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CABIN CREW MANUAL GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

0. GENERAL
0.1. 0.2. 0.3. 0.4. 0.5. RECORD OF REVISIONS ...............................................................................2 DISTRIBUTION LIST.....................................................................................4 EFFECTIVE PAGES .......................................................................................5 ABBREVIATIONS .........................................................................................6 TERMS AND DEFINITIONS .......................................................................... 10

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0.1. RECORD OF REVISIONS
Each and every revision has to be completed by a competent person at the date of issue, showing the date of revision and signature. Rev. No. Effective Date Date Inserted Inserted By Name Signature

RETAIN THIS SHEET UNTIL REPLACED WITH NEW ISSUE 77, Nicolae Caranfil St, Bucharest office@medallionair.ro 0212321102

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0.2. DISTRIBUTION LIST
DOC NO.
Org 1 Org 2 Copy 1 Copy 2 Copy 3 Copy 4 Copy 5 Copy 6 Copy 7-40 Copy 41 Copy 42

LOCATION OF DISTRIBUTION RCAA Accountable Manager Quality Assurance Manager Flight Safety Officer Flight Operations Director Training Manager Chief Pilot (MD 80) Cabin Crew Manager Cabin Crew YR-HBB YR-HBE

DATE

REMARK

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0.3. EFFECTIVE PAGES
Chapter 0 All Pages (16) Edition 2 Chapter 1 All Pages (44) Edition 2 Chapter 2 All Pages (76) Edition 2 Chapter 3 All Pages (14) Edition 2 Chapter 4 All Pages (100) Edition 2 Chapter 5 All Pages (72) Edition 2 Chapter 6 All Pages (46) Edition 2 Chapter 7 All Pages (32) Edition 2 General May 2010 Operator Regulations May 2010 Standard Operating Procedures May 2010 Emergency Procedures May 2010 First Aid May 2010 Aircraft Type MD 83 May 2010 Medical May 2010 Check Lists May 2010

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0.4. ABBREVIATIONS
A/C AC ACAS ADREP ABP AEA AFM AFS AFT AGM AIRS AIS ALT AMC AMM ANAD AOC AOG AOM AOT A/P APP APA APO APS APQ APU ARN ARPT ASAP ASR ASU ATA ATA ATC ATD ATHR ATIS ATM ATPL ATS ATSU ATT AVIH AWO AWY AXE Aircraft Alternating Current Airborne Collision Avoidance System Accident/Incident Reporting System Able Body Person Association of European Airlines Airplane Flight Manual Automatic Flight System Rear of aircraft, rear side Administrate and Guidance Material Aircrew Incident reporting System Aeronautical Information System Altitude Acceptable Means of Compliance Airplane Maintenance Manual Accompanied Inadmissible Passenger Air Operator Certificate Aircraft On Ground Airplane Operations Manual All Operators Telex Auto-Pilot Approximately Accident Prevention Adviser Accident Prevention Officer Accident Prevention Specialist Airline Pre-qualification Auxiliary Power Unit Aircraft Registration Number Airport As Soon As Possible Air Safety Report Air Starter Unit Actual Time of Arrival Aeronautical Transport Association Air Traffic Control Actual Time of Departure Auto thrust
Automatic Terminal Information Service

BARO BAT B/C BFE BITE BLND BRG BRT BRK BRNAV C CAA CAPT CAT CAT II CAT III CB C/B C/C CCOM CCQ CCM CDL CIDS CEET CEM C/L CM CM/CAM CM 1/2 CMD CML C02 COM CP CPL CRM CRS CSS CTA CTR CVR

Barometric Battery Business Class Buyer Furnished Equipment Built In Test Equipment Blind Passenger Bearing Bright Brake Basic Area Navigation Celsius, Centigrade Civil Aviation Authority Captain Clear Air Turbulence Category II All weather operation Category III All weather operation Cumulonimbus Circuit Breaker Cabin Crew Cabin Crew Operating Manual Cross Crew Qualification Cabin Crew Member Cabin Discrepancy Log Cabin Intercom Data System Cabin Emergency Evacuation Manual Company Emergency Manual Check List Crew Member Cabin Crew Manual/Cabin Att. Manual Crew Member 1 (LH)/2 (RH) Command Cabin Maintenance Log Carbon Dioxide Communications/Equipment Critical Point (ETOPS) Commercial Pilot License Crew Resource Management Course Cockpit System Simulator Control Area Centre Cockpit Voice Recorder

