith Yain. flanged plates. Englne Cornpartrnent - The engine compartment may be either round or square in cross section, preferably round. It is also permissible that the compartment be round only at the central portion which envelopesthe engine and propeller. If this type of construction is used, the transition from the square to the round section should be gradual, and shaped to insure a smooth flow of air over the engine. The advantage of a cylindrical-shaped engine room is that it contributes to smooth air flow. A disadvantage is that a specially constructed stand is necessary for working around the engine. It is recommended that the engine compartment have cross sectional dimensions of at least 16 ft. x 16 ft. It should be as free as possible from obstructions which might interrupt or deflect the propeller blast. Fig. 701 illustrates this point. Obstructions that will interrupt or deflect the propeller blast usually cause eddying and surging and result in a rough running engine. Whereas the aforementioned dimensions INTAKE are greater than the minimum values required for the types of engines discussed in this Overhaul Manual, they should be used if the space is available in view of the possibility that a more roomy test house will be needed for larger, more poweiful engines at a later date. It is much easier and less expensive to build the large test house at the start than to enlarge a smaller one later on. In any event, the crbss sectional dimensions should not be less than L2 ft. x 12 ft. in order to provide a three foot propeller tip clearance. The length of the engine compartment proper depends upon the type (round or square) of engine compartment constructed. In any case il should be long enough to cover the engine stand with the engine mounted, and provide an additional space-in front, sufficiently large to permit working - on the engine prior to mounting on the stand. In the caseof the compartrhent with the round central portion, the transitional section from square to round may be the determining factor. In cold climates, roll type doors should be provided to close off the engine compartment from the air inlet and exit stacks and a heating system should be installed. Electric liehts with suitable reflectors may be sunk in the iides and roof of the engine room. A two ton chain fall and track should be suspended from the roof, directly over the engine.

AND EXHAUST AIR STACKS If, for some reason, the use of a vertical intake stack is necessary,the propeller should be at least 10 feet from the inner edgeof the stack opening. The length of the ducts or stacks, which are used primarily to deaden the noise from the engine and propeller, depends upon the type and extent of soundproofing desired for the particular Iocality where the test house is located. Whether or not immediate soundproofing is intended, it is good policy to investigate the possibility of such requirements for a future date and to make the necessary provisions for the incorporation of soundproofing with minimum structural changes. The matter of soundproofing is too specialized and detailed to permit it to be covered in this manual. If experts on the subject are not available locally, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft will gladly offer suggestionsupon request.

The intake and exhaust air ducts or stacks may be either horizontal or vertical, but in either case should have a cross sectional area equal to the engine compartment. The horizontal type of intake duct is preferable because it provides a smoother flow of air to the propeller and engine. The vertical exhaust stack is preferable because the exhaust gases, together with the heated cooling air, are thrown upward and more quickly and completely dispersed in the atmosphere. The combination of the horizontal intake and vertical exhaust stack forms an "L" shaped test house embodying the desirable qualities just described. The horizontal vanes showing to the rear of the engine compartment in Fig. 70I are provided to deflect the exhaust air up through the vertical exhaust stack. However, such vanes are not essential where the air exit is dimensioned and contoured in manner conducive to free, smooth air flow.

CONTROL R O O M The control room should be located adjacent to the engine compartment and so that the operator is behind the plane of the propeller. It should be of sufficient size to house all controls, instruments, and equipment necessary for the operator to manipulate while an e:rgine is running during test. The illustration, Fig. 703, shows the inlerior of a control room. The room should be provided with a heating and ventilating system and special attention should be given

704

RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVEREAUL

f-rr ree
2 HOLES

f onn-r-

9 HOLES

HoLEs tt onruu-4
THESE SURFACESMUST BE FLAT AND FREE FROM BURRS. MATERIAL-BOILERPLATE REE-TC-5t259

-.*

______*t-8
\n

-,*--l
45O CHAMFER TO ROOT DIA. OF TH,DS.BOTH ENDS.

HoLLorv I fi-raxI uor.rc SCREW


POINT ALLEN SET

DRILL STUD TO ROOT DIA. OF TH,D TO RECEIVESET SCREIV.

jl-ro rx'o
SCREW STOCK

| -ro rx'o. s.A.E. I ore.

DETAIL OF STUD AND SET SCREW LOCATION- 2 REQUIRED.

Fig,.7O2 -

Adapter Mount Plate for Single Row Engines

705

RUN.IN

OF ENGINES AFTER OVEREAUL Clock - A clock should be installed in the control room or at the control station so that the operator may check the running time. Potentiometer-pyrorneter, or Pyromllllvoltrneter, and Thermocouple Swltch - A means of accurately determining cylinder head temperatures should be installed. A thermocouple switch with sufficient contacts for at least four thermocouple connections should also be installed. Barometer and Chart - A barometer should be installed in the control room together with its temperature correction chart to allow the operator to determine the true barometer. Psychrorrreter and Chart (Opttonal) - A psychrometer and chart may be provided in the control room to determine the moisture content of the air. Manual Controls for Englne - All manual controls for the engine (throttle, mixture control, blower gear ratio selector valve, starter) should be conveniently located at the control station. These controls should be of robust construction and provided with locks to secure the controls at their desired positions during the test. Fuel Flowmeter or Equlvalent - A fuel flowmeter which reads directly in pounds of fuel flow per hour is helpful in quickly determining _the fuel consumption. The fuel flowmeter should be calibrated for the specific gravity of fuel used. Fuel flow may also be determined by using a tank on a weight scale, or a volume gage. This is further discussedunder "Fuel System". FueI Wobble Pump - A manually operated wobble pump shoulil be connected to the fuel inlet line of the engine. This pump is provided carburetor prior to positively supply fuel to the "FueI System". to starting as described under Prlmlng Pump - A manual or electric priming pump should be installed in order to facilitate -starting. The use of this pump is described cold in the Operators Handbook. OtI Wetght Tank - A weight tank, connected into the engiire oiling system, should be mounted on a platfoim scale so that oil may be weighed and the consumption thus checked when desired. "Oil The arrangement is discussed further under System". Otl Wobble Pump - A manually operated wobble pump should be connected to the oil inlet line of the engine. This pump is provided to positively supply oil to the engine prior to starting as describedunder "Oil System". Ignltlon Swltch - An ignition switch should be provided which will allow the operator to cheCk the operation of each magneto separately.

to eliminating oil and fuel vapors. A lighting system which will completely light the control rbom, and especially the instruments, shogld be installed. This system should be installed with care and explosion-proof fixtures used throughout. A window and door between the engine compartment and control room should be provided. The window should be located opposite the engine, behind the rotating plane of the propeller and should have two plates of heavy glass. The doorway should have double doors. A desk or writing board should be built below the window and the mountings for the engine instruments and controls so that the operator may have a good view of the engine at all times while manipulating the controls, observing the instruments and recording data. It is suggestedthat the engine control station be provided with the instruments, controls and equipment described in the following paragraphs. Tachometer - A tachometer should be provided which reads in revolutions per minute (300 - 3600 R.P.M.) combined with a manually operated revolution counter. Stop Watch - A stop watch reading 0-100 seconds is advantageous for checking fuel consumption. Fuel Pressure Gage - A fuel pressure gage should be connected to indicate the pressure at the carburetor 0-15 lbs./sq. in. (0-1 kg./sq. cm.). Oll Pressure Gages - Oil pressure gages with ranges suitable for the following pressures should be installed: 1. Main Pressure- 0-300 lbs./sq. in. (0-21 kg./sq.cm.). 2. Governor "Nose" Pressure (for engines equipped with nose mounted governor) 0-300Ibs./sq. in. (0-21 kg./sq. cm.). Oil fnlet and Otl Outlet Ternperature Gages - These gages,with graduations of 50' - 220" F . ( 1 0 ' - 1 0 4 ' C . ) a n d 1 0 0 ' - 2 9 0 "F . ( 3 8 ' 143' C.), should be permanently connectedin the oil lines. Alr Inlet Temperature Gage - Air inlet temperature gage(-30'- 150' F.) (-34'- 66" C.) should be located in the air duct to the carburetor to indicate the temperature of the air just as it enters the carburetor. Manometers - Two manometer tubes should be installed. These tubes should be capable of indicating 60 in. Hg absolute pressure. One mercury manometer should be connected with the blower rim and another may be connected with No. 1 intake port. The manometer indicating No. l intake port pressureservesas a check on the blower rim manometer during test.

706

RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVEREAUL

Fr
{J

"*d
t

O h
fi

\---

I I
Fb!
f-.

707

RUN.IN

OF ENGINES AFTER OVERIIAUL should be installed at the control station, one to operate the system in the engine compartment and one to operate the system for the control room. A third valve outside the test house should operate both the control room and engine compartment systems. Following is a list of manufacturers from whom the foregoing instruments and other equipment may be procured:

The ignition switch should also have an off position which will positively cut-out the ignition system of the engine. Flre Extlngulshers - The control station should be provided with portable fire extinguishers of the Pyrene (carbon tetrachloride) and Foamite (sulphuric acid and soda) types. A permanent COz system should be installed. Two control valves for the permanent CO2 system

LIST OF MANUFACTURERS OF INSTRUMENTS, CONTROLS AND EQUIPMENT 1. 2. Tachometers Stop Watches Blanchard Instrument Co. Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A. A. R. & J. E. Moylan Co. 264 West 64th Street New York City, N. Y., U.S.A. American Ashcroft Hancock Co. Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. American Ashcroft Hancock Co. Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. Foxboro Company Foxboro, Mass., U.S.A. Foxboro Company Foxboro, Mass., U.S.A. Taylor Instrument Co. Rochester,N. Y., U.S.A. American Ashcroft Hancock Co. Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. Macalaster Bickwell Co. Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A. (GlassU Tubes Ya in.OD x 40 in. long for manometers) May be obtained locally Leeds & Northrop Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. Lewis Engineering Co. Naugatuck, Conn., U.S.A. Foxboro Company Foxboro, Mass., U.S.A. Taylor Instrument Co. Rochester,N. Y., U.S.A. Henry J. Green 1191 Bedford Avenue Brooklyn, N. Y., U.S.A. Taylor Instrument Co. Rochester,N. Y., U.S.A. Julien P. Friez & Sons Baltimore, Md., U.S.A. Simmonds Aero Accessories 10 Rockefeller Plaza New York City, N. Y., U.S.A.

3. 4. 5. 6.

Fuel Pressure Gages Oil Pressure Gages Oil Intet and Oil Outlet Temperature Gages Air Inlet Temperature Gages

7.

Manometers

8. 9.

Clock Potentiometer-pyrometer or Pyromillivoltmeter, and Thermocouple Switch

10.

Barometer and Correction Chart

11.

Psychrometer and Chart (Optional)

L2.

Manual Controls for Engine

708

RUN.IN 13. L4. 15. Fuel Flowmeters Fuel Wobble Pump Priming Pump (Manual) (Electric)

OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL Fischer & Porter Hatboro , Pa., U.S.A. United Aircraft Products Inc. Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A. The Lunkenheimer Co. Begkman St. and Waverly Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. Bendix Products Div. Bendix Aviation Corp. South Bend, Indiana, U.S.A. United Aircraft Products Inc. Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A. Scintilla Magneto Div. Bendix Aviation Corp. Sidney, New York, U.S.A. May be obtained locally May be obtained locally structure should be capable of withstanding this stress with an adequate safety factor. Layouts and detail construction drawings of recorimended test house designs are available and may be obtained from the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Service Department. SYSTEM

16. L7.

Oil Wobble Pump Ignition Switch

18. 19.

Fire Extinguishers Scales (Fuel and Oil)

The entire test house structure may be built of brick and mortar, or reinforced concrete. In any event, the material should be non-inflammable. Inasmuch as the engine stand supporting cables are designed for a maximum tension of approximately 80,000 pounds, the wall and roof

CARBURETOR AIR INTAKE The air intake duct to the carburetor should draw its air from outside the test house. It should have a cross sectional area of at least 38 sq. in. and should be as free as possible from sharp bends or irregularities that might restrict air flow or cause turbulence. The air duct entrance at the outside of the test house should be Iocated so that dirt or foreign material will not be taken in. A preheater, utilizing the heat of two or more exhaust stacks, or a steam radiator, should be provided in the system to supply preheated air to the carburetor. It should be possible to maintain the temperature of air entering the carburetor at 100' F. or more under the lowest outside air temperature conditions for the

locality. A suitable iarburetor air temp-erature regulaling valve should be qrovided. The preheating system should be so designed as to cause restriction or disturbance to air no apfrebiable flow.- If the preheater is located some distance from the carb-uretor, the portion of the duct between it and the carburelor should be well insulated to prevent lossof heat. The entire intake system should be sufficiently "backfire" pressutes,and a strong to withstand backfire relief valve should be located near the carburetor. A flexible section should be incorporated between the carburetor and the fixed poltion of the intake air duct.

ENGINE EXEAUST SYSTEM The use of an exhaust collector ring is not recommended for the test stand operation. Short stacks are desirable, in that they simplify the mounting of the engine on the stand and permit the operator to detect misfiring cylinders or improper mixtures by watcbing the exhaust flame at each cylinder. The exhaust of two or more cylinders may be conducted through a stove to provide preheated air to the carburetor, as men"Carburetor Air Intake System". iioned under

TEST PROPELLERS From the standpoints of convenience, economy and cooling efficiency, a four-bladed wooden test propeller is recommended for the average test stand. Suitable test propellers, together with the hubs and attaching parts, are listed in the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Parts Catalogs.

709

RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL


Since the location and characteristics of a test house have considerable bearing on the propeller diameter, a test propeller, as furnished, is somewhat larger in diameter than normally necessary, to permit calibration on the particular test stand where it is to be used. A new propeller should be calibrated on a new engine, or on one that is known to be running satisfactorily, and under atmospheric conditions which are considered average for the location. This is done by trimming off the ends of the blades in small increments until the engine will turn its normal rated revolutions per minute at its rated manifold pressure. The detailed procedure for calibrating, trimming and balancing is as follows: Check the propeller for static balance with regular propeller balancing equipment. If rebalancing is necessary, trim the heavy blade, or blades, as required, referring to the related paragraphs which follow for the proper method of trimming. Install the propeller on an engine which is known to be normal in every respect, and run the engine to get an indication of how much the propeller diameter must be decreased. Atmospheric conditions should be noted so that they can be duplicated, or necessarycorrections made, during subsequent trial runs of the calibration procedure. Run the engine at its normal manifold pressure and note the R.P.M. Due to variables such as temperature, atmospheric pressure,shape of the test house, etc., it is impossible to state, without trial, exactly how much increase in R.P.M. can be expected per inch reduction in propeller diameter on a given test stand. The increase is usually somewhere between 30 and 50 R.P.M., however. It is suggested that the diameter be decreased 1 in. (Yz in. per blade) for the first trimming operation, then the resultant change in R.P.M. noted and used as a guide during further trimming of the blades. The first step preparatory to the actual trimming of the blades is to rest the propeller firmly on a bench or suitable stand and draw a line from the hub to the tip of each blade. This line should be on the front face and along the center of the blade width. Cautlon - To prevent damage to the fabric blade covering, when drawing this line, do not use a hard pencil or sharp pointed tool. Next, mark off one half the desired decrease in diameter on the line drawn along each blade and scribe an arc from this point, the radius of which is Yz the width or chord of each blade. Saw off the blade end to this line and round all sharp corners with a suitable file. Paint the newly exposed wood with a good grade of shellac to prevent the fabric covering from becoming loose and the wood from splintering. Upon completion of the trimming operation, the propeller must be rebalanced before installation on the engine. Make sure the hub and cone are perfectly clean, then mount the propeller on a regular propeller static balancing stand, using proper arbors and centering cones. The balancing-stand should of course be in a location free from vibrations and drafts. Rotate the propeller slowly and make sure nothing is affecting entirely free movement. Set the propeller so that two blades are horizontal and determine which, if either, is the heavier. Using a draw knife or suitable fiIe, trim the end of the heavy blade, blending the edges in a round shape, holding to the radius as originally scribed. It has been found that a round blade end is much less subject to splintering and wear than a square one. Set the other pair of blades in a horizontal position and repeat the procedure described for the first pafo, then place the propeller so the blades are 45o off the vertical position. Repeat the trimming until the propeller is in perfect static balance. When in true static balance, the mass of one pair of blades will exactly counterbalance the mass of the other pair, even though it may be found that one blade may vary as much as ry' ir'. in length from the other three bladesto obtain this balance. Caution - Do not use any plugs or fillers of any kind, or additional shellac, to obtain balance. As previously stated, the engine should turn its normal rated"R.P.M. at normal rated manifold pressure when the trimming of the test propeller has been completed (refer to engine performance curves for proper values), regardless of the altitude at which the test stand is located. It is permissible that the manifold pressure exceed normal rated manifold pressure bV 3% at rated speedand that the R.P.M. vary plus or minus 50 from rated R.P.M. at rated manifold pressure. If the calibrating is done in cold weather, the propeller should be trimmed to obtain the maxlrnum allowed tolerance on rated manifold pressure and the mlnlmurn tolerance on the rated R.P.M. Where there is a wide difference between winter and summer temperatures, it is desirable to have two test propellers, one calibrated for winter use and the other for summer urie. Quite often the same engine will require a propeller which is up to two inches smaller for winter use than for summer use, to obtain proper manifold pressureand R.P.M. values. A test propeller may eventually become too small for a given model of engine, due to stock which has been removed to overcome damage (splinters, nicks, etc.) which occurred during test operation. In such an instance, it may be found possible to retrim it for use on some smaller or less powerful engine. When wooden test propellers are not in use they should be protected from weather, particularly ice and snow.

7LO

RUN.IN

OF ENGINES AFTDR OVERHAUL

III'ER C FT.EL TA}I OTT'TAL FOR FI.ELS OF SES.6 OCTA}C RATIT{GS

STRAilER

THI' YENT "**II

ED?lffrJcHffilI

\ t' sAFETy GATE nLvE WITH WEIG}IT T FUSbLC L|t{(

YOI.TE

FIIL

rLd

E?ER

ttat

ctuTcn

accaaeaaTa

Ld

clutct

3-WAY VALVE OPTONAL OITAINING MTHODIS OF FI'EL FLOW

rcIl,INSTRUMENT FANEL

" '

usE r- P|PE ANO FITTINGS FOR ALL FUEL,WATER AND STEAM LrNEsAND tf eree ANo FrrrrNcs FoR tr-r- crRduttttNc otL LtNEs IYHERE OTHERWISE EXCEPT SPECIFIED.

OIJT3DE AN NTAKE .E: + To cAR$nEToR

CAR8. AN

VENT COCK

FULFLO FILTER MOOEL WFDS wtTH il3CVC FILTER UNITS. DRAIN COCK

OIL RADIATOR

gATER TO SEWER

STEAMI

Fig. 704 -

Piping Diagram of Typical Test House

7LL

RUN-TN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL COOLING SHROUDS A shroud or cooling cowl should be used during run-in of a geared engine to insure satisfactory cooling of the cylinders. One may also be used for direct drive engines and should be used if it is desired to run the engine with the cylinder air deflectors in place. The cooling shroud takes the place of the cowling which encircles the cylinders in a normal airplane installation. It is usually flared at the forward edge so as to deflect sufficient air over and between the cvlinders. It should be constructed of a heavy gage durable material to withstand the constant buffeting of the test propeller and should be mounted independent of the engine so that it may be quickly moved to the front of the test stand to allow easy accessin mounting and dismounting the engine, unless it is made with hinged sections as illustrated in Fig. 70L to allow the engine to be mounted and dismounted without disturbing the shroud.

FUEL SYSTEM The lines feeding fuel to the engine should have a minimum diameter of one inch and should be free from sharp bends or restrictions of any kind. Particular care should be exercised to provide sufficient flexibility in the piping to prevent line breakage or leakage. In no case should a trench or connecting passagebelow the floor be used to carry piping or controls into the engine compartment, as fuel or gasesmay collect in such a passageand cause an explosion or fire. A wobble pump with relief valve should be installed in the fuel system to facilitate filling the carburetor prior to starting the engine. A primer, either manually or electrically operated, should be connected to the primer fitting on the engine. The priming pump may be installed either in the control room, or directly at the engine. The system should be provided with a means of measuring fuel flow for the purpose of checking consumption. The simplest method of measurement is a flowmeter calibrated for the specific gravity of the fuel used. A very satisfactory method is to weigh the fuel and accurately time the consumption of a given weight. Another method of measurement is by means of a volume gage. When a volume gageis used, it is essential to have an accurate check on the specific gravity of the fuel. A suggested fuel system is shown in the piping diagram (Fig. 704).

OIL SYSTEM The piping of the oil system should be at least Lrl in. in diameter, and as free as possible from fittings which tend to restrict the oil flow in order to insure an adequate supply of oil to the engine under all temperature conditions. Particular care in this regard should be given to the oil intake system. In order to provide a positive supply of warm oil to the engine when starting in extremely cold weather, a wobble pump capable of building up at least 60 lbs./sq. in. pressure should be incorporated in the oil intake system. Provision should be made for catching the cold oil that is in the oil intake line as hot oil forces the cold oil out before this line is connected just prior to starting the engine. The oil system should incorporate oil cleaning provisions, such as an oil fllter in the oil return line to the engine. An oil filter which has proved satisfactory in test stand operations is the Fulflo Model WFDS with 1136VC Type fiIter units manufactured by the Commercial Filters Corporation, 16 Macallen Street, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. Both the oil pipes and the filter should be so ananged that they are completely demountable for periodic cleaning. If it is not possible to make the pipes completely demountable, they should be arranged with gpadual bends, so that they may be cleaned easily with a swab. The filter should be cleaned and new filter units installed after 300 hours of operation. The filter manufacturer's instructions for renewing the filter units should be followed. In order to maintain oil temperatures within the desired range, a combination steam and water radiator may be introduced in the oil system. Thus, by applying steam, the temperature can quickly be brought up to the desired point and by r-egulating the flow of the cooling water, it may be maintained within the desired limits. An accurate measurement of the oil consumption may be obtained by mounting the oil tank on a platform scale. Figure 704 illustrates a suggested oil system. Warnlng - It has been found that, in test where the oil is vented to the stand operation -air, there is sometimes a tendency for outside the oil to form a high acid content. This condition, if allowed to remain unchecked, can cause conosion or "washing" of the leaded master rod bearing and possible destruction of the bearing. It iv particularly important that a close

7L2

RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL


The use of an acid inhibitor in the test stand oil will aid in preventing high neutralization numbers and in prolonging the periods between oil drains. Thq company furnishing the oil should be consulted in this connection. The use of an oil cleaner in the oil system will also serve to prolong the periods between oil changes. Atty increase in operating time betweei oil changesshould be approache-dgridually as warranted by the general condition of the oil and its freedom from excessiveacidity. If there has been an engine failure on the test stand the complete oil system should be flushed out with a petroleum solvent.

check be kept upon the acid content of the oil. If the neutralization number, according to A.S.T.M. analysis method No. D 188-27 T, exceeds .3, there is danger of corrosion of the leaded master rod bearing. The oil should be changed any time that the neutralization number approaches this figure. It is good practice to change the oil every 30 hours and, every second oil change or every 60 hours, to flush the oil system out with clean, new engine oil. When this is done, the oil cooler should be removed and cleaned separately. Il at any time, the neutualization number of the oil at the end of the test exceeds .65, the engine should be disassembled and the master rod bearing inspected.

CONTROLS Engine controls are provided by suitable bell cranks and torque tubes which extend from the engine mount assembly to the operating room. Hydraulically operated controls are being used, in some instances, with very satisfactory results. It is recommended that the streamlined member which houses the operating controls, fuel lines, oil lines, and instrument wires extend from the side of the engine mount drum to the wall of the test house on a level with the horizontal center line of the supporting drum. INSTALLATION This streamlined member should be supported from the wall of the engine room and should be connected to the suppoiting drum by a flexible leather section. Fle}ible connections should be provided at this point in the fuel lines, oil-liJres, "Fuel ind engine controls. As stated under plt underneath System'i, the use of a trench or -In case of an-y tie engine is not recommended. leakage or breakage of the fuel line,_fuel will collect in such a trench and any explosion or fire will be conducted directly to the control room.

OF ENGINE FOR TEST 2. Connect manorneter line to No. 1 inlet port, also for measuring manifold pressure. (Optional) Connect the tachometer. Connect the throttle control. Connect the mixture control. Connect main oil pressure gage line to the connection at the upper left side of the rear section. Install propeller governor cover Part No. 26646 on Wasp and Hornet engines having provision for such on the nose section.

The test stand should be equipped with an Engine Mounting Ring, such as Pratt & Whitney Airbraft Part No. TC-5t259,. as illustrated in Fig. 702. The starter which is to be used should have its gasket and be installed on the engine. proper -It shoutii be securely fastened and the attaching nuts safety-wired to prevent it from becoming loose during run-in. The fuel pump with its proper gasket should be installed on the engine with the fittings necessary for the connection of the fuel lines. Lifting Sling PWA-37, in conjunction with a hoist, should be used for lifting the engine into position for mounting on the stand. Geared ilrive enginesshould have an additional rope slilg to support the "nose". This rope sling should be attached to the hook of the chain fall and passed around under the propeller shaft to keep the center line of the engine horizontal while installing the engine on the test stand. The engine should be secured to the Engine Mounting Ring with nine bolts. The following instrument and control connections should be made: 1. Connect manometer line to blower rim for measuring manifold pressure (absolute blower rim pressure to be used as manifold pressure in determining horsepower).

3. 4. 5. 6.

7.

Connect pressure gageline to oil passagein "nose" section. Thfu connection is located to the right of the governor mounting -Pgd' as viewed from the front of direct drive Wasp engines. On geared Hornet engines the cbnndction is made at the boss on top of the reduction gear housing. 9. Connect manual control to the two-position propeller control valve for engines so equipped. 10. Connect fuel line to the engine fuel pump and to the carburetor. 11. Connect fuel relief valve (if not integral with fuel pump) in fuel inlet line to carburetor. 8.

OFENONE NOTE:-(FFON RIGHT SIDE AND (Q= ONLEF' SIDE OF ENGINET FROMFEAR. LOOKING OFSHAFTS SPEED REFER TO CRANXSHAFT SPEED A - C A R B U R E T O RM O U N T I N G P A D -SHAFTSPEED ITOI S T A R T E R I T O U N T I N GP A D - sHAFr seeeo ti ro t c- GENERAToR ircuNTtNG pAD - SHAFTSPEED ITO I (L) O-FUEL PUMP MOIJNTING PAD - SHAFT SPEED ITOI (ReL) E -VERTICAL A,XILIARY ACCESSOFI. MOUNTING PAD (L&R) F-TrcH DRtvE-snerrseeeofrot c -orL rANK vENr ro eNo. - txtaru.er (REL) (l) eRESSURE cAGe coruN.-$xzzr'rRr H-otL I _ OIL PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE (R) J -ENGINE OIL SUMP DRAIN I-I8N.S-3 K-OIL PWP Lo t L T N L E T p A D ( A V A T L A B L EB y R E M o v A L o F o r t (d tpol .562 INLETaTHERMo c o r . r r u .e s s V . ) 4.777 M - OIL OUTLET PAD N-orl ourLET THERMo. coNru.-|xrerur-r O FRONT SUPPORT-i.IOSE COWL P- REAR SUPPORT- NOSE COWL (oprroNAl LocATtoNs)

B-

NECESSI OF BREA

477 7

Q-FRONT SUPPORT- RING COWL R- pRop sHAFT pLUG(HIGH pREss. otlreeo) STvAcuuM IGNITION WIRE MANIFOLD puMP iiouNTlNG FLANGE-SMFT SPEED trrot(L)

a4

U - MAGIIETO BOOSTER CONN. ONE MAGNETO ONLY CONN. BOTH MAGNETOS v-I\,IAGNEIO GROTJND W-HYDRO yADJ. PROPCONTROL LEVER conn.(il @) -n7so(o?o) x-BREATHER-f,rosr

MANTFOLC PRESSURE CeCe CONr.r.-$x27N.p.T (A.al) LTNKS

Z-L;FT;NG

DRILLED oFEN|NG lS REQIJIRED lN THE COIvPANION FITTING REAR FACE LINE OF MOUNTING LUGS +L ft. a

LE,\GTH Of, '

A-A-LOCATION TO BE USED WHEN PROVIDING OIL TO PROP GOV (HaururoN srD. pRoP To Ft-RNtsH sPEclAL PLUG WHEN USING THIS LOCATIONJ B-B-REMOVE INNER PLUG UhDER SQ. HD PIPE PLUG WHEN oIL PRESSURETO PAD-ETR.-l.) DESIRING

xtINpr ou nerunr+-t c-c-AccEssoR/ TUBE coxu. |-t+ H.e.r (nal) BLAST D-D-MAGNETo -t-ra ru.r-s coNNEcrroN rNLET TI-ERMoMETER E-E-orL
F-F-OIL INLET FLANGE FRONT FACEOF THRUST NUT GG-ROCKER BOX OIL SUMPDRAIN I-I8N.93

.-sg
t 'Z 3 !2

fix aaxr-r
4-5TU6

+d

txeaN.r-a
6.STUDS

f x rarvc-:- ljoeee
NOSE COWL SUPPORT FRONT UEW

FRONT VIEW OF THRUST CO/ER STUDS

. cstzE

t.001 .250 D.HO

J"'
zjf on
*3o SHAFT END PROPELLER ROTATES COUNTER CLOCKWISE WHEN VIEWED FROM FRONT

ill?."-rH,s sr

TORQUE LIMITATIONS ON ACCESSORYDRIVES- D-2695O DEFIICTOR ASS/. COMPLETE-}.486I0

(rRessune rvpd

ENLAR@ VIEW OF SPl SCAE 4' MfN. ll Mrt. -L r_ !oo.

FOR PRIMII{GSYSTEM SEE DRWG, C-45936 EXAMINE FOR CLEARArcE RocKER Box coNTouR on'wb r +zttg CHORDAL .0672 SLOTWTDTH.0652 4t7 R. APPROX. II TEETH 24146PtTCH so'pRessuee

jurr.r
*st(.ooz)

"it

EQUIPMENT INCLUDED IN C.G LOCATION MAGNETOSOIL PUMP TACH DRIVE IGNITION WIRE CARBURATC'R

t_

l l

l:886to. ----f -

see (r4os) LL pRE ont LOCA OIL FEED -

4583 PD.

f, za Nr4- STU

4.777 THE INVOLUTE TOOTH FORM SHALL BE TRUE INSIDE THIS DIAMETER. ENLARGED VIEW OF SPLINES SCALE 4: I

,lz+-M-s '- 4-STUDS

fnor.rio*^r"^r.

;**6o*'r.
I]A DR'LLJ I rq.E'ssuRE ott.:ED LOCATION tooo r t.625 DrA.

nro.I-rax se.oe-sartffif raocra) ontu.


c'stNKeo'4$on*i

tdro22

Dr&
TACH DRIVE FULL SIZE

^ ls': -,.eI ,-.i33 6 oi,i,i\6$---_"'-ill"


.3/r4_+i+*J
/ / l FRONT,SUPPgRT- RrNG COWL / /FULLSIZE

61 -t:]:-{-=

- an'* ! _:-

-.aa
t

t oo5

cn n.uax$_.azslffi [.<,-- :r 5t-iNEs';'ffi'-toot'$$!orl ,, vrA_.zrg$L


- ? / 'c I

ua.

-jza ":-* DEVELOPMENT OF JAW

$ onrul
3HOLES 3o' +f l'41/, 1-1/r/

/ 3oif.9Y!'"*."
;l{5 ro FAcEoF GEAR

@ Sxas
EXHAIJST PIPE FLANGE

COWL LUGS WILL BE IN

LocArroN sHowNwrrxrrc$

GEi\ERATOR DRIVE

sceleI sze

j srze

T2JAWSEQUALLY SPACED

I//

/Qor

srARrER

,rit

D t r H l :': :l t. t \ I J _. al
I ANGULAR LOCATION OF TH]S FLAhIGE TO BE DETERMINED AT Ei{GINE INSTALLATION, RUE ANGLE OF FLANGE tf- a4REQUIRED FOR REi'Or'ING OIL PUMP BODY

fixz+r.r.n-s
2- STUDS -F E|t x: Ar. EASa OILOUTLET PAD FULL SIZE S :r^CE FOft l2 TEETH ?O/ag PIICA :'r- STRA|NEFI S O . P R E S S U E EA N G L E gOF S:\

.ozarl.333
o25R.
APPROX

ore smi333

MOUNTING LUGS DRILLED HOLES SPACED EQTJALLY

DVELOPMENT OF JAW

alf r,lrxc.on. ovER RocKERco/ERs ovER ftf corvl cLEARATEDrA. ROCKER @VER STIJOS
ll t6

frur.t
*MAX DRILL

TNVoLUTE roorH i FORM MUST BE TRUE INSIDE THIS DIA.

5i8-t_

__-t
riio.
$ ora.
DIA. 2 HOLES

v o*,aa=H

In ttt--?

[; I

F-F
R.6Z +ooa _ooo r.500 DrA

rlvrN

Joos r.875

+
r[i
OIL INLET PAD FULL SIZE

frrlj

VrcUUMPUMPPAD

(ruu-sze)

OIL INLET FLANGE FULL SIZE

CARBURETOf

Fig. 705 -

Typical Installation Drawing -

Wasp Jr. 83

713

!.o02 HEX 3t2

n, .8Put
: x]

07 i

.3I4 DIA. MAX

fi- rar.r-r
- lO'* - too5 -.2t6

HEX EXTERNALSPLINE OPTIONAL

-._^__Cl,-izn ;-:T.'-:P\|sNT OF'JAW

.osslSP' +se1.!l!

f-ea Nr-a

2 )^5 i:,- - -Y 5,4:::

'-$x zaur-s
STARTER DRIVE I2 JAW (oerroNeu) FI.I.L SZE -.-----PRO.JECTION 6-STUDS EQUALLY SPACED VERTICAL AUXILIARY A C C E S S O R YD R I V E S FULL SIZE

TCABLE TO EACH

OF THESE TWO S

\ smnx eluc

= I
3f f.\frtA --::

= \ l

7l\,-tr1\
\l

'/ {i,
-ed-

..--

t.oos sDtA.

#s
B/

STARTER DRIVE 3 JAW (FULL srzE)

1 6-STUDS ! EQUALLY SPACED

]xea H.r-a

S FRONT MANIFOLD

)dI-OPMENT

OF JAIY

RADIO SHIELDING (nena vnw)

6t-

-r$-

Hr+
t ore ontu-

l*Htr,.

tlv

fr x24NF-3

FORREFEREilCE ONIY

CARBURETOR

I/PI}.ITING

PAO

AfiO(L}'Ofi LEFT torg,-(Rl,or.| $Gxt llDE OFEr{G. FFOI' REAR SIDOFEilG,LOOXIi'G SPED REFIR?O CRANK3HAFT SHAFTSPEEDS A- CARS.IRETOR NA-YgH PAD-SMFT SPEED I TOI B- STARTER iDul{Tlt\G tl ro r c- cErRAToR rrouNTtNG pAD-g{AFr'speeo pAD_SHAFT pur/p SpEED trO r (r_) D_ nf,L rbUNTttC pAD-grAFT E: cUN Syr{cHRONtZER SPEED tTOt (Ra.L) - sHAFr seeeo j To | (RlL j-rexs-r F- TAcl-torrETER DRIvEG- orL TANK lol? ro exc- !-u-Ner H- o|L PRESSGAGE@NN.- i-27N.PT I - OIL PRESS.RELIEF \ALVE (R} I?NF.3 J - O I L S I J M PO R A I N _ h ' K- o|L PUMP (R) L- FLEL pREss. cAGE coNN. i-az N_ oL f{-ET BAD_(R) O- OIL OUTLET BAD P - FRONT SUPPORT- NOSE @WL O- REAR SUPPORT-ISSE COWL R- FrcNT SUPPORT-RING COWL s- oFLEcroR RtNc supPoRr lrNrerc Tu: VGNITON WIRE MANIFOLD BReATHERllpsEcoNN. lRl ponrl ner zusHED ro (L) t-ta-Ner (nal)

SPACE REODE REIn/IIG FA

st---------i
(r- ) EI{-ARGEO VEW OF SPI-INES SCALE.4:l

fixze}f-s fi aee
t375'toor o

4 TNSERTS

SPEEDU44TO I @VER},IOR I,|OI'NTIiIG PAD-SHAFT speeo r* ro r srlrr w_ vAc. puMp lvouN?p.lc pAD_(L) (R. r. D x - MANtFoLo pREsstJRE cece conn. {-zz-N.er y- DEFLESIoR Rtlrc SUPR RT (ExHAJsr pcrtT) z- FUEL rNLEr coNN. i- ta-Net /r ) I

LrErrs

!0ro

fh"

B8-RE[,|O/E lNfR PLTJG UNDR SA. FO. PIPE PLUG wl-N DSIRIhIGOIT. PREsS. TO FAD E.R.U-) C.C LFTING LINK D-O MAGNETO BOOS.1R CONN. ONE MAGNETO ONLY F-F I|AGI.|ETO GROUND CONN. rcTH [,l,AG1'lETOs G, PROP. SI{AFT R-IJG GIIGI-IPRESS. OIL FEED) COr.rN. f -ra Uer H-H{CCESSORYO|LRETURT.T EQUIPI,ENT INCLUDEDlN C.G LOCATIONS MAGTTO5 TGNITION WIRES OIL PUMP TACFI. DRIVE TRBURETOR enssun wPq) DFfJcToR AssY co[rPlJTE->41726 FOR PERMISSB.E TORQ{JE LOADS ON ACCESSORY DRIVES SEE D'26950 R/OCKERBOX COTITOJRSAI|D ARMNGEMENT FOR COII/LITIG R.27TI8

O }|oLE IGH PRESS{JRE OIL SUPPLY TO PROP

REAR FACEOF tOLr{TNG

G-GROOVES EOUALLY SPrc!

-42{fAfl x2aNF-3 4 STUDS 1

(u) FRO.IT FrcE OF THRUST T{JT ON ALL INLET }ORNS OF IN.PORT

\Y)t-L_ ':I{r'7 -Tv r 3 4/


/ loos-

?-

z{o'
TI-IIS A'{GLE Pl-AtE S N OF TUBE

L.*r'o

:386,

x3r a0

i---.--c
L't,-E

3.53r tooS

r
I

t3.531

2565 Foc[t '-t 2.565 1.loos fx2a NF-3 12 STLDS

lpos

zsoa!.o,\ - | x a+ r.rr- a---1 r e 6 sruDs

FRONT VIEW OF TNUST CO/ER STI.DS fx

r ON C - 3 - = r

ffitrrFROIIT VEIVOF STuDS FOR CC'IA'LING SLPPOR'T

t
CARB DN

F.F

GROUND

.t

--rt7' rE

I t6

r--_
4.777'
I

REAR MANIFOLD

. i Gorcot*s..

tt

t5 l T rl u _ I --1i-err

.l

&sTr.at

RADIO SHIELDIiIG (nern vrew,)

Fig. 7054

ffifi.'i'tr-3[sr * \H,4
FoR ;SPACE REa,D. **,* *f^(ERs /

u4--t

hl

PRO,'ECTPN OF T}EE

ottY

---rS'

-E

-I

ir
4 STT.DS

{rac nr-r

ILARGED VIEW oF sPt-hs

;i!.oro 1@ " .52o 4

s JAwsJ EpUALLY SPACED

- {tr-6-GROOVES EQUALLY SPACID .?@'DtA.

l---.ir8tr
l_r T l

i|rel xr-s

SARTER DRilE 3-J.il Fllr lrzE

6!n Elru \',

F-venncer_ e\

-----t4il
I

I 4 4 STUDS sruDs I

--r -l .x x24NF-3 24ilr'

tdLEiIGTH OF E spt rNr


i. Lax.

FULL SIZE

I
o

**,*/
\..

9 STr.rOSPRO-ECThIG S FROM PADFACE.

t oF cYLrNoR,

.OF UTR

,-.-.

.675::tglor^
TO FACEOFGEAR

@
/ ,/ / L3252 0 +oo2 _,OOO5

hr
f,xea}f-r
2-STiDS

sc r/E i srzE

NOR DRIVE

r"n

SECTPN THRU EXHAUST PORT FULL SIZE

ry"
.ao"tt , n

OI.(I,TfT nltrll

PAD

-firaar,rF-3
2-STUOS

)$
r?t'\
3r'

i ior

-t --rl-o
lfr OL I}TLETPAD T,LL 3ZE

" i-t
t ' ll tzil
Li I ll
I

"- Sn
f,al'fiac

iilll I,il
il" ,ult6 ir

-scE

$'oeruuo xoues
EQIALLY SPACED EI.IG.DIA c^/ER ROCKERCCI\/ERS, i, D-CO/VL CLEARAI.ICE DlA, c^/ER tft ROCKER CO/ER STUDS.

9I\DUNTII{G LUGS

-*2fe

n(nss)ue. r
CARB FTTOT' NA}E SPACEREqJIRED FOR REIYOVINGOIL PUMP BODY

.*

ROO Tt8E5

+-_-+r,
.r+l83lneer.aPnE ssrJRE
OIL FEED I-oC,TPN

ro.DrA.

t-o 2-

8t
i
i

@:*
"FT - q i
I
TACH.F r,E
RI-L J:ZE

.soo'.*9!
af1

CARB. BOTTOM FLAIE

Fig. 705^{ -

Typical Installation Drawing -

Wasp S3H1

7L4

iEN

F^CE OF

sTr.Ds oil-Y
OUANTER gZE

'-{'g1r-r
F:*$
t!

FRO{T i'P]FOflT-FT@TL ru,! t(!E

$-rr:tes

- -r-)1

-,?T6srurcs
YfW fa^.;E) t 3P-trES

$Clgc

-'+tS
._T

W
F3

|ter xr-r

SURTER DFIE 3-Jfl Flrr |IZE c. f CYLTNDRS --------\

9 STIJOS FRO..ECT|NG T FRC'M PADFACE.

t .ili lsi l
lo
EXHAUST STACX TO BE SLDE FTT IN LIIR

X
,-{lrzarc-3 PRO.ECTING 9 STI,DS i
FMt| PAD FACE. SECTPN TI{RU XHAUST PORT FULLSIZE

fr2erf-r

n-^Ai,
. f : q"--

{."L -rtZ--alfr 35'

firaa{F-3
2-STTJOS

--

,*1 .4

---r

gs'

1
OIL IIILET PAD F1JLL 3ZI

fi'oRtueo noues
EQTALLY SPACED D|A Or'ER ROCKERCC^/ERS. D.-ET.IG, D-CO/VL CLEARArcE DIA,O/ER DLE CUTOFF-PRIi/ER

9]'DUNT|I{G LUGS

;*

RocKERco/ER sruDs.

Z\\/r------PEN

rc(nesJ on. rou


SPACEREOUIREDFOR RElvOl/ll{G OIL PUMP SODY !R.ET D TLES

7o',.

CARzuRETOR @NTROLS

ro.or^.

;.1o Er-rcLEs

nbJ-ro.11^ -..2--l-grg. -1 raiec$$" e+a' 9o^.r'* ^\,, nc-e.ree

:*

JZ'"'",'"

"-lflS!'"^{
-r-

--,-

W, T*-

;t

|
al
I _

l r-&#llgtg'^. *-'3!L
rAcH. m
Rrl-g|zE

@:
FORREFEREilCE Ol{tY

t-l I

$n
GARB. BOTTOM FLAIGE

\\'asp S3H1

7t5

RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVEREAUL


t2. 13. Connect fuel pump drain line. Connect a tee into the blower rim manifold pressiure line and lead to the economizer unit of the NA-Y9J carburetor (used on someWasp engines). *Note-A survey of all cylinder hgad and banel tdmperatures should be made on the first engine run in a new test house, or on the first engine of each type to be run in an old test house. Tliese temperatures should be determined by spark plug gasket thermocouples ior- head temperatures -and rivet type thermocouples embedded just ab6ve the cylindef barrel mounting flange for banel temperatures. Frbm tliis temperature survey, the two hottest cylinder locations can be determined ahd thermocouples used at these locations for all future tests. Cylinder barrel temperatwe measurement is unnecessary after the initial check.

L4. Connect a mercury manometer to NA-Y9C, NA-Y9G or NA-Y9G1 carburetors to indicate the absolute pressure below the carand buretor when the automatic mixture power control unit is checked in "Mid" and ('Cruising" position. This connection is made at the carburetor on the accelerating pump side near the parting section and automatic mixture regulator flange. 15. Connect a line from the automatic mixture and power control unit of NA-Y9C, NAYgG or NA-Y9G1 carburetors to a tee in the main oil pressure line. Connect a line to the oil drain connection of the automatic unit of NA-Y9C, NAYgG or NA-Y9G1 carburetors and lead this to the oil drain pipe on the left side of the engine rear section. Connect breather lines to the breather connections of the engine. Connect priming system. Connect fuel pressure gage line to carburetor. Connect magneto ground wires.

16.

17. 18. 19. 20.

2L.* Connect head thermocouples to at least two cylinders. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Install carburetor air inlet duct. Connect air inlet thermometer line in air duct to carburetor. Connect oil inlet and outlet lines. Install exhaust stacks. Install cooling cowl (if used).

The installation diagram, Fig. 705, *.itt be helpful in finding the previously mentioned connections. The test propeller should be inspected prior to installatiott'ott'the engine propell-er shaft to be sure that its hub splines and nut are free from burrs or dirt which might cause damage to- the engine propeller shaff. The propeller shaft snSUa b^ec6vered with a light o-il, the propeller installed and the attaching nut securely tightened. Any loosenesswill allow the test club to work on the propeller shaft which may cause damage or galling. For the tightening gperat-ion a torlue of from 625 ft.-lbs. to 750 ft.-lbs. should be applied to the propelle,r nut. Thit may be accorirplished bv urling a bar fogl feet lon! and applying a weight of-between 160 and 190-pound; ai the end ol the bar. The weight should be applied at right angles to the ground. The bar shorild not be struck with a hammer or other heavy instrument except to check the tlghtness of thd nut. To check-the tightness of the nut after the above operation has been performed, a 21h lb. hammel may be used to strike the bar near the nut. Care should be taken not to exceeda normal swing of the hammer.

TEST PROCEDURE GENERAL An experienced test operator should have charge of the run-in of an overhauled engine. The operator should keep the engine and instruments under constant observation. A log of the engine test (seesample sheet, FiS. 706) recording observations at 15 minute intervals, should be kept filed with the engine inspection and overhaul records at the completion of the test. It is recommended that the temperature of the air entering the carburetor be maintained at 90" F. (32" C.) for test stand operation. This is particularly important when running-in engines equipped with NA-Y9C, NA-Y9G or NAYgGl carburetors. The engine should be watched for oil and fuel leaks, and=necessary corrections should be made during the run-in, where possible. A few minor adjuslments, 6uch as oil and fuel pressure relief adjustments, are usually necessary-andshould be made during th run-in. Where the engine is equipped with short exhaust stacks and it is possible to watch the exhaust flame from each cylinder, the flames should be watched for any difference or change in color which might indicate misfiring plugs, excessively lean or rich mixtures or other discrepancies at one or more cylinders.

7L6

RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL


ENGINE SERIES-NO.-SHEET NO' OBSERVED BY

LOG OF ENGINE TEST


sTD. OBS. BAROMETER-IN.

HG. AT-

F.

TIME

HUMIDITY-FUEL

(OCTANE RATING)-

CARBURETOR

DATA

CARBURETOR

MAGNETO

TYPE

RIGHT NO,-LEFT

NO.

LOSS OF REV'S.-RIGHT

MAGNETO

LEFT MAGNETO

TEST CLUB

REMARKS

Fig. 706 -

Sample Log of Engine Test

7t7

RUN.IN

OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL STARTING THE ENGINE tenths inches of mercury), below the carburetor in the "Mid" and "Cruising" positions with the throttle wide open. If the unit will not maintain the desired regulated pressures within the aforementioned limits, it is not functioning properly. If the unit has been overhauled and bench tested as described in Chapter XVII, only in rare caseswill it require readjustment and this should be done only by someone who is familiar with the proper procedure. To check the automatic mixture control unit while installed on the engine, the following procedure should be carried out: 1. With the throttle partly closed, (1200 R.P.M.) put the selector valve in the t(Mid" position and speed up the engine by opening the throttle until the manometer indicating pressure below the carburetor reaches a point where there is no change in pressure for an increase in throttle opening. This will be the pressure to which the automatic unit is regulating and it should remain constant for all throttle positions from this point to full throttle. If the operation is satisfactory and the pressure is correct for the particu"Cruising" lar carburetor setting, the position should be checked. 2. To checkl the "Cruising" position, partly close the throttle and move the selector valve to the "Cruising" position; then throtspeed up the engine by opening the "Mid" tle, as was done in checking the position. The manometer indicating pressure below the carburetor should show an increase in pressure until it indicates the regulating pressure for the "Cruising" position, anil should remain constant for ah throttle positions from this point to full throttle. pressure below the carburetor, Note-The when in "Mid" or "Cruising" position is controlled by the air shutters; therefore a thorough investigation of the shutters and their linkage should be made before readjusting the regulator unit. 3. The throttle should be partly closed, until it is positively controlling the engine speed and power, before moving the selector valve out of the "Cruising" position and into the "Mid" position. The throttle should be still further closed, until it is again controlling the engine speed and power before moving the selector valve out of the "Mid" position and into the "Manual Full Rich" position or "Emergency" position. The engine should be

Before starting the engine, a wobble pump in the oil system should be operated until the engine pump is supplied with oil. This precaution is particularly important in cold weather. Where it is extremely cold, the oil feed line should be disconnected at the engine oil pump and the cold oil forced out of the line through use of the wobble pump just prior to starting the engine. Instructions for starting the engine are contained in the Operators Handbook. These instructions should be strictly adhered to. Oll Pressure - If the oil pressure, after starting, does not register on the gage almost immediately the engine should be stopped and an investigation made for the cause. Before the run-in is completed, the pressure should be set, by adjusting the relief valve so that it is 70 - 90 lhs./sq. in. (5 - 6 kg./sq. cm.) with the engine turning 2200 R.P.M. and the oil inlet temperature at 140" - 167' F. (60' 75'C.). Fuel Pressure - If the fuel pressure is not within the desired range of 3 - 5 lbs./sq. in. (0.21-0.35 kg./sq. cm.) at 1000 R.P.M. and above, it should be adjusted by means of the fuel pressure relief valve. Englne Run-In Schedule - The following schedule outlines the minimum run-in period recommended for properly seating piston rings and burnishing newly installed bushings, etc., in an overhauled engine.