Air Traffic Management Airline Transport Pilot License Air Traffic Services Air Traffic Services Unit Attitude Animals in Hold All Weather Operations Airway Crash Axe

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DC DCDU DDG DDRMI DEG DEMO DEPT DEPU DEST DFO DGR DHC DIM DOC DOX EASA ECAC ECON EFOB ELEC ELEV ELT ELT EMER ENG ENGG EO EST ETA ETD ETOPS EU OPS EXP EXT EVAC F F/A FAK FAA FAR F/C FCL FCOM FCTM FCU FD FDP FDR FL FLA FLT FM FMS Direct Current Data Communication Display Unit Dispatch Deviation Guide
Digital Distance&Radio Magnetic Indicator

Degree Demonstration Department Deportee Unaccompanied Destination Director Flight Operations Dangerous Goods Regulations Dead Heading Crew Dimming Document Cargo Documents European Aviation Safety Agency European Civil Aviation Conference Economic Estimated Fuel On Board Electrical Elevator, Elevation Entry Level Training Emergency Locator Transmitter Emergency Engine Engineering Engine Out Estimated Estimated Time of Arrival Estimated Time of Departure Extended Twin Engine Operations European Union Operations Exit Point (ETOPS) External Evacuation Fahrenheit First Aid Firs Aid kit Federal Aviation Administration Federal Aviation Regulations Flight Crew Flight Crew Licensing Flight Crew Operating Manual Flight Crew Training Manual Flight Control Unit Flight Director Flight Duty Period Flight Duty Regulations Flight Level Flash Light Flight Flight Manual Flight Management System

F/O FOB FOM FOQA FOX F-PLN FSM ft, FT FTL FU FWD g,G GA GEN GENDEC GMT GND GRN GPU GS GW H HDG HF Hg HP HYD Hz IAS IATA ICAO ID IDENT IEM in, IN INAD INFO INOP INT IOE ISA ISO JAR kg, KG kHz km, KM

First Officer Fuel On Board Flight Operations Manual Flight Operations Quality Assurance First Aid Oxygen Bottle Flight Plan Flight Safety Manual Foot (Feet) Flight Time Limitation Fuel Used Forward Gram Go Around Generator General Declaration Greenwich Mean Time Ground Ground Ground Power Unit Ground Speed Gross Weight Hour Heading Human Factors Mercury High Pressure Hydraulic Hertz (cycles per second) Indicated Air Speed International Air Transport Association
International Civil Aviation Organization

Identity (Number) Identification


Interpretation/Explanation Material (JAR)

Inch(es) Inadmissible Information Inoperative Interphone Initial Operating Experience International Standard Atmosphere International Standard Organization Joint Aviation Regulations kilogram kilohertz kilometer

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l/L lb LDG L/G LH LMC LO LOC LOFT LP LRNS LROPS LRSP LSU L/V LVL LVTO m, M MAG MAINT MAN MAX mb, MB MCC MCC MEDA MEG MEL MET MHz MIN mm, MM MK MME MMEL MRT MSA MSG NM NORM NOPAC NOTOC OAT OBRM OCC OFP OM ONC OPS OPT OXY Liter pound (weight) Landing Landing Gear Left Hand Last Minute Changes Low Localizer Line Oriented Flight Training Low Pressure Long Range Navigation System Long Range Operations Least Risk Position Lavatory Service Unit Life Vest Level Low Visibility Take-Off meter Magnetic Maintenance Manual Maximum Millibar Multiple Crew Co-operation Maintenance Control Centre Medical Case Megaphone Minimum Equipment List Meteorological Megahertz Minimum, Minute Millimeter Medical Kit Maintenance Management Exposition Master Minimum Equipment List Manual release tool Minimum Safe (or Sector) Altitude Message Nautical Miles Normal North Pacific Notice To Crew Outside Air Temperature On Board Replaceable Module Operational Control Centre Operational Flight Plan Operations Manual Operational Navigation Chart Operations Optimum Oxygen PA PAC PAX PB PBE PBE PET PF PFC PIREP PIC PIL P/N PNF PR PROB POS PRM PROC PROF PSI PSP PSU PT PWR QA QRH RA RCAA REG REP REV RFG RFL RFS RH RPG RPL RQRD RSV RTA RVR RWY SAT SAR SB SCCM SLV SOP SOPAC SPD Passenger Address Pacific Passenger Push Button Portable Breathing Equipment Protective Breathing Equipment Animal in Cabin Pilot Flying Pre-Flight Check Pilot Report Pilot In Command Passenger Information List Part Number Pilot Not Flying Pressure Probably Position Person with reduced mobility Procedure Profile Power per Square Inch Pre-selected Passenger Passenger Service Unit Point Power Quality Assurance Quick Reference Handbook Radio Altitude/Radio Altimeter Romanian Civil Aeronautical Authority Registration Reported Reverse Flammable Gas Flammable Liquids Flammable Solids Right Hand Toxic Gas Repetitive flight plan Required Reserves Required Time of Arrival Runway Visual Range Runway Static Air Temperature Search and Rescue Stand-By Senior Cabin Crew Member Spare Live Vest Standard Operating Procedures South Pacific Speed

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STBY STD STCR STS SYS Sw t,T TBC TDZ TLM TEMP TEMPO T/O TOC TOD TOW TRE TRI TWR TWY UM US U/S UTC Stand-by Standard Time of Departure Stretcher passenger Status System Switch Ton, Tone, Temperature To Be Confirmed Touch Down Zone Technical Log Book Temperature Temporary Take-Off Top Of Climb Top Of Descent Take-Off Weight Type Rating Examiner Type Rating Instructor Tower Taxiway Unaccompanied Minor United States Unserviceable Universal Time Coordinated V V1 V2 VENT VHF VMCA VMCG VMIN VMO VR VREF VS V/S WAI WCBD WCWD WCHC WCHR WCHS WHO WT WX WXR XBAG XFR XMTR Y/C Z ZFCG ZFW Volt Critical engine failure speed T/ 0 safety speed Ventilation Very High Frequency Minimum Control Speed in the Air Minimum Control Speed on Ground Minimum operating speed Maximum operating speed Rotation speed Landing reference speed Stall speed Vertical Speed Wing Anti Ice Dry Battery Wheelchair Wet Battery Wheelchair Wheelchair Cabin Wheelchair Ramp Wheelchair Steps World Health Organization Weight Weather Weather Radar Excess Baggage Transfer Transmitter Economy Class Zulu time (UTC) Zero Fuel Centre of Gravity Zero Fuel Weight