R.P.M. 800-1000 L200 1400 1600 1800 1900 2000 2L00 Rated Speed

Minutes 15 t20 60 60 60 60 60 30 15

Checklng Operatlon of Carburetors havlng Pratt & Whltney Autornatlc Mlxture and Power Control Untt - This unit should be overhauled and bench tested as described in After the overhauled engine Chapter XVII. has been run-in, it is advisable to check the operation of the unit when mounted on the carburetor and controlling its operation. It is also desirable to check approximate fuel consumption in the two automatic positions. The principal check of the unit is for its ability to maintain constant, without hunting, the desired absolute pressure, plus or minus .2 in. Hg (two-

7L8

RUN.IN

OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL

Fig. 707 -

Psychrometric Vapor Pressure Chart

7L9

RUN-IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVEREAUL


operated in the "Manual Full Rich" position at all times on the test stand except when checking the operation of the Automatic Mixture and Power Control Unit and for fuel consumption checks. The carburetor is of the fixed jet type, the proper jet sizes having been determined and tested in each carburetor. Under no circumstances should these be changed without first consulting the factory.

EORSEPOWER DETERMINATION A reasonably accurate determination of the horsepower dei'eloped by a Wasp Jr., Wasp or Hornet engine may be made by ieferring to the sea level calibration curve for the particular engine (assuming that the test stand is located approximately at sea level). The Operators Handbook describes, in detail, how to use the calibration or operating curves, including information pertaining to the carburetor air tem, perature correction. If the test stand is situated appreciably above sea level, the altitude part of the calibration curve should be used as described in the Operators Handbook. The information which follows is furnished in the event that, for some reason, the closest possible determination of actual horsepower on the test stand is desired. Absolute Blower Rtrn Pressure or absolute manifold pressure (in. of Hg) is the algebraic sum of Observed Blower Rim Pressure and Corrected Barometric Pressure. Thus if an engine is operating with a Blower Rim Pressure of -2.3 in. Hg and Corrected Barometer is found to be 29.22 in. Hg then the Absolute Blower Rim Pressure (absolute manifold pressure) is 29.22 * (-2.3) : 26.92in. Hg. Corrected Barometer is found by subtracting from the True Barometer the vapor pressure (i.e. pressure due to moisture content) in the air. For example: assume wet and dry bulb temperatures of 78' F. and 84' F. resp,ectivelyQ8/84. From the Psychrometric Vapor Pressure Chart a correction factor of 0.9 is found for these temperatures. Thus, if the True Barometer is 30.L2, the Corrected Barometer is 30.12 - 0.9 : 29.22 in. Hg. Trre Barorneter is computed from the Observed Barometer by correcting the latter for temperature variation away from the standard temperature upon which the barometer scale is based. Thus if the Observed Barometer is 30.25 in. Hg at 79" F., refer to the Barometric Temperature Correction Chart, supplied with the barometer by the manufacturer, and for 30.0 in. Hg and 78"'F. find a correction factor of -.13. The True Barometer is found by adding the correction factor (with the conect sign) thus: 30.25 - .13 nn True Barometer The True Barometer should be computed and recorded once every hour. Wet and. Dry Bulb Temperatures are required in order to compute the vapor pressure from the Psychrometric Vapor Pressure Chart (Fig. 707) and obtain the Corrected Barometer. Readings should be recorded once every hour. After the absolute manifold pressure has been derived and used with the engine R.P.M. to read hors,epower on the calibration curve, the horsepower read from the curve must be conected for the variation from 60' F. (standard temperature at sea level). The following formula can then be used to deterrhine the actual horsepower: Actual Horsepowr: Horsepower Read on Curve For example, consider the Wasp engine running at 2200R.P.M. with an absolute blower rim pressure of 32.5 in. Hg and a carburetor air temperature of 80" F. At 32.5 in. Hg and 2200 R.P.M., the sea level calibration curve shows 525 brake horsepower. Using the horsepower correction factor table which follows, a correction factor of 1.019 is found for the carburetor air temperature of 80' F. Using the correction factor in the above formula for actual horsepower, 525 : 515 actual horsepower. 1.019 The following table of correction factors for carburetor air temperatures should be used with the foregoing formula.

720

RUN.IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVEREAUL


H. P. CORRECTION FACTORS Barometer 29.02 ln. Mercury

Air Temp. oF.

Correctlon Factor

Air Temp. oF.

Correctlon Factor

Air Temp. oF.

Correctlon Factor

8 1 ..

95. 96... 97... 98.. . 99... 100.. 101. L02.. 103.. 104. . 105.. . 106. t07.. . 108. . 109. 110. 111. Ltz. . 113. Lt4. .

.1.033 .1.034 .L.035 .1.036 .1.037 . 1.038 . .1.039 .:.....1.040 . .1.041 . .L.042 ..L.043 . .1.044 ..L.045 . .1.046 . .L.047 . .L.047 .1.048 . .1.049 .1.050 1.051

Cheeklng FueI Flow - After the engine has been run--in, the gross fuel consumption in pounds or gallons per hour should be checked. it is recomirended ihat the fuel consumption be measured at several points within the cruising range and at rated power and speedof the engine. The gross fuel consumption may be determined readily at all times if a fuel flow meter accurately calibrlted for the specific gravity of the fuel is installed in the fuel line tb the engine. Flow meters of this type should be calibrated once every two months and should be accurate to within L/6 tlvoughout its usable range. It-ryuy also be found bf timing a given weight- of fuel that the engine- consumes from a weigb! t-ank mourrted on a scale. A third method of finding the gross fuel consumption is by timing^a -given volume of fuel consumed. The volume fuel flow tank should be accurately calibrated for the specific gravity of fuel. See Tig. 794,for the various arrangements for determining fuel flow. When determining gross fuel consumption !V the volume or weifhl method, the longe,r the duration of the check, the more accurate the result will be. However, in any case, the time interval should not be less than one minute (60 seconds). flow (lbs./hr.) is computed Fuel Flow-Fuel by means of the formula: x 3600 Flow _lbs. sec. Thus if it takes74.5 secondsto empty 9 lbs. of gas out of the weight tank, the Fuel Flow : 9_. J600 74.5

or 434lbs./hr. In caseof stands equipped with a fuel flowmeter the flow in tbs. /hr. is read direct. (lbs-/8.P./!t.) Speclffc Fuel Consunptlon j Stto,rtd it be desired to-determine Specific Fuel Consumption (not considered practical in average horsepower, case on held test stahds) the actual"Horsepower arrived at as described under Determination", must be used. The following formula may then be emploYed: S.F.C,

, : Fuel m Flow (lbs.ihr.)

Thus for an ensine developine 525 H.P. with a fuel flow of 350-lbs.1hr., the Specific Fuel Consumption is equal to: -350 : 525

.666lbs. lH,.P.llv.

Note-Becalrse of the several engine models and numerous carburetor settings involved, it is not feasible to cover actual fuel consumption figures in this manual. Where fuef consumPtion figures are desired for a particular englr-le model and carburetor setting, information will be furnished by the-Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Service Department upon request. Checklng Otl Consumptlon - qg+ng. .th" should be deterrun-in, th6 goss oil consumption -running the hour at mined' while the engine is 2000 R.P.M. The consumption may b-e ascertained by subtracting the weight of oil- at the ettd of tlie hour, as in-dicated on the weight tank

72L

RUN-IN OF ENGINES AFTER OVERHAUL


scales, from the weight at the beginning of the hour. Readings should be recorded every 15 minutes. If the gross oil consumption is not more than 4.5 lbs. for Wasp Jr.,6lbs. for Wasp, or 7.25 lbs. for Hornet engines, and not increasing during the last two 15 minute intervals, the condition of the newly fitted piston rings should be considered satisfactory. If the oil consumption is high, or increasing during the last two 15 minute intervals, the run-in may be continued for an additional two hours at 1600 R.P.M. to further seat the piston rings, after the run at rated speed is completed. If the condition is not corrected after this run, as determined by a check run of one half hour at 2000 R.P.M., the cylinders should be removed and the condition of the rings investigated. Flnal Englne Check - Since the test club propeller does not have the same flywheel effect as an airplane propeller, it is impractical to make a final idle adjustment of the carburetor on the test stand. However, at the completion of the run-in, the engine should be checked for idling, acceleration, and operation of the magnetos. The engine should not lose over 100 R.P.M. when opeiating on one magneto at 907o rated speed. Checks on single magnetos should be made in as short a time as practicable, as continued running on one magneto at high horsepower output can cause serious detonation. After checking one magneto, the engine should be allowed to run 5 or 10 secondson both magnetos before switching to the other alone. If the engine is to be placed in storage, it should be run at least 30 minutes at 50% normal rated speed on unleaded gasoline, before being removed from the run-in stand.

801

CHAPTER VIII

PREPARATION OF ENGINE AFTER RUN-IN


GENERAL After run-in of the engine, the following treatment should be applied prior the procedure outIined for "Preparation for Installation in Ship" or "Preparation for Short or Long Time Storage". Cleanlng Englne-The engine should be washed externally with white furnace oil, varnoline, or the eqoivalent to remove all oil, grease or dirt. Care should be taken to keep the-cleaning fluid away from the electrical equipment as much as possible. Oll Dratr!_ Plugs-Remove the sump drain plug and the oil pressure strainer in the iear section. PREPARATION Check the sump plug for signs of foreign matter. Check and clean pre$sure strainer. Spark Plugs-Remove spark plugs and check gap which should be not more than .0L5". Valve Clearances-When checking valve clearances make sure that engine is thoroughly cool. Remove rocker box covers, being careful not to damage the gaskets. Check valve clearances in accordance with instructions contained in Chapter VI. Extreme care should be taken in replacing rocker box covers as a slightly damaged gasket will cause oil leakage. IN AIRPLANE

FOR INSTALLATION

Greaslng Rocker Arm Ftttlngs (Grease Lubrlcated-Wasp Jr. B Englnes)-When greasing the rockers it is advisable to turn the crankshaft so that the piston is at the top of the compqessio4 stroke of the cylinder being greased. This allows grease to reach the ball end of the push rod and the adjusting screw since neither is under pressure. At the same time the grease fittings on the exhaust rocker boxes shodd be giveq a_plentiful supply. The top five cylinders should be given half again as much grease as the lower cylinders, due to the tendency of the lubricant to drain down the push rod cover tubes. Normally inlet rocker boxes require as much grease as the exhaust rocker boxes. Checktqg Magnetos-Check magneto breaker points for condition. Make sure they are not oily. Remove any trace of oil or grbase from inside the magneto breaker housings with carbon tetrachlolide, then dry the housings thoroughly. This is important, as serious burning of the breaker points can result from a minute quantity of oil or grease,or a mixture of cleaning fl:uid anil oil or grease. Do not remove the oil from the cam oiler felt of Scintilla Magnetos. Check Cyl. Nos.Wasp Jr. (Navy) Wasp Jr. (Comm.) Wasp (Navy and Comm.) Fin No. Fin No. Fin No.

synchronization between the two magnetos and if a correction is necessary,refer to Page 609. all joints Waterprooffng Magnetos-Seal where moisture might enter with melted compound Quaker Wax No. 368.* Do not put any oil, grease, or preservatlve cornpound. ln the breaker cornpartment. Checking Nuts and Screws-Inspect engine carefully and check nuts or palnuts for looseness and broken safety wire. Look for oil leaks, as such are likely to indicate loose connections, packing or nuts. Packing glands should be tightened and safetied. Give the engine a final visual inspection for any damaged parts. Cyltnder Deflectors-Refer to Chapter I for the description of the various types of deflectors which have been used on the subject engines. The following table indicates the number of the cylinder barrel-fin, counting from the top fin of the barrel, below which the butterfly clamp should be located on both types of pressure baffies (bolted type and latch type). l-2 2-B 8 - 4 4-6 5 - 6 6 - 7 7 - 8 8 - 9 9 - l

22
4 8

4 4 8

4 4 8

22
4 8

4 4 8

4 4 8

4 4 8

4 4 8

4 4 8

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

Hornet (Navy and Comm.) Fin No. To locate the butterfly clamp on bolted type de,flectors,install the deflectors between adjacent cylinders and locate the position of the butterfly clamp from the hole in the deflector, using the

position into which the clamp slides the most freely. Fasten the inter-cylinder deflectors to the cylinder barrels by clamps and wing nuts. Fit the primer lines through the rubber grommets

802

PREPARATION OF ENGINE AFTER RUN.IN


in the deflectors and connect to the cylinders where necessary. The primer lines should be fastened to the intake pipes with clamps. For Wasp Jr. engineswhich incorporate a valve lubricator system and require installation of the cylinder oil feed pipe on No. 1 cylinder, fit the lrpper section of the oil feed pipe through the rubber grommet in No. 1 cylinder heail deflector and connect it to the inter-ear pipe on the cylinPREPARATION der with a hose connection. The hose connection should be secured to the pipe with wrap locks or clamps. The lower end of the pipe should then be connected to the lubricator pump. The latch-type deflectors are installed in the srmemanner as the bolted-type with the exception that the inter-cylinder deflectors are latched to the adjacent cylinder head deflectors instead of being bolted.

OF ENGINES TOR STORAG}E rocker boxes. to coat thoroughly the valve rockers, valves, valve springs, and the interior of the rocker boxes. Actuate the valve mechanism to insure thorough coating of the valves and valve gurdes. Replace the rocker box covers. Thrust Bearlng-Remove the thrust bearing cover plate, and thoroughly coat the thrust bearing with corrosion preventive compound, NoOxide EEE *, then replace the thrust bearing cover plate. Generator and Vacuunr Punrp Drives-Remove the generator drive and vacuum pump drive cover plates and apply corrosion preventive compound, No-Oxide EEE *, to the splines and bearings. Replace the cover plates. Exhaust Ports-Spray a sufficient quantity of "compound, Rust Veto No. corrosion preventive 3568-8*, into the exhaust ports to coat thoroughly the heads of the exhaust valves. The exhaust valves should be in the full open position to insure a thorough coating. Install the exhaust port covers. Internal Englne Preservatlon-(To be completed prior to cylinder treatment). With spark plugs removed, pump corrosion preventive compound, No-Oxide EEE *, through the engine oil passages by means of the engine oil pump in sufficient quantity to^411. the system. Thit.will require some mearu of driving the propeller shaft at a speed of approximately 150-200 R.P.M. Do not allow the first oil leaving the engine oil outlet to mix with the supply which is entering the engine. Rotate and rock the engine on the stand to coat thoroughly the interior. Drain the excesscompound from the sumps. Replace the plugs and safety in place, the engine stand Cyllnder Treatment-Turn so the engine propeller shaft is extending vertically upward. Close the lower set of spark plug holes with plugs. With the intake valve open and the piston at the bottom of the stroke, spray the interior of each cylinder with corrosion preventive compound, Rust Veto No. 3568-8*, through the top set of spark plug holes, so that a quantity of spray will be deposited on the intake valves as well as on the cylinder walls. Follow-

General-Unless an overhauled engine is to be placed in service within a few days after run-in, it should receive special treatment before being placed in storage. Previously, "Long or Short Time Storage Treatment" was applied to the engine, depending upon the length of time and climate conditions to which the engine would be subjected. However, since the final destination of an engine is unpredictable, it is recommended that all engines be given the maximum amount of storage protection. It is recommended, therefore, that the following treatment which is comparable to the previously recommended "Long Time Storage" be applied to all engines which are not to be used immediately after overhaul. A tag indicating the date of treatment should be attached to both the engine and the packing case. Engines to be shipped overseas should be packed in a special double thickness waterproofed packing case. Prellmlnery Treatment-During the last 30 minutes of operation previous to storage, the engine should be run on clear or unleaded gasoline. The engine should then be washed down with white furnace oil or varnoline, or their equivalent, to remove all grease and dust. When washing the engine, the cleaning spray should be kept away from all electrical equipment. Preferably while the engine is still warm, drain the engine of excessoil by removing the sump drain plugs and main oil screen and plugs. Clean and replace the screen and all plugs. Within two hours after the conclusion of the clear gasoline mn, spray corrosion preventive compound, Rust Veto No. 3568-8*, into each cylinder, with the piston at the bottom of its stroke, in sufficient quantity to insure adequate coverage.. The following procedure should be completed as soon as possible after engine shutdown, but in every case the requirements regarding Rocker Boxes and Exhaust Ports should be completed within 24 hours. Roeker Bor Covers-Remove rocker box covers. and clean the

Rocker Boxes-Inject sufficient corrosion preventive compound, No-Oxide EEE, * into the

803

PREPARATION

OF ENGINE AFTER RUN.IN tach the carburetor warning tag, and wrap the carburetor in a waterproof bag. Magneto-Clean the contact points and inspect -breaker the mechanism of the magneto. Seal the magneto with melted magneto sealing compound, Quaker Wax No. 368*. Do not put any oll, grease, or preservatlve conrporrnd ln the breaker compartment. Spark Plugs-Clean the spark plugs and adjust thefu gaps.- Coat only the threads of the-sp-ark plugs with corrosion preventive compou-nd, NoOxi-de BEE *. Wrap in acid-free waxed paper, and place in the speciialspark plug shipping box. such parts Accessorles or Auxlllarles-Inspect as generators, starters, automatiC power -control unit, etc., when furnished with the engine, for proper preparation for storage. Cover.any uncompainted-poitions with corrosion preventive pound, Rust Veto No. 3568-8 *. Pour corrosion ireventive oil, Necton No. 50*, -into the fuel b*rrp and propeller governor, and rotate to fill itt civities,- w6en suCh parts are furnished with the engine. Drain the excess oil. Coat the propeller hub parts with corrosion preventive Lompound, No-Oxide EEE*, and wrap !t- in acid-free waxed paper before packing. Likewise, wrap all the above accessoriesand auxiliaries in acid-free waxed paper before placing in the shipping case. preparation .for General Inspectton-During storage the en-gineshould be c[er:-keii thoroughly to be sure thit all nuts are tight and properly safetied. The propeller thrust bearing nut should be made [ight and all parts of the engine should be in proper adjustment ready for runmng. The entire engine should then be covered with a heavy waterprobf paper and the paper secured in place.
*specifications listed in this chapter may be procured 'the the' following sources. When- procuring material to fromspecifi.cationslisted, requests should be made that the matelial'be furnished i'n accordance with latest reuision of this specification as designated by a letter suffix to the specification. Speclffcatlon Number Source of Supply

ing this operation, rotate the crankshaft at least six revolutions for piston ring coverage. Respray each cylinder with the piston at the bottom of the stroke for final cylinder wall coverage. Remove the plugs and drain the excesscompound from each cylinder by tilting and rotating the engine on the stand. After draining, install dehydrator dummy spark plugs, Protek-Plugs*, in all the spark plug openings. Attach the spark plug leads to the dehydrator plugs, and insure that the plugs are tightly seated on the spark plug bushings. Do not turn the crankshaft after thls operatlon. Note-Do not remove the moisture seals from the dehydrator plugs, until they are to be installed. Palnted Surfaces and Rubber Parts-Corrosion preventive compound, Rust Veto No. 3568B *, fu detrimental to paint and enamel. Remove any of this compound spilled or sprayed onto paintd surfaces by wiping with a clean, dry cloth. External Englne Cleanlng-Spray the exterior of the engine with cleaning fluid (white furnace oil, or varnoline) and dry with compressed air. When spraying the engine, the cleaning spray should be kept away from all electrical equipment. Particular attention must be given to removing cleaning fluid from all rubber parts. Carburetor Openlng-Install the hot spot, if shipped with the engine. Securely attach a % pound bag of dehydrating agent, Silica-Gel*, in the intake manifold. Mount the wooden cover on the carburetor opening, using acid free waxed paper as a gasket between the cover and the carburetor mounting flange. Openlngs-Cover all other openings. Cover breathers, oil inlet and outlet connections, etc., with waxed paper securely tied in place. Propeller Shaft-The exposed surface of the propeller shaft should be coated thoroughly with corrosion preventive compound, No-Oxide EEE*. When required, a thread protector cap should be installed. care Surfaces-Special Crankcase Partlng should be taken to coat the parting surfaces on the nose and rear sections with corrosion preventive compound, No-Oxide EEE *. removing the carburetor Carburetor-After from the engine carefully drain all the gasoline. Fill the entire carburetor with corrosion preventive oil, Necton No. 50 *. Thoroughly slush the interior surfaces by rocking the carburetor, exercising care not to damage the float or needle valves. Operate the throttle pumps to empty the carburetor. Drain all excessoil and replace the plugs. Lock the throttle in the full-closed position. Check all screws and nuts, making sure they are tight and properly safetied. At-

368 wax No. Quaker 8:*nf*f,T;:"1"":;:., Rust vetoNo'3568-8 ";#i"f"ftf!tblf;'". o;nuV?offiir",o,N,.., No-oxideEEE ". and
Chicago, Illinois Standard OiI Co. of New Jersey Necton No. 50 Sitica-Gel m.ay be procured from the Dauison Chernical Co., Baltirnore, Md. Protek-Plugs may be procured from' Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, East Hartford, Conn. Corrosion preuentiue compound, No-Oxide EEE, should be heated to 180' F. (82' C.) before using. Rust Veto .Ay'o.3568-8, should be sprayed on surfaces with a DeVilbiss Gun, Type CL-IOL, or its equiualent, with per square inch. air pressure m,aintained at 4O to 5Ol.bs.

804

PREPARATION PREPARATION

OF ENGINE AFTER RUN.IN AFTER STORAGE

OF ENGINE FOR RUNNING

starting an engine that has General-Before been taken out of storage, extreme care should be taken to seethat all oil has been drained from the cylinders and the intake pipes. The general precautions before starting an engine are outlined in the Operator's Handbook. These precautions should be carefully followed and, in addition, the following instructions be adhered to. Remove any trace of oil or grease from inside the magneto breaker housings with carbon tetrachloride, then dry the housings thoroughly. This is important as serious burning of the breaker points can result from a minute quantity of oil or grease,or a mixture of cleaning fluid and oil or grease. Do not remove the oil from the cam oiler felt of Scintilla Magnetos. The engine should be brought up to room temperature (60'F. minimum) and the Protek-Plugs removed from the spark plug bushings. ProtekPlugs, after removal from cylinders cannot be reused with any assurance that they will provide continued protection. Therefore, it is recommended that they be destroyed immediately after removal. Oil sump drain plugs and the lower intake pipe should also be removed, thus

allowing any oil which may have accumulated in the lower part of the engine to drain out, as well as to drain any oil which may have collected in the lower intake pipe and which would be drawn into the cylinders when the engine is started. Turn the crankshaft at least twentyfive times by hand with the above-mentioned plugs removed and allow oil to drain thoroughly. Install the spark plugs and the oil sump plugs. When reinstalling the intake pipes, the gasket between the intake pipe and the cylinder should be in good condition and the flange should be evenly seated and pulled up snugly. Before engaging the starter, the engine should be turned over by hand at least six times. The engine should be run for approximately one hour, not over 1000 R.P.M., using a grade of oil from 75 to 100 viscosity. This is followed by draining the oil and replacing with a grade recommended for service before the engine is flown. Carburetor-Before installing the carburetor on the engine, the heavy oil in the carburetor should be thoroughly washed out with gasoline.

901

CEAPTER IX INSTALLATION AND RUN-UP OF ENGINE IN AIRPLANE

INSTALLING

ENGINE IN AIRPLANE Fuel pressure gage pipe (at left or rear side of carburetor). Carburetor fuel supply pipe (at left side of carburetor). Oil Tank vent pipe. Oil pressure gage pipe. Oil inlet temperature gage. Oil outlet pipe connection (at rear center of engine). Oil inlet pipe connection (at right side of rear section below oil pipe). Hot air control rod (on air intake). Governor control linkage. Starter energizing rod (if provided). Mixture control rods (on side of carburetor behind throttle). Throttle control rods (on side of carburetor). Battery. Any other accessories, piping or wiring which were removed at the time the engine was removed from the airplane. Wlth Rem.ovable Mount-The same instructions for cleaning the engine before delivery to the airplane apply in this case as with fixed mount. Attach Lifting Sling_and remove bolts holding engine to the stand. Raise engine to horizontal positioq and attach mount to engine, fastetting with all eight bolts on mounting flange. Be sure to draw-up all bolts evenly to assure proper alignment of engine and mount. Install carburetor and air scoop. Note-As the method of connecting up these lines varies with different installations, it is advisable to consult the "Installation Handbook" or Installation Department of Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, for further information. Guide engine and mount to plane and attach mount to fuselage structure by means of four bolts. (In some installations the mount is connected to the cell structure of the plane.) Attach all oil, fuel and control lines to their respective connections provided at the engine fue wall.

subject of installation of the enGeneral-The gine in the airplane is not strictly an overhaul function; however, this chapter covers the subject briefly to acquaint the Overhaul Shop with the final operations on the engine. Wtth Flxed Mount-After the engine has been overhauled and run-in, it is ready to be reinstalled in the airplane. Before delivery to the airplane, the engine should be thoroughly washed or sprayed with kerosene or white furnace oil to remove all dirt accumulated during test and then dried with an air blast, as described in Chapter VIII on "Preparation for Installation in Airplane". Hook the Lifting Sling to a chain hoist and the sling to the lifting links provided at the top of the engine, and then relieve the stand of the engine weight. Raise the engine to the level of the mounting ring. At least two men must be available, one to operate the chain hoist and the other to guide the engine into place. Install all eight of the bolts in the mounting ring. The mounting lugs on the airplane must be in line with the mounting lugs on the engine, so that all of the mounting bolts may be drawn up without putting a strain on the engine or the mounting ring. Be sure to draw up evenly on the bolts to assure proper alignmerrt of engine and mounting ring. of Accessorles, Ptpe ConneeInstallatlon following accessories, tlons and Controls-The and the pipe connections and controls should be connected after the engine has been installed in the airplane: Vacuum Pump. Carburetor (attach braces if provided). Starter. Generator, (if provided) with all external wire connections. Carburetor air scoop (below carburetor). Exhaust manifold and pipes. Exhaust pipes to hotspot. Tachometer cable. Thermocouple wiring. Wiring from magneto to switch (ground wire). Manifold pressure gage pipe. Fuel pump drain pipe. Fuel pump inlet and outlet pipes. Fuel pressure relief pipe.

902

INSTALLATION AND RUN.UP OF ENGINE IN AIRPLANE


an added protection against overheating. It is generally possible, however, to warm up the engine at the usual 1000 R. P. M. When opening the throttle further to check the R. P. M. and magnetos, the cylinder head temperature should not be allowed to exceed 500'tF. (260" C.) in the short burst. The cylin{er temperatures are likely to increase rapidly after passing400o F. (204" C.). Where it is found necessary to give a newly installed engine a prolonged ground run-up,- the ring cowl and int-er-cylinder bafles should be removed as an aid to cooling. After this run-up, the oil strainer should be cleaned to remove any foreign matter which might have come from the tank or pipes of the airplane. Check all installations and controls to see that everything is satisfactory. of OII Pressure Rellef ValveAdjustment -adjust the pressure turn the adjgsting screw To with a screw diiver, until the desired pressure is obtained. The valve is adjusted at the factory to give ?0-90 pounds pressure at rlted sp$ when the oil inlet tempeiature is 140oF. (60'C.). When testing an eng-ine in a new installation, the pressure should be checked and, if_necessary, adjusted to give the above-mentioned pressure. However, wh-en the relief valve is once set for a particular airplane, readjustment to care for variatiotts in pressure is irot advocated. If the pressure drops abnormally, it is recommended ttrat the cause be determined rather than that the relief valve be readjusted.

Flxed Pltah, Controllable' Constant Speed Propellers-Complete inand Eydromatlc structions for the installation of these propellers are given in the service manual issued by the propbller manufacturer, and this manual should be cbnsulted before installation. general Run-up of Englne ln Alrplane-The purpose of the run-up of the engine in the airplane is tb insure that the installation is functioning normally and that the engine operating characteristics are satisfactory. The duration of the run-up period should be at least thirty minutes and preferably an hour. Preaautlons-Engines Runnlng Ground equipped with pressure baffies can be severely ol:erhbated wheir running on the ground unless extreme care is exercised. The effectiveness of pressure cooling is dependent on the forward speed of the plane building up a positive pressure in front of the engine cylinders, and a negative pressure behind the cylinders thereby forcing the cooling air between the fins. When running up an engine against the blocks, the flow of air is very much reduced, so that unless the power is Iimited the cylinders will overheat. It is recommended that at least two cylinder head thermocouples be installed and that, when warming up, the temperature should not be allowed to exceed 400" F. (204" C.). The maximum R. P. M. possible within this 400o F. (204" C.) limit will vary with different installations and propellers, so that for a given airplane it is good practice to determine what limiting R. P. M. under average conditions is necessary as

1001

CEAPTER X GUN SYNCERONIZERS


DISASSEMBLY Unscrew cam follower cap and lock plunger or plug from gun'synchronizer cover, using suitable wrenches. Unscrew four cap screws which fasten zun synchronizer cover; then remove cover and ittim.- Withdraw cam-follower, cam and gear shaft, bearings and bearing retainer as a unit from housing. Remove cotter pin, nut and bolt from cam and gear shaft. Remove retainer and upper bearing from cam and gear shaft by tapping on end of shaft with a dural drift and hammer; then remove cam follower. The bearing may be pushed out of retainer with fingers after both of these parts have been removed from shaft. Remove lower bearing.

CLEANING All parts of the gun synchronizer may be cleaned with white firrnace oil. INSPECTIOIT The following parts should be inspected visually for the various conditions as outlined: Gun synchronizer housing cover for cracks, mutilations and condition of paint. Cam follower, cam and gear teeth for evidence of wear. Balt bearing retainer for free fit in housing. Dowel pin hole for proper depth. Ball bearing as described in Chapter IV, Inspection. Be sure that the lock plunger is of such a width that it will fit in notch of cam follower to the desired clearance. This plunger must not be rounded at the end, as if such were the case it would not seat properly in notch of cam follower. Be sure that the cam follower slides freely in its respective holes in the housing. (Specific Gravity 38-40.)

REPAIR ANI) ASSEMBLY Press lower ball bearing on cam and gear shaft. Fit upper ball bearing in bearing retainer and insert cam follower in hole of retainer. Press upper ball bearing on cam and gear shaft. To perform this operation it is necessary that roller and cam follower be placed between lobes of cam. Secure the ball bearings and bearing retainer on the shaft by means of the bolt, washer, nut and cotter pin. Install the cam follower, cam and gear shaft, bearings and bearing retainer in the housing as a unit. Place laminated shim over gun synchronizer cover mounting flange and housing, and fasten cover in proper position on housing with four cap screws. Insert a small screw in the tapped hole at the end of the cam follower; then pull follower to the top of the stroke. Screw lock plunger in cover insuring that it seats properly in notch of cam follower. It may be necessary to move cam follower slightly to permit engagement of plunger in notch. Care must be exercised not to jam plunger when it is installed. In the event that the plunger will not enter, it should be removed together with the cam, and the width of the notch should be checked. If the end of the lock plunger becomesjammed, do not attempt to correct this condition by filing the burred edges on the plunger, as in so doing the plunger may become sufficiently reduced in diameter to render it a loose fit in notch. Since a loose fit will seriously affect clearance between cam and roller on cam follower, a plunger which is damaged at the end should be replaced with a new plunger. Remove inspection cover plate on housing (after lock plunger is installed) and check clearince betwebn cim and roller on cam follower. This clearance must be in accordance with that specified in the Tables of Clearances and should b-e adjusted (if necessary), by adjusting the laminated shim beneath the gun synchronizer cover to provide the proper clearance. On later synchronizers an ecc'entric sleeve on the lock plunger is used to adjust the clearance between lhe c-am follower and the cam. This should be turned until the desired clearance is obtained between the cam and cam follower. Be sure that the inspection plate is installed after clearance is checked. Remove the screw in the end of the cam fol-

1002

GUN SYNCERONIZERS
jammed and cease to function or else the gun may operate on a hair trigger instead of a pull trigger. Under these conditions a slight wear on the mechanism will cause the gun to fire continuously, with the result that the operator will be unable to shut it off.

lower, and screw cam follower cap on gun synchronizer cover. Secure cap screws which fasten gun synchronizer cover with safety wire. Note-If the gun synchronizer is not assembled as described it may become INSTALLATION Place the proper gasket on the gun synchrotizer mounting pad at the top of the rear section. Then fasten gun synchronizer to mounting pad with the necessary washers, castellated nuts and safety.wire. Be sure that bevel gear in synchronizer is properly meshed vrith the gun control gear. If the backlash is excessive,it may be reduced to the desired limit by either lapping the base of the housing on a surface plate or by machining it off. The amount of metal to be removed will be very small, therefore only a very little metal should be removed at one time.

\--

If a case is encountered where the backlash is insufficient, this can be overcome by inserting a shim to match the mounting surface of the synchronizer housing. When installing a shim care should be taken to insure that the diameter of the hole in the center of the shim coincide accurately with the hole in the face of the housing, otherwise the bearing retainer for the vertical gr" drive shaft will not be held sqcurely in position. The gun synchronizer should be securely bolted down and safety wired in place. The gun synchronizer cover screws should be safety wired in place.

Fig. 1001 -

Adjusting Clearance Between Cam and Operating Plunger

Fig. 1002 -

Gun Synchronizer and Operating and Locking Plungers

1003

GUN SYNCERONIZERS

.ooo5T .oo25L

.ooo5L oo2 L

.oo3

.oorT T .oo3
.ootL.ooo5T .ooo3L .ooI
.OOO5 ul

.o02 L .oo3

OB TA IN C LE A R A N C E W ITH PLUG AGAINST THIS SURFACE

L .oor
. o o 2 5L . oo 4

LA MIN U M S H IM W ITH H E A V Y S E C TIONN E X T TO B A LL B E A R IN G . PEEL OFF IF NECESSARYTO OBTAIN .OO2 TO .OO5 C LE A R A N C E B E TW EEN C A M A N D R OLLE R IN LOC K E D P OS ITION .

L .ooo5 . o o 2L .oo3

THESE GEARS ARE CHANGE-

ABLE FOR DIFFERENT P R O P E L L E RG E A R I N G R A TI O S .

oo4 TO .OlO BACKLASH .ot4

T .OOO5 IN HOUSING .oo25 T tN covER .ooo .oo2 L

Fig. 1003 -

Gun Synchronizer Clearance Chart

1101

CEAPTERXI SPARK PLUGS


GENERAL Spark plugs should be inspected and tested each time they are removed from an engine. The number of hours between these inspection periods depends a great deal upon the type of operation to which the plugs are subjected, the rate of electrode gap increase usually being the determining factor. In general, operators set up inspection and reconditioning procedures to suit their individual requirements. However, it is recomCLEAIYIIIC mended that the spark plug manufacturer be consulted as to details in connection with the particular make and model spark plug in use. The following instructions treat with the recommended procedure for servicing spark plugs in a general manner. For specific instructions and tools for the different makes and types of plugs, the respective manufacturers should be called upon.

AND INSPECTION Thoroughly rinse the electrode end of the oily plugs in clean, unleaded gasoline. Do not hold the plugs immersed in the gasoline and if they are not coated with dirt or oil film, this operation may be eliminated. The blackened appearance at the end of the plug in the absence of heavy oil or lead deposit is not detrimental to its operation. This is acquired after a few minutes of operation in the engine. Permit the plugs to dry thoroughly after rinsing. Clean the inside of the upper shielded barrel. For this operation, use a smali piece of soft cloth wound on a wooden stick dipped in clean, urleaded gasoline. To remove moisture bake all plugs in an oven at 300o F. to 350o F. (149" C.:177" C.) for a period of two hours or more. Set the gaps to the recommended .0L2" clearance, using a flat, narrow width thickness leaf gage. Check the electrode gaps using a wire feeler gage. Bomb test aI spark plugs set at .0t2" gap. at 200 lbs./sq. in. For this purpose use COi or air, where an adequate and dependable supply of dry, high pressure air is available. After the above work has been completed, care is to be taken when storing the spark plugs awaiting installation in the engine. To prevent rusting, plugs should be coated with a light oil or suitable rust inhibitor. Be careful not to allow either the oil or the compound to enter the shielded banel or the inside shell around the nose of the core. In order to keep the plugs clean, and prevent moisture absorption, they should be covered by protecting caps screwed on both the shell and the barrel thread. The top or shielded barrel cap should be equipped with an internal

It ls _v_eryseldom necessary and definitely undesirable to complefsly disassemble spark plugs at every periodic inspection. Under normal conditions, such as a scheduled operation where control is rigidly maintained, the following service procedure is recommended. Spark plugs should be installed in the engine as received, and operated until the tips of-the center electrodes have been reduced toapproximately the manufacturer's specified miirimum diameter or the ground electrodes to the minimum thickness, b"!rg removed only for inspection at the prescribed periods and serviced as outlined in this section. Before installing the plugs, a light coat of mica lubricant should be applied to the threads, and before screwing the plug into the cylinder, inspect the spark plug bushing threqds to make sure they are absolutely clean. Use fully annealed solid copper gaskets that are in good condition. Do not use old gaskets which have becomehard, distorted, or burred from previous service. Care is to be exercised in preventing excssive force being used when tightening the plugs in the cylinder. The pressure exerted should not exceed 450 inch pounds when cold, (approximately 37 foot pounds). Spark plugs are to be removed from the engines at the prescribed inspection periods at which time they are to receive the following maintenance wlthout belng dlsassembled. Lightly brush the threads and end of the shell using a soft wire brush. Do not use excessive pressure as it will tend to round offthe electrodes. Inspect shell threads for nicks and burrs. Chase vyith 18 mm die when necessary. Inspect top barrel threads for nicks and burrs. Chase with s4-27, or 5f-24,, die when necessary.

LLO2

SPARK PLUGS
reached, at which time those makes of spark plugs which can have the center electrodes retipped or new shells to replace the ground electrbdes installed , are to be returned to the manufacturer, otherwise the plugs are to be discarded as unserviceable. OF SPARK PLUGS Core Assembly-Check the core assembly for defects. If the %6-27"or sl-24" elbow attaching threads at the shielded end of the plug are crossed or badly damaged, the core should be scrapped inasmuch as there would not be positive assurance that the elbow would be secured firmly in place. Small nicks or burrs can be cleaned up by iunning a die over the threads, or with a toolmaker's file. Check the mica insulation in the upper barrel for defects, such as deep scratches or gouging. Minor scratches are permissible. However, deep scratches or gouging may develop trouble later on. A definite crack in the insulation should be cause for rejection. Remove all traces of dirt and oil, etc. from within the shielded barrel. A small round wooden stick, or dowel, with several layers of clean cloth wrapped around it and dibped in clean, unleaded gasoline proves effective for cleaning the inside of the barrel. Examine the core threads for nicks, pitting, forms of corrosion, or mutilation. Small nicks or pits can usually be stoned out or removed with a fine toolmaker's file. Threads which are badly scuffed, during disassembly, are cause for rejection. Corrosion, if not too severe, may be tolerated. Check the amount of metal left on the center electrode shoulder in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, and if worn in excess of the manufacturer's limit, the core should be scrapped. To remove the lead deposits which have accumulated on the mica core nose, it is recommended that the core be inserted in a motordriven cleaning socket and revolved at a speed of approximatelyl750 R. P. M. Socketsfor the varioG plugs should be obtained from lhe respective spar-k blue manufacturers. Preferably grade No. 180 Aloxite cloth should be used for this proce$s. However, J''{o. 0_0sa4dpaper will- also serve the purpose. Lead deposits are not of uniform hardnesii or equally distributed; hence it is possible that some sections on the core nose resistance to removal than other may offer greater -For this reason, the operator is causections. tioned not to exert too much pressure on the cloth in the early stages of cleaning. Following the removal of the carbon, lead deposit, etc., polish the mica using No. 300 Aloxite cloth or No. 000 Crocus cloth-in order to obtain a smooth finish. The operator is cautioned not to remove any more mica insulation than is absolutely nec-

gasket to insure an air-tight seal. As an added precaution, plugs should be stored in a heated compartment. This procedure is to be repeated at each period until the limiting factors outlined previously are RECONDITIONING In the event that the conditions of operation are such that it should require some reconditioning by the operator, the following procedure should be followed: plugs should be disasDlsassembly-Spark sembled, using snug-fitting socket wrenches. Open end wrenches should never be used as they ar-eliable to slip and causedamage. If the threads securing the core and shell together have a tendency to bind during the disassembling procedure, do not attempt to force the threads. Place the plugs in a rack, electrode end up, and pour a very small quantity of penetrating oil in the firing chamber. Place the plugs in a heat regulated oven with temperature maintained between 150' F. and 200o F. (66" C.93o C.) for at least twenty-four hours. This procedure will facilitate the disassembly in most cases. If difficulty is still experienced, it may become nece$saryto scrap the parts. large quantities of Shell Assembly-Where shells are being serviced and the facilities are available, removal of carbon and lead deposits is best accomplished by placing the shells in a heated salt bath, or a similar preparation which is recommended by the manufacturer. In small quantities, they may be soaked in clean, unlqqded srasoline to remove the oil and carbon. Hard darbon and lead deposits may be removed with a knife or round wire brush. A small wad of steel wool wound on a drill and used in a lathe or drill press chuck is also effective in cleaning the inside of the shell. Care should be taken to prevent damage to the internal threads, the core gasket seat, and electrodes. Rust may be removed by dipping in a L0% solution of suplhuric acid at L20o F. (49" C.) for a few minutes and then rinsing in cold running water. After drying, coat the shells with a light oil, or suitable rust inhibitor. All shells should be inspected for damaged hexagons, condition of the electrodes and buned threads. Damaged threads should be cleaned up with a tap or die, or in some caseswith a file. When the shell electrodes are burnt away in excess of the manufacturer's limit and can no longer be properly adjusted, they should be discarded and new shells used. On some makes, new electrodes may be inserted, as long as the shell is in otherwise good condition.

1103

SPARK PLUGS essary to obtain a clean and well-polished core nose. Never use emery or carborundum cloth or paper, steel wool, file or sandblasting, as it is detlimental since particles from these materials might affect the plugs in the event that they become imbedded in the mica insulation. Sandblasting is too harsh on mica insulation and would wear away the insulation at a rapid rate. Care should be taken during the core nose cleaning operation to prevent unnecessary wear of the center electrode tips. If there is sufficient metal left upon the center electrode tip, it can be rounded off by inserting the core in the chuck of a motor-driven lathe and turning down the tip. Ottly enough material to obtain a smooth finish should be removed. The tip should be rechecked for contour after this operatron. On certain types of plugs, it is possible to retip the center electrodes when worn to an extent that thev exceed the manufacturer's limits. In this resiect, the manufacturer should be consulted. Examine the clean mica core nose surfaces for pits, burned areas, or unusual wear. Evidence of anv one of these defects should be cause for rei-ection. Check the diameter of the core nosie, using the gageprovided by the manufacturer. If the mica diameter adjacent to the core tip passes through the narrow part of the opening in the ga1e,lhe, insulation has worn apay beyond the Safe point and is cause for rejection. Assembly-Using mica lubricant sparingly, on the lower threads, assemble the core into the shell of the plug. Normal tightening is sufficient. Over-tightening will only distort the core and perhaps damage it. The manufacturer of the particular spark plug should be consulted for the torque limits which generally is never in excessof 3501n.-lbs. (approximately 29 foot pounds). assembly, the spark plugs Bornb Tests-After should be tested in a pressure tester or bomb test at200lbs./sq. in. of COz. Air may be used providing special precautions are taken to exclude any moisture. All new or reconditioned spark plugs should g?p.at 200 lbs./sq. F" r"grrlarly across the .0L2" The duration of the test should in. pressure. -approximately fifteen seconds. If any be plugs fail to fire consistently at this pressure, theie may be a possibility of moisture having collected on the core nose or in the shield chamber. Place such plugs in a heat regulated oven and bake them for approximately two hours at 250" F. to 350' F. (LzL' C.-I77o C.). Retest them after they have cooled sufficiently for handling. If they still fail to fire consistently after the operator has assured himself that the test equipment is operating satisfactorily, and that the flash-over is not occurring within the shield chamber, the plug is short-circuited and should be rejected. Practice is required to determine when a plug fires regularly in a bomb. With some types of plugs, the spark "hunts" from one electrode iroint'to another, firing across the point having the least resistance at the instant. To an inexperienced operator this hunting might appear to be a t'miss". After testing, the plugs should be coated with a light oil or a suitable rust inhibitor to pre,vent conosion, and protector caps installed on both ends of the plug. To avoid the effects of moisture, spark plugs should always be stored in a dry place. This is particularly important during the winter periods or damp weather. A cabinet, or a box, heated with one or more 100 watt electric light bulbs provides a suitable storage place. Terrnlnal Sleeves-Particular care should be exercised when installing the termir:al sleeves on the ignition wire. Cut just the specified amount of insulation from the conductor to permit the right length of wire to extend through the wire outlet. The insulation must bear firmly against the brass disc on the inside end of the sleeve. The ends of the ignition wires, constructed with a layer of cotton under the lacquered surface, should be dipped in an insulating varnish to about /s", and permitted to dry before terminal sleeves are applied to the wire. This treatment prevents the layer of cotton from acting as a wick should moisture find its way into the assembly. When installing the terminal in the plug it should be wiped perfectly cleaa, and aftei that not touched by the fingers as oil, acid, dirt, etc., will promote -eventual flashover, cause defailure of the sleeve. terioration, and The repeated installation of dirty sleeves in a spark plrrs results in contaminatlng the mica insulation on the inside of the barrel, which eventually will causefaulty operation.

t20L

CEAPTER XII

FUEL PUMPS
GENERAL INFORMATION Iruel pump overhaul should only be undertaken at properly equipped overhaul shops where complete facilities for repair and testing are available. Ihe instructions contained in this chapter are reproduced from the manufacturers' handbooks
PESCO FUEL (Pump

covering their products. If the necessary facilities and equipment are not available for overhaul, or additional information is required, it is recommended that the fuel pump manufacturer be called upon.
PUMPS

Englneerlng Servlce Corporatlon Cleveland, Ohto)

DISASSEMBLY Instructions for disassembly are deemed unnecessary except for the following notations. Speclal Tools-Two special tools are required for disassembling Pesco Fuel Pumps, a wrench for loosening the lock nut and puller for extracting the front bearing. These tools are shown in Fig. 120I-. Special expansion tools are available also for removing and replacing the sleeve and rear bearing although they are not strictly necessary. Sleeve and Bearlngs-It is recommended that the pump body be heated to about 250o F. (LzL" C.) in a gas oven or oil bath to eliminate unnecessary wear on the sleeve and bearings during disassembly. The sleeve and rear bearing can be removed with special expansion tools or by tapping the parts out on a soft wooden bench or block after the body has been heated. Experience shows, however, that these parts seldom require any attention for at least 4000 hours service.

INSPECTION AND REPAIR After disassembly, clean the parts with gasoline and inspect them carefully for damage and wear. All defective parts as well as those indicating wear in excessof the tolerances shown in Fig. 1206 must be replaced. Also observe the following: Blades-If the sides of the blades are rough or slightly scored, dress them carefully on a new, flat oilstone, but be careful to maintain the original radius on the edges. Smooth off any sharp corners at the ends of the blades which might score the bronze bearings but do not round them off excessively. Bearlngs-'Slight scoring of the bronze bearings may be corrected by lapping them carefully on a flat oilstone. DO NOT attempt to lap the seal surface of the front bearing. Unlversal Block-Examine the seal surface and tongues and smooth off any rough edges. Substitute a new part if the tongues are worn excessively. DO NOT attempt to repair the seal surface as it must be absolutely true to seat properly on the bearing face. Seal Dtsc-If the seal surface is noticeably worn or scored, substitute a new part. DO NOT attempt to repair the seal surface. Rellef Valve-Inspect the valve to see that the edge is perfectly round and even and that the stem will allow free action in the gurde hole. Clean the guide hole thoroughly with a rag dampened with gasoline and wrapped on a wooden stick or metal rod. To reseat a valve, mount the valve housing on the pump body, insert the valve stem in the guide hole, place a short rod of soft brass or soft steel against the valve or in the spring hole and tap carefully with a wooden mallet. Valve Eouslng-See that the valve seat is round and even and that the integral check valves are in good order. If a ball does not seat properly, place the valve housing on a wooden bench or block, insert a %t" diameter rod of brass or soft steel through the hole in the spring retainer and tap lightly with a mallet until the ball is reseated. Gaskets-Discard used gaskets and substitute with new ones.

L202

.19

25 DRILL 64

I I

LOCKNUT WRENCH T- 160

rHD 8-'. u.ss.

"jI onrurt.0625
tooS

o o
\

s-32 scREw I .o.


BEARINGPULLERT-16I

PUIIP ENGINEERINGSER. CORA


Fig. 1201 - Special Tools for Pesco Fuel Pumps

1203

f * 3,E,

o
F

;;gfi
z. iz
UJI-Lro

z
E f

" 7 9it
oB
lrl < t

LJ

H;ili:
0 o lrl

Ei

r Pi gurz

Eg;

3e=

l-lr'|

-5;p"

a g

i9;ro.

cio

:E ; 5
@ .t-o

; iz

iil;
u =

t!L @ . 9 .

;g
o >

3i

q;ti3E

fi: ; ;5 isEi=3

!,1 F G o O J

36 -,:
?z io

-c

idg a22 <ci Ii=


i 8: @ > o
, . t F

: E:TI ;g"Hj

s 8 T E
T

iE::a

ir!H:

lr, L, C L 6tn

]r'

u<

lxiiil
gI

3.

o<r.lsf

s;

s63H
H;sl
:EF6

!it;; fi:5r
fs
lUcr9o
6Ecoc-

IelEt lsprs

i x
I

zi'zrZl
c) o o)

qHi;i5

0 +)

F
o H

r-. o o)
t{ d +) fr

7
O F

E=. -I
F

lr

Hl
o
r l

an

o{ c\ b!
o F p lr., J <.O

h<

:l r Z ]l|
z g, <u
IJF O L

) <

? ; 93n
o ] < LJ LJ

p,. H e:
F

5'8

z c

H I D

i;;l;i
Sicrr.,

:!fr
L'| L t L ,

s ii H;H
z<
J F

;;s lii
3ia6;3

:Ii ,
f,'t'olJJ<

q;E
B}H

l;l;
H:Ei
[:Pfr

i56d

JoH E .i
_ i.tUl

??g::?,

:3:*;::

ff;; 6ltE"

z.Ag
<IFry

q;3 I

Eai=,,
ii;;:
H8=?h

L204

EEsi
a j t @

o F

80F;

gH;r
H;H-

..i 8g
oB
l!< E

lrJ

i,;sl !;:;;
tt,

3e3
9ra z

ts.n

o rd

Ez
cio

L'F

Hg; ;9i pdg


H . dT 3:

.r!*i
;;;;;

t o O J

; iz
trt E @ . G

3;:E
trl(,tJZ

r99r-

7ry
o > !J |.J Gl|

3r
]r u<
.oo

IIEiH 3e$;.3
= <

H6

IelEr

-c

f;i=
o>o
, . ' F

dHd.g

?rrl:

!i:;i

iln:1

3 < 2 _ -to H; gF

i8'

3![::
{UerEo

o<ugf

s63g
H;sl
cIf6

;*lil;
3;i;EF
tt

2EzE?

F tr
h0 h g

+)

B
a

F , ()
a
@

Fr

+) r.{

Efr =>
o ; <

O F

k q)

B:
J r

F 6

I
I

c\ bb
o F y tdJ (.0

>i r7
:)L

Fr
d< O b, U

< u UF
Ot! J <

9 , ALJ
g 6 o

-rf,

- < Z G
lrJ L,

r3;
lrJ G g trJ

ai3
z'
Lr . lr, .n tE

u F o <

s[! gsei
u
F

i,'r"E
H}H
z<
J F

Hq=;

rfiE

.
) b t

JHfi

:;;;

::*l
( r F u

si;i Er:E
3s[1
; jj1 O G O F

altE'olJJ<

q:i1

L205

PESCO FUEL PUMPS


REASSEMBLY Heat the body to about 250" F. (121" C.) and insert the rear bearing and eccentric sleeve. Place the center pin in the bore of the rotor and the four blades in the rotor slots. This assembly unit can be held together with a rubber band until partlv inserted into the bore of the sleeve. While the body is still warm, insert the top, or front bearing using the special puller to protect the seal surface and to keep the bearing straight. Add the seal parts and drive coupling and tiehten the entire assembly with the lock nut. When assembling the seal parts, place enough oil on the seal surface to provide a film of lubricant, but do not oil excessively. Mount the valve housing on the pump body, referring to the instruction plate on the side of the housing. Add the valve and bellows assembly or diaphragm. * Fasten the cover to the housing and secure the cover screws and housing screws with safety wire. Finally assemblethe valve control spring, adjusting parts and lock nut. Assernbly Test-Test the pump for freedom of operation by turning the coupling with the fingers. If the coupling will not turn, tap the assembly on a wooden bench or block to free the parts. Also, wash out the pump with gasoline to remove any particles of foreign matter. Disassemble the pump, if necessary, to recheck clearances and 6liminate tight spots. When the pumps turn freely after reassembly, proceed with the final test. *When assembling a new diaphragm or replacement valve assembly it is necessary to "preform" the diaphragm to allow for a slight depression at the center when the valve is seated. Preforming can be accomplished easily by assembling the parts in regular order but leaving the valve cover screws only finger-tight. Do not use a screw driver. By means of the adjusting nut, tighten the valve control spring almost to the limit, or enough to indicate that the valve is firrnly seated. Then tighten the cover screws with a screw driver and immediately loosen the valve adjustment to relieve excessive spring tension. Refer to the instruction sheet enclosed with the diaphragm or valve assembly.

rilYer., TEST
Test equipment should include essentially a mounting fixture, an approved fuel flowmeter, a supply tank, tubing, a pair of globe valves for controlling intake suction and discharge pre$sure, and a pair of 30" U-tube mercury manometers for measuring suction and pressure. The mounting fixture should incorporate a suitable drive gear to be coupled to a ftH.P. variable speed electric motor. The flowmeter can be replaced by a stop watch and graduated container or bucket and scales. A 30" mercury manometer will suffice for pressures up to 15 lbs./sq. in. the manometer must be increased two inches for each additional pound. The equipment can be arranged as suggested in the test set-up diagram, Fig. 1204. The procedure outlined in the following paragraphs represents a modification of the standard factory test procedure, and although it has been simplified as much as possible, it can nevertheless be considered a satisfactory check on ordinary service work if observed closely. The thoroughness of the test will depend on the available range of speeds. If for any reason a departure from this procedure is contemplated, an explanation should be forwarded to the Pump Engineering Service Corp. for comments and recommendations. In the following tests the relief valve is to be blocked off from the pump except for the valve regulation test. Substitute a suitable cover plate for the valve housing or mount the housing at 90o from its normal position. The lower or lowest drain hole next to the mounting pad should be left open. I Break-ln-Run the pump for 15 minutes pumping gasoline with no restrictions in the fuel lines. Then disconnect the fuel lines and blow out the gasoline with compressed air while the pump is running. Finally run the pump dry for five minutes. the fuel lines to the pump, Dry Ltft-Connect and close off the valve in the intake lines so that no fuel can enter the pump. Start the pump and measure the mercury differential on the suction manometer, preferably at several speeds. Compare the readings with the minimum allowable dry lift indicated in the curves, Fig. 1205-4. Capaclty-Measure the capacity or rate with 4 inches of mercury inlet suction inches of mercury discharge pressure. mum allowable capacity is indicated curves,Fig. 1205-8. of flow and 8 Miniin the

Valve Regulatlon-Mount the valve and valve housing on the pump in normal position, that is, with the intake side of the housing next to the pump intake port. Run the pump at approximately 2000 R. P. M. and by means of the hand valve in the discharge line, restrict the fuel flow as indicated in the curves, Fig. 1205-C with 4 inches of mercury suction. Then set the relief valve adjustment for 8 inches of mercury pressue (or

L206

PESCO FUEL PUMPS


take out the protecting screen, and clean both the screen and the vent hole. Blocking of the vent hole will result in pressure fluctuation and a general increase in pressure with altitude. Do not apply air blast to the vent hole because it might damage the sylphon or diaphragm. a safety precaution the vent Important-As hole is restricted to minimize loss of pump suction in event of damage to the sylphon or diaphragm. The manufacturer, therefore, strongly cautions against enlarging the vent hole becausethe result would be the creation of an unnecessaryhazard.

any desired pressure). Vary the rate of flow from 0 to twice the original setting and note the effect on the discharge pressure. The allowable pressure variation is plus or minus one half pound per square inch (1 inch of mercury). the foregoing tests any seal Seal Test-During leakage is cause for rejecting the pump. Fuel leaking past the seal will drip from the drain hole. the 4O-hour inspection period Vent Eole-At clean the vent hole in the special plug in the valve supercharger connection. Or, if the vent hole is in the adjusting nut, remove the snap dtg,

a o

MERCURY

,.-txouerenT\
FLOWMETER CAN BE REPLACED BY STOPWATCH AND GRADUATED CONTAINER

VALVE

\ to\-6lol,/

VALVE

TO REGULATE PRESSURE

/:'TZI P E S C OF U E L P U M P

TO REGULATESUCTION

MOUNTED ON TEST STAND AND COUPLED TO '/2 HP. MOTOR

FUEL SUPPLY TANK

tur.tp EtitctNEEB|No sERylcE

coRe

Fig. 120a -

Diagram of Setup for Testing Pesco Fuel Pumps

Fig. 1205

1208

:lAireris;!q tH g iiitil;ig i i g ; i ,iti. il ,i3ll tii,l!; ltl lI i i gg !iiiii!qlqi siisiagl s!a illqiE sEiegig;; sE il* r.-r -or 3ls ig 5-.:B=ls$:si: enl!..! lii?riiiilii gioii!ieiiii
F 9 O 6 . ' - r ? O O - a

u l o u l o z l o

o i il

LJ

<l-

t gtgS833 x o e r u o e o e q e e e e o e e o o e " 3 3 3 3 q q q q q q c c q q c q 9 q c q e c q q q q q q q c q q c q:
I

I :

ld

'

z z
Ll

a 3 i t
!

o o
I

|'

I t
o o t

CI'

oo,
J lrl

filIlltlilI
td- J

lr-

L F E

o u 3n
lrf g

ii:l:ij!;;gi
;Harsxixlisi
L I < J J F < U < - O F f J J < < O J J J | | | - o O t a > > c 3 ' ' o u h t G t

--i* !

. o

i;:=

i$t

G,

o ]L
-

Ll

3t, lrl

' j
o o o g G o

$
! ld 2 z
Ll I

t:
ld

b o o o t? cl

'

c\

(o o

r 9 o o

?irli;ilf?i qli{iiiiti

bi h

AE
lrJ J (,

E o n

'

o o o

o
-

:
i

o o

rlii{i!!!ql11

iiiii?illi?i3
1F F t ro o . o . " p .l l l

ct
2

:
o o l? a
ld I

ts 1r-

cn

iiiiiiliFiil;
;iii{!qiil;;;
I i i
6 6 39 2' i !:Ll : F e d - d:6: F e E a - o t o HardFIalb,

z c 0
tr

Ll

o
Ll l,

c
J

!
b

z
hl

c
G

3:ii3;:!;!!ll
t u c z O O u J O ( o3C))a9,3'|,c,

illiiii;;l;;t
!g
6,1,
F ul Il
t

t209

CECO FUEL PUMP


(Chandler-Evans Corp. South Merlden, Conn.) DESCRIPTION

The Ceco fuel pump is of the rotary vane type oneratine in either direction of rotation. It is piovided- with a pressure relief and regulating valve using a continuous molded diaphragm and seal, no valve stem or other part extending through the diaphragm. Pressure may be set to any desired value within its range by adjusting the fillister head screw at the end of the valve cover. This maintains a uniform discharge pressure throughout a wide variation in intake suction, discharge rate and pump speed. The top of the diaphragm is vented to the atmosphere through a screened L/a" pipe plug. This outlet may be connected to the carburetor air scoop or

turbo-supercharger for maintaining uniform discharge pressmreat increasing altitude. The relief valve is so balanced as to vary the discharge pressure directly as the supercharger pressure. The by-pass valve is incorporated with the pressure relief valve to allow fuel to pass freely through the idle pump, when a separate manually operated pump is the source of supply. The drive shaft has sufficient lateral movement to allow for a slight misalignment and is provided $rith a metallic seal that required no adjustment. L/s" pipe holes are provided for draining any fuel that may possibly have escapedthrough the seal.

INSTALLATION Remove shipping plugs and pipe plugs, thereby draining the oil shipped in the pump. Turn drive shaft with fingers to check operation. Flush with clean gasoline. Lubricate pump through one of the open ports with light engine oil. Again turn shaft several revolutions by hand and drain out excessof oil. Place in any suitable position by rotating the entire pump on its square mounting flange or in the case of pumps with a rotatable rectangular flange by removing the four screws holding the flange on to the pump body and rotating. Next determine the direction of rotation of the engine. Arrows on the anti-drive end cover of the main housing in its normal position (so that the printing can be read normally when the pur4p is held upright with the valve assembly at the top) indicate the inlet port for either direction of rotation. The relief valve housing is mounted on the pump body with four screws, the position depending upon the direction of flow. A plate on the valve housing indicates the end that should be over .the discharge port. The valve housing must be reversed when the direction of rotation is reversed. Pipes must be connected accordingly. Pumps are delivered with relief valves generally set at four pounds per square inch discharge pressure, at three hundred pounds per hour flow, at 2000 R. P. M. To change this setting, loosen the hexagonal lock nut at the top of the relief valve housing cover and turn the fillister head screw ciockwise to increase pressure or counterclockwise to decrease pressure. Reset hexagonal cap lightly with a short wrench, and lock wrre.

DISASSEMBLY To remove rotor assembly remove fout screws, rear plate assembly, and drive shaft. If leakage of the shaft seal occurs, the seal faces of the nitralloy seal collar and bronze bushing should, at this time, be very carefully lapped. Remove four screws and the anti-drive end housing cover, being careful that the center pin does not fall out. The anti-drive end bearing can be removed at ordinary room temperature by pushing on rotor from the driving end using tool No. F2. Rotor assembly will then fall out intact. To remove the liner and drive end bearirg, remove the liner set screw, and immerse pump body in oil at 250o F. (12L' C.). When hot, these parts can then be pushed out freely with a push rod from the drive end. The relief valve may be removed by loosening the four screws holding the relief valve housing and cover, following which the whole assembly will fall apart.

L?LO

S o u T H M E R I D E N TC O N N

u.5.A.

UPPER VALVE GUIDE IN HOUSING


PISTON IN DASH POT

a,ooz x.oo5

.oot a ,oo3 ,+

VANE IN ROTOR gLOT

O.D,CLEAF|ANCE OF VANES EPIN IN LINER

a,ool *,oo1

.oo2 L ,oo7/\
A DESIRED CLEARANCES X C LE ARANCES ALLOWABLE aEFORE SERVICING

.oo4a ,ol2)+
SQUARE SHAFT ROTOR SQUARE HOLE tN

TOTAL END PLAY OF YANE IN LINEF?

a.ool

)+,oo+
ROTOFI HUB ANTI-OtrIIVE BEAFIING IN END TOTAL END R-AY OF

A.OO| |

RoTOR lN LINg;1

*.o035

A.oo15

ROTOT? I.IUB IN DRIVE END eIEARING AFTER AS5EMBLY

x.oo4
Fig. L2O7

CDCO FUEL PUMP ASSDMBLY


Clean all parts carefully in gasoline. Immerse pump body in oil at 250' F. (121' C.). Insert drive end bearing by holding it on a tapered wood plug. Reheat if necessary, then insert liner in similar manner, using a r/e" pin to line up the liner groove with the set screw hole. After cooling, install the liner set screw and its gasket, and insert the complete rotor assembly. Then place anti-drive end bearing carefully into pump body, and press squarely in place with an arbor presn. Do not heat when installing this bearing. Replace gasket and cover and draw down four screws uniformly. Next assemblethe shaft and seal parts in drive end of pump that are held in place by four screws. Tighten screws uniformly and check for freedom of rotation of the pump mechanisrn. If free,

LzLL

stake the four screws in place. Assemble the relief valve in the valve housing, being sure that it rests squarely on the valve seat and that it works freely. Assemble the other parts of the valve, such as diaphragm, spring and spring follower; and replace the valve housing on the pump body in the proper position, depending upon the direction of rotation, with the four screws. Tighten uniformly. The lock wiring of all screws and the hexagonal lock nut should not be done until after the pump has been checked and the pressureregulated. It is recommended that all gaskets and rubber substitute packings be replaced with new ones. On pipe threads use only an approved pipe sealing compound.

INSPECTION ANI) MAINTENANCE Fig. No. 1207 shows cross-sectionalviews of the pump. Clearances should be checked as shown for both desired values and those maximum values above which parts should be replaced. Special attention should be paid to see that the bore of the liner is smooth, also that the working surfaces of the vanes are smooth and that the metallic drive shaft seals are carefully lapped. The square end of the drive shaft and its mating square hole in the rotor should not be worn excessively. When assembled, the pump should turn freely and show no sign of binding. The diaphragm should be carefully checked to see that there are no cracks or breaks, and that it is very flexible. The valve shall fit freely in the valve housing. The valve seat shall have a clean square edge all around, and may be checked with Prussian blue to insure proper seating of the valve.

1301

CHAPTER XIII

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STROMBERG NA.RgA AND NA-RgB CARBURETORS


OVERHAUL-NA.R9A carburetor should be disI)lsassembly-The assembled for cleaning and inspection each time the engine is given an overhaul. After the carburetor has been removed from the engine and the hot spot and air intake or heater taken off, the halves of the carburetor may be separated bv the removal of the fillister head screws at parting surface and the venturi set screw. t[e -economizer needle, mixture control needle, The Dump sleeve and venturi are held in the throttle bodv. The pump sleeveshould be slipped off the operating stem as soon as the halves are separated as it is a brass stamping and is easily bent if allowed to drop on the floor or bench. If it is necessary to remove the venturi, it will have to be driven out using a wooden plug similar to that shown in Fig. 1301-.{. AU parts in the bodies, with the possible exception of the idle discharge jet assemblies, should be removed to enable a thorough cleaning and inspection. bodies and Cleanlng and Inspectlon-The all parts should be thoroughly cleaned in gasoline, and all passagesblown out with compressed air. All variable parts should be checked to see that their sizes are in accordance with the latest carburetor specification sheet for the engine. Inspect all moving parts to see that they iio not have excessiveclearance. ordering replacement Replacements-When parts it is necessary to give complete informaiion concerning the parts desired to avoid delay in shipment or the receipt of wrong parts. Wherever possible, the serial number of the carburetor should be given. A careful reference to the attached assembly drawing (seeFig. 1302) to determine the correct part number and name, and if marked with an asterisk ( *) giving the size as stamped on the piece, will greatly facilitate service. A specification sheet giving the sizes of iets, fuel level, economizer setting, etc., will be -furnished no charge if you will write to the Bendix Products Corporation, Stromberg Carburetor Division, South Bend, Indiana, advising the model of your engine. Parts Price lists will also be furnished on request. P-t9223 covers a complete set of gaskets for this model. headless screw plugs below Reassembly-All the fuel level should be assembled with shellac, being careful not to get it on the end of the plug where it will come off and be carried by the gas into one of the metering orifices. Headless screw plugs above the fuel level and all other threaded parts screwed into the bodies should have a compound of graphite and castor oil put on the threads. When it is necessary to replace the throttle shaft, pump lever or throttle stop, assemblethe Iever and stop as shown in Figure 1301-8 and D. The throttle valve should be so fitted that it excludes practically all tight when in the closed position. It is recommended that in replacing a float needle valve or a needle valve seat that these two assemblies be replaced at the same time, as it is very difficult to fit a new needle to an old seat or a new seat to an old needle. The float level should be fu" below the parting surface and is dependent upon the thickness of the gasket under the needle valve seat. The level should be checked under the conditions encountered in service as regards the fuel used and the fuel pressure or head at the carburetor. Those carburetors having a Yro" needle seat or gravity type, which is that one used with a gravity feed system having lessthan a9'1" fuel head, should have the level set using 1 tb. pressure (39" gasoline sp. gr.) at the carburetor. Those carburetors .71-0 having a .L96" needle seat or pressure type, which is that one used with a gravity feed system having more than a 97" fuel head or a fuel pump, should have the level set using 3 lbs. presat .7I0 sp. gr.). If after assemsure (117" gasoline bling, the level is not correct, remove the needle valve seat and put in thicker gaskets to lower the level and thinner gaskets to raise it. A change in gasket thickness of t4ntt wrll change the level approximately s/a". When any parts of the mixture control system are replaced, care should be taken to see that they are assembledcorrectly. As previously explained the needle valve is operated by an eccentric pin which is a part of the mixture control stem assembly. The mixture control stop is pinned to this same stem and it is important that the stop be located on it at the proper angle with the eccentric pin. This may be done by placing the mixture control stem, without the stem nut, spring and packing, in the throttle valve body with the eccentric pin away from the pump mechanism and turning it until the distance from the parting flange surface to the pin is Yra"(seeFig. 130L-E). With the stem held in this position, place the mixture control stop against the shoulder of the stem with the stop against the stop in the body (full rich position) and drill through the stop and stem. Then assemble the spring, packing, and nut on the stem, press the stop on against the nut, and pin in place.

t302

CARBURETORS
The mixture control needle is screwed into the needle holder and these parts should be so adjusted that a needle valve travel of r%t" + .000", - rAt" and a lever travel of 75o to 80o is obtained. An approximate adjustment may be obtained before assembling the needle valve in the upper half by setting the bottom of the holder slot LrAz" from the main body parting surface with the needle valve held down against the needle valve seat (see Fig. 1301-C). \)Zhen this preliminary adjustment has been made, assemble the two halves together and determine if the needle has r%a,, + .000,,, _ |(t,, travel. The needle travel may be checked by removing the jet and plug below the needle and using the simple apparatus shown in Fig. 1301-4. When in the full lean position, the needle stops against the needle valve seat, when in the full rich position the stop strikes the stop lug. When the proper adjustment has been made pin the needle as shown in Fig. 1301-Cto prevent its changing in service. In assembling the needle in the carburetor the slot in the holder should be placed with the opening away from the pump mechanism. The position of the economizer needle adjusting nut determines the engine speed at which the needle is lifted off its seat, and it is therefore important that this be set correctly in order that the engine will not be operating on too lean a mixture near full throttle or too rich a mixture at cruising speeds. The throttle opening at which the economizer should come in is given on the specification sheet as the economizer setting. This is the travel in degreesof the throttle valve from closed position to that point where the forked lever on the throttle shaft engages the economizer needle adjusting nut. To find the angle which the valve makes with the horizontal flange surface when the economizer comes in, add the throttle valve angle (given on the specification sheet) to the economizer setting. If the economizer setting is 33' and the throttle valve angle is 20o, the angle which the throttle valve will 'rnake with the horizontal flange surface when the forked lever engages the economizer needle is 53o. When the final adjustment is made, use another nut to lock or jam the adjusting nut, being careful, however, not to change the setting.

OVERIIAUL-NA.R9B
The NA-R9B model is the same as the NARgA model except that a priming device is incorporated in the mixture control assembly - of The instructions coverins the the NA-R9B. NA-R9A are, therefore, applicable to tht NARgB except that part of them which covers the method of assembling the mixture control needle and stop. Prlmlng Systern - The priming system in the carburetor consists of a valve on the mixture control stem, with passagesso arranged that fuel from the accelerating pump passesthrough the valve to the pump discharge nozzle in the barrel of the carburetor when the mixture control is full rich, or passesthrough the valve to an rA" pipe connection for the primer system when the mixture control is full lean. Fuel is diverted to the primer system when the mixture control is approximately 55o from the full rich position. To prime the engine the following procedure should be followed: (1) With the mixture control set full rich and the throttle closed, turn on the fuel. (2) Turn off the fuel when carburetor is full. (3) Set the mixture control full lean, which opens the channel to the priming system. Move the throttle slowly, thus operating the accelerating pump and forcing fuel through the priming system to the engine. The number of strokes required to satisfactorily prime the engine will have to be determined by experiment. (4) When sufficient priming charge has been pumped to the engine, close the throttle and set the mixture control full rich. (5) Turn on the fuel and start the engine. Replacernents - When any part of the mixture control and primer shaft assembly are replaced, c,ale should be taken to see that they are assembled correctly. The primer valv-e should be lapped in, using a very fine lapping compound. Care should be taken to see that the valve seats perfectly and after assembly should be checked to see that it shuts off the gas from the pump discharge nozzle when mixture control is full lean and throttle operated. It is important that the stop be assembled in correct relation to the eccentric pin which operates the mixture control needle. This may be done by making up the complete assembly, including the lever, indicator plate and nut, and assembling it in the throttle valve body. With the stop in the full rich position (against the large head screw) the shaft should be adjusted so that the dimension from the shaft to the eccentric pin is .330" (see Fig. 1304-A). When this adjustment has been made drill and pin the stop in place. The mixture control needle is screwed into the needle stem and these parts should be adjusted to obtain a needle valve travel of r%t" plus .000", minus rAE";a lever travel of 75o to 80o, and the primer valve to open between 55o and 60o lever travel. An approximate adjustment may be obtained before assembling the needle in the throttle valve body by setting the bottom of the stem slot r%2" from the main body parting surface with the needle valve held down against the needle valve seat (see Fig. 1304-8). When this preliminary adjustment has been made assemblethe two halves together and check

1303

T-\1

t"

o J vl
t
I

F.

bte -T
I

NA - RgA VENTURI REMO\AL PLUG

A
P-t7too
DR[.L & REAM FORXOOOO TAPER PIN. ASSEMBI.E P-t4577 PtN

9/a6'-24 T
_ t-tN _t(f)

SPLIT PIN AS THROTTLE STOP & SHAFT ASSEMBLY

-t-xseonuL FoRF65E7
PIN AFTER ADJUSTING RIVETENDS OF PIN"& FILE FLUSTI ]*29 D RILL

FOR DRILL& REAM x.ooo P-9745 TAPER PIN DURING ASSEMBLY

& PUMP LE1YER P-I3746 ECON. ASSEMBLYCOMPLETE PRELIMINARY ADJUSTMENTOF MIXTURECONTROL }EDLE VAT-VE & HOLDER

T
350

ol9
I

STOP AGAINST BOSS

-t-SURFACE 8 METHODOFASSEMBLINGPUMP LEVER AND ECONOMIZER MIXTURE CONTROL LEVER IN FULL RICH POSITION FITTING MIXTURE CONTROL STOP AND STEM

E
Fig. 1301

1304

CARBURETORS
to see if the above requirements are met. The needle travel may be checked by removing the jet and plug below the needleand using the simple apparatus shown in Fig. 1304-C. When the final adjustment of the needle has been made so that all the above requirements are met, pin and solder the needle as shown in Fig. 1304-B to prevent it changing in service. In assembling the needle in the carburetor the slot in the needle stem should be placed with the opening away from the pump mechanism. P-20L46 covers a complete set of gaskets for this model.

NA.ROA CARBURETOR SPECIAL AND STANDARD PARTS See Specification Sheet (Fig. 1302) for special parts applicable to your carburetor. ECONOMIZER NEEDLE ASSEMBLY: Std. P-L7321- 5o and 34o P-17430-L5o and 60o P-18036- 2o and 34"

ECONOMIZER SEAT: Std. P-17328-No.32 P-17436-No.34 P-I.8028-No. 44 MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE: std. P-L4L70-L5' P-L7432-30" MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE STEM: Std. P-15623-Usewith P-14L70 P-17435-Use with P-t7 432 MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE STEM PIN: Std. P-6587-Use with P-15623 435 P-7018-Use with P -17 MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE ASSEMBLY: of P-14170, P-15623, and P-6587 Std. P-16283-Consists P-L7435 P-L74}7-Consistsof P-L7432, and P-7018 MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE GUIDE: Std. P-t4L7}-Use with P-15623 P -t7 434-Use with P-L7435 MIXTURE CONTROL WASHER: Std. P-LL726-Vse with P-14170 P-17431-Usewith P-L7432 MIXTURE CONTROL WASHER: Std. P-1417t-Use with P-L4L70 P-L7433-Use with P-I7 432

z0gilEI.{

-:l.lttd l.le rstod JO LatHnX

INIIZOIO X?lU\ .rt tortrnttvt 'lYtlts t^t9 -:(|tttolo r{ttHM lo! ONV tLrVN tl lNtgx? tAlD
lnN 9irr)Yl ?Nrus nitva

ANVdr,.toJ uor3ll
lols Htrl

uotSunEuvs

u-vN 1300n

=|Z|S 'l'rnJ

3]vts

lioJ,ttnatvf 'ltool,,l JO 9ral/vrvlO

-:l?qto No l?tlulnN Sll{J Atlft.ls .lON O -:tJ,oN

-:9llvd ax l?Ogts ?ilAoaroi ltsftln o.l lonr avrlrg :tour*tl? I -: tIgN

o-Q NOu.)3S

go60t-d glTrd r3f 9Ntt:Ftil 6.LLEI grTrd J5f '9p3L3r.t r$rwg t'tLr-d 39:|YH)SE! * NlVlA.

NOlf2SS

g'lzbfrl

3'?01-d 9n1d l^et:s s8t'loveH

rLs9 -d Ir)rsYE 13010H tBnr oL99-d 90'ld,uEratJgt SSi|.|(l VaH * c,|,4ct-d u3q'roH HJ.trv\ -gt1l 3.tor 99,q;zt-d '9.fov lnN l1o

l;lxsvo

lnzzoN'H)s,cr Nrwl
zc39-d -a3HSV A X301

0649r-d

Lgi9er4 ,vr=rat)s.r-=tsr?,nJ.NEn glc!l gn'rd Ma?rts


ZZLet-e I "r!t(Er=n etl\r/ NlVt l gslAl-d rt 3nr ranlNSA 9Nlylvd

9'|rr-d

tunlN3n

euz?-e / Nrd l3^;n qmv 31ol

..rl$ 1r.or1
o|\ilius

girlor

;.:rl,
64ae-d .ito2l 9n1J 9xtttrrl,l 90501-d 'NO?t 9n'rC I3n 9Nlllltt^l (No:a) r:c
SSlgt'el *

9999-d N|d

?9('?,t-d 9N[9nrtv zerci'g * L3fSgvHrs,o

t3ysv9

?Nrtaral,.l

C'llr -d I n'rd,v\3u?s sB3'10Y3l{ a+zot.d 9nrd /\,l3a|'s sg3'rO\GlH 9eLEt-a gNEtdS 'tv?l'tirH
* 4ltEl.d E^'lyn dhrnd c?Ll-d

.,c."NouJ-s

LLsrt-d' Ntd dors 3-ll'J.oeiHJ" 9ZLCre =A''rvn 31lJ.odtuzgtzt-d a3Hi\/ir\ >{)o1 eO;Zt'J M3a)s Sn.rvn =1lJo3HL P erol 33s.- O'gget.d (dno, u3NtYUJ.s SYC
ggs9'd

.v-v.r.rorJrEs
Vu

a-vsvg9n1J

e3r

9NlHSnS I

i.to'tStd dhtnd 6rLet-a 3A3?1S Notstd dNnd * {( ol'ltl -d r 3'lo33N 'J,N0? .txl l,,l L9S9 .cJ t( t( Ntd 3101?N INOS J.X|I.I ?9Sr-d x * hlJ.s 3'1033N.r.No)J,XIN

9882-d 'No23 litvsv9 -L\Gls =rKl33N sB9lt-d @x - lc"nvr) (dr{o)) "*,iil'i-'j* t!:rs ? z'lg3aN ^"" '' tyo'rJ

(avprN
(ctt

(ahrof,) 3]o33Nlvo1l | | tlltr-d * 5 (ano:) tvas sn1vn =rxte=r N tLtrt-d{(r( ?3HSYM Sdrno3'1033N @969c1-d dr.tf oNr)|20'1 @ 9999-d u3t{svM ):o1 @ eete-a '1'llJ
M?U2S r{fvl.l OYEH il0?-d @ 31J3Vtl

/ i Szget-d M:|:tt'H3vhr H 'r.]LJ i /

=r-r.v'rd u*,n?El"u*n r/
gOGCl.c, 9OGClrd '9Nrytw
y30t

/l
,/ I

l,

* x e?Eet -d i( 'NO?3 rvss 3A1YA 31033N 9S9t -d !NruJs 3'1(133N'NO)3 o9s9t -d IJ3HSV/\ ?'1s33N'NO23
9Nl)2Vd l9S9t -d 'NO)3 31Ct3EN -d '959t 'NO)3 31q3lN 30rn9 60??t-d @ '-1'1lJ /r\3:l?S H)Yt l CIV:IH LZgt-d airH9YlA )t3qt tzez-a oH'TilJ /Yr=lzDSlf2vl^| ^ - ... 9ltct.d ('dr.lo:) rra^3'r dlrnd

9LLera J.iDrsY9'|O'1t=lt.S drdnd LLlrct-a J]N iru,EY :DlrJ Ntd I;u10, tslQ,t'd (ar$)rGus dhrnd

908I

e08I ' tI.{

^Nvdht0J uol3unguvf,
D D . D ' r l o t : 3 < t I F . f LF

9a3L.touls

xtoN3e

ccil.t-d -AOOE| g6ci-d Dn'rd 90s9-c O 9n1d tdrd ss]rov3t{ * atfrt-J (NlVl^r)r3F9n |aer3w

NIVNI Nrvao

E r2lS

rE|xw9

&-d ty=13 ErKllilN 'r,Not aI| Fl


zLt?t-a gt<EttN LNo) I '4xr1^f 30s9-d 9n1d Sdrd ss?10v3H tttol'd rrSriut'tftl.&ulJ cr.tcl-d igt9.d 'zttHev/l
gn'rd SSlt t.ci l^tr?s ss310v:lH

l\nl3

utr,ff6ti$t t",tn

.*r"r =,ffii''lHdtr,^
et-rtr-d * * no =t^'rv^LNo) .:rxrw =1(t
x:r|fs

tmlynJlrolJ

x51

r9s9-d x3H 31tSVl J.nN


9999-d NId UEJ.IOJ 9SlSr-d

3rvld lJOtYlloNl sL9Er-d U3431 J.No) :lxlt^l Vru,o{7ir -Z?ZEt-d @ dol,g tNo)'Jxrhl 99061-d Nrd dors INol 'lxrr,,l

e t' a

^ioaHf
a a

- ) J - l o !

l\

3E3.N

Lr.J3S

rnN HllS J'NOI'J,XlN Vrr!||r$-9906t-d O 9NrX2Vd !1319 tNOf IXlt^l Vilorrrs-Sgo6t-d O U3|{SV,Y\ l.l3IS'lNOf 'tXt t"l p rronns-i9o6t-d @ 9illudS t^l3lS'INOt'lxl t"l -d @ peorzes-6?Es

V"roNrtr-t

906t-d

MSets 9s96r-d @ r.,r3ssv t{3ts 'tNo2 txlw

G?f,qD4'rcV ;l-tol Inn,ilKlvno

ce4t.d ',.ov -rl(ll lN\ft|(llfrE


SCltl-d rt

sENr HSng Hlrl^ .^(pc

J-3xsv9

V r l . x r r i - t g 9 s t - d 'INO? @ 9NrHSng Htrr\ W3J,S J.XtW

909C-d 9n.ld 3dld SS3']C!U3H

9n1d

Elflv^ inlolHr. eet6-d Jr 0331 UtY l10l o9|9.d ,v1?!2S SS':|1AV:H

9os9-d O 9n1d tdrd st3.roYtH LLttra (dhro')/v\aa)s do.rs r(lv oeHr


(dwo") va|oJ 044l:d e:rner l3 rrc13

9Z9Ct-e a3n=n e'l r399-d lnN -n


(aHoc) Scasl-d =l^'rv^ \ x)rlda

(ann:)aos zLlet 'l3vitlDl.lc, Nrvhl


L?tl -d JF* 9S9-d

ool

(a, to) anvl\ =rE3aNl)3 'Bs9t.d


etla?l Nrd 0r991 -d

.tnN rov:rt'=GrN't{o)t
z3dvL

r.Jr3u)s 3^lt|o

l,3vsvg rnN H3J.s rNo, J.xtt.l tilfr:d 't{'vr M3:t"3 t EH -l'ltJ 660r.1-d o l,Jvlrli a.lJ.LGltt{l ?Lf.oz4 3IV1d NOlIY2rJr23ds

908I

808r'EId

-:lrlYd t'rtrssod JaO ltrat.lnx

tNrrt(llo N?Hf^ rr loJ.Stnttvt 'rYtlls ZAl9 -:otttlo Hf lrlrs !o! oNV 3ttYN sl tNr9x? lArD

ANVdt.I

uolSunguut

6U-VN 130D1

=zrs']']nJ

3-]v?s

- ?6str-d gNt/{VtO tu sv qtv fflo. tarvtatt{J,oir|.ar,l-t! 9r.r'rirro-tt Ar (aHo) rrrtytri sYO 4attt-d lsn s(Mllt{J. o:rddltls ao INIA?tlu.ril \y -'lroN

rorlt|ntlvc .ltQotr ro tNrrAVl<!

-;lt?qlo No ltgLlnN s[{J, Al|ltde IoN OO _:tJ,oN

c-q

Notl)?s

*Lotsf'*,*^G
Itrl/.l-d l

NOU,?19

e]ail

39affHf,g'El

Nlv^l

et?ol-d 9n1d A^ta2s tsnqv?H

rAs9 -d ?gnr r oaAcf-d Lressv -xlfll, gOZt-d JnN 9rV

I:t)tsvo

ose9r-d xrvl lnaN'Htsrcl 2&t?-d -aaHS/Y\ >|3O1 L9l9|-4 Its r.=ts lijalrNSn Zzl-et'd I eirlgln ?ilv Ntvr^l gslet-d |r

3nr rafrrNt^

9'rar-d 9Nrylvd lunlNtn

vn)a-a t sssv dans.l qltv lrrtl


9N0ds "@2H eNusftrw irtl 6AAC-d tlillsvD gnid txrSartu|xo23 e060t-d 9n1d r3n 9r|l|:LLtht .Notl ss)01.d r ('Ho:r) t?c eNtu3r?t.l

eri294 / Nk aE 3'r9mVtlol

99994 t\ld

-/

LLsUt-d' Ntd dorg a-lr.ioaHl gzLerd t^'rvn =rluo?tF{r @wt'd E,A'rVn =rUl.oeHJ
-d 9S9'd 9r'l1d ?l:tNtY?lJ

'-Hffij?#t
\
4'Bcri.o**\

NU N\

\ \ \

\\ \

JitxsvgrvE MEa)6
V "l.ox 3"s og9t '!.tassv u3NrYUJ.sSve

s 3 'rvA irtctEtN .FV.NO[2ilS

9ntt fi13u2s Bslnov3t{ Srzot 9md,rlEFS s9E11lV?H *tl,tse 9i.g4i'rv?rEsr


4Ethd * eA'lVil\d^rf'td "Gar-d FE&sld dAnd 6fi4.l'd 't^t3ssv tsA3ars dhlnd 0el9r -dt r * * ?1q?3N J.ilO? .lxtbr Lg39 -d * * Nrd 31013N.il*o? .J.xt1.. * * "rsl-J 1",l3rs 31033i( rilO) rxtt.l c9?l-d Xral.l l.lrJ'S Ctlfld 196l-d rallgvi\)|201 sz8r-d /VGTJfIS H:'VhI AHTIIJ 9elrd Et-w'td 9NtNtvt ltt 9Noaf,lH caecl-d r3HSYlA 9xrxtvrAl| .l{t)Ovd li6ehE qrrlXwJ XtOt 92LEt-4 .r3)lsv9't{3llE }vals dl.|nd 4fl JrN Tust (EDI Nld rElr r'rC OtZGr-d 9NlHSng lrEJJS dr^lnd 9LZGI-d 't"l3SBY WAIS dhlncl

c)rlr -d

.-{1. t{ouJ:ls

J.iDtSY9

98A?-d .t\GB =ndaEN

}{Or3

{( rF g?rtr-d r 3.lOEGtN r{O)3 1V3S :lfW lIltl-d it '].|3SSV -l.3S irn1v^ StlEFN
)F * ltt?l-d z3HSYM 3d1n0 t1033N c69l -d dr1) gNlyro'l f,999-d u?r{EYM Xf O1 50r -d ,S?U'S H)Yl,,l OY3H'ull

ESE|rd .LWIJ 3A1VA;r1(l:t3N 9S91 :J gNnadB 3'lottN'xo23 o'ts9l -d


UlHSY,I\ 9Nlvf\

tt9g9l -d 30tn9 31q33N'NOfe

'NO?l 31OBBN 19Sgt-d 31Q33N'NOf3

ggm4 rtA )arfl tGtflezr-d ([{'TIH ,|l;EGTffn| 9'1C,1-d 't,lSSSV it*\-s'l dHnd

908I

e0gl

'EI"i{

AxVdl.lOJ Uol3ungEvf,

9U3C|I^IOUIS XloN?g

6b?l-d

AOC}CI NIVW
jf|-cl On.|cJ NIYaO

xOr1219

4
'4,\

-,

30s9 -c tn'ld 3drd sst.lovSt{ * EilrJ ( N I v t^t) JEIF 9f.{|a!11!il4, eg''u-d ^ar$lo rt:rs :rr(EGrN ].Nof Lill^l * zLttt-e in<El3 r LNOt'fxrw rvl3

sstLr-d ss31qv3H 9n1d nirDs

ur,S6t'l#o" "t,^
* * 2Lt1-a ati*{SVrv\ 3A'rYn'rr\|of J.Xl 3^l

sose-d en.rd Sdrd ss?1ov?l{


99'(tl"d nnntfiJ

,iiY

F *

** eLtrr-d 3dn9:tflv^J}{q?

l)(|t l

.r:Dtgv9

ffilal)9

trtrlJ

c/,tcl-d WnU2rlnJl\tor1J ,99'>-d "tSHstvli x3cr1 9t99-d

Nrd urrro2

ttr?Gl -Gl dOl,S'!l'lo) aasfr -d t.|ld dOIS l,ilO] t66St -d

'l.xtlr J.Xttl

).trrtl
or. rj>.AD--q O.-

l'-anf,
'l tt I(

r-68SFd 31rtol+1
lo lo lF

\t.

\ J,

ffi,

-v1rfi t^.rt^irtstE=lN .rY.lutiF

alts{-d lt.'tr-d nlrr.< artS-d

U]ll{Svrt l'JYHs'lNOl'Ixll.l 'szter -d ,ilHsfig lJ\il{s l.No)'rxl!.| ??98r -d 9xtHsnel'tilo) J.xt!.I s?9r -d tilo) .lxll,l Ijvlls ,xr).)vc te9l -Gl lxt}r ifilxsv^\ 9||l)rfvd'lt{o) ?9931'd 9r.rlds tJvr{s 'lNof rxll,.l -d ttz6l
3A1YA'rNOt'txll^t 9bz6t-d HSNS RI'IA IJYHS INO) IXII,{ 00s? -d ,f\t tdtd sst.lqvtH LLfrFA ']{?SSv l aefg&J.s rov oaFu 04(hd :l.f:rssv xaEJ ?fen-t !3 aroid 'L|3SSV

oL9i -4 9n'rd l tir2s 9s31(tv3H gosE-d tn.1d edld s310\/eH

eacrq-4 3'rOl Maa36 J'tr&?rVTrg'nOV


'l,.l3SSV oEz6t -d IIVHS'INO2'tXl 09iB-d t^l

DNtHgn

9md

/|\t|l29

cehd'fov:rKll Ii{v?toYflE el{zz6l -d .* Hl^^,^@tt EIAT,A =nlroaH.t 4gt5-d ri o331il t lY 310t sslLt-d

9n'rd,t\3rr2s SsSilov3l{ zztar-d AA:IA2S'H)Yr.r OYek 11tJ


sa9Er-d 'r.NO) :lxrlJ l,3^3'r 95rSl-d 3rv.ld torv2rqNl

ltslg.d rnN 3-l 9ca9l -d LJ=ssv =l^']v^ xf3H9

@
lf|s9-d J.nN 3'llSY) 1959-d q\H'l'rtj ,1^3d)S'l{)Yli I?XS\r9 rnN Eeat-d L|3J,S rNO' J.Xlr,,l

cf:
r;Ii

oorer-d 'l{3ssv &rs sL?6r-d Jr * &?tr -d ' r.l3ss v :t^.lvn :rEl3ilr\r'!{o)3 t's9t-d :ErN'l{o?3 InN'rov?rt
e?lCrd Nrd oct?l -c llk;vl

913e4 M3a"9'H3Yl l Ut{''l'llJ 660a1-d

r.JvHs e.r!o!t{r
lo9G -d

M3Uf,G 3Atr!C

3-tv'rd Nolrv2r3r2rds

908r

1307

-o
(Yl

F IT T I N G M I X T U R E C O N TR O L S T O PA N D S T E M .

A
M I X T U R EC O N T R O L LEVERIN FULL RICH POSIT]ON.

=.'rt\ -ro
-_

osz DRTLL t/gz x4s"


c ' s r N KF o R P - 6 s 9 7P t N
AFTERADJUSTING R I V E T E N D SO F P t N & FILE FLUSH.

,,

I/8 TUBING

DRILL
t,

9/t6- 2 4
T H R E AD S .

P R E L I M I N A R YA D J US T M E N T O F M I X T I J R E C O N T R O LN E E D L E V A L V E & H O L D E R .

B
Fig. 1304

1308

CARBURETORS NA-ROB CARBURETOR SPECIAL AND STANDARD PARTS SeeSpecificationSheet (Fig. 1304) for specialparts applicable to your carburetor. ECONOMIZER NEEDLE ASSEMBLY: Std. P-L7327- 5" and 34" P-17430-15oand 60o ECONOMIZER SEAT: Std. P-t7328-No. 32 P-L1436-No. 34 MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE: std. P-14170-15" P-L7432-30' MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE STEM: Std. P-15623-Use with P-L4L70 P-L7435-Use with P-L7432 MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE STEM PIN: Std. P-6587-Usewith P-15623 P-7018-Use with P-L7435 MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE ASSEMBLY: of P-14170, P-15623 Std. P-16283-Consists and P-6587 of P-17432, P-L7437-Consists P-17435 and P-7018 MIXTURE CONTROL NEEDLE GUIDE: Std. P-14L73-Use with P-15623 P-L7434-Use with P-L7435 MIXTURE CONTROL WASHER: Std. P-7L726-Use with P-L4L70 P-L74}I-Use with P-L7432 MIXTURE CONTROL WASHER: Std. P-L4L7L-tTsewith P-L4L70 P-L7433-Use with P-L7432

1309

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STROMBERG NA-RgCT ANI) NA.RgCz CARBURETORS


OVEREAUL
I)lsassembly-The carburetor should be disassembled for cleaning and inspection each time the engine is given an overhaul. After the carburetor has been removed from the engine and the hot spot and air intake or heater taken off, the halves of the carburetor may be separated by the removal of the hexagon nuts at the parting surface, the venturi suction tube for the economizer and the venturi set screw. The economizer needle, pump sleeve and venturi are held in the throttle body. The pump sleeve should be slipped off the operating stem as soon as the halves are separated as it is a brass stamping and is easily damaged if allowed to drop on the floor or bench. If it is necessary to remove the venturi, it may be necessaryto use a wooden plug similar to that shown in Fig. 1307-A to drive it out. All parts in the bodies, with the possible exception of the idle discharge jet asiembly, should be removed to enable aih6rough cleaning and inspection. The economizer needle and diaphragm may be removed by removing the- nuts- holding the economizer cover to the throttle body. The assembly containing the mixture control plates and primer valve may be removed from the throttle body for a more complete disassembly. The automatic mixture control unit should be overhauled in strict accordance with the instructions issued on that unit. bodies and Cleanlng and Inspeetlon-The all parts should be thoroughly cleaned in gasoline, and all passagesblown out with compressed air. Alt variable parts should be checked to see that their sizes are in accordance with the latest carburetor specification sheet for the engine. Inspect all moving parts to see that they do not have excessiveclearance. ordering replacement Replacements-When parts, it is necessaryto give complete information concerning the parts desired to avoid delay in shipment or the receipt of wrong parts. Whenever possible, the serial number of the carburetor should be given. A careful reference to the assembly drawing (Fig. 1309) to determine the correct part number and name, and if marked with an asterisk (*) giving the size as stamped on the piece, will greatly facilitate service. A specification sheet giving the sizes of jets, fuel level, economizer setting, etc., will be furnished if you write to the Bendix Products Division of Bendix Aviation Corporation, South Bend, Indiana, advising the model of your englne. Parts price lists will also be furnished on request. P-61307 covers a complete gasket set for the NA-RgCl and P-61308 covers a gasket set for the NA-R9C2 carburetor. Reassembly-All the headless screw plugs below the fuel level should be assembled with shellac, being careful not to get it on the end of the plug where it will come off and be carried by the gas into one of the metering orifices. Headless screw plugs above the fuel level and all other threaded parts screwed into the bodies should have a compound of graphite and castor oil put on the threads. When it is necessary to replace the throttle shaft, pump lever or the throttle stop, assemble the lever and stop, as shown in Figures 1307-8 and 1307-C. The throttle valve should be so fitted that it excludespractically all light when in the closed position. It is recommended that in replacing a float needle valve, or a needle valve seat, that these parts be replaced at the same time, as it is very difficult to fit a new needle to an old seat or a new seat to an old needle. The float level should be V4" below the parting surface and is dependent upon the thickness of the gasket under the needle valve seat. The level should be checked under the conditions encountered in service as regards the fuel used and the fuel pressure or head at the carburetor. If, after assembling, the level is not correct, remove.the needle valve seat and put in thicker gaskets to lower the level and thinner gaskets to raise it. A change in gasket thickness of Y64" will change the level approximately 5/a". When any parts of the mixture control cover assembly are to be replaced, the shaft and stop should be assembled as shown in Fig. 1307-D. If the valve plates are to be replaced, they should be lapped in with a very fine lapping compound so that any possibility of air leakage wilt be eliminated. The cruise valve stem and lever should be assembled as shown in Fig. 1-307-E. Upon completion of the carburetor assembly, the economizer should be set to open at the value specified on the specification sheet. The venturi suction tube through the wall of the venturi should pe plugged ald t};re %" pipe plgg in -the econonuzer cover should be removed and a source of vacuum connected to this chamber. The small 10-32 plug in the economizer adjustment screw in the cover should be removed and an Ames Dial Gauge should be assembled so the leg is resting against the economizer needle stem as shown in Fig. 1307-F. The vacuum should be increased until the Ames dial indicates that the needle has started moving and that point should be taken as the opening point. NOTE: A water manometer should be connected to the 10-32 manometer connection on the economizer

1310

CARBURETORS
cover so the correct suction may be read in "inches of water". If the opening point is not as specified on the specification sheet the lock nut on the adjustment screw should be loosened and the necessary adjustments made. It is essential that there are no leaks around the gasket surface of the carburetor or around the mixture control assembly, therefore, the carburetor should be water-tested. Plates and gaskets should be assembled to both flanges of the carburetor and 3 to 5 lbs./sq. in. air pressure applied to the inside of the carburetor through a connection in one of the plates. NOTE: Do not exceed 6 lbs./sq. in. pre$sure as the float might be damaged. The carburetor should then be submerged in water and any leaks found and repaired. Safety wire the carburetor before installing on the engine.

1311

AUTOMATIC LEAN POSITION

MANUA- FULL RICH POSITON

MANUALFULL LEAN POS]TON

IDLE CUT-OFF 8 PRIMERPOSITION

MIXTURE CONTROL AND CRUISEVALVE POSITION

A
PLATE MIXTUREOONTROL (FIXED) PLATE TURE CONTROL (MOVEABLE} PRIMERVALVES NOZZLE PUI'P DISCHARGE SUCTION NOZZLE TIXTURE CONTROL

VENTURITUBE MAIN DISCHARGE AUTOMATIC MIXTURE NEEDLE CONTROL AIR BLEEDER

;N N---

TOMATICMIXTURE CONTROL

PLATEs @ cnursevALvE
METERTNG JE @ cnurse VALVE METERTNG @ econoMEER
MAN ilETERING .JET

MAIN AIR BL1ED ARM MAIN AIR BLEED HOLES

AUTOTATICRICH POSITION

Fig. 1305

t3L2

9 )ECONOMIZER SP

@ econoMrzE
DIAPHRAGM E C O N O M I Z ESUCTION R NOZ Z LE

NEEDLE 5 ) ECONOMIZER VALVE

ECONOMIZE METERING JET VACUUMECONOMIZER SYSTEM

Fig. 1306

1313

NA.RgC I & NA.RgCz VENTURI REMOVAL PLUG

A
*4"(0935) DRILL & REAM FoR 'fOOOO TAPER PIN. A SS EMB L E P.I4 577 P IN .
DRILL & REAM FOR T A P E R P I N D U RI N G

*ooo P-9745 ASS EMBLY.