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0.5. TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
Able Bodied Passenger Accident Passengers selected by the crew members to assist in managing emergency situations if and as required. An occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight until such time as all persons have disembarked, in which: a person is fatally or seriously injured as a result of being in the aircraft, or direct contact with any part of the aircraft, except when the injuries are from natural causes, self-inflicted or inflicted by other persons, or when injuries are to stowaways hiding outside the areas normally available to passengers and crew. Violence against a person on board an aircraft in flight if the act is likely to endanger the aircraft. Destroying an aircraft in service or causing damage to such an aircraft which renders it incapable of flight or which is likely to endanger its safety in flight. Communicating information that is known to be false, thereby endangering the safety of aircraft in flight. Unlawfully and intentionally using any device, substance, or weapon. Performing an act of violence against a person at an airport serving international civil aviation that causes or is likely to endanger the safety of aircraft in flight. Placing or causing to be placed on an aircraft in service, by any means whatsoever, a device or substance which is likely to destroy that aircraft, or causing damage to it which renders it incapable of flight, or causing damage to it which is likely to endanger its safety in flight. A cabin crew who is added later to the minimum cabin crew. A situation wherein apprehension exists as to the safety of an aircraft and its occupants. An airdrome designated by an operator for a particular flight, other than the destination airdrome, and to which an aircraft may proceed when it becomes impossible or inadvisable to proceed or to land at the airdrome of intended landing. A vehicle that transports people in the air. A certificate authorizing an operator to carry out specified commercial air transport operations. A service that promotes the safe, orderly and expeditious flow of Air traffic at aerodromes and during the approach, departure, and Any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reactions of the air other than the reactions of the air against the earth's surface, it includes airplanes and helicopters. Region/territory. Corridor/passageway. A defined area, on a land aerodrome, intended to accommodate aircraft for purposes of loading or unloading passengers, mail or cargo, fuelling, parking or maintenance. The act of reaching a place from a distance. The competent authority responsible for the safety and regulation of civil aviation in the state of the applicant or operator. The development and operation of heavier-than-air vessels. Luggage/Baggage.

Acts of Unlawful Interference

Additional Crew Member Alert Phase Alternate Airport

Airplane Air Operator Certificate Air Traffic Control Aircraft

Air Space Aisle Apron Arrival Authority Aviation Baggage

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Beverage Beacon Belt Board Boarding Boarding Card Bomb Threat Soft and alcohol drink. Flashing lights on the aircraft as transmitter. An item that secures people to their seats. To enter or go aboard (a vehicle or ship). The time that the passengers can get on the airplane. Permission card including information regarding flight number and seat number to board the aircraft for passengers. A communicated threat, anonymous or otherwise, which suggests, or interferes, whether true or false that the safety of an aircraft in flight or on the ground, or any airport or civil aviation facility or any person may be in danger from an explosive or other item or device. The act of giving in advance, specific instructions or information. Various switches for lights and calling a member of the cabin crew. A crewmember who performs, in the interest of safety of passengers, duties assigned by the operator or the commander of the aircraft, but who shall not act as a flight crewmember. Gives information about everything the cabin crew needs to know. The air pressure in the cabin. Something that has been called off. The pilot designated by the operator responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft during the flight. The Commander of each flight has authority to discharge all his statutory and company responsibilities for the operation, the disposition and safety of the aircraft and the safety of all persons on board. Nothing in the operations manual shall be construed as limiting or derogating from this authority. Any property, including animals and mail, carried by an aircraft other than stores and accompanied baggage. Paying for an item with money. Food and drink that are served to the passengers. Actions, omissions, events or conditions, or a combination thereof, which led to the accident or incident. Middle line on the runway. Check/control. A formal list used to identify, schedule, compare, or verify a group of elements or actions. It is also a physical aid used to overcome the limitations of human memory. Are defined as persons of an age of two years and above but not less than 12 years of age. Class/section. Getting permission to do something. Removing dirt. Enclosed space for pilots in an aircraft. The transportation by air passengers or cargo for remuneration or hire. An aircraft operation involving the transport of passengers or cargo for remuneration or hire. A vessel for storing items. A member of the flight crew acting in any piloting capacity, other than as pilot-in-command or commander.

Briefing Button Cabin Crew Cabin Crew Manual Cabin Pressure Cancel Captain/Commander

Cargo Cash Catering Causes Center Line Check Check-list

Children Class Clearance Cleaning Cockpit Commercial Air Transportation Commercial Air Transport Operation Container Co-pilot