E X -I362-I5 P UM P LEVER A S S E MB LYC OM PLETE.

P-t7too

9 64 AS SHOWN. T H R O T T L E S T O P & S H A F T ASSEMBLY

B
1'+e(ogss)DRTLL & REAM FoR ooooo T A P E R P I N . A S S E M B L E P I N P-t90E6
& SPLIT END AS SHOWN.

M E T H O DO F A S S E M B L I N GP U M P L / r-N A -R 9C 2 C R U IS E V A LV E LIN K / { coN N E crroN .


A M E S O E ED I T L G A UG E
F

SET TONGUE 05" IWEV FROM & scREw HoLE wHEN EX-|362-86 I S AGA IN S TAU T O MA TIC S TOP A S sHowN.

EX-t362-86 M I X T U R EC O N T R O LS T E M E S T O P A S S E M B L Y
#OOOO TAPER

3?r

s l

6' 5

ADJUST MENT SCREW


LOCKNUT I

#+a(oggs) DRTLL &


P - t 90 E 6 P l N .

R EA M F O R PIN ASSEMBL E SET SLOT 7. FRoM LEVER AS SHOWN;

I PIPE VACUUM

CONNECTION

N A-R 9 C z C R U IS E VA L VE STE M E C O V E R A S S E M B L Y

-,ffi
E

NOTE: BLANK ECON. SUCTION T UBE IN VENTURI BEFORE SETTING ECON.

* to-34 w A TE R MA N oM ETER
C O N NE C T I O N METHOD OF SETTING ECONOMIZER

F
Fig. 1307

1 3 14

fl
6ri
el

E?| ll
t?

.ol

trl

|i
o
io

g
$
0.
I

qE
T

d ol
-l

d g,
4

s$il zl
F U

z
Fl

l'F-

NI

\9

5B
*fi

1o

fl

9<

Eg
E a 1 I'E

HI q
U
tdli *
?
rd

HE ?$ aa

;s

2P

ffil
ol ol - :l o ol0 t .f

2e

H9

iiH@
ol
t9r

3sE !13

iFt Eee

al

I|
ufl

5t

ol

d.l It

stl*l$N $ $
E

t )l Es FE P sl =g ss E
vri.

o z EI

I rd F

U ' b , ,r 8

i B- e r E
d 1t jj-

n ci o o n r t' 0 n 7' I 5 F
a

\ I rt \ s \

._A

\ .v

t a

0 E oo @ d o {

1-

P c iq o c!

o .U

@ tJl

u
t{ !

sl ol
dl

EI
7l

ed I
3
o

|'|

o o c

o U| 9 oo n,
n, o

o c o tg I 0o oq q
& a
Itl

0l

iffii
L

0 I
4

d. a? d_ ( L w 0 t,

od o
0

gR
ti
tt
I

j-

ct o z bt
J c 4 a

a rH () $i $$$ t
v

T5 t9
F
I

f a rD
I
c |'l

fF
r lo

u oT og
T z I
l- o
GI

9 el lL

tr F !I
rO

E m

o
n F

o o (
vr
a
I

ltl

a
IJ

o \r|

q, o oa
Y f

o $l t rO (fl t
to H

||, o @ o E ul o Cl o c r{

Lf

eL
T

d-

t d {

ao
rt PF r:

1315

P-20506 7-REQ.

P-6r331P.|?t67 z-REa. Ft2403 2-REQ: P - 6 t 2 3 52 - R E Q ; P-6il2t 2-REO.


P-6t346

P-20r65 F/t6-2
P-8508

-P-r659s -FrTroo lp--T-pagose lF929rP-6243] xP-2O347-l l*P-|373 -Fr6ss6 tElros?


,(P-918

0166 (5/16-24)

P-20399( (5/r6-24) P-2Or66 P-717O COTTER PI F20r65 fl/4P-r3675 P-20399flo-32)P-8508-

6581 66 OOTTERPII{ Ft3675 P-6670 00-3 icP-r3760

*P-r7r37
?-t?252 P-6670 (rO-32) P-6571 (t/4-28't P-zOr65 20t67 (3/8-24' P-8460 (5/t6-24' (t/4-?81 P-2Of65 P-l1477

P-t3733 P-6869 z-REQ. P-20399(lO-3e) P - 2 r 8 r 96 - R E O . P - t 5 3 5 06 - R E Q . - P-6r347 P-60234


P-6588 3-REQ;

SEG TI O N A /
P-60r4
( P-13r40
P-

P-6r328

P-603035-REQ:
P-20364 5-REQ: P-6867 P-60244 | P-20355 il-REQ:

P-60089 2-REQ:

P-r9086 P-6023

P-6r320 P-6r354
P-ro666 t/32 P-60307t/64THrCK P-60308 3/64THlCK P-6t340 P-r5350 6-REQ. P - 2 r 8 r 96 - R E Q ; P-2924 r67 P-r? P-tg6t6z-REO. P - r 6 0 r 9z - R E Q . P - r 6 0 r 42 - R E Q ; P-ro238aREa. COTTER
P-6t34

P44577 P-60233 P-r3657


P_6O252-

P-r3r40 3-RE P-6135 F6r35

P-r66tO(2 P-20376
P-6592 lF2l4l

P-20167 F/A-241 (9/16-r8) P-t4376 P-3779 P-20r67$/e-Z4l P-531 P-20t64 U/2P-9008 P-zt208

!-'19?1-lp+ogs
P -6I339 MA IN B OD Y
*P-7881

SECTION
xP-ro455
P-60857 3-REO.

rvtstoN

Fig. 1309

1315

P-9745 P-t3726 P-6r3r6 P-t7r48 P-2924 P-4627 P-8880 P-60ilO P-9201 A-t7726 P-6r341 P-6668 P-r3898 Fr37 P-60224 P-60228

P-r3531 P-[640 P-19285 P-60627

*P-r7r7r 3r9 l / 3 2 T H r C K
P-t4425 t / 6 4 T H r C K ?-t4426 3 / 6 4 T H r C K P-t4427 r/t6 THtcK P5O8 P-20ro9 P-6558 P-r3680 xP-1o455 t342

SECTIONA A
P-601 P-60t47.

P-r4376 F37

Pr3r40(
P-61

Fr3897 z-REQ. P-r7099 P-16597 P-ro252


F155 P-70277 P-6 P-7I7OCOTTER P-6r336 P-20351 P-61

SECTION B B

P-6r343 P-7037r z-REQ.

P-6r3
P-6r349

P-2r805 P-6r3t9 P-2Of64 {n't-zo')


P-53r9 *P-2r454 Ft6790 P5O8
P-6564

P-6r333 P.7I7O3-REQ. COTTER PIN P-138773-REO. P-r3775 P-ro9t8 P-r3876 r3875 3-REO. P-t3873 r9283 749 Fr7329

*P-r3737 r3735
165(r/4-28) P-60973

P-r4825

P-ro248 F/e-241

SECTIONC C

\-P-6t3t5

P-t7423 *P.|7425

SECTIOND D
IOIE.COIPLCIE

S E C T I O NE E
SEt OF gASItlS FOF ClReuRrOn P-6tJ6g

rOR SPECIAL PATY3 ANO 9EE3 0F VAnrltLE PAntS itfln to crnoue:ron 3PgCrfrcAtrot th[EYs.

00 xot StEcrfY lttg oaaf,ila iuaagR ot oRot3 clvE rAIt Aro iotif tooEl For fhrcH caPouProF rs oR0f,RE0. GIYI SENIAL TUIOCN OF caReucEron r; Po99totE |HEI OROfFII 'AR?O.

STROT'8ERG CAREURETOR

Fie. 1309

1401

CIIAPTER

XIV

MAGNETOS
GENERAL CONSTRUCTION (Type SB9R) Scintilla SB9R magnetos employ the principle of rotating magnet and stationary coil. Rotation of the four pole magnet produces reversals of the magnetic flux through the core of the coil. This produces a high tension current in the secondary ivinding. Ttrls high tension current is conductei by the distributor to the spark plugs. The condenser, connected across the breaker cont4cts, is located on top of the coil. The hreaker is held in position by two hold-down springs which makes it quickly removable for inspection without the use of tools.

DISASSEMBLY The following procedure of disassembly is recommended to avoid any possibility of breakage. As the parts are removed, place them in order on the bench to facilitate reassembly. Blocks-Remove the distributor Dlstrlbutor blocks after having released their spring clamps. Magneto Coll Cover-Take out the two fastening screwsand lift offcover. Breaker Cover-Remove safety pin and breaker cover fastening screw, after which the cover can be removed. Magneto Coll-Remove the two coil fastening screws and clamps after which the coil can be removed. Care must be taken so as not to break or damage the high tension carbon brush when removing the coil. The felt pad under the coil can be taken out by hand. Contaot Breaker Assernbly-Remove the breaker assembly after having taken out the two breaker hold-down springs. On fixed spark magnetos, also remove the clamp assembly which securesthe breaker cup to the housing. Remove the contact point assembly after taking out its two securing screws. Inspect the contact point assembly as outlined under "Inspection of Contact Point Assembly". Front End Plate, Rotatlng Magnet, and Magneto Ilouslng-Remove the front end plate after having taken out its two securing screws and the four lock nuts. Use Socket Wrench No. 4-1337 for the lock nuts. Tap each side of the front end plate lightly with a rawhide mallet to remove it from the housing. Remove the distributor cylinder after prying out the lock ring with a small screw driver. Remove the cup from the end of the large distributor gear hub. Unscrew the lock nuts on the end of the distributor gear axle and lift off the distributor gear. Do not loosen the two screws which sec'rre the distributor gear axle to the front end qlate-unlgss the axle is-damaged and must be replaced. This will maintain lhe original adjustment fo1 t_hegears. The top ball and cage assembly and the spacer with the shim washers will come out as lobse parts when the distributor gear is lifted from tlie axle. Make sure that the same spacer and shlrn washers are used when reassembling as this will give, in the majority of cases, the correct adiustmenf between the axle and gear. It is goodpractice to wire.the spacer and shim to one ball and cage assembly to prevent from being misplaced. If the bearings of the distributor gear axle need replacement, the outside race foi the bearing which came out as a loose part and, also, th6 complete bearing and retainer at the othef end of the gear hub, must be pressed out. To facilitate this, it is suggestedthat a small pressingdisc of the size and shape shown in Fig. 1401 be used. This disc can be placed inside oT the sear hub with its flat face in contact with each outer race as indicated. Remove the rotating magnet from the housing and place it on a clean part of the bench to mak6 sure that small chips oi particles do not come in contact wlth rt. Remove the insulating plate from the housing after having taken out its two securing screws which also hold the safety gap bridge. Replacernent of Drlve Shaft and Breaker End Ball Bearlngs-If any one part of a ball bearing is defective and needs replacement, the cornplete bearlng rnust be replaced. The outer ball races are insulated from the magneto by insulating strips and are also backed by washers of the same material as used in the insulating strips. Remove the outside race from the front end plate with Puller No. 4-222 and remove the inside race from the magnet with Puller No. 4-243.

t402

MAGNETOS
When it is released, it will expand against the walls and the ends should overlap slightly in the recess cut for them. Press in the outside ball race for the front end plate with Tool No. 4-136, and the outside ball race for the housing with TooI No. 4-134. Press on the inside ball race for the drive shaft end bearing with Tool No. 4-229 which is also used for pressing on the small distributor gear. The small distributor gear can be removed with Puller No. 4-233. Press on the inside ball race for the breaker end bearing with Tool No. 4-232.

Remove the outside baII race from the housing with Puller No. 4-218 and the inside race from the magnet with Puller No. 4-235. Before removing this inside race, the cam must be taken off with Puller No. 4-241. Before installing new races in the front end plate and housing, first put in the flat insulating washer in the bottom of the recessfor the bearing so that the cut in it will line up with the oil recess. Then spread a few drops of oil evenly over one side of the insulating strip. Bend the strip in a circular form with the oiled side inside and overlap the ends enough to allow the strip to fit Ioosely into the recess for the outer race.

INSPECTION Inspectlon of Magneto lfouslng-See that the pole shoes, the adapter and stud assembly, and all studs are tight in place. Examine the interior of the housing. If it is evident that the rotating magnet rubs, scrape out the housing slishtlv. Make sure that all threaded holes, paiticularly those in the pole shoe extensions for the coil securing screws, are clean and in good condition. Examine the outside race carefully. If it is found unsatisfactory for further service, the complete ball bearing assembly must be replaced. (See "Replacement of Drive Shaft and iJreaker End Ball Bearings" for tools required.) Inspectlon of the Rotatlng Magnet-Make sure that the magnet shaft is not bent as it is important that the ground surfaces of the pole pieces and the cam pilot extension be within .002" concentric with the bearing pilot seats. (For testing magnet strength, see "Magnetic and Electrical Test".) Replace any ball bearings which show noticeable wear, roughness, or looseness. The complete ball bearing assembly must be replaced when any one part is defective. The cam must have'a comparatively close fit on its shaft and must run true within .001" full indicator reading (see Fig. L402, Tolerance Chart). Check the small distributor gear for burrs or excessive wear of the teeth. If this gear is replaced, it is recommended that the large distributor gear also be replaced. When the small distributor gear is meshed with the large distributor gear during reassembly, the backlash should not exceed.006" (seeFig.1402, Tolerance Chart). Remove all chips or particles of dirt which may have adhered to the rotating magnet. Inspectlon of the Coll-Examine the rubber housing for cracks and make sure that all screws are staled or provided with lock washers. Make sure that the carbon brush is in good condition. For electrical test of the coil and condenser see "Magnetic and Electrical Test". of the Front End Plate-See that Inspectlon -felt strips are in place and that the oil cover the closestightly. Cleari the oil tube which Ieads to the drive shaft ball bearing with compressedair. Examine the outer ball race of the drive shaft ball bearing. Ifit is found unsatisfactory fol further service, the complete ball bearing assembly must be replaced.

Fig. 1401

1403

MAGNETOS

E;i
idd l60

3E ;rll "t:5 , !,ix


6"r o 'La -

H,

PU

;!e =tf
0<c 2

l= ;E:!E;EE 3fr'.' E:iJ6::$


P i -r d

gr ::;
F!=li

rr r

o
N

{,
l

ro

F
=eJ

a l -oo a I a 9

5jj

gfii::l;l

iH;c;

uP z :
Llt ItJ

lz u I '
U . ar{

#P
-Tr

: 6
I l;
i

6 0

' t

^4

i3i

3iz lEr
i:l
@u

U;J
o. --

:ii[( :i! i;
lirsie E-lrsn
irzc<<>

:l

LXI >r l<;


-

7;

2
0 (t)

g f;F:
Itr" 3
} < E F

iii
Z " o

ii!;:r
t [ H" i 5 2:60jz
I

fil:' .a9",

i!:r--: ];
= 3I ErI 2 azil eRtl
c i hPl
E

O
0)
I

0) ti

F i=l r20l
u uol

-..1'u
z o od 9z 2w iF
CN

I
6l
d

t I

iiriii;i;i
.elE*.SI:d

bi

^Hp ti g; 33 ds
H 3 HE Q oo
zo9 .,,,

?a
!

o ! z 9 2 F o o
F

o 4.J t

to

eL

Eg;;

hE , =2

: , rR
2t

lEliit
tx,o.,
u!;oo

:i

= i: t

fiE,riii;; :i;qiits*: !r:tgi:q: i

;:::;H;i;E

!'Jt i.l

i;!!3;
!3is

1404

MAGNETOS
of Large Dlstrlbutor Gearfnspectlon Examine the large distributor gear for burrs or excessive wear of the teeth. If this gear is replaced, the new small distributor gear should be installed. The gear should turn freely with the least possible end play between it and the axle. The bearings must be cleaned, examined, and repacked with Keystone No. 44 Grease. Inspectlon of Maln Cover wlth Booster and Ground Terrnlnal Block-Clean out the oil tube which leads to the breaker end ball bearing with compressed air. Examine the booster and ground terminal block for defects or cracks. Make sure that the felt strips are in good condition and tight in place. Inspectlon of Dlstrlbutor Bloaks-See that the electrodes are clean and tight in place. If new electrodesare installed, they must be checked with Template No. 4-L40 to insure that the required clearance between them and the distributor cylinder segments is maintained. (See Tolerance Chart.) Use Tool No. 4-8092 for machining distributor block electrodes newly installed. Cyllnder and of Dlstrlbutor fnspectlon B oolt er Collector Rlng -Examine the dielectric material for defects or cracks. Check the height of the distributor cylinder segments in Gauge No. 4-7264. Segments should be replaced when they have burned away .015" as indicated on the gauge. Inspectlon of the Contaot Polnt AssernblyWhen inspecting the contact points, the breaker main spring should not be raised beyond the point giving Yrc" clearance between the movable and stationary contact points. Further tension of the main spring caused by raising it beyond this point will result in the weakening of the main sprrng. Check the main spring tension with Scintilla .the Gauge No. 4-9713. It is important that hook of the gauge be applied on the main spring adjacent to the contact point as illustrated at E (Fig. 1403). Main springs that have been in service and have a tension of not less than 15 ounces will be satisfactory for further service. New main springs should have a tension of 20 to 32 ounces. If the main spring tension as checked by Scintilla Gauge No. 4-9713 is too low, it can be raised by removing washer No. 10-3768 (Fig. 1403). If it is too high, it can be lowered by inserting an additional washer No. 10-3768. The other function of washgr No. 10-3768is to obtain maximum contacting surface between the contact points. Examine the contact points for evidence indicating excessivewear. Mounds or peaks appearing on the contact surfaces should be removed. It is not considered necessary to remove slight pits which appear on the contact surfaces unless they are in excess of I0/o of the total contact area. Dressing of the contacts should be undertaken only by the most experienced operator and can be accomplished by using the Scintilla Dressing Tool No. 4-12L76,the Scintiila special and StoneNo. 4-12868. cut File No. 4-12177, Normal operation of the magneto causes a certain amount of wear to take place on the top of the cam follower. This wear is indicated by a small depression worn in the top of the cam follower at the point where it lifts against the end of the main spring. The distance between the Iowest point of this depressionand the top of the spring on which the cam follower is riveted should be checked at each overhaul. This distance should be /n" or over. If it is less than Yn", d new cam follower should be installed. If the above inspection indicates that the rires replacement of contact breaker assembly requires parts, use the No. 4-12967C ontact Point Reassembly Fixture.

Fig. 1403

MAGNETOS REASSEMBLY
Before reassembling, make sure that all parts are clean and free from chips or foreign particles. Front End Plate-Clean the distributor gear bearings thoroughly and then allow them to dry. Press the complete bearing and retainer into the side of the distributor gear hub nearest the front end plate side and also press in the outside race of the other bearing into the other side of the gear hub. Place the gear on the axle and install the orlglnal spacer and shlm washers and also the remaining cage and ball assembly. Secure gear with its plain washer and lock nuts. Do not greasethe bearings at this time as it is necessary to test the gear fbr end play. This is done by pressing on the outside diameter of the gear with the thumbs, first applying pressure on one side and then the other. If the end play is too great remove shim washers next to the spacer. The gear must turn freely with the least posslble end play. After the correct adjustment for end play has been made, remove the two lock nuts and take out the first cage and ball assembly. Pack Keystone No. 44 Grease into the hub of the gear around the axle. Reinstall the cage and ball assembly after packing it with Keystone No. 44 Grease. Reinstall the two lock nuts and then press on the brass cup after having placed a small amount of greasein it. Moisten all felt strips with oil. Rotatlng Magnet-There are two breaker cam keyways located on the cam pilot and two engraved marks on the rotatihg magnet back bearing plate, namely, "D" and "G". Place the cam key in the keyway opposite "D" for clockwise rotation and opposite "G" for counterclockwise rotation. Place the cam in position and secure it with its screw, lock washer, and plain washer. Charge the magnet in Magnet Charger No. 4-14215. Pack the ball bearings with Keystone No. 44 Greaseor its equivalent. Make sure that all chips or foreign particles have been removed from the magnet and the inside of the magneto housing. Place a light coating of oil on the pole piecesof the rotating magnet and insert the rotating magnet into the housing. Front End Plate, Rotatlng Magnet, and Ilouslng-Mesh the chamfered tooth of the small distributor gear (see Tolerance Chart) with the tooth on the large distributor gear marked "D" for clockwise rotation or "G" for counter-clockwise rotation. Secure the front end plate to the housing with its two screws and four lock nuts and washers. Adjustrnent of Magnet End Play-The rotating magnet should have no perceptible end play. Its adjustment is checked by turning the
TO ALIGN CONTACT POINTS, USE SHIMS UNDER INSULATED SUPPORT.
Fig. 1404

r405

rotating magnet away from its neutral position and then allowing the magnetic pull to return the rotating magnet to its neutral position. The neutral position of the rotating magnet is the position where one of the pole piecesfills the space between the top of the pole shoes which are integral with the magneto housing. The smaller the distance of the trailing edge of the pole piece from the top edge of the pole shoes, the tighter the bearings. The end play is too much if the distance from the trailing edge of the pole piece and the top edge of the pole shoe is more than fu" and too tight if less than /s". Adjustment of end play is obtained by placing steel spacing washers back of the inner ball races of the magnet shaft. These washers are available in thicknesses of .0025", .004",.005", .008", .0L0", and .012". If the inner races are removed, always keep the spacing washers which are already installed, in the same position. If additional washers are required to take up end play, install them equally in thickness in back of each inner ball race. If the original spacing washers are kept in place, it will be rarely necessary to adjust for magnet end play. Adjustlng Mesh of Dlstrlbutor Gears-It will be rarely necessaryto adjust the mesh of the gears if the position of the distributor gear axle has not been chahged. If a new gear is installed,

1406

MAGNETOS
The contact point assembly is secured to the breaker cup with two screws, plain washers, and lock washers. The eccentric screw protrudes through the slot provided in the support of the contact point assembly. Install contact breaker assembly into the adaptor and stud assembly and secure with the two breaker hold down springs. Place breaker assembly in the full advance position by turning it as far as possible against the direction of normal rotation of the magneto. For fixed spark requirements, install clamp assembly or the collet which was used in earlier model magnetos, in the hole located inside the adaptor and stud assembly "R" for clockwise rotation and "L" for marked counter-clockwise rotation. plvotless type IMPORTANT-Sclnttlla contaet breakers as used ln thls serles magnetos must always be adjusted so that the contacts open at the proper posltlon of the breaker carn ln relatlon to the tlrnlng marks ln the rlrn of the breaker cup and not for any ffxed clearanoe between the contacts. Place a straight edge such as a steel scale (K) (see Fig. 1402, Tolerance Chart) on the step of the cam. Turn drive shaft slightly until the scale coincides with the timing marks (M) on the rim of the breaker cup. At this position, the contact points (C) should just begin to open. To make this adjustment, place a .001" shim stock between the cohtact points (C). Loosen the two screws (O) and adjust the eccentric screw (?) so that the contact points (C) just begin to open. The opening of the contact points can be checked with the .001" shim stock. When the .001" shim stock is releasedwith a slight pull, it indicates that the points are just beginning to open. Tighten the screws (O) and recheck adjustment. Apply a few drops of standard grade oil (S.A.E. 20 or 30) cn the cam follower felt. Do not give it all it will hold as excessoil will reach the contact points and cause interference with magneto operation. Secure breaker cover with its screw and safety pin. Maln Cover and Dlstrlbutor Blooks-'Secure the main cover with its two screws and install distributor blocks. Number discs are provided on top of the main cover in order that the distributor blocks can be installed on the correct side. AII felt strips on the main cover and front end plate should be made moist with oil.

however, it will be necessaryto adjust the mesh of the gears as described in the following paragraph. This is obtained by loosening the two screws and lock nut which hold the distributor gear axle to the front end plate. Turn the large gear until the round hole in the distributor gear axle flange can be seen through one of the holes in the face of the gear. Place a drift in the hole on the axle flange ind turn the flange slightly to the right to raise the large gear (loosen mesh) or to the left to lower large gear (tighten mesh). After adiustment is made, tighten and lock the two screws and nuts holding the distributor gear axle and apply Keystone No. 44 Grease or its equivalent ei""iy in ihe teeth of the large distributo-r gear. Dlstrlbutor Cyllnder and fnsulatlng PlateMake sure that the dog screw is tightened and in the face of the large locked in the hole located gear marked "D", for clockwise rotadistributor "G" for counter-clockwise rotation. tion. and The booster collector ring is secured to the diswith two screws. One screw tributor cylinder"D" and the other "G". The hole is marked "D" must face toward the straight hole marked line or timing mark on the distributor cylinder for counter-clockwise for clockwise rotation and "G" must face towards rotation the hole marked the str'aight line or timing mark. Place the distributor cylinder in position on the large distributor gear having the dog screw in the face of the gear engage a coruesponding hole located on the flat surface of the distributor cylinder and then install the lock ring. Install the insulating plate and the safety gap bridge to the magneto housing with their two seCuring screws. These screws must be staked after they have been tightened. Cotl-Place the felt pad between the pole shoe extensions in under the coil. Place coil in position and secure with its two screws, clamps, and washers. Make sure the high tension carbon brush is not broken or damaged while installing the coil. Contact Breaker Assernbly-On the inside assembly are two tapped of the adaptor and stud "R" for clockwise rotation, holes, one marked "L" for counterfixed spark, and the other clockwise rotation, fixed spark. These holes are not used for variable spark requirements. MAGNETIC

AND DLECTRICAL TEST magnet is not rubbing against the pole shoes of the housing. If so, this can be detected by the occurrence of a decided knock which must be eliminated by scraping out the inside of the housrng.

Mount the magneto on Scintilla Test Stand No. 4-17011or an equivalent test stand. Connect the high tension cables to the 7 mm. three point spark rack. Run magneto for two or three minutes. Make sure that the rotating

1407

MAGNETOS

ANTI-CLOCKWISE MAGNETO

ROTATION DETERMINE D FROM DRIVE END

cLoCKwrst
MAGNETO

I V I E W E DF R O M I I B R E A K E RE N D I

ADJUST CONTACT POINTS TO .OI2 C L E A R A N C E . W I T H B R E A K E RI N F U I L ADVANCE POSITION, CONTACT POINTS MUST BEGIN TO OPEN WHEN TIMING qBX MARKS IAII & COINCIDE OR WHEN ROTATING MAGNET IS 50 TO 90 PAST NEUTRAL,

t
\=/

Fig. 1405

Check the coming-in speed with the contact breaker in the full advance position. It should spark consistently at 1ii5 R. P. M. If a variable spark magneto is being tested, also check the coming-in speed with the breaker in full retard position at which position sparks should occur consistently at250 R. P. M. Increase the speed to 3000 R. P. M. Observe the spark closely. If missing occurs, it may be causedby: Improper breaker adjustment. Dirty contact points. Faulty or broken connections. Defective coil. Defective condenser (if contacts arc excessively). Check the ground connection. No spark should occur at the spark rack if the magneto is short-circuited through the ground wire terminal screw. Connect the cable from the source of booster current to the booster connection in the magneto. Run the magneto at 500 R. P. M. and observe the booster spark at the spark rack. The booster spark always trails the secondary spark. Rotatlng Magnet-Operate magneto for about five minutes at 3500 R. P. M. During this run, short circuit the primary current at least 35

times. Then operate magneto at 400 R. P. M. (This speedmust not vary more than 10 R. P. M.) Hold contact points open by inserting a piece of insulating material between them. Connect Scintilla Ammeter No. 4-46762 in parullel or across the open contact points. The ammeter should not read below 1.8 amperes. If reading is below 1.8 amperes, the rotating magnet must be recharged in Scintilla Magnet Charger No. 4-142L5. Repeat ammeter test. If reading is still below, repeat test with a new coil before rejecting the magnet. Cotl-Before installing the coil in the magneto, check the resistance of the secondary winding with the No. 4-12933Y Ohmmeter. The reading must be from 4000-6000ohms. The final test of a coil must be made an actual running test of the magneto on the test bench. Also, as heat from the engine affects the insulation materials of the coil, the final test should be made at an elevated temperature. This is done by directing a reflector type heater on the magneto while it is being run on the test bench. When the temperature of the coil has reached approximately 165" F. (74'C.) the spark gaps should be increased by means of the No. 4-8386 Adjustable Panel from 7 mm. to 9 mm. The coil must spark consistently at this temperature and spark gap. Increase the gaps to 10 mm. If

1408

MAGNETOS FIBER STOP CTEARANCE MUST BE .OO2 TO .OrO WHEN POINTSARE WIDE OPEN.

TENSfONt6-3 2 c 2. # 4-9713.) CONTACT POINT C L E A R A N C E .OIO MINIMUM .OI2 DESIRED .OI4 MAXIMUM.

STAKE SCREW IN BREAKER LEVER.

KEEP FELT WICK MOISTW|TH OtL.

GAM MUST RUN TRUE WITHIN .OO2FULL INDICATORRFADING. CGAUGE 8 4-9886)


Fig. 1406

consistent sparking occurred with the 9 mm. gap, intermittent missing with the 10 mm. gap will not be sufficient cause to reject the coil. It may be found that the coil produces consistent sparking at room temperature with 7 mm. gaps, however, if the coil does not spark consistently at the elevated temperature with 9 mm. gaps, it should not be used for further service.

Prhnary Clrcult Condenser-The condenser must be tested before it is installed on the magneto. The recommended test is made at an elevated temperature with the No. 4-L7-49, four hundred volt D.C. megger. The condenser must be heated to 200" F. (93" C.) in an oven. If the reading of the megger for the condenser at 200oF. (93" C.) is 50,000 ohms or more, the condenser is satisfactorv for further service.

VAGg.D AND VAGO.DR MAGNETOS This section is issued as a supplement to the SB9R magneto instructions and covers the servicing of the VAG9-DR magneto which employs a lever type breaker. AII instructions given in the preceding pages of this book which cover the SB9R magneto apply also to the VAG9-DR magneto with the exception of the contact breaker instructions. This section will cover the instructions for the lever type breaker. For VAG9-DR magnetos, the cross-section view of the lever type breaker as shown in Fig. 1404 replaces section A-A of the No. L0-1.5574 Tolerance Chart. Fig. 1405 shows the internal timing for VAG9-DR magnetos, clockwise and counter-clockwise rotation. AII other information on the No. L0-15574Tolerance Chart applies to VAG9-DR magnetos. For general information, when the No. 2-792 high output Cobalt Magnet is installed in the "VAG9-D" magnetos which originally employed a chrome magnet, the letter rrR" is added, automatically making the type designation "VAG9DR". When checking the coming-in speeds or primary current values on "VAG" magnetos, make sure the values for the type magnet employed are used. The values when using the No. 2-792 Cobalt Magnet are given in the No. L0-15574Tolerance Chart. For "VAG" magnetos in service which employ a chrome magnet, the minimum primary current value is I20 R. P. M. and for full retard 240F". P. M. Lever Type Breaker Assernbly AdjustmentBefore installing the coil, place breaker assembly temporarily in the magneto for final adjustment.

1409

MAGNETOS Set the contact points with the Scintilla Wrench No. 4-490 so that the clearance between them is .012" as measured with the feeler gase on the No. 4-490 Wrench. With this adjuitLrent, the clearance between the back of the breaker arm and the fibre stop should be from .002" to .010" when the contact points are wide open. Check this fibre stop clearance for each cam lobe. Turn the magneto drive shaft until timing marks "A" and "B" (Fig. 1405) are approximately opposite each other. Place the breaker assembly in the full advance position. Turn the drive shaft in the direction of rotation until the contact points begin to open. The points should open when the timing marks "A" an4 "3" are opposite each other or when the rotating magnet is 5" to 9o past its neutral position as measured with the Scintilla Timing Disc No. 4-25L2. After adjustment is made, remove breaker assembly and install the coil, main cover, distributor blocks, etc. Reinstall breaker assembly. Other information pertaining to lever type breakersis given in Fig. 1406.

1410

lrJ rrJ OpO

&

1 7l 4 jv Sr"d
t U(rUaO

Y I

o (o
!o

uff,P:Paa

pZgPEB r[, g

P:;EgHE:;I
b :4 8Z "P oP BE el r Zi r &="e
F N @oo NNf?)
o
llr

rr=-*fi3fitg6h

lrJ t

z
J

pl
|o
N =l

'fisln(o iricucvru

tr

()l El

"l
(Jl

T
F q

o
= 5
l

t llJ F

Fl

g \.'

LrJ I

O l

z.l <l ol zl

2 2=f" A r [
u

5 5

t ;

>l
I

I [ $h q * drEq
bHiF<

o
F
lrJ

o
U

rrj

<l
ol
I

n'H ' i : d RsI*r"d 3 d o^u m


6 h

iF

>

+t o

bD

z t o f ,
O F O F

855cqSg2:5

@ F -

Fl (Jl
l4J I Jl

: H : i X2 s A t -i
t J t r u J O L l ! : n a O O > =

-l

H :H"aZxA9;d-= 9-G9:AXEoh<
k

u0

tt- I

ol I >l

:43"'";;:zrog,-fi

<l d.l (91

EP"ef ZAZE E"vez


t o i : o - 1i ' l 5 o o o o 9
(r) A
q)

6l
(Jl

<l

3=3=s;;9885s
a

' o ( o r " e e R * s t.-

I I

EI >l
trl I -l

b0

3l
o

u)z

uJ(,

2x*
ozt f = q

-g
E'
to z

ro6

5:A B

o (,
l J (L

h 26 Fggng

:(
t (L U)

o
F

ftsiga#
-NrosroroFooo-$

L4tt

CEAPTER XIV (Conflnued)

SERVICE INSTRUCTION FOR AMERICAN BOSCE AVIATION MAGNETO SB9RU.S


GENERAL CONSTRUCTION Note-The numbers given in the following palagraphs are reference numbers onlyl referring to reference drawings contain6d in this instruction, and shouldnot be used when ordering service parts. General Desorlptlon-The American Bosch SB9RU-3 is -a 9-c-ylinde_r, fixed-ignition, 4-pole, b-ase-mounted,.polar inductor type magnetb oi' clockwise-rotation, faqing drive eh-d,being driven directly through a qpli4ed drive coupling. The magneto drive shaf,t-which turns at- Lrfi engsne speed rotates the g-lobe compensatine breiker cam at one-half engine speed througf, a 2fu:t gear ratio between the inductor rotor and'distributor gear shafts. This magneto is completely radio-shielded, and includine radio shield and .coupling driven member, weighs LE% pounds. magneto housing $."gleg.to Houslng (l)-The (!) is.die-cast, the material being fhigh-pressure aluminum alloy. (M) are cast integral .Two stationary m_a_gnetq withpole shoe assemblies(P and Pr) and magneto -alloy housing. Tttpy ut" made from a special 'Alnico', known as the main charaiteristics of which are maximum available enersy and mini-helds, mum demagnetilation by stray high temperatures and mechanical vibrations. Inductor Rotor (5a)-The inductor rotor consists of a single laminated, 1*s.pole section mounle-d axially on the drive shaft *trictr is supporJe{ !y a 17 mm, one-piece, single-plate, senisealed ball bearing (7) on drive end-with a demouatable- one-piece oil seal packing (6) contacting hub of drive coupling in front of briaring. +\2 mm, siirgle-plate, semi-sealedball bearing (11) is mounted in gear housing to support the inductor rotor at that end. The beaiing (Z) on the drive end is held in a fixed positiory thereby preventing axial movement of tlie inductor rotor. The bearinC eq on the other end floats in the gear hgusing and the outer raceway is.^lept_from . turning by _the retaining spring (43). The drive shaft end is splined to ac'commodate a splined drive couplins (2) which is secured with a recessed plain wishei 1B;, lock washer (4), castle nut (5) and cotter pin (58). Coll Assembly (O)-The high-tension coil with laminated core is mounted on the extension of the upper pole shoes. It is of a design wherein the primary and secondary are wound, taped and impregnated directly on its laminated core. This method permits more copper and insulating material for a _givelrspace ahd materially conl tributes toward reducing the temperatuie rise of the coil. _- The primary cable (83) goesfrom the terminal block (11) through slots in- insulation apron (b0) (46) to the assembly Tastening 3ng CgqI ho^using. bolt (79) of the breaker plate, to wliich is ab5 connected the moving. and live breaker spring with point (78). The circuit between the second ary coil terminal (10) and the distributor roror is established -by. lraving the concentricallympgnted.,.round, high-tens-ion terminal post (1b) of the coil protrude into the rotating, ring-shaped electrode of the distributg,r rotor (b2). No physical contact is made. The circuit is estab'lisLed by a rotary jump spark. Frea\er Assenlbly (?0)-!he is stationary and consists of: breaker assembly

a. 4r.adjlstable bracket (76), carrying the grouTded- -platinum-iridium breaker foini, is positioned betwedn.guidgq on breaker piate (20). This bracket is adjustable by means of an e6ce_ntrically-headedstud (75) and is secured after adjustment by a fillister head screw (g2). . b. A pjvoted cam follower a*sembly (?B) whose independent spring (74) maintains prbper iension of follower block against contour bf globe cam (31). c. A br_eaker spring assembly (28), incorporating the moving and live platinum-iridium breaker point, is mounted on one side of an insulated terminal post by means of an assembly fastening bolt (79). To other side of terminal post, ove-r threaded end of fastening bolt, are connected.the prima,ry'cable (83) of tf,e coil, Iive s.ideof prqnary condenser (85), supporting irlate (82).and short-circuiting spring (81). Tlie-supporting plate (82) establishes contact with the grounding terminal assembly throueh a shortcircuiting spring (81). If for anv-reason the grounding terminal should become iemoved. this .564-cilcuitin^g spri-ng will ground the magneto against inner fae.-e of gear housing, thus acting as an automatic safety device. Dlstrlbutor Bloek ( l9)-Distributor block (19) is of one-piece molded construction, made oi heat-resistin_gcomposition. Stainless bteel piercing screws (20) are used to secure all high-tension

14L2

MAGNDTOS
cables. The nine electrodes are molded as inserts into the distributor block. Dlstrlbutor Rotor (52)-Distributor rotor (52) is a heat-resisting composition molding having two main working distributing electrodes, two booster electrodes and a booster collector ring. Electrical contact between the distributor rotor electrodes and distributor block electrodes is made by jump spark. The two booster electrodes are used in connection with an outside high-tension ignition source for starting purposes. Booster Conductor (16)-The magneto is provided with a booster conductor which is separately mounted underneath the radio shield to the dustcover by means of two fastening screws (18). Electrical contact between the booster conductor and the booster collector ring, molded into nose of distributor rotor (52). is made bv jump spark. The booster collector ring is integrally connected to trailing booster electrodes which are molded as inserts in the distributor rotor. These electrodes are spaced at a certain angle f,ollowing ,the main working distributing electrodes to produce a retarded spark for starting the engine. The booster conductor cable is fastengd by a stainless steel piercing screw (17). An independent booster coil with battery arrangement or booster magneto may be used for startrng purposes. Radlo Shteldtng, (f4)-In order to suppress disturbance caused by electrostatic waves radiated by the ignition system, entire magneto including primary circuit within the brealier housing-is completely enclosed in metal housings or radio shields. O-Lobe Corrrpensatlng Cam (31)-Due to a condition which is inherent in all radial engines of conventional master rod design, the trav-el of each piston, with the exception of the master rod piston, is a few degreeseither early or late in reIation to the crank pin. The g-lobe cam (31) used in the SB9RU-3 has lobes so spaced as to compensate for the irregular apgular position of each link rod in relation to the master rod. The cornpensated cam_ insures each cylinder firingwith its piston at the desired advance position. The distributor gear shaft is partially hollow, with the space thus provided icting is an oii reservoir. Oil is fed in minute quantities to the surface of the cam through an automatic meterips _device (0) located in the distributor gear shaft. After reaching the surface of the gear shaft, the oil travels through a small hole in the cam to the surface where it lubricates the contact area between the cam and follower block (73). Quantity of oil in reservoir (37) is sufficient io provide ample lubrication between major overhauls.

MAGNDTIC AND ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS (SeeElectrleal Dlagram)


As the inductor rotor revolves, it provides alternate paths for the magnetic flux as illustrated. Thus, the flux will pass from the north pole of magnet Mt through lower pole shoe Pl, inductor rotor, upper pole shoe P3,coil core and back to the south pole of magnet Ml. This path is illustrated by solid line. As inductor rotor keeps turning, the direction ofthe flux flow through the coil core is reversed, the flux passing from the north pole of magnet M2, through lower pole shoe P2, inductor rotor, upper pole shoe Pa, coil core and back to the south pole of rnagn'et M2, this path being indicated bi.y dotted Iine. polarity is assumed for illusNote-Magnetic trative purposes only, and is not necessarily as shown in actual magneto. OnIy one magnet at a time delivers flux to the coil circuit. As'the cycle is repeated, it can be seen from diagram that four flux reversals are provided per revolution of the inductor rotor. The number of flux reversals is equal to the number of magnetic poles in the magneto. One side of the coil primary is connected to the ground, wbile the other end is connected to 15s llve and moving breaker spring with poinf (78) bV means of the primary cable (83). The
Electrical Diagram

flux reversals, as described above, induce a primary current which flows to the ground when the breaker points are closed.
TO DISTRIBUTOR

This flow of current stores energy in the magnetic circuit which is utilized to generate high

1413

MAGNETOS
voltage in the secondary winding of the coil. The discharge of this high voltage in the secondarv winding, one side of which is also connected to'the ground, takes place through a closely coupled j*ttp spark connection from the hightensfon terminal post (10) to the distributor rotor, spark distribution to the then by regular l*"p electrodes of the distributor block. The circuit is completed through the high-tension cablss, and ground. Exact time of dissnark plues -is ?etermined by instant at which the charge Iobes of the compensating cam open the breaker points. TIMING AND INSTALLATION The switch cable makes electrical contact through the terminal assembly, short-circuiting spring (81), etc., with the primary cable and live breaker spring (78) which are fastened to the insulated mounting post (70A). When switch is in off position, the primary circuit is shortcircuited, thus preventing the building up of high voltage in the secondary winding of the coil. The primary condenser across the breaker points is essential to proper ignition, preventing arcing and prolonging the life of the breaker points.

OF MAGNETO TO DNGINN pling in the position first tried, remove the magneto from dowels and adjust the rubber coupling until a perfect mesh is achieved. Ftnal Tfunlng of Magneto to Englne-For synchronized sparks of both magnetos, both sets of points must open simultaneously. This is done in the following manner: With the engine in proper position, as described under paragraph'Mounting Magneto to Engine,' and both magnetos having been mounted as outlined, proceed as follows: Turn propeller in a clockwise direction (facing front of engine) until the breaker points have closed. Insert .001" feeler strips between the breaker contact points of both magnetos, or connect two timing lights across the two sets of points. Turn propeller in a counter-clockwise direction by very gradually jarring the propeller blade with the hand until a slight pull on the feeler strips releases them, or until both timing Iights go out. Both feeler strips should release at the same time and should require equal efforts of pull, or if timing lights are used, both lights must go out at the same instant. At these magneto. settings, the engine timing marks must regrsrcr. If the feeler strips or timing lights indicate that the two magnetos are not perfectly synchronized, then the exact position for the opening of the breaker contacts on the magneto, which does not coincide with the engine timing marks, must be adjusted accordingly. If it is desired to advance the timing, remove magneto from dowels and turn the rubber coupling one or two notches in a counter-clockwise direction. If necessary to retard the timing, remove magneto from dowels and turn the rubber coupling in a clockwise direction. After the two magnetos have thus been synchronized, retighten the mounting cap screws and secure them with safety wire. Connect high-tension cables. Spark plug cable for 1L cylinder is inserted in distributor block cable hole marked #1 and secured with

Correct internal timing of the magneto has or at the overbeen accomplished at the factory 'Reassembly of Maghaul shop (see chapter on neto') so that magneto is ready to be mounted to engine. Breaker contact point opening has been adiusted to .009"-.010". This corresponds 'E' gap of 3-3.5 mm (proper position of to an inductor rotor relative to pole shoe when spark occurs) at instant points begin to open on 11 cam lobe. Mountlng Magneto to Englne-Bring pistoq of #1 cylin-der to advance firing position required on compression stroke. (Refer to Chapter VI for details on how to obtain this position.) Remove the radio shield (14), dust cover (13) with booster conductor assembly, distributor block (19) and breaker cover (39). Turn magneto drive shaft in normal rotation, as indicated by arrow on cam, until 11 cam lobe is about to open the contact points. No. 1 cam lobe is marked by a red dot on the face of the cam. When facing magneto drive shaft end, this position can also be observed by the white mark on distributor gear (49) on side nearest coil and the white marli on red pad on inner face of gear housine (46). When these two points are in line, #1 lobe of cam is about to open contacts for fring of #1 cylinder. Determine exact breaker point opening by inserting a .001" feeler gauge between the points, or connect a timing light acrossthe points. Correct instant is reached when a slight pull releasesthe gauge, or timing light goes out. Hold cam in this position by either pressing finge-rs asainst the dfutributor gear (49) or holding the diive coupling - so that inductor rotor shaft (54) cannot turn. Now place the magneto on the mounting plate of the engine, using the mounting plate dowel guide for sliding the magneto toward the rubber coupling. The dowels fit into coffespondingholes in the mounting surface of the magneto. Tighten the latter securely to engine mounting plate by means of the necessary cap screws. If the pronis of the magneto coupling member (2) will not mesh with the slots in the rubber cou-

t4L4

MAGNETOS
Replace breaker cover (39), distributor block (19), dust cover (13) with booster conductor assembly and radio shield (14). When installing the latter, make certain that screws (69) holdinE radio shield to gear housing are tight'en6d befor6 screws (55) holding shield to dust cover are inserted.

cable piercing screw (20). Insert the cable for the cylinder next to fire, according to firing order. into distributor block cable hole marked #2, etc. Note that the numerals on the distributor block (19) indicate the firing sequence of the magneto only and must not be construed as the firing order of the engine.

DISASSEMBLY OF MAGNDTO (Relerence numbers apply to relerence drawlngs) To facilitate reassembly of the magneto, it is suggested that parts be laid on a clean bench or in a pan in the order in which they are disassembled. Radto Shteld (14)-1. Disconnect ignition harnesscoupling from radio shield elbow (15). 2. Remove two elbow hold-down screws (56). 3. Open radio shield assembly by withdrawing three screws (57). 4. Remove two fastening screws (69) holding radio shield to gear housing (46). Also remove two fastening screws (55) holding radio shield to dust cover (13). Withdraw halves of the assembly. Dust Cover (18) and Breaker Cover (80)Dust cover (13), including booster conductor assembly (16), can be taken off by removing two fastening screws (62). Disconnect booster cable by Ioosening cable piercing screw (17). Separate booster conductor from dust cover by withdrawing two screws (18). The breaker cover (39) can be taken off by removing two fastening nuts (68). Dlstrlbutor Block (I0)-Remove two distributor block fastening nuts (65). Lift block vertically, remove insulation plate (21) by hand and disconnect spark plug cables by loosening piercing screws (20). It is recommended that each cable be tagged to facilitate reassembly. Prepare magneto for removal from engine by unfastening lock spring (26), unscrewing slotted nut (24) and giving switch cable a slight pull which will allow insulation gland (25) and terminal (27), including terminal nut assembly (28), to be withdrawn completely. Magneto can now be taken from engine by removing cap screws holding magneto to engine mounting plate. Coll Assembly (9)*Loosen screw (12) in cable clamping block (11) on side of coil and disconnect the primary breaker cable (83). Remove coil by withdrawing coil hold-down screws (60 and 61). It is not necessaryto place a keeper acrosst the pole shoe extensions while the magneto is disassembled. The insulation plate (63) under coil and primary cable holding clip (53) should be removed at this time by withdrawing three screws (64). Breaker Assembly (70)-Remove hexagon nut (34), using a 32" socket wrench. This can be accomplished by holding inductor rotor shaft stationary (thereby also holding distributor gear shaf! in a rigid position) by means of wrench TSE 5232 placed in position on the splined drive coupling (2). Timing collar (32) and sealing gasket (33) can be removed by hand. Removal of the hexagon nut exposes felt oil restrictor plug (35) which should be pulled out of distributoi gear shaft at this time. Remove three fastening screws (41) which secure breaker assembly 170) to gear housing. Entire breaker assembly can now be pulled out and disassembledinto its component parts which should be carefully inspected (see 'Inspection after Disassembly'). Withdraw breaker cam (31), Woodruff key 'from (36) and copper wdsher (3b) distributoi. gear shaft. Dlstrlbutor Rotor (52)-To remove distributor rotor from unit, withdraw both the rotor and apron fastening screws (51 and 66). Unfastening of the latter permits horizontal movement of apron. Rotor and apron must be withdrawn together. At this point, back-lash of gears should be measured with a suitable dial sauee. With inductor rotor held in a fixed posilion', back-lash as measured on periphery of teeth on distributor gear must not exceed .010", otherwise both the distributor gear and drive gear must be replaced. Gear Eoustng (46)-Remove four fastening nuts (67). Magnetos are provided with two slots between magneto and gear housing to permit prying the two housings apart by means of two screw drivers. On earlier models having no slots, tap edge of gear housing carefully with a rawhide mallet to separate the two housings. (On these models, do not pry with screw driver or similar tool.) To remove distributor gear shaft from gear housing, screw drift tool TSE 5225 on end of shaft until it bottoms. Place tool TSE 5248-1 on arbor plate and insert two pins TSF, 5248-2 in proper holes. Locatn gear housing assembly on these pins which are so spaced that they will

L4L5

MAGNETOS
slide through the two holes in gear hub and will press against gear housing surface. With arbor ram pressing against drift TSE 5225, push entire Iength of distributor gear shaft through gear housing. Remove bearings (22 and 30) from gear housing by means of puller ST 452. Remove spacer (29), spring riilg (23) and outer bearing race locking key i40). Inductor Rotor Assernbly (ba)-To remove inductor rotor (54) from magneto housing (1), proceed as follows: 1. Remove cotter pin (58), castle nut (5), lock washer (4) and plain recessed washer (3). Splined drive coupling (2) can be loosened by means of wrench TSE 5232. 2. Remove ball bearing thrust plate (8) which contains oil seal (6) bv withdrawing four fastening screws (59). To facilitate removal, take two of these screws and insert them in the two unused, threaded holes with which the thrust plate is provided. Tightening of the two screws will provide the equivalent of a puller, and will withdraw thrust plate from magneto housing. 3. Inductor rotor is removed by screwing drift tool TSE 5225 firmly on rotor shaft and tapping end of drift with rawhide mallet. 4. Place tool TSE 5248-t on arbor plate in such a manner that there is free space below the slot in this tool. Slide rotor shaft into slot which is so shaped that it will just clear steel washer (48) on rotor, with seating surface pressed against insulation plate (47). Using pressing tool TSE 5248-9on shaft end, press shaftthrough ball bearing (44), rotor gear (45) and insulation plate. Now remove Woodruff key (42) and steel washer (48). Magneto Eouslng (l)-Tap out ball bearing (7) bV meansof a fibre rod.

INSPECTION AFTER DISASSEMBLY Metal Parts-All metal parts must be washed in clean gasoline and dried with compressed air. AII parts must be free from chips and foreign material. Examine magneto housing (1), gear housing (46), radio shield (14) and dust cover (13) for cracks, Ioose inserts and studs. Inspect all tapped holes. insulations, such as distributor Insulatlons-All block (19), distributor rotor (52), booster conductor (16), apron (50), insulation plates (2L, 47 and 63), coil (9), insulation bushings and washers must be cleaned with oily cloth and wiped dry with a clean cloth. Carbon deposits on distributor block and distributor rotor electrodes should be removed and electrodes cleaned with fine emery cloth. Distributor block and booster conductor cable holes should be examined and cleaned. Inspect assembliesfor cracks. coil for cracked end Coll Assembly-Examine plates and check soldered connections. Before of secondary ieinstalling coil, check continuity 'Testing and Perwinding as outlined under formance.' Ball Bearlngs and Otl Seal-All ball bearings must be cleaned in an approved solution and rough, loose or worn bearings replaced. Pack bearings with high-temperature grease American Bosch US 508 (or, if preferred, use Royco #5 grease). If oil seal (6) shows evidence of excessive 'Reaswear or leakage, it must be replaced. See procedure. Magneto' for sembly of the Gears-Examine both distributor gear assembly and rotor gear for butrs, excessivewear or other defects. Clean oil reservoir (37) in distributor gear shaft with approved cleaning solution. Breaker Assernbly (See Flgures I and 2)ThorougNy inspect and clean all component parts of the breaker assembly (70). If the bakelized linen cam follower block is worn, replace with new lever assembly (73). Wipe primary condenser (85) with clean cloth dipped in clean machine oil and test condenser as outlined under 'Testing and Performance.' 1. I)resslng of Breaker Polnts: a. Examine both breaker points for evidence of wear. Extrbme care must be exercised in dressing points to insure a flat, square surface. Peaks appearing on contact surface of points should be removed, but it is not necessary to remove enough of the platinum-iridium points to cause small pits or craters to disappear completely, unless they collectively cover an excessive part of the contact surface. TooI TSE 5229 must be used for this purpose. 2. Reassernbly of Breaker (See Ftg. 1): a. Place breaker plate (70) on breaker assembly fixture TSE 5220 and secure by means of three fastening screws (41), lock washers and plain washers. b. Mount contact bracket with point (76) and secure to plate (70) by inserting screw (92) and lock washer (93) through cup-shaped contact bracket stop bushing (77). As contact bracket wiII have to be moved again, do not tighten screw (92) too securely. c. Assemble to fastening bolt (79), the following: Iock washer (80), spacing washer (88), contact spring with point (78), spacing washer (88), three shims (89), insulation bushing (90). Assemble these parts to supporting post (70A). Over threaded end of fastening bolt (79), slide insulation bushing (90) and secwely tighten assembly to supporting post by means of square nut (91).

t4L6

MAGNDTOS

Fig.t

Fig.2

SECTION A.A

S E C T I O NB . B

d. FiU groove in cam follower lever supporting post with high-temperature grease,American Bosch US 508. (Do not use Royco 15 grease.) Assemble cam follower (73) with follower block resting on flat part of dummy cam, and secure by means of plain washer (71) and cotter pin (72). Assemble follower lever spring (74). Make certain that plain washer (71) is not clamped between cam follower and cotter pin, but is perfectly free to turn. 3. Breaker Polnt Adiustrnent: a. Shift contact bracket with point (76) in its elongated hole until both contact points are in perfect alignment. Tighten screw (92) enough to hold bracket in place. b. Turn dummy cam so that cam follower block will rest on high part of cam. Loosen screw (92) and move contact bracket with point (76) bv means of the eccentrically-headed stud (75), until feeler gauge TSE 5213, inserted between the points, just becomesfree, indicating a point opening of .009"-.01,0". Tighten fillister head screw (92) securely. c. Check tension of contact spring with point (78), using spring scale TSE 52L2 (se Fig. 1). Hook of scale must be held adjacent to point as shown in illustration. Spring tension must be

22-32 ounces at instant breaker points open. This can be determined by inserting a .001" feeler gauge between points. When a slight pull releasesthe feeler gauge, points are just beginning to open. A suitable electrical timing light connected across points may be used in place of the feeler gaugefor determining correct instant. For spring tension above 32 ounces, decrease by adding one shim (89); for spring tension below 22 ounces,increase tension by removing one shim (89). In adding or removing a shim, all parts on assembly fastening bolt (79) must be removed from supporting post (70A) and reassembled in 'c' their proper sequence, outlined in section 'Reassembly of Breaker.' Readjust conunder 'a' and 'b' tact points as outlined in sections and recheck spring tension. d. Check cam follower lever spring tension using spring scale TSE 5212 (see Fig. 2). Tension must be t4-22 ounces at instant top of cam. follower block touches contact spring with point, otherwise lever spring must be replaced. e. Using feeler gauge TSE 5213, check clearance between top of cam follower block and contact spring with point (78). This must not be Iess thari .017" when follower is at its lowest position.

MAGNDTOS
4. Corrpletlng the Assernbly of Breaker: a. Fasten condenser (85) to breaker plate (70) by means of two fastening screws (86) and lock washers(87). b. Assemble supporting plate (82), shortcircuiting spring (81), primary cable (83) and

r4L7

condenserlead on fastening bolt (79), and secure nut (84), using tool TSE 5218. The breaker assembly (70) should be removed from the breaker assembly fixture TSE 5220 and is then ready for ir?stallation on magneto. (See 'Reassembly of Magneto.')

REASSEMBLY OF TEE MAGNETO (See Reference Drawlng) Magneto Eouslng (1) and Inductor Rotor (54)-Insert post TSE 5248-3 in hole 'C' of tool 'fSE 5248-l-. Place round plate TSE 5248-4 on end of post. Slide magneto housing (1) over plate TSE 5248-4, which fits into the tunnel between the pole shoes. With sealed end of bearing facing the insjde of magneto housing, press bearing (7) into housing with large end of tool TSE 5248-8until it seats firmly. baII bearings must be packed with Note-All American Bosch US 508 grease or, if preferred, Royco 15 greasemay be used. Next, insert drive end of inductor rotor into hole 'C' of tool TSE 5248-1 which is placed on arbor plate so that free space exists b-elow hole 'C'. Assemble steel washer (48), Woodruff key (42) and insulation plate (47) on gear end of inductor rotor shaft. Using tool TSE 5248-6, press drive gear into place, with flat surface of gear resting against insulation plate. Care must be taken that keyway in drive gear lines up with Woodruff key. With sealedend of bearin9 G4) facing 4rive gear, press bearing on inductor rotor shaft with tool TSE 5248-7. Next, insert pressing tool TSE 5248-7 tnto hole 'D' of plate TSE 5248-1. Place inductor rotor shaft in an upright position by putting bearing (44) into the recess of tool TSE 5248-7. Slide magneto housing over drive end of shaft as far as it will go. Using large end of tool TSE 5248-8 on ball bearing (7) in magneto housing, press housing on shaft until bearing seats on shoulder ofinductor rotor shaft. If old oil seal is worn or shows signs of leakage, replace as follows: Place thrust plite (8) in h5le 'A' of tool TSE 5248-l and use small end of tool TSE 5248-5 for pressing out worn seal. Now turn thrust plate over and place it in hole 'B' of tool TSE 5248-1. Metal-supported side of new seal must face toward inside of magneto when thrust plate is irrstalled. Use large end of tool TSE 5248-5 to press seal into place, making certain that seal is properly seated iir thrusT plate. Assemble thrust plate with oil seal in magneto hogsi4g, using four screws (59). Tighten screws gradually and evenly, and stake screw heads with tool TSE 5219. Gear Eouslng Asserrrbfv (48)-Before assembling distributor gear shaft to magneto housing, oil reservoir (37) in shaft must be refilled with oil. This must be done in the following manner: 1. Fill oil pressure gun TSE 5233 with Fiske BS bearing oil, with oil at a temperature of about L20 to 130 degreesF. 2. With distributor gear shaft preheated to about L20 to 130 degrees F., fiIl oii reservoir to top of shaft, keeping spout of pressure gun under surface of oil to prevent air bubble formations. 3. Insert felt restrictor plus (35) into end of shaft and press firmly into plaie by hand until a paximym gf t4u" of-the plug remains protruding from the shaft. Elevated oil tempeiature wili prevent e-xcessive_ back-pressure of oil when plug is. pressed into shaft,- and prevents trapping oT air bubbles at head of plug.Note-If inspection after 'Testing and Performance' indicates either- insufficient or excessivecam lubrication after the oil reservoir was properly filled, as outlined above, and after inspection shows that the small oil hole from the center to the surface of the cam is not clossed up in the case of in'sufficient lubricatlon. then the entire distributor gear assemblv should be returned to the factorv for repiacement of the automatic metering oiler assembly (0). Under no circumstances should acijustment_ gt tttis assembly be attempted, nor should it be tampered with IN ANY WAY. A thin oil film on cam indicates that oiler is working properly. Mount outer bearing race locking key (40) in slot in gear housing (46) and s-ecure i'ittr spring ring (23). It is suggested that location of locking Fgy U" marked on the two hubs of gear housing-with pencil marks to facilitate assembly of bearings into housing. Locate gear housing assemb_ly, with breaker end facing upward, on tool TSE 5248-L0. With open siiie of bearing faging downward and one of its two slots aligneii with. pencil _marks,press bearing (30) into gear housing with small end of tool TSE 52[g-9. Bearing slot must, be aligned with end of locking Turn gear housing over so that gear side \"y. faces upward, with bearing which has iust been pressed in resting on slight projection of surface on tool TSE 5248-10. Ipse{ spqggl (29) which is held in place by tool- pilot TSq 5248-11. Press bearing (:2i) in- place as-oqtlined above, with slot in Fearing 'Remove al.ignedwith key. pilot from tool TSE 5248-10 and re-locate gear housing on latter. Check location of spacef to make sure that it is

1418

MAGNDTOS
Iined up with bearings. Now press distributor gear shaft through gear housing, using tool TSE 5248-6for pressing against hub ofgear. Mountlng Gear Ilouslng Assexnbly to Maggear housing partially neto Iloust^ns-Guids on to studs of magneto.housing. mesh distributor gear and drive Irnportant-To gear teeth properly in order to obtain correct internal timing of the magneto, make certain that distributor gear tooth, marked with white dot on gear side facing ball bearing in gear housing, will become meshed between two drive gear teeth marked with red lines (seereferencedrawing). It is advisable, but not absolutely necessary, to turn floating inductor rotor ball bearing (44) until the edgesof one of the two slots are lined up with two red marks on drive gear teeth. This will facilitate seating of bearing against bearing retaining spring (43) in gear housing, thereby avoiding undue pressure on retaining spring which results if bearing must locate itself. Gear teeth mesh can be noted through observation hole of gear housing on breaker side. A suggested check is to place pencil marks on top of the two drive gear teeth as well as on the rotor side of the distributor gear tooth having the white dot. This will permit observation of the setting from either side of the gear housing. After correct gear teeth mesh is obtained, use rawhide mallet to tap gear housing firmly against magneto housing. Secure with fastening nuts (67). Apply a little American Bosch US 508 grease, with fingers, on surface of distributor gear teeth. (Do not use Royco 15 grease.) Dlstrlbutor Rotor (52)-Reinstall apron (50) and distributor rotor (52) together. Do not fasten apron screws until distributor rotor is in its proper place over the gear hub. When apron and rotor are in proper position, secure apron and rotor fastening screws (66 and 51) firmly. Breaker Assernbly (70)-Fish primary lead (83) from breaker assembly (70) through hole in gear housing assembly and slots in apron. Mount breaker assembly to gear housing by using three fastening screws (41), Iock washeis and plain washers. Screws should be located approximately in the centers of the three slots, but should not be tightened firmly at this stage. -be Now install a temporary ground wire (to 'Testing removed after and Performance' run) by inserting terminal nut assembly (28), terminal (27), rubber insulation Q5), and securingslotted nut t24) with lock spring 126). Slide copper washer (38) over distributor gear shaft until it rests against bearing (30). Mount cam (31) with Woodruff key (36) and copper gasket (33) on shaft ofdistributor gear. Irnportant-Un4er no circumstances is grease to be applied to cam. This- is to avoid clogging of the small oil hole which permits the Fiske BS bearing oil to reach the surface of the cam from the metering oiler assembly. A second objeition is the possibility of grease reaching the breaker points, thereby causing burning and pitting of the latter. Assemble timing collar (32), which fits into cam slots jn olre posjtion only, by pressing it into place by hand until it seats snugfu in tlie slots. Use wrench TSE 5232 on drive coupling (2) to prevent distributor gear shaft from turning and tighten hexagon nut (3!) firmly by applying an even pressure on 14" socket wrench. Turn magneto in normal direction, as indicated by arrow on cam until the cam follower (78) is in cam dwell preceding #1 cam lobe. Insert .0_01" feele1 gagge between breaker points. Place straight edge across step of timing-collar. Continue turning magneto in normal direction gntil 11 cam lobe just begins to open points, indicated when a slight pull releasei the feeler gauge. A suitable electrical timing light, conpoints, may be used in-place of nected acrossr feeler gauge to determine this instant. At this setting, straight edge must Iine up with timi4g marks 'T' qr rim of gear housing. If this is not the case, loosen three fastening screws (41) and turn entire.breaker plate in its slots until correct-position is obtained. Now tighten screws (41) firmly- Check breaker point setting by inserting feeleq gauge TSE 52Lg (.009t blade) which should just become free when cam follower is on the highest point of 11 lobe. If feeler gauge indicates that breaker point gpening is.other than .009" to .010", then adjust by loosening screw (92) and moving coniact bracket with point (76) slightly, by means of eccentri!"ally-headedstud (75) until correct opening is obtained. Screw (92) must be tightened firmly after adjustment. Re-rnagnetlzatlon-This magneto is unusually stable in its magnetization and does not ordinarily require remagnetization during routine inspections or even complete disassembly. Remagnetization should not be attempted unless the primary current reading as obtained under 'Testing and Performance' is below 1.7 amperes, and then only with a magnetizing stand of ploper strength. If remagne_tizationis necessary, use magnetizing stand TSE 5210 1or equivalent). Ailapter plate TSE 5246-2, held to law TSE 5246-t by pilot pins, is designed to make contact with th-e two exposedchamfered lower pole shoe surfaces P when base of magneto housing is placed in it. Next, slide jaw TSE 5246-3 into space between pole shoe extensions until contact ls made with upper pole shoesPt.

MAGNETOS
It is essential to remagnetize magneto in the srme magnetic direction as originally done, otherwise a complete reversal of the permanent magnets will be required, which might possibly be beyond the strength of the particular magnetizing stand available. Polarity can readily be determined by means of a compass. The south pole of the magneto should always be placed against the north pole of the magnetizing stand. Polesof stand TSE 52L0 are marked'N' and 'S'. Apply two charges of four to five seconds duration each. It is suggested that inductor rotor be gtven a quarter turn between charges, in order to allow saturation of both magnets in turn. Now remove adapter'plate TSEr 5246-2 fiom jaw TSE 5246-1,and reverseposition ofjaw TSE 5246-3 on magnetizing stand pole. This will leave two straight jaw surfaces. Place jaw TSE 5246-l against bottom of magneto housing underneath lower pole shoes P, and jaw TSE 5246-3 across upper pole shoe extensions. With jaws held on same poles of magnetizirtg stand as before, apply two additional charses of four or five seconds duration. This time;f charging will be sufficient to allow magnetizing current to build up to its full value for saturation of the magnetic circuit. Completlng the Assernbly-Fasten insulation plate (63) and primary cable (83), held in place by holding clip (53), to magneto housing with screws (64). Mount coil (9) on pole shoe extensions, with high-tension electrode inserted into distributor rotor. Place one plain washer under insulation washer and insert both in space between coil core and primary lead clamp assembly. Assemblelock washer, plain washer and insulation bushing on screw (60), and fasten coil to pole shoe extensions, using short screw (61) with lock washer to tighten right-hand side of coil (as seen from drive end of magneto). Connect primary cable (83) to terminal block of coil.

1419

After providing distributor block with temporary test cables, install insulation plate (21) by hand. Mount distributor block to magneto frame and securewith fastening nuts (65). Oheck air gap between electrodesofdistributor rotor and electrodes of distributor block with gauge TSE 52L4. At overhaul stage, with magneto being prepared for re-installation on engine, air gap between electrodes should not be less than .015" nor greater than .060". If the latter condition should exist, distributor rotor must be replaced. In cases where visual inspection indicates that distributor block electrodes are also worn or burned excessively, both distributor rotor and distributor block should be replaced. At this time, magneto should be tested as outIined under'Electrical Testing and Performance'. It is now assumedthat tests are completed with temporary ground wire and testing cables removed, distributor block reinstalled, and primary cable connected to terminal block of coil. Complete assembly as follows: Securedust cover (13), including the booster assembly (16), to magneto housing with screws (62). Fasten breaker cover (39) to gear housing with nuts (68). Assemble radio shield (14) and secure with screws (69 and 55). Note-Screws (69) holding shield to gear housing must be tightened before screws (55) holding rihield to dust cover are inserted. Mount radio shield elbow to radio shield. using screws (56). Assemble drive coupling (2), plain recessed washer (3), lock washer (4), castle nut (5), and cotter pin (58) to the drive end ofinductor rotor shaft. . Magneto is now ready for re-installation on engrne.

ELECTRICAL TESTING AND PERFORMANCE Condenser (85)-Test primary condenser (85) on a 500-volt Megger tester, with condenser preheated in an oven to 180-200degreesF. Ifreading is 1 megohm or more, condenseris satisfactory for further use.
TERMINAL

VOLTMETER

Cott (0)-Check continuity of secondary winding by connecting coil in series with battery and

sensitive voltmeter of suitable range for battery being used (seesketch). A definite voltmeter reading must be obtained which will be somewhat less than the batterv voltage, depending on sensitivity of voltmetei. If continuity of secondary winding is checked with an ohm-meter, resistance should be 3900 to 4300 ohms. Final test of coil must be made during actual test run of magneto as outlined in latter part of this chapter. Test Runs-Attach pulley TSE 5250 to rotor shaft and mount magneto on a suitable test stand which is provided with adiustable test gaps ST 260. Test stand must have a variable speed range up to 3000magneto R.P.M. Connect high-tension cables to test gaps with pointed, three-electrode test gaps set at 9 mm (see sketch).

1420

MAGNETOS
After remagnetization, operate magneto for 30 minutes at 2000 R.P.M. magneto drive shaft speed. While running, short-circuit the magneto primary fifty times in rapid successionby means of the grounding terminal, in order to reduce rnagnetization to a stable value.
SPARK GAP AS REQUIRED

HIGH TENSION ELECTRODE

GROUND ELECTRODE MAINTAIN SHARP POINTS

After stablIization, magneto must be capable of firing the 9 mm test gaps without missing between L25 and 3000 R.P.M. magneto drive shaft speed. The magnetic strength of the stationary magnets (M) is tested by measuring the primary current output. To accomplish this, disconnect primary lead (83) from terminal block (11) on brimary side of coil. Connect one lead from high-grade AC ammeter, such as Weston Model 528 (0 to 2.5 ampere scale), or equivalent, to coil terminal block, and ground the other lead from ammeter to the magneto frame (stud on gear housing may be used as a convenient ground). If th magneto is properly magnetized and the electrical performance of the coil is satisfactory (seetest run for coil below), a minimum reading of 1.7 amperes will be obtained at 400 R.P.M. magneto drive shaft speed. If this reading is lower than L.7 amperes, the magnetizing stand should be checked by investigating battery condition and battery interconnecting leads. If battery is in good condition and properly conROUTINE INSPDCTION

nected to the stand, the magneto should be correctly remagnetized as per instructions contained herein. In the event that the current reading is still b"l9* 1.7_amperes after this remagnelization, coil tests having previously proven same to be in proper working _condition, then the charger used is of insufficient strength to completely saturate the 'Alnico' 14qgne!s, and the proper magnetizing stand should be obtained. Reconnect primary lead (83) to coil terminal block (11). In order to check the insulation of the coil under the worst possible operatin'g conditions, heat magneto with refleCtor type of heater to a temperature of not less than 165 nor more than 190 degrees F., as measured on coil core. In this heated condition, magneto'must be' capable of firing not less than 10 mm, pointed, three-electrode test gaps without missing, at any "magnetir s_peed between 200 ana 3OOO R.P.M. drive shaft speed. If missing occurs, ctrecX. magneto with coil of known quality. Should this check show that missing occurs because of difficulties other than coil failure, then the cable connections, breaker contact point adjustment, distributor block and distribufor rotor-electrode clearance, and primary cu::rent output must be investigated. Booster Current-Run magneto at 100-200 R.P.M. magneto drive shaft speed with grounding terminal grounded and the hish-lension cable from booster tinit connected tb booster assembly terminal. Use 7 mm pointed, threeelectrode test gaps for checking spark of booster. Booster spark follows the magneto spark, which can be checked by disconnecting- grounding terminal intermittentlv. AND MAINTENANCE straight e4_ge across step of timing collar (32). Jar propeller in a counter-clockwise direction untr_l slrqSht edge just lines up with timing marks 'T' on rim of gear housing. Loosen ad-jr:stable- contact _bracket, locking screw (92), and shift contact bracket by means of eccentr-ii screw (75) lrntilcontact points are in such a position- that the_slightest counter-clockwise jairing of the propeller will open the points. This in-stant is reached when a slight pull will release feeler gauge. When setting is correct, feeler gauge will become free just as straight edge coincides with timing marks when propeller is turned counterclockwise, indicating that contact points on fil cam lobe are just beginning to open.- Now make certain that locl<ing screw (92) is securely tightened. Re-check this adjustment by moving propeller as outlined. Aft-er final adjustmentf recheck synchronization of both magnetos to engine timing marks (see 'Timing and Installation of Magneto'). Replace breaker cover (39).

lubrication is required beLubrlcatlon-No tween major overhaul periods. regular routine inspecBreaker Assembly-At tion periods, breaker cover (39) should be removed from gear housing (46), and the instant at which contact points start to open on ffl cam Iobe (indicated by red dot), should be checked. At this instant, a straight edge placed across step of timing collar (32) should coincide with registering marks 'T' on rim of gear housing. Permissible limits are/n" on either side of registering marks 'T'. If this checks, no adjustments need be made. However, should the straight edge fail to come within these limits at instant contact points on 11 cam lobe are about to open, then correct in following manner: Facing front of engine, turn propeller counterclockwise (thereby causing magneto distributor gear shaft to turn in normal direction as indicated by arrow on cam) until cam follower is in cam dwell preceding #1 cam lobe. Insert a .001" feeler gauge between contact points. Place

t427

THERMOCOUPLE CONNECTION

4 3

I 4 POLE, FIXED IGNITION, BASE-MOUNTED MAGNETO, DRIVEN AT 1116 ENGINE SPEED.

:ilI

AMERICAN BOSCH AVIATION MAGNETO TYPESB9RU.3


H IGH- TENSION GROUND (SWITCH ) C O N N E C T I O NT E R M I N A L

\--

COMPENSATING CAM TURNS AT r/2 ENGINE SPEEO.

RED DOT ON CAM I N D I C A T E S NO.I LOBE

46

\
G E A R RATIO = 2 r/4

STRAIGHT EDGE PLACEO ACROSS STEP OF TtMtNG COLLAR MUST COINCIDE WITH TIMING MARKS "T" WHEN CONTACT POINTS START TO OPEN ON NO.I CAM LOBE. THIS WILL "E" GAP. GIVE CORRECT PERMISSIBLE LIMITS ARE I/3e" ON EITHER SIDE OF TIM ING MARKS " T".

ROTOR WORKING ELECTRODE FIRING NO.I CYL. WHEN MARKS ARE IN LINE AS SHOWN.

ASSEMBLE GEARS WITH TIMING MARKS IN LINE AS SHOWN.

ECTION B-

\\ ll &

1501

CEAPTDR XV RADIO SHIELDING PRATT AND WHITNEY TYPE


General-The Pratt and Whitney Radio Shielding is made in two sections and consists of a front and rear manifold to which are attached braided conduits for spark plug leads. Braided conduits also connect the manifolds and the magneto shields. These parts are joined by union connections to facilitate the operations of disassembly, replacement and assembly. The manifolds are a covering for the ignition system cables. They protect the ignition cables from wear and deterioration due to exposure, and prevent them from becoming saturated with oil. It is general practice to replace the ignition cables at the time of each engine overhaul. This will eliminate the possibility of weakened or defective cable being overlooked at inspection.

DISASSEMBLY There are two types of manifold to spark plug conduit assemblies. The separate elbow type has a detachable elbow which is secured to the flexible conduit by a union nut. The tntegral elbow type has the elbow soldered to the flexible conduit. Separate Elbow Type-To disassemble,remove the spark plug terminal sleeve,unscrew the union nuts at the elbows and remove elbows from the ends of the spark plug leads. Disassemble the braided conduits between the spark plug elbows and manifolds by unscrewing the union nuts at the manifolds. Elbow Type-The elbow soldered Integral connection should not be broken at the time of periodic overhaul unless one of the details is damaged, in which case, the solder may be softened by applying a torch, enabling the parts to be separated. Periodic overhaul disassembly may be accomplished by removing the spark plug terminal sleeves and unscrewing union nuts at the manifolds. Remove the grommets from inside the union nuts on the spark plug to manifold braided conduit. Remove the cable fastening screws from the distributor blocks to disassemble the cables from these blocks. Disassemble the magneto elbow assembly from the braided conduit and the braided conduit from the manifolds by unscrewing the union nuts. Remove the ignition cable from the manifolds.

CLEANING The metal parts (manifold, conduit, elbows, etc.) may be cleaned by the process described in Chapter III. INSPECTION AII conduits should be given a careful visual inspection for any signs of breakage. Inspect manifolds for dents or other damage. ASSEMBLY The following table is given as a guide for replacing ignition wires:

L502

RADIO SEIELDING
TABLES OF WIRE LENGTES IN INCEES Wasp Hl and El-G Equlpped wtth SBOR Magnetos No. of Distributor Block No. 1 No.2 No.3 No.4 No.5 No.6 No.7 No.8 No.9 Total Length Rear Front Manifold Manifold
ot

51" 62" 75" 62" 50"


Dt'

83" 73"

37" 55" 66" 46" 32" 46" 59" 55" 40"

Wire Length from Rear Manifold to Left Magneto L8" L9" t7rh,, 18" L9" L7rk,,

t8%" 20,, L9"

Wire Length from Front Manifold to Right Magneto 32%" 3314" 32" 32%" 33rh,, 32" 33" 34rh,, 33rh,,

Equlpped wtth SBORU-B Magnetos No. of Distributor BIock No. 1 No.2 No.3 No.4 No.5 No.6 No. 7 No.8 No.9 Total Length

Front Manifold

49s2" 63r2" 7554" 62%" 5012,, 58V8"


8454" 73"

oo

Rear Manifold 35" 5314" 67r2" 4654" 32Y2" 4611" 60V8" 5654" 40,,

Wire Length from Wire Length from Rear Manifold to Front Manifold to Right Magneto Left Magneto 30rh,, T6" 1714" 32r2" 33t2" L8Y4" 33T4" t854" 34" Ls%" 32Ya" L732" 347A" 2014" 36r4" 2ty6" 33rh,, L9"

Eornet D-G, Ez-G, and E8-G No. of Distributor Block No. 1 No.2 No.3 No.4 No.5 No.6 No.7 No.8 No.9

Total Length Rear Front Manifold Manifold 38" 59" 55" 53" 67" 63" 46" 77" 32" 65" 46" 52" 60" 59" 56" 85" 40" 72"

Wire Length from Rear Manifold to Left Magneto L8" L9"

17%" 18" 19,, 17Lh" Lgrk,' 20" 19"

Wire Length from Front Manifold to Right Magneto 34Lh" 35%" 34" 3412" 35rh,, 34" 35" 36%" 35%"

Wasp Jr. B' 82 and BB Equtpped wlth SBOR and SB0R (N) Magnetos No. of Distributor Block No. 1 No.2 No.3 No.4 No.5 No.6 No.7 No.8 No.9

Total Length Rear Front Manifold Manifold 3'1" 53" 55" 47" 66" 58" 'll" 46" 32" 58" 46" 46" 59" 53" 55" 92" 40" 66"

Wire Length from Wire Length from Rear Manifold to Front Manifold to Left Magneto Right Magneto lg" 29" 19,, 30" L7%" 28rh,, 18" 29" 79" 30"

r7%"
20" L9"

181h,,

28r2" 29%" 31" 30"

1503

RADIO SEIDLDING
Equlpped wlth SBOR(N)-a Magnetos No. of Distributor Block No. 1 No.2 No.3 No.4 No.5 No.6 No.7 No.8 No.9

Total Length Front Rear Manifold Manifold 57" 39" 60" 55" 62" 67" '14" 45" 6L" 29" 47" 45" 54" 59" 81" 53" 69" 39"

Wire Length from Rear Manifold to Left Magneto

Wire Length from Front Manifold to Right Magneto

18" L9" L7rh,, 18" L9" 1714" L8%" 20" L9"

29" 30" 28%" 29" 30" 28%" 29r2" 3L" 30"

Equlpped wtth SBORU-B Magnetos

No. of Distributor Block No. 1 No.2 No.3 No.4 No.5 No.6 No.7 No.8 No.9

Total Length

Front Manifold
oD"

4814" 63r/+" 74%" 6trh,, 47%" 55%" 82%" 69"


DIMENSIONS

Rear Manifold 37" 5332" 68Yr" 45%" zgrh,, 45%,"

5e%"
54%" 39"

Wire Length from Wire Length from Rear Manifold to Front Manifold to Left Magneto Right Magneto 20%" 33" 201h,, 33" L9" 3t%" L8rZ" 3L" 17%" 30" L8" 30%" L7rh,, 30" r8rh,, 31" gLrh,, t9"

Waep Jr. Magneto to Rear Manifold Magneto to Front Manifold Eornet E Magneto to Rear Manifold Magneto to Front Manifold Eornet D2-G ond E8-G Mameto to Rear Manifold Magneto to Front Manifold Waep Hl Magneto to Rear Manifold Large Dlameter Small Dlameter Magneto to Front Manifold Magneto to Rear Manifold Magneto to Front Manifold

OT FLDXIBLE CONDUITS I.D. Length (In Inches) (In Inches) lYn + \s l0%+%a L%z+ %a 2l%*46 Lrl + Yn Lr/a+ %a L%+Xt L%+%t

(In Inches) 1.335-1.345 1.335-1.345

o.D.

27 Ya*. Xa
L0r%6 + N6 27%a*\a

L0ryr6 + Yt6

l3%4 135/u

Ls%4 L3%4

l0rh+X6 25 +X6 L2 rl * Yra


LN6

r% r%
L%z

L3544

L\Y6L

1.340-1.355 1.340-1.355

lYrz

1504

RADIO SHIELDING
sary length of cable from manifold to magneto. Asiembl6 the spark plug conduits and fasten with union nuts using a grommet in each union. Install the elbows and terminal sleeves, and solder the ends of the wires to the terminal sleeves. Assemble the conduits from manifolds to magnetos. Using some form of standard electrical test, make sure that the number on each ferrule corresnonds with the number of the cylinder to which the cable runs. Then attach the wire to distributor blocks according to the the magneto -diagram wiring tFig. 611). After assembly of the niagneto block, again check with some form of standard electrical test to make sure that the wires are in position for proper firing order. AII joints should be carefully inspected after assembly to seethat they are snug and that there are no vibrating contacts. No external soldering should be attempted while the ignition cable is in the shield, as the heat necessaryto make the soldered joint is detrimental to the insulation of the cable, and may injure it to the extent that this point will be the first to break down. CABLE

For information pertaining to any ignition cable not in the following approved list, consult the Service Department of Pratt and Whitney Aircraft. Belden Manufacturing Conrpany Chicago, Illinois, General Cable Corporation Buffalo, New York, Packard Electric Division General Motors Corporation Warren, Ohio, Sterling Cable Corporation Port Huron, Michigan. Mark ferrules consecutively from 1 ihrough 9 with a suitable metal stamp. To reassemble, remove /2" insulation from the end of each lenglh of cable,-being careful not to cut any of the strands. Sepaiate -along the strands of wire and bend the insulation' Install each them back ferrule on its corresponding number ignition cable and secure it with a crimping tool. String the cables through the manifold and in their pr-operoutlet holes, maintaining the neces-

REPLACING ONE IGNITION Determine which cable is defective by a recognized electrical test. Disassemble the connection and elbow from the end of the spark plug lead and remove the spark plug lead conduit Ly uncoupling the union nut. Remove the wire from the distributor block. Loosen the coupling nut on the conduit from the manifold to magneto and slip the conduit back towards the distributor block. Solder the new cable to the old cable at the spark plug end. Dust the new cable with talc oi soapstone to prevent seizing or friction. Pull the old cable out, at the same time feeding the new cable in at the manifold. It is necessaryto perform this operation carefully so as not to injure the protective coating on the cable. When the new wire has been pulled through far enough, cut it off to the proper length on each end. Reassemble the conduits, elbow and spark plug terminal sleeve connection, and solder the wire to the connection.

Termlnal Sleeves-Particular care should be exercised when installing the terminal sleeves on the ignition wire.' Cut only enough insulation from the conductor to permit the correct length of wire to extend through the wire outlet. Th6 insulation must bear firmli against the brass disc on the inside end of the sleeve. The ends of the ignition wires which are constructed with a layer-of cotton under the lacquered surface should be dipped in an insulating varnish to about y8" ;;d permitted to dry before the terminal sleeves are applied to the wire. This treatment prevents th6 layer of cotton from acting as a *ick should moisture find its way inlo the a-ssembly. When installing the terminal in the plug it- should be wiped- perfectly clean, and aftel that not touched by the fingers as oil, acid, dirt, etc., will promote flash-over, cause deterioration and eventual failure of the sleeve. The repeated installation of dirty sleeves in a spark plug results in contaminating t-he mica insulation-on the inside of the barrel, which eventually will cause faulty operation.

1601

CEAPTERXVI AUTOMATIC OIL TEMPDRATURE CONTROL


DESCRIPTION A thermostatic oil temperature regulator is now included as standard equipment to be incorporated in the oil system of any airplane. This device automatically regulates the temperature of the oil entering the engine to a predetermined setting, thus obviating the use of radiator shutters or other means of controlling oil temperatures on a great number of installations. Where 8" coolers,or larger, are utilized, congealing ofoil mav occur in the core of the cooler if the amount of dold air is greatly in excessof that required for oil cooling. Obviously, under these conditions it is necessary to have shutters or some other acceptable means of controlling the amount of air albwed to flow through the-cooler. It,also reduces the warming up period to approximately one-half the time over installations not equipped with this device. When the oil is cold, the valve automatically directs the outlet oil from the engine to the bottom of the oil tank, in close proximity to the suction line. Consequently the warm oil coming from the engine will be drawn into the suction line feeding the oil pre$sure pump. This process continues until the oil entering the engine reachesthe desired temperature; at which time, the automatic valve directs sufficient oil through the plane's external air cooler, thence to the top of the oil tank to maintain the desired inlet temperature. The current type thermostatic oil temperature control assembly incorporates a check valve at the point where the engine return oil line connects to the unit. This valve prevents oil flowing from the tank into the scavenge system of the engine while the engine is not in operation. automatic oil temperature Malntenance-The control unit normally requires no attention between overhaul periods. The operating limits of the unit cannot be altered except by replacing the sylphon with one of a different calibration. the four nuts holding Dlsassembly-Remove the two bodies together and separate. Disassemble nut from the end of the thermostatic unit and unscrew unit from body. Also remove the two nuts holding the check valve housing from the body which housesthe valve and separate. The unit is now disassembled sufficiently for ordinary inspection. If, however, it is intended to replace any parts, remove the solder, nut and waslier on end of unit. Disassemble valve and vhlve guide. IJnscrew pin holding the check valve bushings and springs in place. The springs, bushing and valve may be then removed through the slot in the top ofthe check valve housing. Cleanlng-Clean all parts with white furnace oil, or some suitable cleaner. Inspeatlon-The automatic oil temperature control unit should be inspected at every regular engrne overhaul period by checking clearances in accordance with clearance chart on Page 1603. Inspect the sylphon for any dents or cracks. Also inspect the seat of the check valve in casting. Assembly-Assemble valve guide and valve to the thermostatic unit. Fasten with washer and nut. Lock the nut with solder. Assemble gasket on each side of the valve guide and gasket on the threaded end of the thermostatic unit. Assemble unit in body and fasten with nut. Install body and fasten unit together with washers and nuts. Then assemble the check valve assembly by inserting the springs, bushing and valve through the slot at the tbp of the casting and insert the pin holding them in place. Therrnostatlo Unlt-It is good practice to test the thermostatic control at the time of overhaul to determine whether or not the thermostat bellows are properly actuating the valves at the desired temperature settings. Earlier units did not have any temperature settings recorded on the unit. Later units had the temperature settings on the thermostat stem only, while cunent units now have the settings stamped on both the thermostat stem and data plate. In the case of the earfier units, the temperature settings will have to be determined by checking the unit. The temperature ranges and Part Nos. of thermostats are as follows: Part No. 18199 1p198 18197 16403 11435 Range 85oto 105'F. 120oto 140'F. 140oto 160'F. 130oto 150'F. 150'to 170'F.

It should be noted that the above listed range temperatures are the temperatures at which the valve starts to open, and at which it is fully opened. The temperature at which the oil will stabilize is dependent upon the airplane installation.

1602

AUTOMATIC OIL TDMPERATURD CONTROL

BODY toNe cHAMBER)

UNIT THERMOSTATIC VALVE GUIDE

CHECK VALVE HOUSING

(TWO CHAMBERS)

Fig. 1601 -

Automatic Oil Temperature Control Unit

Oil should be circulated through the unit at the temperature of the lower setting. With continued operation at this temperature the valve should be just starting to open, although no oil should be allowed to pass through the outlet to which the oil cooler normally connects. Then with the oil at the temperature of the higher setting, the valve should move to and remain in the "oDen" position which will direct all of the oil thr6ugh the outlet to the cooler. Cheak Volve-The check valve and seat may be tested for leakage at the time of overhaul as follows: Subject the valve to 180 viscosity oil under a Dressureof 3 lb./sq. in. If the valve leaks in of one ounce iri 2l hours, the faces of both ex'cess the valve and the valve seat in the casting should be machined to obtain a perfect seat. The tension of the spring against the valve may also be checked by connecting a head of 180

"oil from pump" flange of the viscosity oil to the gravity assisting the valve to unit so that with open, the valve should not open with a 5" oil tiead'nor should remain closeil under a 30" oil head. Oll to Cooler Poeltlon-An added improvement "Three is now incorporated on the later type or Bolt Flange Type of lJnit", which provides for locking the unit so that all "Return Oil" frcm the engine is dfuected to the oil cooler. This feature, however, is only used in special flights to test oil cooler capacity. On satisfactory completion of the oil cooling test, the unit should be readjusted to operate automatically. To set the unit in "Oil To Cooler Position" loosen lock nut on the end of the Thermostatic Control Shaft and screw in shaft until it bottoms on the stop provided for this position. Tighten lock nut and safety with brass wire.

AUTOMATIC OIL TEMPDRATIIRD CONTROL

1603

J J

83a

t8B t()
rn

JJ

J J

69 qq
() ()

sEg
(Yl(} ()

'rl

nllllllillh
k It

0) a

,
o
k

J J

Jt

E t5 E 8 E sgg N
'j-,

-.) P () ()

JJ

ooG' ar\ /
.4\ 5 ' A

O
N

() ()

r o 90 I cg C -

b0

rt

I :.i
+_9 h
6 l | O v v v

a r-Et F F r
.E - i= 9E ! F E
0- 6E
6 x A

f;-3
F 7.-

.=..:g o

n EE !eo(E
E F }

i5F= H 9 d

& E_e)
I
I

.:i F A

1604

ALT ITUDE CALIBRATION OF AUTOMATIC CONTROL OIL TEMPERATURE


WITH INCREASING ALTITUDE OF OIL TEMPERATURE SHOWINGDECREASE

AUTITUDE 5

THOUSANDSOF FEET 15 20 25

rd o o:
lrj

F F lri J.
J

z_
6

Fig. 1603

1701

CEAPTER XVII AUTOMATIC MIXTURE AND POWER CONTROL THDORY


Due to the fact that the metering characteristics of a carburetor are a function of the air density entering the carburetor, a simple method of maintaining a constant metering characteristic is to maintain a constant density of this air. To do this one must either employ an external supercharger to maintain sea level density or an PRACTICAL To avoid the use of an external supercharger, the air density control valve method was chosen. The particular application under consideration for a-supercharged engine where it is desirable to restrict the maximum sea level power output, the two-fold purpose of the unit is readily comprehensible in that a reduction in the density of the air entering the carburetor to the density altitude at which full throttle operation is permitted not only serves as an automatic throttle stop, but at the same time gives the desired constancy of carburetor metering. Carrying this thought air density control valve to maintain a density equivalent to a predetermined altitude. The use of such an air density control valve necessitates the reduction of the power output of the engine at all times to the full throttle power at the density altitude chosen. APPLICATION still further, there is a density altitude at which the full throttle power is reduced to what is considered the normal cruising power of the engine. If the air entering the carburetor be reduced to this density, the cruising power output of the engine will then be maintained from sea level to this altitude and the carburetor remain characteristics constant metering throughout this range. In either of the above cases, the carburetor throttle would be left in wide open position at all times.

UNIT

DESICN OF UNIT
To take care of cruising conditions, the unit must reculate to one pressure; to take care of conditiois requiring mbre power, the unit must regulate to a second presfture and for cases of emergency -the where it might be necessary to exrated power the air density control ceed valve must be held wide open. (For the cruising condition one mixture ratio from the carburetor is deeired, while for the higher power a second mixture ratio is desired, and for the emergency full power condition, a third or still richer mixture is required.)

AUTOMATIC MIXTURD CONTROL UNIT


The Automatic Mixture and Power Control Unit is a device for maintaining the air entering the carburetor at a constant preslrre, and openine the correct number of jets in the carburetor to grve the desired mixture strength. A special type carburetor is supplied with this unit in oi8er to obtain the aulomatic mixture control feature. Bellows regulate the air pressure control valve through an oil servo mechanism. The unit is provided with a selector valve and three positions are available. . The normal throttle and manual mixture controls are provided on this carburetor in case of any malfunctioning of the Automatic unit, and the Automatic unit does not interfere with the normal It does, however, make it use of the throttle. possible to leave the throttle wide open for all normal flyrng conditions except landing.

EXPLAITATION OF TEE OPERATION OF AUTOMATIC MIXTIIRE CONTROL


The operation of the automatic mixture control resuiator is shown diagrammatically on the followins pages. It will be seen from these illustratilons that the principal operating parts of the regulator consisl of two bellows, a lever arm actuited by any movement of the bellows and a needle valve directing oil to the two sides of the operating piston. Of the two bellows one is evacuated and spring loaded internally, and the other vented behind the venturis in the carburetor, thereby being affected by the carburetor air horn pressure. If the absolute pressure in the air horn is such that the evacuated bellows is collapsed, the lever arm is drawn to that side and, being fixed at the top, draws the needle valve to that side. This action admits

t702

AUTOMATIC MIXTURE AND POWER CONTROL UNIT

Fulcrunr -\djustrrent

C a s ef i l ! i r r gC a p

Oil Pressure Cottttectiolt

Open Bellows

"CruisiIg" Adjustine

Presstrre Nut

Evacuated

Bellows

" llid Prsitiorr" Pressurc u-.tirg Nut

Sen o Needlc ()perating

Yalse Lever Lock Nuts

Serlo

\'alre

Prcssure Yalvo Operating Piston Shaft

Oi! l)rsiD Fittinc

Carburetor Jet ),IeedlcPistonr

Automatic Mixture Control Unit

engine oil pressure to the back of the operating piston at the same time opening the opposite end to drain, all of which forces the operating piston outward and through suitable linkages closes off the pressure control valves in the carburetor. As these valves are closing, the absolute pressurein the air horn is being reduced. When this pressure reachesa value such that the open bellows tends to collapse, thus expanding the evacuated bellows, the needle valve is thereby moved. During this movement, there comes a time when the needle valve is in its central position thus holding the operating piston and air valves stationary. The absolute pressure to which the unit regulates depends on the strength of the springs in the evacuated and open bellows. In this respect, it is readily. seel that an- increase in spring compression in the open bellows will change the absolute pressure for balance to a lower value. This feature is used to enable the same regulator to control the two different pressures and is accomplished by what is termed the range-shifter piston operating on the spring in the open bellows. Adjustable stop nuts are provided to limit the travel of the range-shifter piston in both directions thus providing an adjustment for both regulated pressures. The jet and passage arrangement in the car-

buretor is shown diagrammatically in the illustrations on the following pages. For simplicity in explanation, let us consider the cruising position first. Here the regulator is set to maintain a pressure equivalent to an altitude of say, 11,500 feet. This means that the density in the carburetor is greatly reduced and on a normal carburetor would require the use of some mixture control. In this carburetor, two of the jets are selected to give the desired consumption at this altitude, and the other two being cut off due to the needle valve being closed. As the regulator will maintain a constant pressure in the carburetor, these two jets will give uniform metering at any altitude below the critical altitude. In the mid position (sometimes used as a higher power cruising position) the regulator is set to maintain a pressure equivalent to a somewhat lower altitude, say, 6000 feet. This necessitates additional fuel capacity in the carburetor due to the decrease in altitude and, becausehigher power is available from the engine, necessitates an even greater fuel consumption. To accomplish this, a third jet is brought into action by relieving the oil pressure holding the needle on its seat. In the emergency position (see Fig. 1701) where the regulator is inoperative and the air horn pressure is always atmospheric, additional

AUTOMATIC MIXTURE AND POWER CONTROL UNIT


ASSEMBLY 1. Put servo needle in its bushing and push through until hole for lever pin appears in cup rn case. 2. Assemble bellows with connecting spool. 3. Put bellows together into case with gaskets on each end. Assemble so evacuation tube on evacuated bellows is on opposite side from housing cover plate. 4. Install needle valve lever. Put half of lever with pin riveted to it on opposite side from evacuating tube. Be careful not to break this tube when putting other half of lever in place. Be sure discs on lever are in the spool of the bellows link and the upper fulcrum. Bolt parts together using lock washer under nuts. 5. Put operating piston in cylinder and screw on guide making sure gasket is assembled. 6. Assemble range-shifter piston guide and piston with adjusting nuts. 7. Put range-shifter piston in cylinder. A tool should be used to guide end of piston shaft

L707

through oil seal in bottom of cylinder. The tool should be a rod of same diameter of oil seal with a pilot on end to fit in the range-shifter piston shaft. The return spring must be in place before piston is assembled in cylinder. 8. Push range-shifter spring thrust plate in end of shaft. 9. Drop range-shifter spring into bellows stop sleeve and over thrust plate. 10. Put selector valve in from drain fitting end, holding locating pin slot toward parting surface. Push in until slot with three drill point holes lines up with pin hole, then drop pin in place. 11. Place locating pin spring on top of pin. 12. Holding unit horizontally, press cylinder assembly into housing and bolt up securely. Be sure that locating pin spring goes into the hole provided for it in cylinder body. 13. In some cases,it is easier to assemble the drain fitting before assembling the two parts of the unit.

INSTALLATION The Automatic Unit is bolted to the rear of the carburetor, making oil pressure and drain Iines the only piping necessary. The pressure control valves must be at least 8" below the flange of the carburetor or on an elbow giving an equivalent distance in order not to spoil the m'etering characteristics of the carbureior. A suitable linkage must be supplied to connect these valves with the operating piston of the Automatic Unit. Any scoop design, other than those suggested by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, should be sent to the carburetor manufacturer, to test its effects on metering characteristics. In installation, care must be exercised to see that the pressure control valves have a full 90o travel, before the operating piston reaches its full stroke. Suitable oil pressure and drainage connections in accordance with the installation drawing should be provided. Besidesthe usual throttle and mixture controls, an additional control to the pilot's cockpit is required for the automatic mixture control regulator, although a combined control for the regulator and manual mixture may be used if desired. After installation on the carburetor, be sure the bellows caseis full of cylinder oil. This oil is poured through the cap on top of the case marked "Fill".