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Corporate Aviation An aircraft transport operation on behalf of a company, other than a commercial air transportation, in connection with the transport of passenger(s) or cargo for a company, where the crewmembers receive direct compensation, which is more than a nominal nature, for their services as crewmembers. Group of people working together on an aircraft. A person assigned by an operator to duty on an aircraft during flight time. A program designed to improve the safety of flight operations by optimizing the safe, efficient, and effective use of human resources, hardware, and information through improved crew communication and coordination. Certified seat fitted with a harness, seatbelt and headrest occupied by cabin crewmember during taxiing, takeoff, and landing. Those portions of operations involving taxiing, takeoff and landing, and all flight operations below 10000 feet, except cruise flight. Controlling the crowd. A level maintained during a significant portion of a flight. Pillow. Articles or substances which are capable of posing significant risk to health, safety or property when transported by air and which are classified according to IATA. A notebook that is filled in by the cockpit about flight information. Staying the day. Crew traveling by air to/from their duty station to take up or to terminate flight duty. A form where the relevant subjects are declared. Device which removes or melts frost on the cockpit windows. Emptying the fuel from the fuel tanks. The system that removes icing after ice occurs. Leaving the ground. A passenger who has been illegally admitted to a country or who has illegally entered a country and who at some later time is ordered by the authorities to be removed from that country. The airport the aircraft will arrive at. Late for departure/arrival. Handicapped passenger. Passengers who are causing offences against penal law; Acts which whether or not they are offences, may or do jeopardize the safety of the aircraft or of persons or property therein or which jeopardize good order and discipline on board. A situation wherein apprehension exists as to the safety of an aircraft and its occupants are threatened by grave and imminent danger or require immediate assistance. Changing the destination. Items that are not tax included to the price. The time period of 1 hr prior to STD and 20 min after STA. Unexpected need demanding immediate action. Nearest exits which are used in an emergency situation. Shows the way out in case there is no visibility on the airplane.

Crew Crew Member Crew Resource Management

Crew seat (Jumpseat) Critical Phase of Flight Crowd Control Cruising Level Cushion Dangerous Goods

Data log Day Stop Deadhead Crew Member Declaration Defroster De-fueling De-ice Departure Deportee

Destination Delay Disabled Disruptive/Unruly Passengers Distress Phase Divert Duty Free Goods Duty Time Emergency Emergency Exit Emergency Light

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Escape Slide Estimated Estimated Off-block Time Evacuation Exemption A device that can inflate so that the passengers and crew can slide out of the airplane in case there is an emergency. Approximation. The estimated time at which the aircraft will commence movement associated with departure. Process of clearing people out of the aircraft. A formal authorization issued by the Authority providing relief from part or all the provisions of EU-Ops. The authorization may or may not be conditional. Woman. A pilot that assists the captain during the flight. The term used for immediate, temporary assistance given to persons who are injured or ill. A bag with first aid equipment or medicine in it. The additional oxygen provided for the use of passengers, who do not satisfactorily recover following subjection to excessive cabin altitudes, during which they had been provided with supplemental oxygen. A licensed crewmember charged with duties essential to the operation of an aircraft during flight time. Operational Flight Plan: The operator's plan for the safe conduct of the flight, based on considerations of aircraft performance, other operating limitations and relevant expected conditions on the route to be followed and at the airdrome concerned. The total time from the moment an aircraft first moves under its own power for the purpose of taking off until the moment it comes to rest at the end of the flight. Any type of recorder installed in the aircraft for the purpose of complementing accident/incident investigation. The car that guides the aircrafts to there park position after they land or guides to the runway. Kitchen in the aircraft. Passageway through which passengers board. An aircraft operation other than a commercial air transport operation or an aerial work operation. Greenwich meridian (00:00) is the common meridian in the world and the time arrangements are made according to it. In Romania 3 hours must be added to the GMT in the summer and 2 hours in the winter. Supplies power to the aircraft on the ground. Waiting time on the ground. Ground Service. Equipment consisting of two shoulder straps and a lap belt, which is provided to restrain a member of the flight crew against inertia loads occurring in emergency conditions. Stowage for hand luggage and belongings. Any condition, event, or circumstance, which could induce an accident. When a person has unlawfully committed by force or threat thereof an act of interference, seizure, or other wrongful exercise of control of an aircraft in flight or when such an act about to be committed. Meal which is heated.