OPERATION When properly installed, the automatic mixture control operates in the following manner: in Errrergency Full Power Posltlon-When this position, the carburetor functions conventionally, being independent of the automatic unit. The air pressure control valve is held wide open both by a spring and servo control mechanism. All four jets in the carburetor are in use giving a full rich fuel consumption near full throttle that is normally experienced on a standard type carburetor. At a throttle position equivalent to the normal cruising R. P. M. the mixture is slightly richer than n6rmally experienced at this speed due to the fact that there is no economizer action. Proper use of the mixture control will give normal consumption. Mld Posltlon-When in this position, the air pressure control valves are in operation, limiting the power to a predetermined valve and closing one jet to give the correct mixture strength for this power. By use of the engine throttle, less power than the maximum regulated by the unit can be obtained. Crulslng Posltlon-When the control is moved to this position, the air pressure control valve is maintaining a pressure below the carburetor which allows a predetermined power output

1708

AUTOMATIC MIXTURE AND POWNR CONTROL UNIT


position is used only for normal cruising, and stroutd not be used for climbing. Even if the airplane is flown two or three thousand feet above the critical altitude of this position, the enrichment of the mixture will not be great enough to necessitate using the manual mixture control. By use of the engine throttle, Iesspower than the m'aximum regulited by the unit cin be obtained.

desired for cruising. The second oil controlled jet is closed off leaving two jets in operation wtrictr gives a mixture ratio considered most practical with regard to economy and durability of the engine. This power and fuel consumption is maintained at aII altitudes below the critical cruising altitude or that altitude where cruising power is maintained only at full throttle. This

ADJUSTMENTS All adjustments are made on a unit when tested at the factory. Following the installation, a check on the operating pressure below the carburetor for the mid and cruising positions should be made. If these do not agree with the recommended pressures, something is undoubtedly wrong with the regulator unit. Only in TESTING AUTOMATIC MIXTURE rare cases will a unit require readjustment and this should only be done by a specially trained mechanic. The carburetor is of the fixed jet type and the proper jet sizeshave been determined and tested in each carburetor. Under no circumstances should these be changed. RDGULATORS ON BENCII RIG is set, and this pressure is maintained with varying degreesof vacuum set by valve (C). Test Rlg for Automatlc Mkture and Power has been found that when a Control Unlts-It standard petcock valve (B) is used, it opens and closes too abruptly and does not provide a smooth increase or decreaseof vacuum necessary for the adjustment of the automatic unit. By reoperating a standard petcock valve, as shown in Fig. 1705, the desired straight line characteristic will be obtained in the opening and closing of the valve and prevent hunting. The dimensions contained in the sketch are approximate, as each valve will have to be reoperated to suit the test rig in which it is to be used. An appropriate method of reoperation is to file a small groove in the valve and then try it out in the test rig. The desired condition will be attained when the travel of the mercury in the manometer is smooth and gradual during the opening and closing of the valve. REGULATOR

Operatlon of Test Set-Up-Since the Auto--atic Mixture Regulator is- a pressure control device, means should be provided for setting this regulator to control to the desired pressure. Fig. 1704 shows a convenient set-up for adiustiig the regulator. As the pressuresto which the regulator is to be set are less than sea level atmospheric pressure, a source of vacuum is required. (In exceptional cases, where such a tesl device is located at a high altitude field, a source of pressure may have to be substituted.) An aspirator or vacuum pump may be used, as shown at (D), with a valve (C) to control the degree of vacuum. With a fixed air bleed (E), the pressure in the system depends on the rate of flow through this air bleed, and the pressure may be controlled by throttling with the petcock (B). This pressure is transferred to the automatic regulator and is recorded by the manometer (A). Connecting the petcock (B) to the operating piston rod of the automatic regulator, the petcock is automatically adjusted to-maintain the pressure for which the regulator

ADJUSTING TEE AUTOMATIC For the purpose of clarity, the positions of the selector valve are given as follows: of selector valve Ernergency Posltlon-Position when unit is inoperative. Manual mixture control has to be used when necessary. of selector valve when Mtd Posttlon-Position unit is in operation, and used for take-off, climb or higher cruising power than normal Crulslng Posltlon-Position of selector valve when unit is in operation for normal cruising requirements.

The absolute pressuresto which the regulator is to be set are determined from dynamometer test to obtain the desired engine power. The figures for these presriures are supplied with the regulators. Given the presswes, the regulators are adjusted on the test rig as follows: 1. BoIt the regulator securely to the mounting plate (H). 2. Connect the operating piston rod to the petcock (B).

1709

rt

Fz
lr, ( d )

ou,
0lF 41 U J (9

\) ho h o u.l lu U x

o o

9U ) u
g r
0 :

U)

o
ll,

U, ) 1
ll, t,

a qr
o 2
tr, o

d 9

7 ul
) I
J

z F o
f ?

i$
d ) a

) ( F

z @

n o

9 ff rDo

bk

g 6u o
d

z 4 & 0 J

u
4

o O s lqo

@;6

O F

s u

n I
f

iga 9ir3
j o v

z )
U

L )

u o

qdH
o

g
]-

zej
rd

E t
o
|)

I
J

u, o

t de8
{

ie6r

< ll,

o t o-rDu

: r f 5-'nP

I uz
L

o U
tr,

ur9{/)

t-<i\

dd8
) o trJ ) tu 0/

g, F l

z
F-

o
J

tr F

zu
)

t
\

x
o ul o
;

o 6
yi n
!J d

l,

bi

99
F
lrJ I

do

t
f

J rJ

o $l
\, :-l!'

t- rtQ U f u, o { ) o t-.
t,

5 6 o

v (

o U)

f,

o o F

p
f ouJ
lll 1z o

o
ul
1

lr=

o7

ul

urq
o
A
J )

so

, oort
-lN

e(

ul o f
d o ot ) o 0/ o t- t 4 l

#jE
d

o z u o
IU

6u
o

lt)

of, Yt 8
<o(o

j v ) tl-

llt U FQ ltr Ur3 \

s o / B

t) n J oI
F

F c,g z

EN \

7 _ l V

zn6

?ao) vJ\_-/ o e 2 < u , n


o
t)

i k< $A2 4
U It 7
lD

u o
o
Irl

ros

i v3 > L o o

{ uJf

$o

n;5
P85

: 0 ; l

3,qB
Uw F> :. u ,o

rJg '81 '9 i o z r ?$

t z lF 0

1710

t z o9
J t
J q
IL(L

)o

zz oo ,F
IL(L

fo

to

"e t;
68 Ftr
UJJ

0)

0) lr

U< qz

c,
lrl J

I d

xo o |o
&,o o. (L
5

lrl J I

o ? r,r
. O >t t t ^[L

q)

'l$

ci

)< o"d

a
x x
L

tr-lo

9 t r r .<
,- l)

i l<i (r, J

fio

H 5o zJo
Foo

5u
lrJ JUJ J

rrJ
F-

bb

old
L,L

r< U>

AUTOMATIC MIXTURE AND POWER CONTROL UNIT


3. Connect the oil pressure line to the regulator, and after starting the oil pump, adjust the oil presriure to about 80 lbs., by means of valve (G). 4. Set the selector valve (F) in the position for which the pressure is to be checked (cruising or mid position). 5. Adjust the vacuum supply valve (C) until the operating piston has moved about half its stroke. 6. Read the manometer, and if the pressure

171 I

is not correct, move the adjusting nuts on the regulator until the desired pressure is obtained. Do this for two positions of the selector valve - i.e., the cruising and mid positions. 7. After obtaining the correct adjustment on the regulator, vary the amount of vacuum by the valve (C), and see that the regulator holds the pressure for which it was set. In this check, do not supply too much or too little vacuum, as it will cause the operating piston to hit the stops at the end of its stroke, and the manometer reading will not be correct.

GENERAL NOTES ON ADJUSTMENTS 1. If the absolute pressure is too high ("U" tube reading too low) move the adjusting nuts from the body of the regulator, and if too away -("(J" tube reading too high) move the nuts low toward the bodY. "Cruising" 2. The inner set of nuts are the "Mid" position adjustment and the outer set the iosition adjustment. 3. If full travel of either set of adjusting nuts fails to give the desired pressure, the fulcrum of CIIECKING the servo valve lever may be moved. It must be remembered when using this adjustment that rrMid" and "Cruising" adjustit affectsboth the ments by the same amount, making a readjustment.of one of them necessary. After moving the fulcrum be sure to check the adjustment of both positions. Also care should be taken that extreme adjustments of the fulcrum does not cause the unit to be sluggish in one direction (seefollowing paragraph). OF UNIT ON TEST RIG

OPERATING CIIARACTERISTICS

Slugglshness-Change vacuum rapidly and obselve speedwith which operating piston moves. The piston should move at approximately the same speed in both directions. If the movement is ver5rslow in one direction, the fulcrum adjust-ment-has been set to an extreme distance off far out center. If the fulcrum screw is set too "closing" the movement will be slow in the direction, and if set too far in it will be slow in "opening" direction. the Hotdtnc Pressure Under Load-Apply a load to the operating piston shaft by a spring (use tension spring and pull on it) and observe the reeulatins pressure with and without load. If are not the same, check the fit of the servo th"ese valve in the bushing. A loose valve will cause a variation in pressureunder load. Also this condition would indicate a slight leak between the servo valve bushing and the case, if the servo valve itself were tight (Fit of valve and bgqhittg is.0005 to.0025 loose). The pressureshould not vary more than .1 Hg. under a load of 30 lbs. Power of Operatlng -determinePlston-A check should whether the operating be made to piston can be moved away from its normal pressiure. bosition under about 60 lb./sq. in. oil "Mid" or Put the Selectoi Valve in either the "Cruising" positions and without applyingvacuum "opening" direction. trv to move the piston in the tf ttris can be ilone easily the servo bushing is leaking badly and should-be-replaced.. Also to check-the selector valve for leaks put it in the "Emergency" position and attempt !o move "closing" direction. the operatiirg plston in the

With 60 lb./sq. in. oil pressure the piston should be able to hold a load of 40 lbs. Leakage of Oll Through Untt-There are two good indicatlons of excessiveleakage through the Unit. First, the pressure drop as shown by the oil pressure gage and secondly, the amount of oil flowing from the drain of the Unit. If, with the same setting of the by-pass valve, "Mid" or there is less pressure when in the "Cruising" position then when in the "Emergency" position there is excessiveleakage by the servo valve or bushing. To check for this leakage substitute a rod of the same diameter as the servo valve and note the oil flow from the drain. If it appears less, then the servo valve is loose but if it is about the same the bushing is leaking and should be replaced. If on the other hand, "Emergency" position the pressureis lower in the the selector valve is leaking or the hole in which the selector valve slides had become damaged. This can be checked by substituting a blank rod of the same diameter as the selector valve and noting the oil flow from the drain. A slight leak at this valve is not serious. The maximum drop in pressure between the emergency and regulating positions should be 5 lbs. Euntlng-If a Unit hunts badly or if difficult to adjust due to its not regulating to the same pressures each time, check the following parts for sticking: Servo Valve Servo Valve Operating Lever Bellows Operating Piston

1801

CHAPTER XVIII

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS
information in this Chapter is General-The taken from various Service Bulletins which deal primarily with conversions, and is for the convenienc6 of personnel involved in the overhaul of engings which for some reason were not changed in accordance with Service Bulletins as thev were issued. In most instances the bulletiis are reproduced word for word; in some cases, however, bulletins have been combined or slightly altered to facilitate usage. Numerical order has been disregarded, the information appearing in the order used for describing-overhaul procedure -that is, working from the front of the engine to the rear. The material of Service Bulletins through No. 318, dealing with changes or information other than that on conversions. is covered under normal overhaul procedure in the main text of this Manual.

BREATEERS (From Servlce Bulletln No. 818) Current Wasp Jr. Engines incorporate a solid plug, Part No. 20159, in the nose section at ihe-'location where a breather was formerly installed. A gasket, Part No. 233, is used under the plug. The nose breather, which was found to be unnecessary, was eliminated because of leakage of oil through it in some airplane installations. The left-hand blower section breather has also been eliminated for the same reason and has been replaced by a plug, Part No. 255, requiring an oil seal, Part No. 33891. The right-hand blower section breather assernbly has been redesigned to incorporate a hose connection for use where it is desired to pipe the breather exhaust outboard. Part No. 38436 assembly replaces the former Part No. 8927 assembly. It is permissible to make the above changes in earlier Wasp Jr. engines where leakage of oil from the breathers is troublesome. This involves no changes within the engine. Substitution of a plug for the nose breather, alone, has proved a satisfactory correction for this leakage in most instances. Either one of the blower section breathers may be replaced by a plug. Before making these breather changes to remedy oil leakage, it should, of coutse, first be made certain that the leakage is not due to something wrong within the engine.

PROPELLER SEAFT FRONT PLUGS (From Servloe Bulletln No. 270) Wasp H1-G, Eornet E-G and E8-G-The propellei shaft front plugs incorporated in these engines have been redesigned to eliminate the possibility of breakage caused by excessive tightening of the former pipe plug 4nd to facilitate removal. Provisions have been made on the large plug, into which is inserted the small plug, to accommodate a wrench, PWA-1733, to be used for preventing the large plug from turning when installing or removing the smaller plug, which now has a hexagon head instead of an Allen head. The threads have been changed from pipe threads to straight threads (%"18NF-3), so the large and small plugs are interchangeable only in pairs.

PARTS AFFECTEI) Unlts 1 1 1 1

New Parts 36783 36784 36639 5747

Part Narne Plug-Propeller Shaft Front* Plug-Propeller Shaft Front** PIug Gasket

Parts Replaced

Unlts

24307 299L9 11603

1 1 1

*Hornet **Wasp Note-When

installing new type plugs, a Gasket, Part No. 5747 must be used.

1802

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS
CONVERSION FROM TEE TWO.WAY PROPELLER CONTROL VALVE TO THE CONSTANT SPEDD GOVERNOR DRTVE (Frorn Servlce Bulletlns Nos. 206 and 234)

\-,

Eornet E-G-Provision was made for a constant **a e"*rnor drive to be mounted on the nose "6"iio"- of Hornet E-G engines, starting with -E;;il" No. 2798 unless a Two-*ay valie was
Parf,s Requlred

specified. Engines prior to the above number may be convelted at overhaul to incorporate the constant speed governor front drive as follows: Parts l)lsoarded Unlt Part No.

Unlt 5 2 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 4 1 I 1 1 1 1 1

Part No. t72 11359 22977 22972 22969 L1625 284L7 L7187 2L678 23533 23534 23535 202 22974 511 243 24L 19672 L76 21680 2L57r 2298r 22978 26597 14058 23529 23528 26598

Part Narne Washer Cotter Pin Pipe Pipe cap Nut Gear Snap Ring Cover Housing Assembly Gear Assembly Pipe Assembly Screen Bolt Nut Gasket Gasket Gear Washer Gasket Screw Cover Pipe Pipe Plug Gear Assembly Anchor Assembly PIug Shaft Packing Nut Bushing Lever Pin Pipe Pipe Carrier

L3280

12342 13067 12945 t4373 t234L 15008 8232 L1567 L2343 44 13043 13069 10731

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Reoperatlon-Reoperate the Part No. L0727 FE;a- 6gai to Prri No. 26596 in accordance with Fig. 1801.
Fig' 1801'

Ream the governor driven gear_bushingi4 the nose section, using PWA-1040 Reamerand PWA-1039Fixture.

H:'-il,s'.J,t"3'f?l ftT,:s,-& ;f';i,#;};; *:-#tr seTi6ePa":l fnl,'-fiflr#::#il"l


Ream the the following pWA-1g41 FWA-$bgpwA-iig pWA-711 cam reduction gear bushing using tools: Fixture Atig"i"g g.t noighiifn"u*"t Finfihing Reamer iii"";' pipe rss"-Etv Ir i"rtuu"a ifi end of th" the bracket located on the inner snap ring of the front main crankcase. Install the Part No. 19619 Cam Reduction Gear in the_ bearing_ support. Assemble the Part No. 19672Propeller Diive Gear on the shaft of the cam reduction gear.

1803

MISCELLANEOUS

CONVERSIONS

REAM .406 !.ooo5 IN HOUSING R22967

./

THRU , . f i o r n .D R I L L 373i.ooo5 REAM DtA. + DEEP$xas' CHAMFER


I N F I X E DG E A R

625!.002

,J ?h

$-z+ Nr-srno.

\K
F ig. 1801

/I I

BOTTOM TAP i DEEP STAKE PLUG A-26598 SECURELY IN PLACE AS SHOWN.

Note-The flange side of the propeller drive gear should be adjacent to the bearing support when properly installed, this being contrary to the former position of the gear. The front or flat side of the gear should have the word "Front" etched on to insure proper installation at future overhauls. Install the bearing support in the usual manner and install the Part No. 28417 Intermediate Gear on the Part No. 28320+10 Bushing. Install Part No. 23535 Pipe Assembly on the anchor plate with elbow and fitting at Part No. 64 Dowel and securing it with Part No. 202 Screw, and Part No. 22974 Bolt. Use Part No. 172 Washer and Part No. 511 Nut with this bolt. Install the bell gear and bearing in accordance with regular practice. Then install the Part No. 26596 Fixed Gear in the Part No. 23533 Reduction Gear Housing in accordance with regular practice. Insert Part No. 26587 Pipe through the reduction gear housing and into the hole in the fixed gear. This hole in the reduction gear housing is located directly in front of the governor drive pad. Cover the pipe with Part No. 14058 Cap using Part No. 243 Gasket under it. Wire the cap to the housing securely. InstaII the Part No. 23534 Governor Driven Gear in the reduction gear housing locking it in place with

Part No. L7L87Locking Ring. Install the reduction gear housing in accordance with regular procedure. Note-The backlash between the new Part No. 28417 Intermediate Gear and the Part No. 23534 Governor Driven Gear Assembly located in the nose section should be .004"-.0t2", replace at .020". When installing these new parts, the backlash circuld be within the limits, but if there should not be enough backlash, the large face of the Part No. 23009 Bushing in the nose section should be faced off enough to give the desired backlash. If the clearance should be excessive, it will be necessary to replace the Part No. 23009 Bushing. After securing the housing in its place, insert Part No. 22977 Pipe in the passageat the right of the governor control pad. Install Part No. 22972 Pipe located in the same passage and cover with Part No. 22969 Cap with a Part No. 241 Gasket in between. Install the governor drive unit using Part No. 21680 Gasket under it. Fasten securely with four (4) Part No. 172 Washers and four (4) Part No. 21571 Nuts. Install Part No. 2298L Cover in the sump in place of the two-way valve.

1804

MISCDLLANDOIIS CONVERSIONS
SEAFT ADAPTATION TO HAMILTON STANDARD CONTROLLABLE, CONSTANT SPEED AND HYDROMATIC PROPDLLERS (From Servlae Bulletln No. 268, Revlslon D) constant speed or hydromatic propeller. As manufactured, these shafts incorporated the foUo*i"g adapting parts: Wasp Hl and El-G Eornet E-G and D2-G

PROPELLER

Wasp El and El-G andEornetE-G and D2-G ;Prgg9^Ier sfalls in Wasp. engines starting. with No. 7483 and Hornet engines starting nl! T:: the 3031 were designed to accommodate either Part Narre

Unlts

299L8 24308 Gasket - Propeller Shaft Front Plug 1 PIug - Propeller Shaft Front 1 36784 36783* 29920 27505 Plug - Propeller Shaft (Screw Type) 1 1 2992L None Washer - Propeller Shaft Screw Lock 24304 None Screw - Propeller Shaft Plug Lock Washer 3 11618 None Washer - Propeller Shaft Plug Screw 3 None 27407 1 Screw - Propeller Shaft Plug None Nut - Propeller Shaft Plug I 5213 None LL754 Pin - Propeller Shaft Plug Nut Cotter 1 5747 None Gasket - Propeller Shaft Plug 1 None PIug - Propeller Shaft PIug 1 36639 *Part No. 36783, PIug - Propeller Shaft Front, supersedesPart No. 24307. See instructions entitled "Propeller Shaft Front Plugs" in this chapter.
If hydromatic propellers are to be installed on the subject engines, the above listed parts must be removed from the propeller shafts. Conversely, if after using a hydromatic propeller, it is desired to install a two-position or constant speed hub, the above parts must be reinstalled ii the propeller shaft. Propeller shafts in early engines of the above mo-dl6 *ttictt have nof bdn reoperated to accommodate a hydromatic propeller may be sent to United Airports, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Connecticut, for reoperation. Englne Model Wasp H1 and H1-G Wasp H1 and Hl-G Type Shaft Reoperated Current St'd There is a slight difference between the internal thread size of production shafts designed to accommodate the hydromatic propeller, and reoperated shafts. Therefore, when ordering distributor valves for hydromatic propellers, it should be specified if the shafts are reoperated or not. Propeller shqftg may be identified !V--egsu-1ing the internal threads at the front of the shaft. The internal thread sizes in Wasp and Hornet engines and the correct distributor valve assembly for each are listed in the following table: Dlstrlbutor Valve Assembly*

Thread Slze

214-16 2y4-L6N-3 215/16-24Ns.3 2r%6_24N5_3 2y8-L6N-3

Reoperated Hornet E-G and E2-G Current St'd Hornet E-G and E2-G Current St'd Hornet E3-G *Hamilton Standard Propeller Division Part Numbers.

55106 (23D40) 55r2t (22D40) 54644 (23D40\ 5462I Q2D40\ 53604 (23E50) 53604 (23E50) 53594 (23850)

PROPELLDR SEAFT (From Servlee Bulletln No. 240) insure the proper assembly Eornet E-G-To of the oil seal spacer in the hydromatic propeller, the length of the splines at the front end of Part No. 27409 Propeller Shaft have been reduced by rZ". If it is desired to install a hydromatic propeller on this model, the propeller shaft should be reoperated, if not already accomplished. To determine whether a propeller shaft has been previously reoperated, the distance from the front end of the shaft to the top of the front face of the propeller spline,s should be measured. If the distance is found to be 2r/a,,, the shaft has not been reoperated as the distance should be 2Yz!'.

1805

MISCDLLANDOIIS CONVERSIONS
Note-This reoperation applies only to those propeller shafts that have piping installed for the hydromatic propeller. If it is desired to convert engines now in service to incorporate piping for the hydromatic propelIer, it is necessary to return the propeller shaft to the factory for reoperation and in this case, the above reoperation will also be incorporated. To reoperate the propeller shaft, place it in a lathe and- cut back the end of the splines which are located at the front of the propeller shaft, tl". The rl" radius should be maintained. Pbtistr the reoperated portion of the propeller shaft with crocus cloth. If the propeller shaft has a Part No. 240 Screw instead of tlie wide spline at this point, the screw should be removed before reoperating the shaft. It will also be neccssary to duplicate the No. 10-32 NF-3 hole which is one inch directly toward the rear of the shaft. The diameter of the small counterbore of the No. 10-32 NF-3 hole is Vn" , and the depth rs rZ," from the O.D. of the splines. The diameter of the Iarge counterbore is rYn", and the depth is /n". The propeller shaft should be cleaned thoroughly after reoperation and if Part No. 240 Screw is used, it should be installed in the new location. The propeller shaft should be assembled to the engine in accordance with the usual procedure.

CYLINDER ASSEMBLIES (Frorr Servloe Bulletln No. 81f) Eornet E, E-G, E2-G and E8-G EnglnesHornet E3-G Engines incorporate cylinders with heads which have been strengthened at the dome and at the attaching threads. The design of the head at the valve guide bosseshas also been changed and the valve spring lower washers no longel seat against the valve guides as formerly, eliminating a so'rce of possible damage to the gluoes' The E3-G cylinders, Part No. 34271, can be used as replacementson E, E-G and E2-G engines, but requiie long reach spark plugs, which makes it advftable to-install the Part No. 34271 Cylinders only in complete sets. E,E-GandE2-Gengines. TheseCylinders,Part No. 36889, require the same valve spring lower washers and valve guides as the Part No. 3427L Cylinders, and this should be borne in mind when ordering spare Part No. 36889 Cylinders or spare valve guides and valve spring lower washers for these cylinders. To take advantage of the additional cylinder head dome strength-made possible by useof the long reach,spark plug, it is of course desirable to use_Part No. 34271 for replacements on. the earlier Hornet E Series engines, where it -o possible and feasible to change over completely to long reach spark plugs.

Spare cylinder assemblies,which are similar but in which to the Pait No. 3427I Assemblies, short reach plugs are used, are not available for
Unlts Per Englne New Type Part No.

The following table is to assist in ordering spare cylinders, valve guides and valve spring lower washers:
Old Type Part No. Unlts Per Dnglne

Part Narne

I I I I 9 I

3427Ix* 36889* 34269 34270 8?59 8759

Cylinder Mach. and StudsAssy. Cylinder Mach. and Studs Assy. Guide - Valve Inlet Guide - Valve Exhaust Valve Spring Washer Valve Spring Washer

27845 L420 23408 9358 9356

I I I I I

*Accommodates short reach spark plugs. **Accommodates long reach spark plugs. (Removable Type) CRANKSEAFT FLYWEIGETS (From Servlae Bulletlns Nos. 218' 275 and 810) it becomes necessary to reWasp Junlor-If place-the flyweights, it is important to determine i'hether the crankshaft is balanced for the ltght or heavy type flyweights. Starting with Enghe No. L248, all Wasp Juniors were equipped with the heavy type flyweights and will require no alteration of the crankshaft balance weight if new replacement heavy type flyweights are used. It is also possible that engines, which originally incor-

1806

MISCDLLANDOUSCONVDRSIONS
porated the light type flyweights, have previously been converted to accommodate the heavy type. The heavy type flyweights bear the Part Nbs. 34465, 34462, 34464 or 34463, stamped on the flyweight face. Light type flyweights were furnished in Engine Nos. 717-726 and 73L-L248. It is also possible that engines prior to these have been converted in service to incorporate crankshafts with the light type flyweights. These flyweights may be identified by the Part Nos. 2390L,23900, 2707L or 27072. Replacement flyweights which are supplied as sparesare all of the heavy type and if installed as engines balanced for the light type flyweights, the crankshaft will have to be rebalanced bv removing the Part No. 167 Rivet from the outer center position of the rear counterweight. Flyweights supplied for spares will be of the new heavy type. If it is desired to replace one flyweight, both will have to be replaced to maintain the proper crankshaft balance. To remove the Part No. 167 Rivet, drill a sf" hole one inch deep in the peened end of the rivet to be removed. Chamfer at a 60o angle to sufficiently relieve the end of the rivet. Using a hydraulic press and a /8" drift, press out the rivet. By leaving the rivet hole empty, the New Parts Requlred Part No. Unlts crankshaft will remain properly balanced, tf non-nltralloy knuckle plns are used. For instructions regarding balancing of crankshafts when the new, heavier nitralloy knuckle pins are used, refer to the paragraph on the use of "Nitralloy Knuckle Pins" in this chapter. Installation of new type flyweights necessitates reoperating the flyweight liners to accommodate the larger radius at the rear ofthe new flyweights. The chamfer at the rear of the new flyweights has been increased from 5/4,,x 4bo to rf,, x 48". This reoperation can best be accomplished by placing the rear half of the crankshafl in a 20i' lathe, on a suitable fixture, in such a manner as to center the flyweight liner; then grind the chamfer to the proper depth with a "Dumore" or similar type grinder. If a 20" lathe is not available, this reoperation may be done with a small grinding wheel installed in an electric Regardless of which method is hand drill. used. the liners should be marked to show the proper depth of the chamfer before grinding. Care should be taken not to grlnd beyond After grinding, the the marked depth. chamfer should be stoned or smoothed up with crocus cloth. Install the 4/2x flyweight on the left side and the 9x flyweight on the right side (looking frorn ihe rear forward, toward the propeller). Parts affected are as follows: Parts Replaced Part No. Unlts

1 1 I 1 2

34465 34462 34464 34463 447L8

Part Name Flyweight'- Inner (AYzx) Flyweight - Outer @%x) Flyweight - Inner (9x) Flyweight - Outer (9x) Expander

2390r 23900 2707L 27072 TT52T

1 1 1 1 2

Part No. 23902 Screw - FlvNote-The weight, may be reused in the new flyweight, if in suitable condition. Wasp Hl and Hl-G-Wasp Hl and Hl-G engines were at first equipped with two 4fux rlveted type flyweights. It has been found that a combination of one 4rlx and one 9x flyweight is desirable for the best interests of the crankshaft and propeller from a vibration and blade stress standpoint. Therefore, it is recommended that a 9x flyweight be substituted for one of the 4ftx flyweights in the rear counterweight of the current Wasp HL (direct drive) engrnes. Since one of the 4ftx flyweights must be replaced by a 9x flyweight, which is available only in the demountable type, in direct drive engines, it is necessarythat a new 4/2x demountable type flyweight which is heavier and more durable than the original 4/2x flyweight, be substituted for the remaining 4/2x nveted type flyweight to maintain uniformity. Wasp Hl-G (geared) engines still use two 4/2x

flyweights, but when replacements are made it is recommendedthat the demountable type be used. Installation of the new demountable type flyweights (whether two 4rlx are used in geared engines or one 4lx and one 9x are used in direct drive engines), necessitates reoperating the flyweight liners to accommodate the larger radius at the rear of the new flyweights. The chamfer at the rear of the new flyweights has been increased frorn fta" x 45o to l(4" x 45". Part No. 16699 Liner may be reoperated to Part No. 34949 Liner. This reoperation can best be done by placing the rear half of the crankshaft in a 20" lathe on a suitable fixture in such a manner as to center the flyweight liner, and grinding the chamfer to the proper depth with a "Dumore" or similar type grinder. If a 20" lathe is not available, this reoperation may be accomplished with a small grinding wheel installed in an electric hand drill. Regardless of which method is used, the liner should be marked to show the proper depth of the chamfer before grinding. Care should be taken not to grlnd beyond the rnarked depth.

MISCELLANNOUS CONVERSIONS

1807

e{
PART NO.35044 PART NO.34520

Fig. 1802

Fig. 1803

To remove the old.flyweights, dylll a- Lrl" hole-one-inch deep i1^the peened end of the flyweigh! chamfer ?t- 45" to sufficiently reljeve the end of the flyweight and using a hydraulic press and a I" dift, press out the flyweight.

the securing expander which spreads the slotted end of the-scr6w is drawn uf tight. The end clearance of the assembled flyweight is .008".0I2". If necessarv, grind th6 sm6ll end face of the outer flyweight- to-obtain this clearance. The following is a list of parts affected by the installation of t-henew type 9x flyweights an-dthe 4rlx flyweights in direct drive engines. Parts Replaoed Part No. Unlts

To assemble, use AssemblyTool No. TAM1773 and TAM-L774, making certain that the through screw is tightened snugly and that
New Parts Requlred Unlts Part No.

I q4q47 Flyweight - Inner 1 $%x) L670I q4948 1 Flyweight- Outer. (4%x) 16200 t q4Q+!(Qx) 1 Flyweight- Inner 1G201 1 @Yzx) L 34945(9x) Flyweight-- Outer 16?00 1 $%x) 2 34949 Liner - Flyweight 16699* 2 2 34946 Screw- Flyweight 2 44718 Expander *May be reoperatedto the Part No. 34949as described previously. type 4rlx flyweights . The following is a list of parts affectedby the installation of two demountable in leared engines.
New Parts Requlred Unlts Part No. 2 3494t Parts Replaced Part Narrre Part No. Unlts Flyweight - Inner 16701 2 GYd Flyweight - Outer 16700 2 Q%x) Liner - Flyweight 16699* 2 Screw - Flyweight Expander No. 34949 as described previously.

Part Narre

2 34948 2 34949 2 34946 2 447L8 *May be reoperatedto Part

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS
Installation of the new demountable type flyweights necessitatesrebalancing the crankshaft. It is recommended that this be accomplished with a milling machine by milling a flat on the bottom of the rear counterweight to obtain the proper balance. If a milling machine is not availiUt6, it is permissible to use a portable grinder. In either case, it is important that the flat area be at right angles to the vertical centerline of the counterweight. The counterweight should be milled, or ground, to a depth of Vn" measured modate the larger radius at the rear of the new flyweights. The chamfer at the rear of the newer liners has been increased from 22Yu" x 45o to 25A"x45". TheFlyweightliner,PartNo.20SlL, may be reoperated as follows: Place the rear half of the crankshaft in a 24" lathe on a suitable fixture in such a manner as to center the flyweight liner. Grind the chamfer to the proper "Dumore" or similar type grinder, depth with a permissible to use a small grinding wheel or it is installed in an electric hand drill. Mark liner to

(see Fig. centerline 1802). atthevertical

S;*,'3;"??1"*rlHt#tiltj'*:t"il:f

EornetE,E-GandE2-G-Replacementofrivet tvp" nv*"ights with the demouitable type necessitates reoperating the flyweight liners to accomNew Parts Requlred Part No. Unlts

After grinding trhe chamfer should be stoned or dressed with a fine emery cloth. The following is a list of parts affected: Parts Replaced Part No. Unlts 205LL* 18597 18598 2 2 2

itlllf:

*May be reoperated to Part No. 34777. It has been found that an accumulation of adverse tolerances may cause interference between removable type crankshaft flyweights and the inside of the crankcase on the subject engine models. In order to insure ample clearance (.060" minimum) at this point, a bevel is incorporated on the outer edge of each flyweight flange. Parts on hand may be used providing there is a minimum clearance of .060" between the flv-is weights and the crankcase. If the clearance found to be less than .060", the flyweights may be reoperated, according to Fig. 1803, but when this is done a steel ring, Part No. 40662, must be pressed into the reoperated flyweight Part No. 35044 to compensate for the weight removed. The following is a Iist of parts affected.

2 2 2 2 2

34777 34520 35044 34521 447L8

Part Name Liner - Flyweight Flyweight - Inner Flyweight - Outer Screw - Flyweight Expander

New Parts Requlred Part No. Unlts 40661 2 40660 2 40662 2

Part Name Flyweight - Outer Flyweight - Inner Steel Ring

Parts Replaced Part No. Unlts 2 35044 34520 2

New parts are fully interchangeable with each other, but are interchangeable with old parts only in pairs. NITRALLOY KNUCKLE PINS (From Servlce Bulletln No. 268) Wasp Jr., Wasp and Eornet-Nitralloy knuclkle pins are now used in latest model"qof the above engines to reduce galling and to prevent possible pickup when assembling and llisassembling pins in the master rods. Future
Englne Model Unlts

spare kluckle pins will !e of_the nitralloy type and,withtheexceptionoftheW"qpJr.Bengines, are directly interchangeable with the previous type pins. See table below for parts affected. Assernblles Replaced Unlts

Current Nltralloy Knuckle Pln Assys.

R-985-B R-1340-H1 and Hl-G R-1690-E, E-G, E2-GandE3-G

8 8 8

32L53 32L54 32t55

4483 15318 11539

8 8 8

1809

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS
Nitralloy knuckle pins for Wasp Jr. B engines arcL.02 pounds heavier per set than the previous tvpe anil the use of them will necessitate rebaiancing the crankshaft to compensate for the additional weight' Spare crankshafts balanced for light type nonnitrilloy knuckle pins can be furnished, providine Part No. 23905 is specified for engines ring pistons, or Part No. 28102 for with hve 'with fbur ring pistons. Otherwise, encines spires which are balanced for the nitralloy knuckle pins will be furnished' When rebalancing Wasp Jr. B crankshafts, for the nitralloy pins there are two conditions to be considered. If the crankshaft has been heavier type flychanged to incorporate the "Flyweights (Removweie[t, as explained under abld T.vpe - Wasp Jr.)" in this chapter, additional fu-eigfrtmust be added to the crankshaft Type ol Knuakle Plns Lieht (Non-Nitralloy) Liiht (Non-Nitralloy) Heavy (Nitralloy) Heavy (Nitralloy) Type of Flywelghts Light Heavy Heavy Light by employing one unit of Part No. 34460 Rivet (heavy head) in the outer center position of the front counterweight in place of Part No. 25784 Rivet. and one unit of Part No. 167 Rivet in the outer center position of the rear counterweight. In the event that a crankshaft incorpodescribed under rates the Iighter type flyweights, "Flyweights (Removable 'Iype - Wasp Jr.)" in this chapter, additional weight must be added to the crankshaft by employing one unit of Part No. 34460 Rivet (heavy head) in the outer center position of the front counterweight in nlace of the Part No. 25784 Rivet and also one irnit of Part No. 34497 Rivet (heavy head) in place of the Part No. 167 Rivet, at the same iocation in the rear counterweight. The table below outlines the various combinations of flyweights and knuckle pins, and lists the rivets to be used for balancing the crankshaft with these combinations. Rlvets (Outer Center Posltlon) RearCounterwelght FrontCounterwelght 25784 (Light Head) 25784 (Light Head) 34460 (Heavy Head) 34460 (Heavy Head) 167 (Light Head) None 167 (Light Head) 34497 (Heavy Head)

The above rivets should be replaced in accordance with the following instructions: Drill a sf" hole one inch dqep iq the-peened end of the iivet to be removed. Chamfer at a

60o angle to sufficiently relieve the end of the rivet, and, using a hydraulic press and a 54" drift, press out the rivet. Press in the new rivet, and peen over the end with a suitable tool.

PISTON PINS (From Servlce Bulletln No. 288) in material and Wasp Jr. B-Refinements nroc&ses of manufacture have produced a Stronger piston pin which is used in Iater Wasp Jr. BlB2-and 83 engines, beginning with Engine New Parts Requlred Unlts Welght Per Unlt (Wfth Plugs) Part No. Part Name No. 1248. Because piston pins are one of the most highly stressed parts in the engine, it is recommended that the improved pins be installed at the next overhaul. Parts Replaced Part No. Unlts I I 9

9 9 9

.78lbs. .91lbs. 1.14lbs.

31795 31806 31796

Pin Assembly- Piston Pin Assembly- Piston Pin Assembly- Piston

9003 or 3601 13113 17355

In the following paragraphs, which will be of assistance in ascertaining the comect piston pins to be used for replacement in Wasp Jr. Engines, it will be noted that several master balance weights appear. This is due to various weight changes in pistons and master rods. In the case of engines originally equipped with four-ring pistons, but in which bqla-nclng screws have been incorporated in the crankshaft counterweishts to compensate for the additional weight of frve-ring pistons, the original master balance weight should still be used for reference.

Part No. 81705- Pln Assembly - PlstonThese pins replace those used on all Wasp Jr. A Engines having crankshafts balanced for fourring, 5:1 compression ratio pistons. The master balance weights which may appear on the crankshaft of the engines in this category are as follows: 37.38 lbs., 37.56 lbs., 38.22 lbs., 38.32 lbs., 38.86 lbs., or 39.04 lbs. These pins also replace those used in {a,sp Jr. B En!"ines havinf crankshafts balanced fol either forir or five r-ing, 6:1 compression ratio pistons. The master balance weights which

1810

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS
may appear on the crankshaft of engines of this category are as follows: 38.22 lbs., 38.44 lbs., 38.95 lbs., 38.99 lbs., 39.10lbs.. 39.97lbs., or 40.35lbs. Part No. 81806-Ptn Assernbly-PlstonThese pins replace those used in Wasp Jr. B Engines having crankshafts balanced for fourring, 6:1 compression ratio pistons, but which actually incorporate four-ring, 5:1 compression ratio pistons. These engines were built with crankshafts balanced for four-ring, 6:1 compression ratio pistons, and require additional weight at the piston pin when using four-ring, 5:1 compression pistons. The master balance weights which may appear on the crankshaft of engines in this category are as follows: 38.22lbs., 38.44lbs., or 39.10lbs. Part No. 31796- Pln Assernbly-PlstonThese pins replace those used in Wasp Jr. B Engines having crankshafts balanced for fivering, 6:1 compression ratio pistons but which actually incorporate four-ring, 5:1 compression ratio pistons. The crankshaft master balance Plston Pln Assembly weights which may appear on the crankshaft of engines in this category are as follows: 38.95lbs., 38.99 lbs., 39.97lbs., or 40.35lbs. Due to the fact that there have been various changes in master balance weights in Wasp Jr. engines, it is recommended that if there is any doubt as to the correct replacement piston pins, the necessary weights for the correct piston pins be sent to the Service Department. These weights include the connecting rod cluster (master rod and bearing, link rods, knuckle pins, screws and locks), the master weight balance weight (stamped on crankshaft counterweight), and the weight of one piston (stamped on the piston pin boss). The part numbers designated represent piston pin assemblies,i.e., the pin with plugs. The new pin itself, Part No. 3L740, is identical in all three of these assemblies. This part number is marked on the end of the pin. When piston pin plugs are installed at overhaul, it is important that the proper ones be used to maintain proper balance as follows: Plug

31795 31796 31806

9002 (Aluminum) 7735t (Bronze) LL447(Bronze)

Unlts Per Assembly 2 2 2

New piston pin assemblieshave the assembly number marked on the edge of one of the plugs. In the event that replacement is made of the plug bearing the assembly number, it is important

that the new plug be rnarked with the piston pin assembly number for ftrture identification. New type piston pins were first incorporated in Mfrs. Engine No. 1248.

IIEAVIER SECTION PISTON PINS (From Servlce Bulletln No. 200) with Engine Nos. Wasp Hl and El-G-Starting 6244 and 6223 respectively, a heavier section Piston Pin, Part No. 22320 is incorporated in these engines in place of Part No. 1515 Piston Pin. If used in previous engines, the crankshaft requires rebalancing to offset the increased weight of the piston pins. Making this change necessitatesreplacement of all piston pins in the engine. To determine the proper rivet part numbers and also the location of the rivets to be changed, compare the crankshaft assembly with Figs. 1804 and 1805. If the crankshaft assembly number is found to be on both Sketches II and III of Figure 1805, the thickness of the rear counterweights should be measured to determine the proper figure. The rear counterweights shown on Sketch II, Figure 1805, should measure approximately l5%4tt thick, and those on Sketch III, Figure thick. 1806, should be approximately L5%4tt Reoperatlon-If necessaryto remove Part No. 6040 Rivet, drill a sf" hote one inch deep in the peened end of the rivet; then chamfer at a 60o angle to sufficiently relieve the end of the rivet and press out rivet, using a /s" drift and hydraulic press. Install Part No. 27856 Rivet in place of the one removed, using a 30-ton hydraulic press to peen over the end of the rivet. A suitable adapter should be improvised for the rivet head when using the hydraulic press. When removing any other rivets shown on the sketches, use a 78" drill instead of a fu" drill and also use a l(" drift in place of a 51" dnft. Remove and install rivets as described above. After changing rivets the old master weight should be obliterated and the new weight, which is found below the sketch, stamped on the crankshaft.

181 1

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS

FOR LATER PART NO. 18385 CRANKSHAFT ASS'Y. AND ALL PART NO. 2O3O5 CRANKSHAFT ASS,IES, REMOVE PART NO.25743. INSTALL PART NO. 27655.

FOR EARLY PART NO. 18385 CRANKSHAFT ASSEMBLIES, REMOVE PART NO. I3898. INSTALL PART NO. 27457. FRONT COUNTERWEIGHT

ON ALL PART NO, 18385 AND PART NO. 2O3O5 CRANKSHAFT PART ASSEMBLIES,'REMOVE NO. 6040. INSTALL PART NO.27A56,

REAF COUNTERWEIGHT

ASS,Y NO. CRANKSHAFT r8385 20305

OLD MASTER WEIGHT 55.05 LBS. 55.05 LBS. SKETCH I

NEW MASTER WEIGHT 55.68 LBS. 5s.68 LBS.

Fig. 1804

r8t2

MISCELLANEOUS COIVVERSIONS

NO. t3898 NO.27657

SKETCHII FRONTAND REAR COUNTERWETGHTS. (Z EACH)


CRANKSHAFT ASS,Y.NO. OLD MASTER WEIGHT 52.98 53.6r 55.06 55.06 55.06 5s.06 LBS. LBS. LBS. LBS. LBS. LBS. NEW MASTELWEIGHT 53.61 s4.24 55.68 55.68 55.68 55.6E NO.r2295 NO.27854 LBS. LBS. LBS. LBS. LBS. LBS.

t23to
t5396 t5400 t5431 t5746 t5798

SKETCH III FRONT AND REAR COUNTERWETGHTS. (Z eeCn)

CRANKSHAFT ASSY NO. l23to 15396 t5400 t5746

OLD MASTER WEIGHT 52.98 53.6 | 55.05 55.05 LBS. LBS. LBS. LBS.

NEW MASTER WEIGHT 53.6t LBS. 54.24 LBS. 55.O8 LBS. 55.68 LBS.

Fig. 1805

1813

MISCELLANEOUS COIIVERSIONS
ROCKER AND ROCKER BEARINGS (From Servlce Bulletlns Nos. 235 anil262) Wasp Jr. B Englnes-Curr_ent W".p Jr. B Engines incorporate imp-roved rocker arm-assemblies. The rocker is larger to accommodate a greater capacity double row bearing as,well as a stronger valve adjusting screw with finer threads. These parts are interchangeable only as complete assemblies. The following is a list of the parts affected if it is desired to make this ;;"-;; uua'E's'

New Parts Requlred Part No. Unlts 10678 I I 18 18 18 L0677 9016 95L4 9294

Part Name Intake Rocker and Ball Cup Assembly Exhaust Rocker and Ball Cup Assembly Rocker Bearing Valve Clearance Adjusting Screw Assembly Valve Clearance Adjusting Screw Lock Nut

Parts Replaced Part No. Unlts 9 3734 3735 314-D 3725 551 I 36 18 18

Chapters II and V of this manual should be referred to for instructions on disassembly and assembly of the rocker arms. Wheninstallingthelargetyperockers,acheck st ouid be made" to aefbi#iire that ;"tr;l;;; L"i*"e" the rocter and ilit"ti;i;;;;";;iirtr i"a"r-"""t "r U"". If the clearance is insufficieirt, it should be obtained by burring off the ridge INSTRUCTIONS

on the bottom of the rocker boxes and also burring the sides of the rocker boxes with a power driven, flexible drive rotary file. ^ , r , r r r--- :--_ ar_ __--____, To determine the amount of metal to be re' moved, a heavy tvpe rocker assemblv.should be used as a guide as some cylinders will require less burring than others. LUBRICATOR

FOR INSTALLING PRATT AND WEITNEY ON WASP JR. B ENGINES (Frorn Servlce Bulletln No. 320, Revlslon A)

The following instructions cover the changes required to con"vert Wasp Jr. B Engines having either the grease type or one-shot rocker box lubrication system to permit the use of tt e Pratt Part No. 8955 Ll52l 14779 14814 20L42 20388 26843 26841 2ol4l 37564 20255 26090 33393 27507 27503 13705 7L748 287LL 33395

& Whitney automatic lJ'bricator. The parts listed.below .are required for converting a grease-lubricated engrne to one wrth automatic lubrication. Quanttty 18 18 18 18 18 L2 T7 1 20 40 18 2 L 1 I 1 1 1 1

Part Narre

Gasket - Rocker Shaft Plug - Cylinder Head Gasket - Rocker Cover Spring - Rocker Cover Shaft - Rocker Ball End Pipe Assembly - Inter Ear Pipe Assembly - Connection to Main Feed Hose Clamp Fitting - Inter Cylinder Clamp Brace Clip Bushing Screw Nut Pipe Assembly - R,ear Case to Lubricator Pipe Assembly - Lubricator to Cylinder (Lower)

t8t4

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS Part No. 28709 32330 22747 22348 LL42 12009 32966+4 12L84 30489 31724
Part Narne

Pipe - Lubricator to Cylinder (Upper) Lubricator Bushing - Reducing Elbow Gasket - Lubricator Nut Stud Grommet Rocker Shaft Seal Seal - Rocker Shaft

Quantity 1 1 1
o

2 2 4 1 18 18

Dlsassernbly-Remove the following parts in accordancewith regular practice: 1 . Rocker box covers, gaskets,and rocker box cover spnngs. 2 . Push rod assemblies from No. 1 intake, No. l exhaust, No. 2 intake, No. 2 exhaust, No. 3 intake, No. 3 exhaust, No. 4 exhaust, No. 7 exhaust, No. 8 intake, No. 8 exhaust, No.9 intake, and No. 9 exhaust. Greasefittings from all cylinders. 4. Rocker shafts from all cylinders. 5 . Remove Part No. 134 Plug from the left side of the rear section just below the gun synchronizer pad. b . Remove the fuel pump and also the fuel pump drive assembly. Remove the present fuel pump attaching studs and also the rear section to blower attaching nut located below the fuel pump pad. 8. Remove primer line clamps from No. 1 Intake Pipe.
t).

Assernbly-Install two Part No. 20142 Rocker Shafts in each cylinder in place of the former Part No. 8952 Rocker Shaft, and secure with Part No. 12606 Nut. Note: A new Part No. 8955 Gasket should be used beneath each Part No. 12606Nut. Part No. 30489 Oil Seal should be used between these gaskets and the cylinders, and Part No. 31724 Oil Seal should be installed between the washer and the cylinder on the small end of the rocker shaft. Install two Part No. 11521 Plugs in each cylinder where the grease fittings were removed. Install Part No. L4814 Rocker Cover Springs in place of ones removed. Assemble 18 units of inter-cylinder fittings, Part No. 20255, which connect the rocker shafts of adiacent cylinder; also assemble the 17 Part No. 2OS+g Inter-Ear Pipe Assemblies to the rocker shafts of all cylindeis except No. 1 Intake. On No. 1 Intake Rocker Shaft assemble the Part No. 26841 Pipe Assembly - Connection to Main Feed. Tighten pipes securely, making sure that the tee connection of the Part No. 26841 Pipe Assembly faces the rear of the engine. hose connections connect the Note-Where two pipes together, it is first necessary to slip the hose on one of the two mating pipes. After the pipes have been tighiened and properly aligned-, slide ttie hose over the gap between the two pipe assemblies.Part No. 37564Clgryn sfrbUa be used to bind both ends of the hoseconnections securely. Install four Part No. 32966 * 4 Studs in the fuel pump pad in place of those pr-evioully removed. When properly installed, the height of the stud from th-efulel pump pad should be 23f". Install the Part No. g23g0 tubricator and FueI Pump Drive Assembly on the fuel pugp driyg pad in the rear section, using a Part No. 1142 Gasket between the lubricalor and the pad. Install the fuel pump in accordance with- regular practice, usine i Pait No. 1142 Gasket between ihe fuei pum-p and drive. Install a Part No. 22348 Elbow in the oil inlet and another in the oil outlet of the lubricator. Note-The oil outlet is located at the bottom of the lubricator and the oil inlet is in the center of the lubricator housing.

a, t .