Female First Officer First Aid First Aid Kit First Aid Oxygen

Flight Crew Member Flight Plan

Flight Time

Flight Recorder Follow me car Galley Gate General Aviation Operation Greenwich Time (GMT) Ground Power Ground time Handling Harness

Hatrack Hazard Hijacking

Hot Meal

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Hot jugs Hydraulic System Inadmissible Pax Incident Infant Landing Gear Last Minute Change Local Time Life Vest Lost and Found Mail Main Gear Manifest Maximum Certified Take-off Mass A vessel where hot liquids are held. A system that helps the movement of various parts on the aircraft. A passenger who is refused admission to a country by the authorities of that country, due to the lack of visa, expired An occurrence, other than an accident, associated with the operation of an aircraft, which affects or could affect the safety of the operation. Children under 2 years old. The tire equipment of the aircraft. Changes right before the departure. The time of the resided place. A vest that is made of buoyant material to keep person afloat in the water. Office for lost or founded baggage. Postal service. The landing gear under the body of the plane between the wings. A list with the names of the passengers on the flight. The maximum total weight of the aircraft and its contents at which the aircraft may take off anywhere in the world, in the most favorable circumstances in accordance with the certificate of airworthiness in respect of the aircraft. A list which provides for the operation of aircraft, subject to specified conditions, with particular equipment inoperative, prepared by the operator in conformity with, or more restrictive than, the MMEL established for the aircraft type. A list established for a particular aircraft type by the manufacturer with the approval of the State of Manufacture containing items, one or more of which is permitted to be unserviceable at the beginning of a flight. The MMEL may be associated with special operating conditions, limitations, or procedures. Staying somewhere over night. Its used to describe a procedure or checklist, and refers to a nonroutine operation in which certain procedures or actions must be taken to maintain an acceptable level of systems integrity or airworthiness. The front landing gear that is mounted at the front of the aircraft. Thunderstorm. A person, organization or enterprise engaged in or offering to engage in aircraft operation. The exercise of authority over the initiation, continuation, diversion or termination of a flight, in the interest of the safety of the flight. Excess reservation of passengers. Excess load. Excess time. A person other than a crewmember traveling or about to travel on an aircraft. List of passengers. Passengers that are not allowed to entry in the country. A Pilot who for the time being is in charge of the piloting of the aircraft without being under the direction of any other pilot in the aircraft. Boarding the special passenger first.

MEL (Minimum Equipment List) MMEL (Master Minimum Equipment List).

Night Stop Not Normal /Abnormal

Nose Gear Oraj Operator Operational Control Overbook Overload Overtime Passenger Passenger Manifest Passenger Pilot-in-Command Pre-boarding

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Pre-flight Inspection/Check PRM (Passenger with reduced mobility) Policy Procedure PBE (Protective Breathing i ) Recommendation Rest Time Risk Runway Sabotage Safety Security Senior Cabin Crew Member The inspection carried out before flight to ensure that the aircraft is fit for the intended flight. Those passengers, who because of their medical, physical or mental state require individual attention, which is not normally provided to other passengers. A written requirement established by an operator's management that is expected to be complied by appropriate personnel. A step-by-step guidance on how to do something. Breathing equipment for protection against smoke, fumes and other harmful gases. A preferred technique or action described by operator that employees are expected to follow whenever practical. Time period between 2 flights or other duties. The consequence of accepting a hazard. A defined rectangular area, on a land aerodrome prepared for the landing and take-off of aircraft. An act or omission intended to cause malicious or wanton destruction of property, endangering, or resulting in unlawful interference with international civil aviation and its facilities. Standards and procedures that are aimed to prevent accidents and reduce the consequences to the aircraft, crew or passengers in any abnormal situation. A combination of measures of human and material resources intended to safeguard international civil aviation against acts of unlawful interference. A cabin crew appointed by the operator to act as chief of the cabin crew. SCC shall have the responsibility to the Commander for the conduct and co-ordination of normal and emergency procedures specified in the Operations Manual. Flight plan. Boat/Slide. The State on whose register the aircraft is entered. Means the additional oxygen required to protect each occupant against the adverse effects of excessive cabin altitude and to maintain acceptable physiological conditions. Continuation of life or existence. The part on the wings that supplies lifting power by changing the Stair which is equipped to the aircraft. Be ready or available to act.
Any one of the following three types of apparatus in which flight conditions are simulated on the ground: A Flight Simulator - provides an accurate representation of the flight deck of a particular aircraft type to the extent that the mechanical, electrical, electronic, etc. aircraft systems control functions, the normal environment of flight crewmembers, and the performance and flight characteristics of that type of aircraft are realistically simulated. A Flight Procedures Trainer - provides a realistic flight deck environment, and which simulates instrument responses, simple control functions of mechanical, electrical, electronic, etc. aircraft systems, and the performance and flights characteristics of aircraft of a particular class. A Basic Instrument Flight Trainer - equipped with appropriate instruments, it simulates the flight deck environment of an aircraft in flight in IMC.