Reoperatlon-The twelve Part No. 10905Push Rod Assemblies should be reoperated to Part No. 20508 Push Rod Assemblies as follows: Remove the Part No. 10667 Ball End from the end of the push rod which seats in the ball end socket in the tappet (crankcase end of rod), and replace with Part No. 20388 Ball End in accordancewith regular practice. the push rod is not Iong enough after assembling new baII ends, a Part No. 10942 Spacer may be inserted between the push rod and ball end to obtain the proper length. The rounded edge of the spacer should be toward the ball end. and in no case should more than one spacer be used under a ball end. Due to possible interference of the rear section attaching stud when assembling the lubricator, it is best to check the projected length of the stud which should be 94" as measured from the blower face. If the length exceedsthis, the end of the stud should be filed down to obtain this length. A Part No. 12009 Nut should then be installed on the stud in place of the nut previously removed. Note-If

1815

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS
Install Part No. 22747 Reducing Bushing in the rear section hole from which the Part No. 134 Plug was previously removed. Install Part No. 22348 Elbow in this reducer. Connect Part No. 287t1Pipe Assembly from the oil inlet side of the lubricator to the Part No. 22348 Elbow in the rear section. Connect one end of Part No. 33395 Pipe Assembly from the oil outlet side of the lubricator and one end of Part No. 28709 Pipe to the tee connection of Part No. 26841 Pipe Assembly. The Part No. 33395 and Part No. 28709 Pipes should be connected together by means of Part No. 20141Hose. The Part No. 33395 Pipe Assembly should be secured to the rear section with Part No. 27503 Bushing, Part No. 27507 Clip, and Part No. 33393 Brace. Fasten the brace to the most convenient blower to rear section stud, using Part No. 12009 Nut in place of the present rear section attaching nut. Part Nos. 13705Screw and 1L748Nut should be used to fasten the brace and clip together. Part No. 26090 Clamp should be used to fasten the Part No. 28709 Pipe and the primer line of No. 1 Cylinder to the intake pipe. Part No. 8650 Screw and Part No. 8651 Nut from the old clamp should be used to fasten this clamp securely. Part No. Install push rods, check valve clearances and install rocker box covers with new gaskets. Note-Before starting the engine, the rocker box lubrication sYstem should be primed with engine oil. Adiustrnent of the Pratt & Whltney Lubri' cat"or-Located on the Iubricator is a scalefor the adiustment of oil flow to the rocker mechanism. When first installing this device on an engine, it is best to set the arrow at a point somewhere between one (1) and one and three quarters (1?r) on the scale. However, this may not be a nerilanent setting, but may be used during the hrst eneine test'after installation of the unit. As a pr6caution it is well to remove the rocker box cbvers after about 10 minutes of running to see if sufficient oil is being furnished to the rocker mechanism of each cylinder. If an over supply is being furnished, it is likely to cause sti'efit smoLine?om the exhaust, which may be colrected by Jetting the pointer at a lower position on th6 scale.* If there is not enough oil found in the rocker boxes, that is, if the springs, washers and rockers are not wet with oil, adjustment should be toward the higher end of the scale. having a one-shot lubrication Engines already -converied to incorporate the svsteir mav be as follows: system lubrication altomatic

New Parts Requlred Part Narne

32330 33395 28709 20L4I 33393 27507 13705 27503 11748 12009 32966+4 22348 22717 L142

Lubricator Pipe Assy.- Lubricator to Cylinder (Iower) Pipe - Lubricator to Cylinder (upper) Hose Brace CIip Screw Bushing Nut Nut Stud Elbow luslring- Reducing Gasket Lubricator

\-

.Fli: -_ Feed toMain LtTl"l?""" *::nBlI ?331" Pipe Assembly - Rear Case to Lubricator 287LL

Clamp 26090 *Used on engines not hiving the Part No. 26843 Inter Ear Pipe Assemblies. Dlsassembly-Remove the fuel pump and fuel pump drive assembly as previously described. Aho remove the fuel bump-hold down studs and the blower to rear tiold down nut located beneath the fuel pump. Remove the two pipes leading from the oneshot valve to No. f ind No. O Cylinders, also remove the valve from the left side of the rear section.

Quantlty 1 1 I 2 1 1 I 1 1 2 4 3 1 2 L 1 1 2

Assernbly Note-Some engines "pipe may have earlier type assemblies than those inter-ear now furnish-ed' In this case both the tee connection pipe of No. 1 Cylinder and its matins pipe assembly will have to be replace-d-bYa Patt No. 26841 Pipe Ass-embly--Connectio^n to Main Fe^edand a Part No. 26843 PiPe Assembly. On No. 6 Cylinder the inter-

1816

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS

$x+ s" cHAM FER

:469!.ooo5 REAM

IF THE DEPTH OF THESE HOLES IS LESS THAN THE REQUIRED AMOUNI, THEY SHOULD BE INCREASEDTO AGREE WITH THE PROPER DIMENSIONS.

Fig. 1806

ear pipe assembly having the tee connection should be removed, and the inter-ear pipe assembly not having the tee connection, which was removed from No. 1 Cylinder, should be used in its place. If the Part No. 26841Pipe Assembly - Connection to Main Feed is now installed on the Unlts Per Englne 6 12 6 L2 12 12 12 Part No.
Descrlptlon

engine, the one on No. 6 Cylinder should be replaced by a Part No. 26843 Pipe Assembly. , The remaining parts should be assembled in accordance with instructions previously given. The following table provides a ready means of determining the correct push rod arrangement for Wasp Jr. B engines equipped with either an automatic lubricator or the one-shot system:
Locatlon

10905 Push Rod Assembly Which consists of: Ball End (plain type) 10667 Push Rod 10904 20508 Push Rod Assemblv Which consists of: 10667 Ball End (plain type) 20388 Ball End (drilled type) 10904 Push Rod

Ir:JLet rt4,5, 6, 7 cyls. Exhaust 15, 6 cyls.

I n l e t # 1 ,2 , 3 , 8 , 9 c y l s . Exhaust #1, 2, 3, 4,'1, 8,9 cyls.

All drilled type ball ends should be installed on of the respective push rods. the crankcase-eirds Wasp Jr. Engines incorporating-the Pratt & Whitn6y type rocker lubriiator, now incorporate of stroke regulator assembly an improved type in theie units. The new type stroke regulator assembly has a slightly largdr baII and t[e method of feening the lip of the regulator has been discarded in

favor of spinning. It is recbmmended that the old Part No. 27606 Stroke Regulator Assembly in eng-inesnow.in service be ieplaced by the improved type which is also Part No. 27606. When making this change, the Part No, 27434 Lubricator Housing should be checked and if necessary, reoperated in accordance with Figure 1806.

18 1 7

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS

INSTRUCTIONS FOR CHANGING THE LOCATION OF THE OIL PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE (Frorn Servlce Bulletlns Nos. 159 and244) Wasp Jr. B-Due to the occasional loss of oil pressure caused by foreign matter in the oil becoming lodged on the relief valve seat on engines equipped with relief valves in the oil pump, it is recommendedthat the location be changed to the rear section at the discretion and convenience of the operator. Remove the No. 9050 and No. 9051 Outer and Inner Plugs respectively, from the left-hand side of the rear section just above the oil pressure screenchamber. Remove the oil pressurerelief valve assembly complete from the oil pump. Install No. 9051 Inner Plug in oil pump. Install Plrg, No. 13119, in pumps with high- boss and Plug, No. 16443,in pumps with low boss. Cautlon-The No. 13119 and No. 16443 Plugs are used to lock the No. 9051 Plug in place.
New Parts Requlred

If the No. 13119and No. L6443Plugs do not screw up enough to tighten against the No. 232 Gasket, their internal lugs should be shortened the necessaryamount. The No. 9048 Bodv removed from the oil pump should be installed in the rear section. Assemble the No. 1138 Plunger and No. 6091 or No. 980 Spring. Assemble No. 8698 Screw in No. 8700 Cover and install cover with No. 234 Gasket. Assemble No. 501 Nut on end of screw. After the engine has been run, and the oil pressure adjusted, the No. 8699 Cap should be installed and safetied. Parts Replaced Unlts Part No. Part Name 1 9050 Outer Plug 1 1 12830 9049 Cover (Pump with High Boss) Cover (Pump with Low Boss)

Unlts 1 1 I

Part No. 13119 8700 16443

Part Narne

Inner Plug (Pump with High Boss) Cover Inner Plug (Pump with Low Boss)

Wasp Hl and Hornet E-Due to the occasional heavy breathing experiencedshortly after starting on Wurp Hl and Hornet E Engines having the relief valve installed in the front of the sump, an oil relief valve has been made available for installation on the rear section to obviate this difficulty. This relief valve is installed on the left side of the oil screen pressure chamber and Part No. 32986 26680 26679 26676 26677 26678 2t352 16443 9051 237 6091 234 232 6924 PWA-978 27451

incorporates a by-pass line which conveys the relieved oil to the inlet side of the oil pressure pump. Note-Thls change cannot be lncorporated on engines where lt ls deslred to use the flat type hotspot. The following parts should be used if this change is desired by operators:
Quantlty

Part Narne

1 Pipe Assembly Oil Pressure Relief to Pump Connection Oil PressureRelief to Oil Pump I Plug Oil Pressure Relief Body Oil Pressure Relief Plunger Oil Pressure Relief Cup Oil PressureRelief Elbow Plug Plug .l Gasket Spring 1 I Gasket 1 Gasket Gasket 1 Wrench Spacer Relief Valve (Useonly on engineswith NA-Y9A, NA-Y9B, NA-Y9E, NA-Y9E1 and NA-Y9H Carburetors. )

1818

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS The following parts not marked with an asterisk should be used in addition to the above parts when either the NA-Y9C or NA-Y9G
Part No.

carburetor is installed on the engine with a hotspot. When no hotspot is used,the parts marked with asterisks should be used: Quantlty 1 1 1 1 1 1 I L 1 1 1 1

Part Narne Pipe Assembly - Relief Valve to Carburetor Pipe Clamp - Oil Pressure Relief Clip Bushing Clamp - Oil Pressure Relief Stud Pipe Clip Screw Nut Pipe Assembly - Relief Valve to Carburetor Pipe Assembly - Carburetor Drain Elbow

33050 32t70 26098 2668L 623+4 274L6 27068 13705 LL748 * 33052 21379* 32169*

Parts now in relief valve in front of sump, which are to be installed in relief valve in rear section: Part No. 8698 501 8699 Part Narne Screw Nut cap

Quantlty 1 1 1

Dlsasserrrbly-Remove the present relief valve assembly from the sump in accordance with regular practice and plug up the two tapped holes, using Part Nos. 9051 and 16433 Plugs. Remove the Part No. 13404- rYt6"Plug in the Ieft side of the oil pressure chamber. Before installing any parts in place, it is first necessary to lap the seat of Part No. 26677 Piunger in the Body, Part No. 26676. This operation should be done with a fine lapping compound and the parts should be washed thoroughly after the plunger is properly lapped
ln.

Nos. 8698 Screw and 501 Nut. Note-Part which were salvaged from the old relief valve, should be installed in Part No. 26678 Cap before assembling this cap to the body. Part No. 8699 Cap should be retained from the former relief valve assembly and used on this new assembly after the oil pressure is properly adjusted. Remove Part No. 13119 Plug located in the bottom of the oil pressure pump and install Part No. 26680 Plug in its place. Insert Part No. 21352 Elbow in Part. No. 26680 PIug. Then connect Part No. 32986 Pipe Assembly to this elbow. The above instructions cover the assembly of the relief valve on engines which incorporate one of the following model carburetors: NA-Y9A, NA-Y98, NA-Y9E, NA-Y9E1, Or NA-Y9H When using either the NA-Y9C or NA-Y9G carburetor with a hotsnot. the collar of Part No. 33050 Pipe Assembly should be installed on the relief valve in place of Part No. 27457Spacer. The other end of tha pips should be connected to the inlet connection of the automatic mixture controL unit. In order to clamp this pipe assembly to the hotspot, it is necessaryto remove the rear left stud on the hotspot and replace with a Part No. 623 + 4 Stud. This stud is longer and affords more room for attaching the clamp. Part No. 26681 Bushing and Part No. 26098 Clip should be installed on the Part No. 33050 Pipe Assembly. Fasten the Part No. 32170 Pipe Clamp to the hotspot, using the Part No. 623 + 4 Stud. Fasten the clip and the clamp together using Part No. 13705 Screw and Part No. 11748Nut. The Part No. 27416 Pipe Assembly should be connected in accordance with regular practice, using Part No. 27068 Clip. This clip should be fastened to the nearest magneto stud bolt.

Assembly-Install Part No. 26679 Plug in the hole on the left rear corner of the pressure chamber. This plug should be driven in so that it fits snugly. Next instali one Part No. 237 Gasket on the rear of the Oil Pressure Relief Valve Body, Part No. 26676. Over this gasket place Part No. 27451 Spacer and install this body with the spacer in the tYt6"-- 16 tapped hole in the rear section, using a Part No. 6924 Gasket in between the spacer and the pad on the oil pressure chamber. Note-When installing relief valve on engine it is essential that the fuel pump be assembled on the engine. Install Part No. 26677 Plunger in its place in the body. Next assemblethe collar of Part No. 32986 Pipe Assembly on the oil pressure relief valve body, with a Part No. 237 Gasket in between. Install Part No. 6091 Spring inside lhe plunger and secure in place wit=h Pirt No. 26678 Cap and Part No. 237 Gasket.

1819

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS

c C - rr^ o no
oa
rfii'ri

INSTALL ONLY BETWEEN REAR S E C T I O N A N D V A C U U MP U M P D R I V E HOUSING.

INSTALL ONLY BETWEEN VACUUM PUMP DRIVE HOUSINGAND VACUUM PUMP (OR COVER).

Fig. 18064

When not using a hotspot, the Part No. 33052 Pipe Assembly should be used in place of Part No. 33050 Pipe Assembly and Part No. 2L378 Pipe Assembly should be used in place of Part No. 27416 Pipe Assembly. When using

Part No. 2L378'Pipe Assembly, it is necessary to remove the drain fitting from the automatic mixture control unit and replace with Part No. 32169 Elbow. Clamps are not necessary when not using a hotspot.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR INSTALLING SIDE VACUUM PUMP DRTVE ASSEMBLY (Frorn Servlce Bulletln No. 212) Wasp Jr., Wasp and Hornet-A side vacuum pump drive is available as optional equipment for all the latest single row engines, for driving the Type B2A Vacuum Pump. This drive may be installed without disassembly of the engine. To install this drive it is necessary that Part No. 9634 Vacuum Purnp Drive Assembly be used for Wasp Jr., Wasp and Hornet Engines. The above assembly consists of the following parts: Quantlty 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I Drlve - Remove the Method of fnstalllng cover plate and gasket, then install Part No. 9629 Liner in the rear section, driving flange of liner down so that bottom is against shoulder provided in the rear section. To determine if this Iiner has been properly bottomed, measure the distance from the flange of the liner to the face of the pad with a depth gage. This depth should .824". be.802" Cautlon - Be sure liner is pressed down evenly as cocking would prevent obtaining the proper seat. The assembly as received will have two bearings separated by a spacer installed on the gear and held in place by a nut which is fastened with a cotter pin. InstaII this gear and bearing assembly in the rear section, taking care to press it in firmly and to have the bevel gear teeth mesh with the gear already in the engine. The backlash should be .004"-.012".

Part No. 9629 9630 9626 9627 9628 9631 9633 9705 9632 8

Part Narne Liner Bearing Gear Nut Housing Seal Gasket Spacer Cover Plate Cotter Pin

1820

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS

BEARINGS MUST BE ASSMBLD WITH HIGH SHOULDERSOF OUTER RACES TOGETHER AS SHol,vN. THESE CAN BE IDENTIFISO BY MARKING ON OUTER RACE,

TURN OFF CAGE LIP TO FREE OUTER RACE LONGITUDINALLY.

Fig. 1807

Fig. 1808

Install Spacer, Part No. 18431,over the outer race of the bearing. Install Part No. 9633 Gasket over the studs for holding the pump in place. Measure the distance from the top of the Part No. 18431Spacer to the top of Gasket, Part No. 9633, then measure the distance from under flange of the Housing, Part No. 9628, to the bottom of the housing. Grind down Part No. 18431 Spacer to obtain a .002" clearance between the housing and the bearing. Install housing and oil seal over end of shaft. When installing vacuum pump, use Part No. 16532 Gasket between housing and pump. Figure 1806A shows the gasket used between BLOWER IMPELLER

"the vacuum pump drive the rear section and housing, also the one used between the vacuum pump drive housing and the vacuum pump- (or iovei;. Reversinglhe location of these gaskets may result in improper backlash and blan\ing off-the oil supply to-the pumP, causing srrbsg; quent failure b? Itre p..mp. Siecial care should be taken to insure the proper installation of these gaskets. Note-Misalignment of oil holes in rear section mounting pad and gasket uP to one half the hole diameter is permissible and will supply vacuum pump with ample lubrication. GEAR BEARINGS

SIIAFT AND INTERMEDIATE (Frorn Servlce Bulletln No. 214)

Wasp Jr. B - Latest engines having the steel cage type blower bearings incorporate bearings having a formica separator instead of the original Part Nos. 103 and 105 Bearings. Serviceexperience has shown formica separator type bearings New Parts Requlred Unlts Part No. 4 12768 1 1 L 9035 9036 12769

to be more durable. Wasp Jr. B Engines have the steel cage type blower bearing cage and may be converted toincorporate bearings as described in the following table:
Parts Replaced Unlts Part No,

Part Narne Bearing BalI Bearing - Roller Lock Plate Cage - Impeller Shaft Brg. Bearing

103 105 5020 5022 5028

2 2 1 1 1

r82l

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS

*tO-Za NC-z THD. a DR|LL AND TAP i 8-HOLES EQUALLY SPACED BOTH ENDS RADIAL LOCATION OF HOLES NOT IMPORTANT.

*1
l

sZ

?.g77 DIA.

!'oo5

fFig. 1809

Part No. 5022 Cage may be reoperated to Part No. 9036 Cage in accordance wilh instructions given in Figure 1807. A_ssernbly-Install the Part No. 9036 Impeller Shaft Bearing Cage in the blower section in accordance with regular procedure. The Part No. 12768 Bearing should be installed on the impeller shaft with the thrust faces as shown on Figure 1808 Part No. 9035 Lock Plate is used in place of Part No. 5020. If desired, the bearings on the intermediate

gear may also be replaced. The intermediate gear is equipped with a large bearing, Part No. 5028, and a small bearing, Part No. 103. Part No. 5028 should be replaced by Part No. 12769, and Part No. 103 should be replacedby Part No. 12768. No reoperation is required on the intermediate gear cage. Cautlon-Extreme care must be taken to be sure that the thrust faces of the bearings are placed in the proper position as shown on Figure 1808.

EOTSPOTS (Round and FIat Type) (Frorn Servlce Bulletln No. 199) Hotspots on latest engines incorporate a packing and retainer at each end of the casting to obviate any p rssibility of leakage between the casting and hotspot tube. In the event that the hotspot tube becomesloosened in the casting of hotspots now in service, reoperation in accordance with the following instructions is recommended. Reoperatlon-Machine a groove in each end of the hotspot casting from the O.D. of the hotspot tube to an O.D. of 2.877" + .005". This groove should be 7/s2" deep with a %t" radius at the bottom of the groove and chamfered lAt" x 45" at the outer ends (see Fig. 1809). This operation may be accomplished by chucking one end of the hotspot in a lathe and machining a groove with a cutting tool. Cautlon-Care should be taken not to allow the cutting tool to touch the steel tube. Also drill and tap eight No. 10-24 NC-2 thread holes in each end of the casting using Part No. 23871Retainer as a drill jig for locating holes in casting (seeFig. 1809). New Parts Required Unlts Part No. Part Narne 2 Packing 23873 2 23871 Retainer 16 23872 Screw Assernbly-Place Part No. 23873 Packing in the reoperated grooves at each end of the hotspot. Install Retainers, Part No. 23871, securing in place with the Part No. 23872 Screws.

r822

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS MAIN OIL SCREEN (Frorn Service Bulletin No. 208)

Installatlon of Sprlng Loaded Check Valve in Wasp Hl and HlrnJt E Englnes-In certain instalhtlions where the oil tanf, is located some distance above the engine and the airplane is allowed to stand a con"siderablelength bf time, oil may seep from the tank through the pressure pump into- the crankcase and . cylinders._ To prevent- this,-a main oil- screen incorporating.a spring- loaded check valve is now installed ir1 the subject engines. This check valve is forced open as soon as an appreciable oil pressure is

registered in the pressuresystem. On stopping th"e engine and ivith the resultant loss of oil press,tr6, the spring loaded valve closes, thus preventing any oil seeping through the pressure brr*p from going beyond this check valve. The oil screen and check valve assembly is directly interchangeable with the plain gil screen formeriy used. T-heplain oil screenwill be continued is a replacement part for those customers who may desire them for engines shipped prior to this change.
No. 23215 Parts Rernoved Unlts Part No.

One-Plece Type Otl Screen and Check Valve Assernbly

Parts Requlred Unlts Part Nc. 1 4-23435 t B-22545 I A-22897 I A-22895 1 A-22896 1 A-501

Part Narne Ring - Oil Seal Oil Screen Assembly (one-piece) Seat Valve Valve Spring Nut FLOATING GEARS (Frorn Servlce Bulletln No. 287)

8-6075

Hornet E and E-G-BeginningwithEngineNo. 29LL, ali- Hornet enginls incorporate hoating gears and blower intermediat" "orrnt"r.hufT

teeth in place of the stub type. This will insure greater wear characteristics due to greater overLp of the teeth. Part No. 17232 19477 26L45 18693 26147 Note-The

gears having theFelrows typer,r'u,p"tiofil gi;J"e"fftf{: ffi#ol{":ttlt3;:"nffi"1il};t#;


lear and shaft assembly. The following^ is a iist of blower intermediate geql and sha& assembliesusedwith Part No. 74134Floating Gear:
Blower Ratlo

If it is desired to replace the Part No. 13670 Floating Gear bv thq new, type ea{ }9 !!I1l blower intermedtate Gear' the p.rgsenq' l::'iig-

Part Narne

t2:l Blower Intermediate Gear and Shaft Assembly 10:1 Blower Intermediate Gear and Shaft Assembly 8:1 Blower Intermediate Gear and Shaft Assembly 11:1 Blower Intermediate Gear and Shaft Assembly 13:1 Blower Intermediate Gear and Shaft Assembly desired. ratio blower proper assembly to be used should be determined by the IMPROVED TYPE REAR SECTION (Frorn Servlce Bulletln No. 220)

Wasp Jr. B, Wasp Hl and Ifornet E-The latest models of th-e above engines have a redesigned rear section which chaiges the location of the oil pressure relief valve from the left side of the strainer chamber to the right side of the crankcase. The reliefl valve rout"es the relieved oil to the inlet or suction side of the oil pump through an internal cored passage. Thii rear sectioi also incorporates a n^ewtipe oil strainer having a check valve as described under the heading "Main Oil Screen" in this chapter.

On Wasp Jr. B rear sections,.the flow of oil chamber is go-wchanged through th-e oil strainer "outside in" oil flow. from -'inside out" to A new type oil--pump must be used with the rear section-to utifize the new relief valve position. The new rear section may be used in engines-now in service without changing the, oil pulnp by_plugging an_oil pqssage.as described below. When this is done, the relief valve cannot be used in the new position.

t823

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS

H.S.P. PART NO. 5t742 248.24 NIPPLE 42970 NUT

r-)

\ J O

r
r^)
I I

)
(, (,

5664 CONE

44000

44002

CONNECT.ION REAR CASE

6924 GASKET

Fig. 1810

1824

MISCDLLANEOUSCONVERSIONS
New parts are as follows: Part Narne Part No. Plug 4.-9051 Plug A-16443 Plug A-25429 A-232 Gasket Assernbly-The installed in the new cored passageat the face of the oil pump boss. The Part No. 9051 and 16443 Plugs should be installed in the opening on the right side of the rear section just above the oil pump where the relief valve is ordinarily located on these new rear sections. A Part No. 232 Gasket should be used with Part No. 16443Plug.

Unlts 1 1 1 1

Part No. 25429 Plug should be

CONVERSION TO PERMIT TEE USE OF IIYDROMATIC PROPELLERS (Frorn Servlce Bulletln No. 828. Revlslon A) Wasp Jr. B. and B2-If it is desired to use a hydromatic propeller on a Wasp Jr. B engine, the crankshaft must be reoperated and the engine must be equipped with a nose housing of a reinforced type. Reoperation of the crankshaft is a factory procedure, and the crankshaft should be returned to United Airports, Rentschler Field, East Hartford, Conn. The strengthened Nose Housing and Studs Assembly, Part No. 37968, may be identified by the presence of eight reinforcing ribs on the inside. Wasp Jr. engines built subsequent to No. 1732 (the first engine of the 82 series) require no reoperation to the crankshaft. The first ofthese engines will, however, require a new nose housing having the additional reinforcing ribs on the inside. The strengthened Nose Housing and Studs Assembly retain the original Part Number (39346) and will automatically be furnished on future spare parts orders. On both the Wasp Jr. B and 82 engines the propeller governor continues to be driven from a vertical drive or gun drive at the rear of the engine. Following is a list of oil pipes and connecting parts which are necessaryfor the hydromatic propeller installation. The location of these parls is shown on the accompanying sketch (Fig. 1810). Unlts 1 1 1 I 2 | L Part No.
Part Name

44000 Pine Assv. - Governor to Rdar Crankcase OiI Drain 44002 Pipe Assy. - Rear Crankcase to?ropelier Governor Oil Pressure 20189 Oil Connection 44738 Bushing - Rear Crankcase Oil Drain 2L352 Elbow 24824 Nipple 6924 Gadket

Instructions for installing a distributor valve assembly and the hydromatic propeller, itself, are furnished by the Hamilton Standard Propeller Division.

PROPELLER SHAFT OIL PLUGS (Frorn Servlee Bulletln No. 8lg and Supplernent l). Wasp Jr., Wasp and Ilornet-Propeller shaft oil plugs now incorporate straight threads to facilitate the removal of the small steel plug when constant speed or controllable pitch propellers are used. A neoprene gasket, which fits into a recess in the aluminum propeller shaft plug, provides an oil seal as well as a method of preventing the steel plug from loosening. Only propeller shaft plugs with this recess for the gasket have straight threads. If it becomes necessary to replace either of these plugs (tapered thread) by one ofthe later (straight thread) type, the mating plug must also be replaced. pipe (tapered thread) plugs Note-Aluminum (Part Nos. 9737, 10263, 10894, and 10957) are no longer available, the steel pipe (tapered thread) plugs (Part Nos. 11522, LL523, and 11603) being available as spare parts for early type propeller shaft plugs. The design and location of the new (straight thread) plugs when installed in an engine are similar to those shown in the accompanying sketch (Fig. 1811).

1825

MISCELLANEOUS CONVERSIONS Parts Requlred Units Part No. | L 44077 44078 44073 44074 44075 44076 Parts Replace Unlts Part No. 10957 10263 10894 9737 tL522 or L1523 or 11603 1 1 1 1 1 L 1

Model

Part Narne

WaspH1 Hornet E Wasp Jr. B WaspH1-G Hornet E-G. E2-G


AII models AII models

Plug-Propeller Shaft Plug-Propeller Shaft Plug-PropellerShaft Plug-PropellerShaft Plug-Propeller Shaft Plug Seal

1 1

At overhaul, the taper-threaded propeller shaft plug may be replaced as follows: Using a counterbore with a pilot, bore out the flared portion of the oil pipe which extends through the aluminum plug. The pilot on the counterbore should be approximately .002" smaller than the I. D. of the pipe and the counterbore itself should be approximately .002" smaller Using a steel drift than the O. D. of the pipe. approximately .002" smaller than the O. D. of the pipe and having a pilot approximately .002" smaller than the I. D. of the pipe, drive out the pipe. The aluminum plug may then be driven from the propeller shaft towards the rear. Note-Some engine models have a stand pipe which must be removed before driving out the aluminum plug. Using a suitable drift, drive the new aluminum plug into place in the shaft. This plug should have a tight press fit. With a drill .004" smaller than the O. D. of a new oil pipe, transfer-drill through the old pipe hole in the shaft to the center of the aluminum plug. Remove the drill and ream the hole .002" smaller than the diameter of the new pipe. The fit of the pipe should be .001" T to .002" T when installed. Turn the shaft over and repeat the drilling and reaming from the other side. Clean out all chips. Using a shouldered drift, install pipe in the shaft, and carefully flare out the ends into the countersink in the shaft with a rounded drift. Carefully inspect the flared ends for tightness and cracks.

DESIGN AND LOCATION OF TYPICAL PROPELLER SHAFT OIL FEED PLUGS

Fig. 1811

9 g
n r ) n u r )
2 )

1703

E o o
o

Ii
dj
ld

0/ 0

ril

Z o z ld

td

z
4 g

L
\,
IDU

il utO F F

\
v

>:

t"

s
rl

E
R

{
a

F n

a
u, ) tr,
t,

s s tq

r.-

o 2

u, tr o

F 4 d

vr

t-

z o
g

il

0.

il
,

r /

\
i

x
i

A (
b

E*,
x

IU

lr,

- ,

5
L
z llJ
F vl

uo 0, d
F
f

U) t1 lu

!--r

v' >
llJ J

in

'5",6 qb

. d

:t=
h'r*
r i

B?B e ?s S$g
u*8

E.HA

D l<

tr>

t
f

u,u

opltr

f i:t H6g

) o o

o ID

3 o J

r,i
Er
A

I704

G. . o

t
J

u g
0
t

u,

un J

ot 9 trt
[]

t 9 o

il

l,

o a 2

l-

9il rH

t,

7
z

ILU

u t

Ei

ll,

l*l ru

fs

('

d lrJ

z
5 rX p

ttr,

E
F.l h0

t ll)

F ',

o u

g
*,

z
I I I 1 t_

6, u
J u ,l >. E 1 )
tq u IL

E.P -U:E
EgA !+= x d =

e
4

v -7
t,

o/ ? u'l ttl UJ

n{ s g$ 8EI
3E .EE.E
"g.g
F{.= !

u0
t,

u1 ) -, o 4

0 7 tfl 0
J

r l

tl,

0l 4

8*e

rhdm

Hr-E

g U.v

o lu

tri
Fi

d )

u)

5 f o
6
J

1705

d
b ttr rrl ? )

n
ul d

o ! 0

P
t I

il4 rn>

lu

tso

tf

z rt
IU

ul

dr-*

Pfsi
P2
I

5g

o/

?e

He

\
v rX p B

{
6

F (n )

D0 (D

o
F-

tt

b! ,F

u,
) 4

u,
) o lt, a

lu L 0

i d

0 .F
2 0 . r

^ 3 i^; P'
' d . 6 1

v
{1 ttl, ttl

.;' b . E

L
, {.,
vt

I I

I I

?i n>
et r
ltr

x?

=7= o,e'O

E.HA

xf;x ;.;E ':


^q I-E 38
tr e-Y

s;g
E'-

r z
)

u, 9/|f.r 0E

tl

w , Y^

[uu

3"oH
r F p m V H H

r f :
J

u) oa
{

o )

o0

F
a

tri

1706

AUTOMATIC MIXTURE AND POWDR CONTROL UNIT


of engine oil pressure, a spring is provided which operurthe pressure control valve, i.e., similar to throwing control into the emergency position. In the mid position (see Fig. U02) the two direct connections to the operating piston are closed off and the pressure and drain connections to the needle valve are opened thus putting the regulator into operation. The passage to the range-shifter piston is still open to drain so the pressure maintained will be the higher absolute figure corresponding to the lower altitude. Only one ofthe jets has been cut off to compensate for the first altitude condition. In the cruising position (see Fig. 1703) the only change from mid position is to shift the range spring so that regulation to a higher altitude is obtained and at the same time cut out the second needle controlled jet, thus giving the proper carburetor metering for the regulated altitude.

fuel capacity is necessary. This is accomplished by bringing the fourth jet into action by relieving the oil pressure holding its needle controlling this jet on its seat. By the proper selection of the various jet sizes, it is possible to obtain any desired fuel consumption for the three possible operating conditions. In the emergency position, oil pressure is applied only to the passage which is directly connected to the opening side of the operating piston. All other pressure passagesare blocked off. Similarly, in this position all drainage passages are open except the drain from the needle valve. By applying pressure to one side of the operating piston and opening the other side to drain, positive opening of the pressure control valves is assured. The two jet operating pistons are both open to drain and being spring loaded, the needle valves are thus open giving maximum fuel capacity in the carburetor. In case of loss

DISASSEMBLY
Remove bellows housing cover plate. Remove operating and range-shifter cylinder body. Be careful not to lose selector valve locating pin spring. Take range-shifter spring out of open bellows. Unscrew operating piston guide and remove piston. Pull off range-shifter spring thrust plate. Unscrew range-shifter piston guide and remove adjusting nuts from shaft. Remove range-shifter piston assembly. If cup leather catches in threads turn piston as if removrng nut. Shake selector valve locating pin out of hole and push selector valve out through drain end. Do not pull through oil seals. Split servo needle valve lever. Be very careful not to break evacuation tube on evacuated bellows. Remove both bellows together. Compress enough to allow pilot on evacuated bellows to clear case. Bellows may be separated if necessary by unscrewing connecting spool. Remove plug at end of servo needle chamber and take out needle. Pull jet piston out of cylinders at bottom of urutr.

CLEANING Wash all parts with engine washing fluid. INSPECTION 1. Gaskets-Be condition. sure all gaskets are in good upon edge, replace. 5. Check condition of jet operating piston. 6. If there is a large quantity of oil in open sylphon on disassembly, replace range-shifter shaft oil seal. 7. Check selector valve for rolled up edges on locating pin groove. Stone Iightly if necessary.

2. Rubber ring oil seal should be replaced if damaged or roughed up. 3. Check servo needle for scoring. Need not be replaced unless badly scored or it lets too much oil leak into case (can be seen on test rig). 4. If range-shifter cup leather is roughed

1713

TOLERANCE CH MODEL 3/05- 8 AL'TOMATIC

1713

SERVICETABLE OF CLEAA,ANCES
No. Parts Fit New Fit I Range Shifter in Shaft Guide. .002L .004L 2 Replace Range Shifter Assy. when leather

Seniceobln
Limit .008L

cup becomesworn or torn to the extent that the O.D. of the leather fails to provide an effectiveseal... .002L .004L .008L 3 Range Shifter in Body Housing. 4 Control Valve Lever Button in Bellows .0005L .0045L .0045L Conn. Rod. 5 Control Valve Lever Button in Adjusting .0005L .0045L .0045L Rod. . . .0005L .0025L .003L 6 Pressurc(iontrol Valve in ISushing. 7 Replacc Guidc Oil Scal at each overhaul. .0005L .0025L .003L 8 Pin in Prcssure(lontrol Valve. 9 Replace IJell<-rrvs Assy. if dented or cracked. .0025L .0045 .005L l0 Pressure(jontrol Valvc in Bushing. 11 Replace evacuatcd bellows assy. if dented or cracked. t 2 SelectorValvc in Main HousinC..... . . . . . .0005L .0025L .005L l 3 Operaiing Piston in Housing Body.. . . . . . . .0015L .0045L .006L .002L .004L l 4 Operating Piston in Guide. .010L Replacc all worn or damaged gaskets. Replace all leather oil seals if w<lrn to the extent that the I.D. of the leather is a clearanccfit on the O.D. of the shaft. Note: Whcn replacing parts at ovcrhdul, the follorving parts must be purchasedas assembledunits: Control Valve Lever Assembly, Bellou's Assembly, Evacuated Bellows Assembly, Ilange Shifter Assembly, Body and Bellows Stop Assembly, Operating Piston Assembly, Main Housing and Bushing Assembly.

GASKETS. REPLACE ALL WORNOR DAMAGED REPLACE ALL LATHR OIL SEALS IF NARN TO THE EXTENT THE LEATHER IS A CLEA.RANCE FIT ON THAT THE I.D. ff rHE O.D. OF THE SHAFT. NOTE. WHEN REPLACING PARTS AT OVERHAUL THE FOLLOIy. AS ASSEMELED UNITS:. ING PARTS MUST 8E PURCHASED CONTROL VALVE LEVER ASSEMBLYT EELLOWS ASSELIELY; EVACUATEDEELLOI(S ASSEMELY., RANGE SHIFTER ASSEUELT' EODY AND EELLOWS STOP ASS.EMSLTIOPERAT|NG PTSTON ASSEUELIi UAIN IIOUSING AND SUSHING ASSEMELT

TOLERANCE CHART MODEL 3/05-8 AUTOMATTC MlXTUR CONTROL


Fis.1706

1317

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STROMBERG NA.YgE ANI) NA.YgET CARBURETORS


OVEREAIIL carburetor should be disI)lsassembly-The assembled for cleaning and inspection each time the engine is given an overhaul. After the carburetor has been removed from the engine and the hot spot and air intake or heater taken off, the halves o{ thg carburetor may be separated by the removal of the fi"llister head screws at the parting surface. The economizer needle, pump sleeve and venturii are held in the throttle body as the _bodies are separated. The pump sleeve should be removed- from the opeiating stem immediately so there will be no dinger oT -packits dropping and becoming bent. Rubber ing is used around the venturii so that if it is found necessaq/ to remove them, they will have to be driven out by using a wooden plug as shown in tr'ig. 1310-4. Before removing-the throttle valves, mark them so they may be returned to the barrels from whici th6y were removed. It should not be necessarvto remove the idle discharge jet assemblies uniess some of these parts should be replaced. The main body parts may all be removed. and Cleanlng-The Inspectlon bodies and all parts should be thoroughly cleaned in gasoline and all passagesblown out with compressedair. Parts which should be inspected foi wear are the float assembly, float needle and seat, throttle shaft and bushings, economizer needle, seat and operating mechanisms and the pump stem. All variable parts should be checked to see that their sizes are in accordance with the carburetor specification desired. To disassemble the compound pump unit (see Fig. 1311) it should be removed from the operatini stem ind the four small hexason head dcrews wf,ich hold the stem clip in phc:e should be removed. The connecting rod between the upper and lower piston is milled flat above the cross hole, so it can be held with a wrench when removing the center scfews. Considerable force will be required to loosen the center screw as it has been staked in place as a precaution against its coming loose in service. When the center screw has been removed the upper piston may be lifted out ofthe sleeveand the connecting rod and lower piston can be removed through the bottom of the sleeve. Care should be taken that none of the parts are damaged during disassembly or assembly as they are made to fit with very close tolerances and a small nick or dent might canse a binding action. Replaoements-When ordering replacement parts it is necessary to give complete information concerning the parts desired to avoid delay in shipment or the receipt of wrong parts. Whereever possible, the serial number of the carburetor should be given. A careful reference to the assembly drawings (seeFigs. 1312 and 1313) to determine the correct part number and name, and if marked with an asterisk (*) giving the size as stamped on the piece will greatly facilitate service. A specifiiation sheet givin-g gf jets, fuel level, economizer selting, the sizes_ etc., will be furnished (no charge) if you wiii write to the Bendix ProductJ Corforation, Stromberg Carburetor Division, South Bend, Indiana, advising the model of your engine. Parts price lists will also be furnished on request. P-2L463 covers a complete set of gaskets for the NA-Y9E and P-60524 for the NA-Y9E1. Reassembly-All headless screw plugs below the fuel level should be assembled with shellac. being careful not to get it on the end of the plug where it will come off and be carried by the fuel into one of the metering orifices. Headless screw plugs above the fuel level and aII other threaded parts screwed into the bodies should have a compound of graphite and castor oil put on the threads. When it is necessary to replace the throttle shaft, the lever which operates the economizer should be assembled in accordance with Fig. 1310-8. The throttle valves, when in the closed position, should fit tightly. When the throttle valves have been fitted, center them in the wide open,position. If the economizer operating lever has been assembled at the correct angle the throttle valves should be centered. However. when this work is done in the field it mav b6 necessary to file the stop at A, Fig. 1310-8, or bend it toward the screwed-in stop. If it is thought necessary to replace a float needle or needle seat it is recommended that bqlh !,e replaced at the same time as it is very difficult to fit a new needle to an old seat or a new seat to an old needle. In ordering these palts, be sure to give the size of the by-pass -needle holes in the float seat. These by-bass -and holes meter the fuel during inverted flight their size has been determined to meet the requirement of that particular engine and it is, therefore, important that a seat having the proper size by-pass holes be used for replacement purposes. The float level should be ry'", plus or minus Ye" below the parting surface, and is dependent upon the thickness of the gasket under the float needle seat. The level should be checked under the conditions encountered in service as regards the fuel used and the fuel pressure or head at the carburetor. If a fuel pump is used. a pre$sure at the carburetor of 3 lbs-.per square incir 11U"

1318

CARBURDTORS
gaso-line at .!10 sp. gr,) shouldbe used in checking the fuel level. A gasket %2" tbickshould be useii first and if the level is not correct use thicker gaskets to lower the level and thinner gaskets to raise it. A change of ,(4" gasket ttrickness will change the level approximately %r". The float needle should have at leaet/6a" travel. If it becomes necessary to replace the mixture control shaft or stop it is important that the stop be located in the conect angular position on ihe shaft. In order to do this.-place^a small piece of wood in the slot of th'e'outer valve plgle in such a-way that it extends through and will fit in the slot of the inner plate. Place the outer valve plate ln the carburitor in the opening position and the wood key will keep it flom turning. Place the shaft and bushing assembly in the carburetor, adjusting the shAft so tlie screw driver ends fit into the valve, and put in the screws to hold the bushings in place. Slip the washer and stop on the shift and turn until the full rich stop is against the large head screw. Assemble lever, indicator plate and nut on the shaft. Draw nut up until washer strikes shoulder on qhaft. drill and fit pin through stop and shaft. (See assembly draryrng (Ffr. 1312) for section and end view of shaft assembly.) The economizet needle is operated bv an eccentric pin which is part of thi economiier lever stem. This stem is operated by the throttle through two levers and a connecting link. It is important that the economizer lever be located at the ploper angle with the eccentric pin on the economizer lever stem. When replacing the economizer lever stem use a new economizer lever also. The lever should be assembled so that its cetlter line forms a 90 degree angle with the centr line of the eccentric pin as shown in Fig. 1310-D. When the lever fqs.leen properly set, tighten the clamp screw and drill stem and one sideof lever for ttie locating pin. Screw pin into place. The adjustment of the economizer needle valve in the holder and the eccentric pin on the lever determine the position of the l6ver when the needle is on the seat and. therefore. the throttle opening at which the lever lifts off the seat. This throttle opening is one of the items of the variable specifications or setting in the carburetor and is given on the spec:ffication sheet, being referred to as "economizer setting", the figure give! being the throttle opening in degrees. By adding 20 or 18 (the angle of the throttle valve) to this figure the angle which the throttle valve makes with the horizontal surface of the carburetor is obtained. Several economizer settings are in use and the proper one should be determined from the carburetor spec-ification sheet. The first adjustment is made by screwing the needle in or out of the holder so that when placed in the main body the distance from the-top of the slot to the parting surface will be in accordance with the dimensioru as shown in Fig. 1310-C for the economizer setting desired. When this has been done, tighten the nut and pin the needle as per the instructions given in Fig. 1310-C. The two halves should then be assembled and final adjustment made by means of the eccentric on the economizer lever. Check the angle between the throttle and the horizontal surface of the carburetor flange when the needle starts to leave the seat. A simple apparatus to check when this movement starts is shown in Fie. 1310-E. It is made by drilling a hole througli- the center of a %6"-18plug,large enough to allow the free movement of a piece of tubing about 4" Iong. Then by _taking 9ut the- economizer metering jet plug and jet it 19 pos,sible to screw in the other plug and push the tubing up so that it rests on the poinl of lhe qe_edlg. If a slight pressure is put on the tube with the fingers while the throttlb is moved,lhe ulseating of the needle will be easily detected. Adjust the eccentric until the conect angle is obtained. When the adjustment has been made, tighten the nuts, being careful not to move the eccentric, and assemble the cotter pins. When reassembling the compound pump unit, considerable care shbuld be t-aken sb tfr'at ttri parts will be concentric to each other and then checked in the body to see that it works freely before restaking the center screw which hold's the piston in place. The small hexagon screws should be safety wired after tightening. When assembling the upper sleeve and piston into the sleeve fastened in the body, considerable care should be taken so the leather will not be curled up around the piston. The leather should be wet with gasoline and one side assembled in the sleeve, then as the piston is forced into the sl@ve, it should be rbtated so the leather will go into the sleeve evenly. With the throttle yalves open the operating stem may then be hooked in place or the purnp unit arid the two halves of the carburetof ass^embledtogether in the usual manner.

1319

br19 30' -T-

wooD
NA-YgE & N A - Y 9 E I V E N T U R I REMOVAL PLUG.

A
SPLIT PIN AS SHC D R I L L& R E A MF O R P'I9O66 PIN WHEN P-20t36 LEVER tS tN P O S | T t O NA S S H O W N .

WITHP-17684 LINK | - il/32"CENTERS I'j SETTING t6c-t8c )- tu32" P-16004 t9-2F


2 ? . 26c-3lc _ 2 5 c r , ' r t

, T 5 2 D R I L L F O RP - 6 5 8 7 P I N A F ADJUSTINC. RIVETENDSOF PIN AND FILE FLUSH. ADJUSTMENT PRELIMINARY NEEDLEVALVE OF ECONOMIZER AND HOLDER.

H E X .H E A D

E
NA-YgE & NA.Y9EI CARBURETORS FITTII.IG ECONOMIZERLEVERAND STEM.

Fig. 1310

1320

ftl
P-2t229
P-6721 P- 20578 P- 20595 P-205E2

,-rtrroff,_
tP-

l e 2t223 -

21207 2t?24 P 2t226 21222 2t223

sEcTloN

'A -

A"

2t230
P- 20579 P- 20581 P I S T O NW I T H RING. P-20594 PTSTON ASSEMBLY

P:20577 P-2183r P-20576

(tt+-za) P-r7rss
-3779 -r090E

D OU B L ED E CK PUMPASSEMBL\. N A -Y g E& N A -Y gEI C A R B U R E T O R S

Fig. 1311

t32L

HtADLt3t

SCatW rtu(l ?-ra'l'lt

XT CONTROL BLEEDER x P-9eOr

Hlaorttt

Ecarw Purc t- to2ae sgcIloN:e-9.

TXEOTTLI !tHAF' Et'Ei4OLY. P-20lt3 FLO'T FVLCEUII SCarrv P-t"ao4 'LOAI TULCQUM PIX .Ft9t9

Mlxr coNTRoL TUBEDusH\Nq (THREADED) xP-t7425 -MIXT CONTROLTUBE AUSHING FUMP STEH P- \74?-3 P-alll
MIXT CONTROLTUBE P-Z\453

rHiorTLr tHAfT ousl{rto P-2o\46


.HEADLESS SCREW PLUq P- \?tss

TIIROTTLE i PACKING P,.

T}ICOYTLEgTOP PIX P-ls06c


THIO.LTVER AtaD t"Ot P- 201a6 T|IEG|. AD.r, tiltlP P-n+Tf
HEADLES|3 SCREW PLUI P-ltt6t

A3tt',l.

SETSCETr,V P-t4'f29 .?XROTTLE LgVEi F- e I Z ro (A.C.usE P-zl4lz) ROT'TLg 3TOP PIII P-\3046 I{G,AOLESs |ICPEW PII'6 A -P-loz4a VENTUEI MAIN BOOY GASKET P-\?60''

3BAFI srAcEr r-rlatl HCAD PIPE PLUG p-8509 THR,O. STOP AND sYE. LB/ER P-Z\ZBO SET SCREr,vWACI{?:, P-6s9z(a.c usE F-\c?eg ) --\ tralcrTt.!
SQUARE

HtaDutt

P|rt Ftaot
t-l3Ol!

rl.|,l.

w^gr{l:

c^trLr xur
CA3Tl.f

VENT\JTI TUBE '-I Fl76l3 MAIN OISCH. NOZZLE


P-l6790

\ GIASI<ET

t-taota l'coN. AqJugttxa

P-raora

Stuo

XUt P- llE"7 PIX -COTTII ?-aaaa 'IEDUCER F-r!2E3

NozzLE MA|N orSet{^toa * tz2t494 'H!rDt63 SCiEW PLIJC

P-roe4c

lcoil.3r3n

xutOatxrl-

P.OlOl

P -2t 2rO (A.C.UlE P-Zr4l!) SQUARE HEAD PlPE PLUG P- a50a SPECIFICATIOI' PLATT I'IVIT
P-tte95 tPECtFTC^nOX PLATI, P-2O!"6(/\C US" El"Glt) .wA9t{El lDrE DBCH. JET A33H{. (LEFf) * P-?t4f0 IDLE DlScH JET AssEM (i\GFrl' x P-21467 THROTTLE VALVE SCRE}' P-\2403 \ ----\ LocK wAsHeR \ P-\2ta'2 VALYEI THRTTLE

CONTROL

LEVER

OIL CAP P-ltrtt orl. cAP wlcx

P-rtD7A wtlH llrgrarl{oa

DLt AD.r. QrJ DrAl{l ScElw Fac3t o.r3 A0.r. GlrrAocA$THD?ll (.'.hr)

coTT3l

THIO. vaLvt Dorr P-2t.1aa


CA3TLI NUT FCETI tril ccflTlt P-4334 COTTER PIX

1OL3ADJ. OUADTAXT .,Ft?aio GrrO

P-raort Ptx P-rorl6 . l{ur P-raor4 i4a[{ art 8L:EDl'a * P-1t672 VENT CHT,CKVALVE P- 2r450
VENT CH'CK VALVE P- 21452' A C. rJ5'a ONLY VENT CHECK VALVE PLUQ-. P-2t45t A.C USg ONL.Y VENTURI PACKTNG-P-17t48

i\-

p-zrzsr

P- toett ccoi.coxltoL LlNx P'lloorl tocx w^gr{lE P-rtr6?


lcor.
FILL,HIAO

IUMP DISCHARGENOZZLE * *rssll


CATOR PLATI

LR Et cLAllP tctll, P-2)24

P-rtsoE5
scR.Ew

?.ara6

MACH.'C'-l\/ FrLL HEAD MAcH p-65tE F\N P- ra6ce N\'T r-c3 cl


HEAO MACH.

LK

FeoGa(A.c.u3EFrrsaa) ntaDr-t3! grt scltw P-lor8 A3lltrrt c^t StcArxtl P-lBt7l aAt SflArrlla PuLl oAtl(lt P-artt

vt/ASHC'

COTtER

MAIN BODY (A C lJSe P-ar449) P-zr459 SOUARE HEAO PIPE PLIJG

P-\.r 4ZZ HTADLeS3 SCIIW oLU6 P- 3370 , ACCEIVFLTJO tl4eo

FILL

SCREW

P.BEoSCREW HEADLESS l-l,45Ol FLUq OEAIN

gcecwPt-uo t4?14

PLU6

P- e 006 ADLEss SCRCV'fuIF ?.1E2?A

A.e.r AlrCotPt

BENDIX STROMBEPG CARgUR

Fig. 1312

121

I PUi4?

STItvr

I
I

I PUMPsrEr BU3HIN6.F-Zrrzl I
PUM? STEM PACI(IXGI

e-zrzzz

'

CKIN{I

?-zrza, FUMF STEM A33EH J') PUrar 9YEM ----rr_ t-21t'20 P-2r226 I
I PUMP I3TI,M LINK

\
wrtr G^titl ilndlo

PIN .

r t* era4. . l ' l-r,ta.

ltlc. atrTrHq " tJ-tr. a l : - l j ' " ' gc.-!l. .

wm . r

?ntrc4 lliK wrrH ., p_"leoo4 " P - l e @ 4. ' r . F-ldl

t-ryE 4|.rut. t_[ltt l - r l A l l-llAt

THROTTLE SHAFT PACKING ?-2Ot94

I PUMP STE 't UNK\

?-ztzz+

FUhPLtilIIOLT..1 t-llela

p-zrzoz \
\

!!.!!!!EE9\E_3EArE9.
r. vluw s:er P-3Oo64 E VALVE P-1355t rssam) ) I NIEDII. I SEAT ASSEXBLY T F-Llall

alre:gxl

ASSSMSY FLilT ?-lal8l4

P- 2,\24! 5TE}4 IU3XIN6 ?- 6? Zl

6ASK?T

PUMP Fi3'ION SLET,VEA33EM. P-raoat tut PUT{' F1gr6r AssEM. P-\32.!l VALVE * F-lt?47 Rr3a8
FOR tEFtt

SPR,IN(D
PUMP PART' tl-tzla-g!

9OU3LE DECK TO piawtNq

Itr. r-zr4!r)

,_-_{
l1!/lT ar

VALVESEATCLIP P-r3A9A
LOCK IOLE ADJ NUT -=-=\ F-19037 \ IDLE ADJ. LEVER P\N-\\ F-6245 \ IDLE ADJ LEVER A33EM. P-9z'9t \ IOLE D\sCH JET PACKINq P_\SO56 \ IOLE DISCH,JET (RIqHTl ] xP-2r468 _ \ | loLc o\s$r .Jrr (!eFr) / / P-el47r \ ,* / / WASHER. P-6664 MIXT, CONT SHAFT MIIT CONT. 3TOF F-l14r ! ?-z\26'l

DlscH JET A33E.t.,r.(LtFt) + P- 2t410 )-E D\scH JET AssEI4 (RlG{t) t ?-2t461 - - ROTTLE VALVE SCREW P-r2409 \ WA3HER ----\ -oc( \ P-lalc7 \ -iROTTLE VALVE--\ \ - :=P-2t2S5 \

FILL HD. MACH. SCREW -r:core P'3ltl vlrvE sEAy GAsKET ASSEM Ecoir LRtrGIEN LEIR srM NM rECOT{ P-tgo7z P-rgo7z | ,ii"".""l f ll,.; ". WASHER sPi,lNG WASHI IECON !.coN SPi,ING ;i;.i;;;i _ z;x,c* P-taZ9 P-ttz9 oi F-rrza! /rrHrcr I I \ gPRrxo I l!.cox.grrlt r.ilxT CONTROL SHAFT assf.lt P-ltoa.l I I P-t"4ZO lrvAatrr Ecox. gTflt STllt waalrlt \ \ I lECOft. r-\!ocr \\\ /ECOltLE80LEvALvE P-r76os acoI. 3r!ti ItACx',*o =\\\ /' ECOll. srlM Nrtl P-t90c7 WA9HEt,

iuT. cort sroP PDI


nttT. cotat. SHAF\ wASHli P-\7416 nrrt COxY SHAFT BUSNIXC P- r74ra itxr. cotfl SHAFT PACKltto t-ra!ot filtY. coxY. PAcKrNq P-13679 SPR\NC W ITIXT CONT. p- 26 A(| IilX?.CONr SHAFT 3t .- t]90? lllrl. CO|ff.SHAFT PrN

p_,"oro

rcoN. LEvlR As.."

4,

\ AssEMWJfirlUS*t-Ur STEM \\\


HEAOLE3s SET SCREW\ \ \\

\\\
\

,,n \\\\\
\t\\\

fco'r.coxlllll$r
\ \
\

flr

b.r ^,1-8ll?o \\ / | eetel


roLE TUAE r P-!ftl! ECON. I!!'lLlqtno

\\

\\\ \\
t \\ :-Jl \!1!

ccolrxrrB:tll3)'- \W

\\ \\

\',,r'i\,\

,)^

ECOT{.I{IEDLE ?-14722 ECOI{. XEEOLI' IOCK lluT P-.l8al ECO{ NIEDLE VAVE ITAA * P-lEOll

coxr. sHAtr cAtKEt P-r?421


COIT VALYE SPRING P-tt4 | 6 coilT vALvE PLAIe (Oulfl) P-20393 PLA1E RINq COHT V[\'E

L\.ro !lra

tcox.v^lvl

atar

P-tae7e

HCYilINO JET (ECON)-=* P- lOrL55 PLIJO 'CEEW HIA9LE63 .-P-l+974

P-r1905 .JIT(MAIN)Aux MfTEEINO r P-lO.l 55

METEe|NG JET (nx) r F.to.{,ss iNETERING .JET PLUG P-)479


!o 'AFS W{EN QiTiI{G T ALWAIS GIVE MAiFE9 grze oR ENGII:6oDeL xot lrlcrtY flrs DlAir{

]VIAIN AIP gLEED AEA AEM (iA3K]T BLETD P-t4',25 / ?-t1t7a


F-16347

ilrlllrc

J3T tllra

X STROMEERC CAIBURETOR COMPANY

Fig. 1312

1322

r P-oo!q9l*=--=.--K)\< 'o3rz-R P-60312-6-

:il'i:-R
sEcrroN

"H-H"

rP-212Q7 | 7 P-2t224ft-aa2o .*zta?c I r r?-212251 /7P-2t2231 ',aP-422?)


F.I7CI4

PVMP STEM AssEMBLy

FLOAT ASSEMELY

P-3r09P-?t229

z-P-19291

x Ft373? P-r3735
F3tCl

XF

FUEL LEVEL

OR oR oR oR

FLlszAl-rt4Tl{cK P-.r5262-3 4THrcX P-rszt't/rG THTCK Fcooct-o(, THtcf(

as ma otci tu, raaar 10 arccrar Ma laf !r-[tl-ar.

"D-D" sEcTroN
F-r74t 3
2 666

3oo7
/

,/ ,/ ,/ rP-6243

//S*ezet

P 2646 3479

[-F21647 P-33te i I I li-P-ro252 I I lr P-21655

P-2r653

//// / //// / // /

/ ////

'/// "-,*'zj li$:_

lP-re2ol lP-532elFreo64_

///// r"-t3eo6 //// /rP-2ta3e /// / /rP-2t65o /// ///-P-2t267

'////r'^-i',2:

+ P-9rA7 +rFl45l3 F65C3 86587 F_t6OO5P-I5

--P-t7421 '!P-t74t6

*
t7a (7/lp'-2o,)

-F20393 P-CC667a P- 65Ct P-r737 5-(P-22rOOovERsrzE) P-t5O36--\

ovERsrzE)

sec!_9!_.4_'

947 F3779 Ft43

l6tar
fs oroairo uatao* asrs

trLtl3

l:t

atieE

ld

c^aur{

s5?4.

ir?i Grvf 9la

F ioY atacfr Da^ff uaat do crYa Mra

rxa d ootg trcit

qcq( r^tl3 Arc E mla sECt c $ar-r3 afaaa lo t^aaut3td qcsE^troi lxaata

COMPANY TEURETOR

Fig. 1313

r:

P-t2775 (6-32)

P-toz4g (3/S-2
P - 1 7 6 0 4-

P-t7A23

-:j:i7.iz
___i,,.!}l\ --*P{7425
SECTION F.F
P-t7423 P-2r453 P-l-5-2_3_!--F6506

ovERsrzE F".;*X
\

P- 5319P-t 4425-t/C4 F 1442C-:l/C4THrCl( P- 1659A P- 16596

secroN "e-e'

P-2ot48,JP-2t425 ovERsrz\\ ?-2t4zsovERsrzE\\ P - r 7 t 5 5 ( ! 4 - 2 r ) \\ --p-t7t'stw-zct \\


\ \

\
\

\
\ \ \

:#:-R
F F

\\ '\ '\
\ \ \ \

sEcTto

P-ro248(Vr-

P- t90t6
P- t7

/ / aP-2t23O / / *csEa ,/xc.uszets_la


P-t47?9

toI =-P-zt2 P-zt4321 AC,USE


-P-r906C
P-t7@7

A
rtP-17613---_

P-r8790 *P-zi454 -P-to246\3/C-?4)


P-

p- zosz6l oc.usep-'zc.Lgj
P_ E5O6 -_\ P-il4??-. P- 65t1

P- t367 P- 6666 COTTER PIN P- 19285P-il640 P- t3579 P- 1357 P- 15295

SECTION
-P-2t443

'4./

P-t3733
P-21446 1 \ P-t7t55 [/4-2A)

P-r?c90
- --

vP-l9O3l--

P-2t450-.
ACUSE F21452 oNLY-\ ACUSEP 2145r ONL ACUSE FI9C95 ONLY=-

P-17t40
AC.t SE -_-\.\P-6660 \P-6361 .

P-t460 (3/16-24) -P-9006


P-t437Q(V\C-?O)

Fcc7000- 32)
P-t4E25

P- r50c
P - t 4 S O l (t/2-

Y-P452aat$-24) ) P-60312 Pt{-- P-21

gec.I-9N-!:9"

ovEFSTZE

.
rc2 0a td

. .

ra'-ra' *rtE rr1 zf a{- A'

$ti

,Cr'
oY

t-rrao. a-6. t"i|g F@a ilrovco

Lrn . . r

fiti . . .

r-rv9-' c3rttal LlYla tsra/t7' r.ry5

rrtx

G *al

ECON. IELDL

ADJUSTMENT

WITX

NEEDLE SEATED

A.C= AtR CORPS

BENDIX STROMBERG CARBURETORCOMPANY

Fig. 13rB

1323

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STROMBDRG NA-YgC, NA-Y9G AND NA-Y9GI CARBURETORS


OVERHAUL
When the engine is overhauled the carburetor should be disassembled for cleaning and inspection. The carburetor halves should be separated bv removing the fillister head screws at the oirtine surfice on the NA-Y9C and NA-Y9G tarbur-etors, and the nuts at the parting surface on the NA-Y9Gl carburetors. All plugs, screws, etc., at the end of the fuel passagesshould be removed. The upper pump cylinder and piston assembly should be removed from the carburetor as soon as the halves are separated. All parts in the bodies, with the possible exception of the idle discharge jet assemblies, should be removed to enable a thorough cleaning and inspection. bodies of the Cleanlng and Inspectlon-The carburetor should be thoroughly washed in gasoline "Td. uU the channels blown out with compressec arr. The throttle valves should fit the bore tightly and if necessary to remove them they should be marked in such a way that they may be replaced in the same way they came out. All variable parts such as metering jets and air bleeds should be checked against the specification sheet of the carburetor being worked on. Examine all movThe float ins parts for wear or irregularities. nidie seat and needle valve should be checked for Ieakage by holding the needle with the point up and tlie seat in place and fiJling the small space above the needle point with gasoline. If any leakase is evident the needle should be lapped in with irocus powder or fine lapping compound. If that doesn-t stop the leakage both the needle and the seat shoulal be replaceil, as it is very difficult to fit a new needle to an old seat or a new seat to an old needle. If necessary to disassemble the accelerating Dump piston assembly, it should be done in the lo[oi'iire manner: The slotted plate held to the uDDer pfuton by four screws should be removed, tli6n uhstake and remove the central countersunk screw. This will allow complete disassemblv of the upper sleeve and piston stem assembly. Afoembly ollhis unit is accomplished by reversine the ibove procedure. Before restaking the ceiter screw, the assembly should be placed in the main body to see that all the parts line up correctly and-there is no binding in any of the parts. If it becomes necessary to replace the mixture control shaft, it is important that the lever be Iocated in the proper angular position on the shaft. In order to do this, place a small piece of wood in the slot of the outel valve plate in such a o'uy that it extends through and will fit in the slot of the inner plate. The upper plate should be in such a position that all the slots are open. Then install the spring, mixture control shaft, and cover plate. l'he lever should be located on the shaft so that when connected by the linkage to the primer valve lever, this latter lever will be at the full rich stop. The mixture control lever should be drilled and pinned to the stop in this position. Cautlon -Remove the wood stop before final assembly. When it is necessary to replace the primer shaft, care must be exercised to see that the valve is in the idle cut-off and priming position with the lever against the full lean stop. The shaft should be completely assembled except for the pin through the stop lever, and placed in the body so the idle cut-off hole through the conical valve is lined up with the hole from above the throttle. With the valve in this position insert a metal pin through the hole in the throttle bore into the hole in the inner valve as shown in Fig. 1317-D. This will keep the valve and shaft from turning while the stop lever is moved to the full lean or idle cut'off position against the stop. With the stop lever in that position the hexagon nut should be tightened and the entire assembly removed from the carburetor and the stop Iever pinned to the shaft. If the float level is not correct (1" below the parting surface at 3 lbs. fuel pressure at .710 specific gravity) it may be changed by changing gaskets under the float needle valve seat. Thinner gaskets should be used under the seat to raise the float level and thicker gaskets to lower the Ievel. A gasket change of Y64"will change the level approximately /6a". The pump valve should be disassembled and the diaphragms checked, as the NA-Y9G Carburetors between the serial numbers 5565574 and' 5567459 except carburetors having serial numbers 5566149, 5566150, 5566151, 5566152 and 5567454, were originally sent out with only one diaphragm and due to the fact that a failure of this diaphragm would permit fuel to leak out the venting hole in the cover and thereby create afirehazard besides a loss offuel, later carburetors have been furnished with a reinforcing, perforated diaphragm (Part No. P-61159) assembled on the sprihg side of the other diaphragm. The nerforated diaphrasm has three .028" diameter holes in it to pieverit an air loch between the two diaphragms, which would result in faulty operation of the valve.

1324

CARBURETORS
Upon completion of the assembly of the check valve. it should be checked to see that it has the coruect opening joint by assembling the check valve in a fixture whereby pressure may be applied to the needle side of ih-e diaphragm and the pressureraised until the needle opens. The opening pressure should be between 20" to 35i' of water. ordering replacement Replacernents-When parts it is necessaryto give complete information concerning the parts desired to avoid delay in shipment, or the receipt of wrong pafts. Whereever possible, the serial number of the carburetor should be given. A careful reference to the assembly drawings (see Figs. 1318 through 1322) to determine the correct part number and name, and if marked with an asterisk (*) giving the size as stamped on the piece, will greatly facilitate service. A specification sheet giving the sizes of jets, fuel level, etc., will be furnished, no charge, if you will write to the Bendix Products Corporation, Stromberg Carburetor Division, South Bend, Indiana, advising the model of your engine. Parts Price lists will also be furnished on request. P-2I200 covers a complete set of gaskets for the NA-Y9C, P-22LL0 for the NA-Y9G and P-60910 for the NA-YgGl carburetor. points of vital imporReassembly-Several tance in the reassembly of the carburetors are: 1. The main body gasket: This should be in perfect condition. If the gasket is torn at any point around the float chamber, it will not only allow fuel to seep out but will seriously effect the mixture control action. If torn around the idle tube, it will cause difficult starting and poor idling operation. 2. Compound or double deck pump: Considerable care should be taken during the assembly of the pump to the carburetor. This operation should be done before assembling the throttle body. The pump leather should be wet with gasoline and one side assembled in the sleeve. It should be rotated so the leather will go into the sleeve evenly. With the throttle open the operating stem may then be hooked in flace on the pump unit and the two halves of the carburetor assembledtogether in the usual manner. 3. If the venturii have been removed the rubber packing should be replaced before reassembling the carburetor. Make sure that the venturii are down tight with the locating pins in their correct positions so as not to hold the bodies apart. 4. No dirt, shellac or other foreign material should be left in the carburetor. 5. Idle discharge jets: If it was necessary to remove the idle discharge jets to clean and inspect the carburetor they should be assembled in the same holes they were removed from as they are different in the right and left barrel. 6. Auxiliary jet valves: If it was necessary to replace the valves the new valves should be lapped in, using fine lapping compound. The opening point of these valves should be checked to see that they operate properly by placing an 8 lb. weight on the sylphon; this weight should just start the valve towards its seat and a 12 lb. weight should seat the valve. If the valves do not start closing correctly the valves should be checked to seethat they are not binding. Upon completion of assembly the carburetor should be water tested to see that there are no Ieaks from the inside of the carburetor. Plates should be assembled on the intake and engine attachment flanges, the automatic mixture control unit should be assembled and the fuel inlet plugged. By applying 3 to 5lbs. per square inch pressrure, through a connection in one of the plates and then by submerging the carburetor in a tank of water any leak may be found and repaired. Upon completion of all assembly and tests the carburetor should be completely safety wired before installing on an engine.

1325

E
olr,l (J

9 6

z 3

o
trJ r. lrJ

>o io

6 8 t z
\

6l

s
UJ J UJ trl

rer E 9r VtrL\
!)o

5"

z* O-r EO zn

6 t
o
l r j o-

\i:r'
i i f---'l

i i
i
l

@
lrJ

P $ s b 3
L o - T

ar
< trJ rJd J:)

l
l

850
l jr =
L

t-trJ -)

t l Tt---]
l

s
lrl J

j 3
?

o
<
U

F lrJ o tr 5 It Z
, t )
|!

u z

---- ---l-----1-- - --.


t
l J

lrJ lrJ

z z I
F

o
6 lrJ

s
J

U ; t r I
lrJ

LrJ

P O tz o u

o tr F. z o U
lrj (r

lrj G (l. -f-t6

tn o

lrJ

>J

s
o z

r i
l l l

i l
l

rrf

d. F a U

l i

t i r l

u0

G -) eu.
f F

x
J

i l-,' i

3
Ir
|!

) z

i l 1,,..1 i l t .i r!-,
i ' l l

z I
F

g o

u lrJ

I
LrJ

s
J

3@
F

o
t I F
/AU \7f,

hJ (, tr

fs
N N

^o zz

o dn
< v

t326

z o b o o (L

'9@
L

u
lrj J

Q
F IJ J

J UJ f

@
lrj

s
o I

,n o
lJ J

trJ F

L l!

z
e
L ro

@
lrJ

J UJ

l g
o
tl F
J

z z
I

F. f

u
IJ J

o
bo

o
L t!

e
I

F LrJ

o
I

) (,

z o (J
lrJ

tr
f, F X

F l (J UJ J

z t
lrl J

Ho
e

tr o o 9
F
lrJ J N N

o z

UJ I

F u ) o

= O o

u tn

r,t
- afl

t.

r_ < l^t I J U N (/)N


l! J

td

UJ lrJ J

o
I

oo z

t_
hJ J

o
F

9
L

o tr
J lrJ t!

u_

:)

t327

@
bJ J I q U)

x
I

bJ

(n o

6 Z t l O

@
lrJ

(u) 0-o

=E

o-

l
bJ I

o
U

o
z o
F UI

z o

u z

/^z
t

F O lrJ

@fE
:) o-

F Lrl J

o tr
=

lrJ

o J

Y)z

o u

tv)

bJ

IJ

o o
f TL
lrl

t >J

Ir

o
t (,

hD

u
lrJ

l
t

lrJ

l,.rj I O F LrJ J 1-

lrj

>{
lrJa

u
F lrJ I q

g)r
o z tr
l 0-

FF E I F

_[ (/))

:)

UJ E.

<uJ

8NO 62
(L f (L

I J

1329

P-t7CO4 P-53f9 - l/32- THICK OR P-14423 164"THrcl o R P - t 4 4 2 6 3/64"7i11C

aRACrMi EOSS.
G

Ftoot4(e-antI

P-60089 P-t02t!t P-60627 P-20rc!t

r sTExAssar lP-2t22C
P-2t220

l?-2t224

)r-r,rr"

(*aza+
P-203o4 "-z,a,e-{ lP-2or47 LFrgoso
P-2t2lO

I lP-2t22tl!"21222 e-?l229P- 672rP-t9020 P-|e035. * P-r3737

P-r373s\ \P-20165 \ r6590 to596 ?-r477 r5295 50731

P-ro248
* P-20157

Fteoz]g
Fr905il

* P-t2422

P-0600 'P-C581 P-20roo

P-20rc5 P-zt828 *

Freo52
Ft9055

F20306
F

P-201c5
P-

Ftoo89 P-7334 F-20167 a?-2t257 * ?-212t6 P-84eO


8508
P-I368O STRAINER

P- 20i'99 P.

---+-6550 P-ZO1O4
CAPBIPETO?.S PPIOP TO j'ENL

Ps3r9

Fig. 1318

1329

oR P-14425 L!4'TH|CK. oR P-t4426 3/64'TlilCK.

(P-20r48 o v E R s t z E)

-t7425 * P- 17423

P-20r05 P-201c6 6070 P-t7t55

sEcTroN-cc
P-t7115 P-20t27 P-rEO3l P-tc099 P-t06,:t2 P-t8020 P-tECz9 P-t9044 P-19045 P-t9054
It P-1O455 SECTION-EE

(P-600e5 ovERSTZE)

-2r4:10

F3779 P-10455 * ?-2290/ P-20364


SECTION-FF

MIXTURE @I{TROL A PRN/ER SHAFT ASSEM P.2O62

P-6863 F203oO F20301 P-20t32 P.20t5l

p-rsssr')
20roo r7r55 P-2r430

e-zoszt)

>P-2030*

2 THTCK oR-P-1526t-r/O4 THrcr oR- P-t52ta/64 TI{CX oR-P-l5AtiIt/rO TIICX oR- P-6006t - .oto'THtcK OR P- 60062:.O20-THlCl(

--__p_t45ol
SECTION-AA

P-3t99 P-6006 P- t3

crn3gl=to"
MOOELT{A.Y9C
ry:uq

Fig.1318

1330

l/3?' THICK. -P-5319 oR P-14425 l/64- THICK. oR P-t4426 3/04'THICK.

Et8Ct6 P-16019

P-1o236 P-t6014 .P-20579:.. .P-6721

ffi:::
"H-H SECTION

(e-azot, P U M PS T E M A S S E M B L Y lP-2t224P - ? t 2 2 0l P - 2 t 2 2 6 I P-?r225.


P-65CA -1=7P-19064

ffix

l"-2t223. \P-2t222
9008 P-t7604 20t67 P- eol65 P- 22rot

P-2
P.

P-2t42C

F P.

P-r6596 I P-2054F P-r.477 | e-aosea' F60023{ P-20582

,P-z2loslo-aosea
P-20577 F-21831 P-20583 ser xorr sre rcr: *s rcr:

P-6Ca7\ P-to23t.

:iec!-oN-.o-o"
K+J C P-203t9
PP-

zoze-) 20rto I
) re654 | 7t7o I 2o33t)

rerse I r6e60 jr-20182

E P-20391

PRIMEI VALVE

P-toz3t-F|ltolo -=-\-

P-t50t i( F 20t57 **t242


F

F-733t

P-6550 F6506 F20576 P-3779 P-r0908 P-600@


!&2a l0! $t lEARts ru crrsor.A I pL^cE or lrc$ mn ooccm ug rre Fo!!ffi ivt ^rD F.a *cocrr nrtriJt:rc ei Ftd 9m P-2o69 ?&rul FLIK Fm ioLlrd F-CO?St.l IHEIOEO lu$res p-w[ ssiEt iE[Ac3 m![ v{v: a |&il rurP I Pitrl ilct P-!7?9 FDg GlgxEt ! [u6. !Lv!, nrEi cEGt ww.Fs[ D otfct
II Uil 13 dEED lOY 3butD ALSO m Ol*[O. AL ilB LIS':D IOVE EICEPI reM3 lUSHreS

mtr

Fis. 1319

1330

,ffi::::::'ilb:Hi:,?a-

P-603t2 F20r65

20rec
70

7r 5 5
. P_3420

"o-D" sEcTloN orze-)


prEo I

sEcTroN-c-c'

ruac I

te6o )P-2O|C2 )654 'r7o |

PRIMER AND IDLE CUT OFF P-zzl0l vALvE ASSEMELY

I
-

"-r'..0{IX?l
Ft60

P-377e 1430 P-203C4 F60834 F20t70

P-22t35 F 21900

I lo35u

P-22ilr\ P-2r88r \ \

,itto2l,

-.oro' THtcK.
oR oR oR oR oR
wix drR|E uiT! udto IL*AG Oil' 3IZ:4 EEIE & *l oo tot sEgtal N(,sA OI OEN ttE

P-606?-O20'THICK. ESECI - t/3tTHt,K. FfszCt t/64' I;ltcrt. Frsar2 3/64-THtcx. F-t52t3 t/tt' THtct(.
$ns

P-OO3 3/a-ra

lUSXrNO WHrcX hA3 @?3rE ttsFlaD3.

P-zraoa !u$rs ltsrca aag t/ra-! @t5tot lHtw!.


sEtrAL NUU*I P-aoraa &$rE 9$Aar nrcN US NAg

CARzuRETOR
MODEL \r. NA-YgG
*{t: ru! t

u U-ans ox qd. wrn -nrt ruv*c rctrt


YSN a555rrra spEcrat mtF ErF t0 Ex-t32t-E_

Nlg ^s 9za3 t I dvi r^s ^xD aErE Er | .or sEr[ 6 lvArr^BLt stra ftrEr tocao- lror wrrct caBtcrd
| I oNa $rral x|JEr d g*

uiEld

rt tsslraa

wx

iis.1319

0[8I

'tt.{

9USnOurS xroNSt

'SdU@ UlY.'3'Y

(o3u-z) 90zl ?gttz-d 60toza (3drd-9/t)gogat


(8r-9f/6) Llrtz-d
,291?lZ-d*

961f9-d Oz'rA)

V?s/E)

zztzta* t9roz ! Jr

( oura I rseoz-d I rse6r-d 'd1 0969r-d


9t9t-d

99261
-d ? -d -d

o9roz-d f6t roz?

6r9-d

a
-d rd

069Zt-d 69e9-d etel-d (3d ld 90s9-d |e-Otrn 66{'Z-d (619rr-d 3sn'r'v) relo9-d 9629r-d Vr-

E"ZZZ-{ 3Sn'JV)

'F

1999-d o1|l.1

u3Ntvutsostrz
t89OZ-d l9lzrd LLgo,Z-d

@z-"n ggtoz-d
\--^-=--6ZZtZ:d

lesoz-a) 'z99oz? )ezoogr fesoz-dI uara')


tggoz-d, 9699lid

{ g
t

96991-d..:-.2 o3U- (OZ-Zlt) gO|eZrd-

9go6r-d d

oz- r/l) 99toz


vz-e/d 1groz-d
togl'|-d 9006

i8l.so?-d '96902-d ,, tztg'd/ '61902-d

\ /

ozztz'd Arn3ssv n3ls dnnd 'o3u-e


tto9r-d v3rHl ..t92 gzttl-d uo D3U-E 9ezor? 'v)tHL ..rg/t gettl-d uo 'y)tHL o 3 U - e 6rogr-d -ze/l 6re9-d 'o38-e 9t99r-d

I88I

0z8r'Eu
'w suao x3{i tltsaqJr unn -fv?f xrris fD trini
fzrl mr:ttr
i lU ittw

106A-Vtl'I3OOn

totttcD dY ilr{t

t)lrr@ !a9 iln

-cD

ol tlg araB FS3ZEdVg&lrff ltil, rcltB !D

f,tvrlv U wit

uot3unguv)

!!oo io lhx toN @ sru lJl2r3

ola6

s1!wruruw

'Y?lHl ..91ll egzglrd U O 'y?tHL-?g/e 'yttHI..t9./t zezst-d U O f9zgtt U O 'yftHl'zelt - t999t uo xzrHL_ozo-29000{ uo 'v?tHl..oo'-

oetl

..9--..Norr)3s
6Zt9 vertz -d -lztog LLttz'd 99111

v:ffilrTis

---

3-3..NOrrt3S

egoz-a/

(82-rlr)99rZr.d (ze-or) 99821


el9l

9906t -d

..J-J-NOl.
6t"o9-d

(ze-or) 66soz-d 9ZrU-A)k ez'lt-d 90tzz-e

10z6ti(

tnzz-d t o 1 9d Irotg -d gtot9 d ltol9-d

4totg-d

A.ln3ssv3A'lvA

oNv u3nlud Jro rn? 3101

EfiI?:E-i
..5:ffiiEis
99OZ-d

..o-o..Notr?3s

e9t09-d
(9f-9f/6) LLtlz-+-

azt9-d ugrlz @z-r/t) c 9 t t r - d (ze-ol,f) bz'evg) 9 9 r O Z - d l9z'r/l) 99toe-d'o3u-91 o9l09-d '03u-91 9Seoe-d 'o3u-9r gttLt-a zreog-d ls909-d
gz"t?-d -,-_,otoz'a' 99rOe-d

Qz-e/e) stzot-d

- le06l-dx ,.-' gezg'a/ --gveoz-a/,--

,T:::@

-T:n:re-rrc3s

'l'lgn3ssv Aooa 3"lLrouHr

:f::--:=@
I88I

i@!

- ""'"F
. "'. iltUtIlgt^S

}.{rcIruDure

-I*ffo?fr,5$1'oJl*

1l$ti3HrTf"i$E.iriii*#
NOTE:-

I)IMENSII'NS THC ON ?}IIS gRA\,VINC INstTALtATrOt.. FU ^tg_ftrr OIILY. REEEET TO C)CTAIL DF'AWINGS FG)EI'VIANUFAC,TURINq TC,LCRANCES.

ALLOI./.OIa A,rAFIC,C
N I N

Ool

atr{
SETWC txDll tN.

-P- 2ol3l -r -P- 2t49. f-P-21e50 --P-2|e+a(3)J

r- --t
I

[*

rlt---------- rif

*t7--

e-rosE+-1 ?gJbl I I P-cOOZ'tl ...:,_.--'

e+zzzse @@f

5/3eorA. X 9o';'srNK

?-:_P-LA!:E5

s6a-cloa.o "o"tttOn

oPEN POSITION

i6
A

rif--#-3

a#
'REAM FoR .#oooo TAPER PIN P.6ooZZ@ RIVET PIN FLUSH AFTER AssEMBLY.
?.- PLACES. #9 (.t96) DR\LL ANp y.+-Z.O NC-3 TAP,

t,/32x 45o cstNK.

--J_--y !6bRS lEYllC F :fO O-G?AIL!

!I _tWA5_P.?D3( I iPl!,rvrAr Fllzl


H iFr6ooeTADEa

Fig. 1321

1e-zzzez
- OOT ALL AIIOUNO C;LEAFIANCE \^,HEr{ rN cLogE() Po6rTl9N. vALvEs gETWCEN yALVeS TNNER Hqc .Oro-.o26 IIg i

cLosEo

PosrTtoN.

-e3
P-20l3l -

'E-

;-izE
P-Zt2+a(3)l

F.3g,!.

_T
I -st
N

J4zGoea)oeruu
) SCEAM FOT,

Ptrr| p-aooc,z,. 4PLACES A3 sHowN,

I ia .---_--

r !:!," '..

r -1f,

SecrroN A-A

at-3O_N99_rnp=

9/32 DRILL,14-HOLEs

fiF ==-l-

e-zoro,o

a -.J---y lEYt3EO !6&E3 ^ ;fO OGTAILS

:Muav'E

tl\)l

wAs
C iw*rttryc-

F-zte,94

x Ie,-coozzA6xo ---- a't/4<;x lZg IFJ,l"i",-,*. Fig. 1321

B I ihn r{Ar F?lzB4g|&35lXJR,ra A

NOTE ADDEO NoTE REVlsr,p

XOtBr t-!9!9E m SH[? OOTNEB 7O flE ilTffi A!& ltru w!r. ioT ?Evm H]\lqruNG! lsEruY, llllill !!rc otuTtotcruI|$EAre [mte

THAT rrorE

TmNoTsruDUWG ON FMCTTONI DrNroNs baOlffCB DEm DffircNs +- ot - .@ un$

ArE + OR - .oro, ON oTHuwEE SPErts.

P-60045

P- 60034 P- 60047

P-60038

P-?O355.-

P-qoo_g_ P-2o354\

AIR THERMO.

T}'IIS END MUST BE FLUSH

RIVET PIN FLUSH AFTER

ASSE,MBLY.

5/32 DIA.X90 & RIVET OVEF

SECTION

'A-A"

eel
;-7 FReOOgE
10

P-ZOl8a 4-REQ. P. G6G6 P-60042. A<-r

P-2O1304-REQ. P-ZOI90 2-REQ.

?-?o355-

P-qeea_s
P-20354

P-16599
P-ZZZAE^

P - e o| 3 4 Pjl6597 P-20135 4-REQ...

P- 20135- l |:f ovERs\zE


*oooo TAPeR P\N P-6002,2 --..5/32 DtA.x900 cslNK, & RIVET OVER. .PLACE,S.

P-ZOr35-2 zNeOVERStZE
b Aa\lFA r-4 \.,ro"-l

I F -zOl59 | :-=:-

P-zot 5g-

NOTE:-

---p-20r3f_l .-'...--p-zr z+g i-p-eoogz


\..---P-2,12,48 |

POsrrroN. C

vtEw "B-8"

BET

\-E BES,_J

BENDIX STAOilIENGCAlBlnETORCO. SOUTH IEIID, IIIDIAIIA Us.A.

Fig. 1322

1335

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STROMBERG NA.YgE CARBURETORS


OVEREAUL
Disassembly-The carburetor should be disassembled for cleaning and inspection each time the engine is given an overhaul. After the carburetor has been removed from the engine and the hot spot and air intake or heater taken off, the halves gfthe carburetor may be separated by the removal of the fillister head screws at the parting surface. The economizer needle, pump Sleeveand venturii are held in the tbrottie-body as the bodies are separated. The pump sleev-e should be removed from the operating stem immediately so there will be no-dangei of its dropping and-becoming bent. Rubbei packing is used around the venturii so that if it is founil necessary to remove them, they will have to be driven out by using a wooden plug as shown in Before removing the throttle Fig. 1323-4. valves, mark them so they may be returned to the barrels from which they were removed. and Cleanlng-The Inspectlon bodies and all parts should be thoroughly cleaned in gasoline and aII passagesblown out with compressed air. Parts which should be inspected for wear are the float assembly, float needle and seat, throttle shaft and bushings, economizer needle, seat and operating mechanisms and the pump stem. All variable parts should be checked to see that their sizes are in accordance with the carburetor specification desired. To disassemble the compound pump unit, it should be removed from the operating stem and the four small hexagon head screws which hold the stem clip in place should be removed. The connecting rod between the upper and lower piston is milled flat above the cross hole, so it can be held with a wrench when removing the center screws. Considerable force will be required to Ioosen the center screw as it has been staked in place as a precaution against its coming loose in service. When the center screw has been removed, the upper piston may be lifted out of the sleeve and the connecting rod and lower piston can be removed through the bottom of the sleeve. Care should be taken that none of the parts are damaged during disassembly or assembl! as they are made to fit with verv close tolerances and a small nick or dent might iause a binding action. Replacements-When ordering replacement parts, it is necessary to give complete information concerning the parts desired to avoid delay in shipment or the receipt of wrong parts. Wherever possible, the serial number of the carburetor should be given. A careful reference to the assembly drawing (Fig. 132a) to determine the correct part number and name and, if marked with an asterisk (*), the size as stamped on the piece will greatly facilitate service. A specification sheet giving the sizes of jets, fuel level, economizer setting, etc., will be furnished (no charge) if you will write to the Bendix Products Division, Stromberg Carburetor Division, South Bend, Indiana, advising the model of your engine. Parts price lists will also be furnished on request. P-60701 covers a complete set of gaskets for the carburetor. Reaseembly-All headless screw plugs beIow the fuel level should be assembled with shelIac, being careful not to get it on the end of the plug where it will come off and be carried by the fuel into one of the metering orifices. Headless screw plugs above the fuel level and all other threaded parts screwed into the bodies should have a compound of graphite and caster oil put on the threads. When it is necessary to replace the throttle shaft, the lever which operates the economizer should be assembled in accordance with Fig. 1323-8. The throttle valves. when in the closed 'When position, should fit tightly. the throttle valves have been fitted, center them in the wide open position. If the economizer operating lever has been assembled at the correct angle, the tbrottle valves should be centered. However. when this work is done in the field. it may be necessary to file the stop at A, Fig. 1323-8, or bend it toward the screwed-in stop. If it is thought necessary to replace a float needle or needle seat it is recommended that both be replaced at the same time as it is very difficult to fit a new needle to an old seat or a new seat to an old needle. In ordering these parts, be sure to give the size of the by-pass hole in the float needle seat. This by-pass hole meters the fuel during inverted flight and its size has been determined to meet the requirement of that particular engine and it is, therefore, important that a seat having the proper size by-pass hole be used for replacement purposes. The float level should be r7(', phts 3/a" and, minus Y6a"below the parting surface, when using fuel of .710 specific gxavity, and is dependent upon the thickness of the gasket under the float needle seat. The level should be checked under the conditions encountered in service as regards the fuel used and the fuel pressure or head at the carburetor. If a fuel pump is used, a pressure at the carburetor of 3 lbs. per square inch (117" gasoline at .710 specific gravity) should be used in checking the fuel level. A gasket Ye" thick should be used first and if the level is not cortect, thicker gaskets should be used to lower

1336

CARBURETORS
valve) to this figure, the angle which the throttle valve makes with the horizontal surface of the carburetor is obtained. Several economizer settings are in use and the proper one should be determined from the carburetor specification sheet. The first adjustment is made by screwing the needle in or out of the holder so that when placed in the main body, the distance from the top of the slot to the parting surface will be in accorda4ce with the dimensions as shown in Fig. 1323-Clfor the economizer setting desired. When this has been done tighten the nut and pin the needle as per the instructions given in Fig. 1323-C. The two halves should then be assembledand final adjustrnent made by meansrof the eccentric on the economizer lever. Check the angle between the throttle and the horizontal surface of the carburetor flange when the needle starts to leave the seat. A simple apparatus to check when this movement starts is shown in Fig. 1323-8. It is made by drilling a hole through the center of a Yt6"-L8 plug, large enough to allow the free movement of a piece of tubing about 4" long. Then by taking out the economizermetering jet plug and jet, it is possible to screw in the other plug and push the tubing up so that it rests on the point of the needle. If a slight pressure is put on the tube with the fingers while the throttle is moved, the unseating of the needle will be easily detected. Adjust the eccentric until the correct angle is obtained. When the adjustment has been made, tighten the nuts, being careful not to move the eccentric, and assemblethe cotter pins. When reassembling the compound pump unit, considerable care should be taken so that the parts wiII be concentric to each other and then checked in the body to see that it works freely before restaking the center screw which holds the piston in place. The small hexagon screws should be safety wired after tightening. When assembling the upper sleeve and piston into the sleeve fastened in the body, considerable care should be taken so the leather will not be curled up around the piston. The leather should be wet with gasoline and one side assembled in the sleeve,then as the piston is forced into the sleeve, it should be rotated so the Ieather will go into the sleeve evenly. With the throttle valve open, the operating stem may then be hooked in place on the pump unit and the two halves of the carburetor assembled together in the usual manner.

the level and thinner gaskets to raise it. A change of |(t" gasket thickness will change the Ievel approximately Y64". The float needle should have at least 9(a" travel. If it becomes necessaryto replace the mixture control shaft or stop, it is important that the stop be located in the correct angular position on the shaft. In order to do this, place a small piece of wood in the slot of the outer valve plate in such a way that it extends through and will fit in the slot of the inner plate. Place the outer valve plate in the carburetor in the open position and the wood key will keep it from turning. Place the shaft and bushing assembly in the carburetor, adjusting the shaft so the screw driver ends fit into the valve, and put in the screws to hold the bushings in place. Slip the washer and stop on the shaft and turn until the full rich stop is against the large head screw. Assemble lever, indicator plate and nut on the shaft. Draw nut up until washer strikes shoulder on shaft; drill and fit pin through stop and shaft. (See assembly drawing (Fig. L324), for section and end view of shaft assembly.) The economizer needle is operated by an eccentric pin which is part of the economizer lever stem. This stem is operated by the throttle through two levers and a connecting link. It is important that the economizer lever be located at the proper angle with the eccentric pin on the economizer lever stem. When replacing the economizer lever stem, use a new economizer lever also. The lever should be assembledso that its center line forms a 90 degree angle with the center line of the eccentricpin as shown in Fig. 1323-D. When the lever has'been properly se*t, tighten the clamp screw and drill stem and one side of lever for the Iocating pin. Screw pin into place. The adjustment of the economizer needle valve in the holder and the eccentric pin on the lever determine the position of the lever when the needle is on the seat and, therefore, the throttle opening at which the lever lifts off the seat. This throttle opening is one of the items of the variable specifications or setting in the carburetor and is given on the specification sheet, being referred to as "economizer setting," the figure given being the throttle opening in degrees. By adding L8 or 20 (the angle of the throttle

1337

F
J

o
o

brg

l" 4

VENTURI REMOVAL

.-3o FoR lEo vALVEs L-5"FoR ao"vALVEs


P-2OI3E FOR I8O VALVES P-I60I7 FOR 20.VALVES

A
S P L I T P I N A S SHOWN D R I L L & R E A MF O R P - I 9 O 8 6P I N W H E N LEVER IS IN P O S I T I O NA S S H O W N

WITHP-17684 SETTING LINK | - ltl32"CENTERS r'j t60-t8" P-16004 t- t5/32" r9-2P t" 27-2? t-t/64' 26.-3lo
, T 5 2 D R ] L L F O RP - 6 5 6 7 P I N AFTER ADJUSTING. RIVETENDSOF P I N AND FILE FLUSH. PRELIMINARA YDJUSTMENT NEEDLEVALVE OF ECONOMIZER AND HOLDER.

c
#2.9DRILL

LEVER AND STEM. FITTIT.IG ECONOMIZER

Fig. 1323

1339

P-fo24a F/A-zel
P- t7604 P- 53p t/32 P- | 446-t/64rHtcK F- ta42-il/34TH|CK P- t6 59a

Fr7423 P-2r453
P-20t4A -tP-2t423

P -6 0 3 1 2- *60a57-

._

p-t7tss lw-zd

P- rc5e6 eo|l
P- t5702 P-l

P-17t35 l/4P- t60D P- laOlzl

Ft5762

*P-t76t3- c Fr679O-

P-r00t6--=*\
P- t3677P- 0660 coTTER P- t025 P- ilG 40 P- 13379 P- t337E
P-

JJJ'*zllsa-P-r450r Q/2 -20)


--.-P||.1

'

A.C.USE P- r75r9
P-6O4AE THROTTLE BODY ASSEMBL

r-

P-f 7155 lt/4-261

-----\\ r-rt6r -- ---\ P-6666 P-to23a --P-t8OO4-

,-.;'-]\

P-r2403\ p-reror-----*arasr ------------: --P-tooD ---------\\ P-ro23B

\ -\

e- sorr ---.-\

P-t2t67P_ 2e21 P- 6576

E
P-t7t4g

-\p_eceal a6.ggge-rrgan['--------.-'-----------'...P- 15074 STRAINER ASSMBLY, P- 8556 GASKET P-'0497 MAIN BODY GASKET.---.------_

E
-P-848O lYt6-24) ?-REA. f-2t2o8 -P-900a 2-REQ
R607000- 3 P-t4325

P_6300 P-t4SOt \t/2-2q 2l P-00312 P- 60499 MAIN BODV ASSEMBLY


F-OO64A ^ ^{s,c - z. u, t,w rxrros scr mrc I

"8 sEcTroN

-t5224 (to-24J
6 . . . rr-t'ItrE d-rf t'f'. *J rrn . . r-tta!. Lm. is.. Fr6{. Lm . srx . . ' r-vr" caxratr t-tvv' rtartt r-ri/s

A.C.=AIR CORPS

BENDIX STROMBER6 CAFzuRETOR

COI

Fig.1324

1339

sEcTtoN

"H_H"-P-2o57e
r P_2O595 P-2057A

2t226 2t225 23
Fl76l4 FLOAT ASSEMBLY-

.---"-21?29 rP-6121

FUL LEVEL

s
SECTION 'A.A'

oR Fr3z8t-Lt4TH|CX OR P{eoz-3rt4Txlcx oi F{3aat{reTH|CX oR F{OOO|-OO THtcK


OR F8OOOAO2OTHrcX P-A505

\'\-P-2os63 \-l-2os77 .P-2t a3l

sEcTtoN-o-o' p-rz?3-l
P-20t21 P - r 86 3| P-16 699 P -r 4 6 3 2 P-16626 P-r86 29 F-60493 T- P - 6 O 4 s 2
P-60541 P-60494 P-r9054 P- 60405 P- 60 462

P-60500

A.C. USE P-0il62 |

p-rsoa3 l

r-- -+F9187

-*Ft45l3 F6563/
P- 6 587

---

P-r6005 PJa?22 P-4643-*R.O3 *P-O455-

!\-"--orJ -P-12a65
,.,4 P-6O419 P'OO4?O /.P.60376 zl.,.P-Att59 / / .P-6644) /.,/ /.P-6O342 /-1',-z*6_06?a P -60381 = :'"':-p-60474 60379

P- 21646 P-560 P-19055 P-r904? P- et8S4 P-604tA

Fr5503-"B-8,

SECTION

roti wu otoarc cArioi( sr! d srat! ftrca xrtt crva

@rtYf

rat

sia?a

ad

c^r@idd

p-ao?ol

9ll

^D tRur tattg str-ta mi! f rc catalttM

Etr6

CAFzuRETOR

COMPANY

Fig. 1324

1341

TNSTRUCTIONS FOR BENDIX.STROMBERG


OVERIIAUL carburetor should be disI)lsassembly-The assembled for cleaning and inspection at each engine overhaul and any part worn beyond serviceable use should be replaced. All work should be performed on a clean bench and care should be taken to dispose of all lockwires removed during disassembly to insure against any of the small pieces becoming lodged in the carburetor at reassembly. The entire Pressure Operated Economizer and Valve Body should be fiftt removed from the rear face of the carburetor, by removal of the six Elastic Stop Nuts, and carefully set aside. This unit will be treated in detail in later paragraphs. The Link Bolts should now be removed from the Pump Stem and from the upper end of the Link bet',rr,.en Mixture Control and the Cruise Valve. Unscrew and remove the two Bolts which are in the Air Horn and accessible from the bottom and all Elastic Stop Nuts around the flange which hold the Throttle Body and Main Body together. The Throttle Body can now be lifted off but care must be taken to immediately remove the Pump P_iston and Sleeve Assembly from the Pump Stem to prevent it dropping off and being damThe Automatic Mixture Control Unit asd. sf,outd be removed by the use of special Spanner Wrench, T-24977, and carefully set away. CAUTION: THIS UNIT MUST NOT COME IN CONTACT WITH MERCURY AS THIS and service of this unit will be treated in separate instruction sheets.

NA.YgJ CARBURETORS

Before removing the throttle valves, they should be marked to insure their return to the barrel from which they were taken. Care should be taken not to nick the edges of the valves. The Main Metering Jets are accessible frorn the bottom of the carburetor and the Economizer Metering Jet from the right side. After removal of the Hex Head Jet Plugs the jets can be disassembled by the use of Metering Jet Screwdriver T-24923. The Cruise Valve Metering Jet is accessible from the bottom of the carburetor, under the rear float chamber, by the removal of its Hex Head PIug and the use of the same screwdriver used on the other jets. In order to remove the Float Needle Seat, the small Iock clip must be disassembledand special socket screwdriver, T -L9276,must be employed. Removal of the Diaphragm Pump Check Valve is accomplished by the use of Special Socket T-25075. All other main body parts and plugs may be removed. bodies and all Inspeotlon and Cleanlng-The parts should be. thoroughly rinsed in gasoline and all passages blown out with compressed air. Following parts should be inspected for wear: Float assembly, float needle and seat, throttle shaft and bushings, mixture control and cruise valve stems, and the pump stem and leather. Check all variable parts (jets, bleeds, etc.) to see that their sizes are in accordance with the proper carburetor specification. ordering replacement Replacernents-When parts it is necessaryto give complete information concerning the parts desired to avoid delay in shipment or the receipt of wrong parts. Whereever possible the serial number of the carburetor should be given. A careful reference to the specification sheet and the assembly drawing (Fig. 1330) to determine the correct part number and narne. and if marked with an asterisk (*) the size as stamped on the piece and listeil on the specification sheet, will greatly facilitate service. A specification sheet giving the sizesof jets, fuel level, economizer setting, etc., will be furnished (no charge) if you will write to the Bendix Products Division, Stromberg Carburetor Division, South Bend, Indiana, advising the model of your engine. Parts price lists will also be furnished on request. P-61163 covers a complete set of gaskets for the NA-Y9J. Reassernbly-All headless screw plugs below the fuel level should be assembled with shellac, being careful not to get it on the end of the plug

ELEMENT HAS A VERY DESTRUCTIVE EFFECT ON THE BELLOWS. Disassemblv


To disassemblethe compound pump unit the four small hexagon head screws which hold the stem clip in place should be removed. The connecting rod between the upper and lower piston is milled flat above the cross hole so it can be held with a wrench when removing the center screw. Considerable force will be required to loosen the center screw as it has been staked in place as a precaution against its coming Ioose in service. When the center scr:w has been removed the upper piston may be lifted out of the sleeve and the connecting rod and lower piston can be removed through the bottom of the sleeve. Care should be taken that none of the parts are damaged during disassembly or assembly as they are made to fit with very close tolerances and a small nick or dent might cause a binding action. The rubber packing rings around the venturii swell, making it necessary to remove the venturii by driving with a plug similar to that shown in Figure L327-A. This packing should be replaced before reassembly.

1342

CARBIIRETORS
where it may come off and be carried by the fuel into one of the metering orifices. Headless screw plugs above the fuel level and aII other threaded parts screwed into the bodies should have a compound of graphite and castor oil put on the threads. When it is necessary to replace the throttle shaft the new style shaft, bearing the same part number but having a larger diameter (%2't instead of rYn") at the point where the throttle stops are assembled, is used. It will also be necessary to use a new throttle stop P-