Schedule Slide Raft State of Registry Supplemental Oxygen Survival Spoiler Stairway Stand By Synthetic Flight Trainer

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Take-off Alternate An alternate airdrome at which an aircraft can land should this become necessary shortly after take-off and it is not possible to use the airdrome of departure. The aircrafts movement from the parking place till the runway or movement from the runway to the parking place. Allows you to travel. The moment that the wheels touch the runway. The place where the passengers wait for the flight after going. A person who has reached his/her 5th birthday but not his/her 12th birthday as of the date of commencement of travel and travels alone. Portable small containers. Rubbish bins. Chairs that have wheels for the disabled people. Passengers who cannot ascend/descend or move by themselves and requires assistance from airline, even if they have or not their own wheelchair.

Taxi Ticket Touch-down Transit Lounge Unaccompanied Minor Unit Waste Box Wheelchair Wheelchair Pax

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CABIN CREW MANUAL OPERATOR REGULATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. OPERATOR REGULATIONS


1.1 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART ...................................................................................................... 3 1.2. NOMINATED POST HOLDERS (EU-OPS 1.175) ................................................................. 4 1.3. RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF OPS MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL ....................... 5 1.3.1. ACCOUNTABLE MANAGER ........................................................................ 5 1.3.2. QUALITY MANAGER (EU-OPS 1.035) .......................................................... 5 1.3.3. TRAINING MANAGER ............................................................................... 5 1.3.4. GROUND OPERATIONS MANAGER ............................................................. 6 1.3.5. TECHNICAL MANAGER ............................................................................. 6 1.3.6. FLIGHT SAFETY MANAGER (EU-OPS 1.037).................................................................... 6 1.4. RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF FLIGHT MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL ................. 7 1.4.1. FLIGHT OPERATION MANAGER ......................................................................................... 7 1.4.2. CHIEF PILOT(S) .................................................................................................................... 7 1.4.3. CABIN CREW MANAGER ..................................................................................................... 8 1.4.4. DEPUTY CABIN CREW MANAGER ...................................................................................... 8 1.4.5. CABIN CREW TRAINING MANAGER.................................................................................. 8 1.5. LINE OF AUTHORITY, DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES OF CREW MEMBERS ................ 9 1.5.1. COMMANDER ......................................................................................... 9 1.5.2. CO-PILOT .............................................................................................. 9 1.5.3. CABIN CREW MEMBERS ........................................................................... 9 1.5.3.1. SENIOR CABIN CREW - EU-OPS 1.1000................................................. 10 1.5.3.2. CABIN CREW MEMBERS ...................................................................... 10 1.5.4. SUCCESSION OF COMMAND see chapter 4, 4.11.2, page 14..................... 11 1.6. COMPOSITION AND QUALIFICATION OF CABIN CREW ................................................ 11 1.6.1. NUMBER AND COMPOSITION OF CABIN CREW .......................................... 11 1.6.2. MINIMUM CABIN CREW ......................................................................... 12 1.6.3. EXPERIENCE ........................................................................................ 12 1.6.4. ADDITIONAL CREW MEMBERS ................................................................ 12 1.6.5. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS OF CABIN CREW..................................... 12 1.6.5.1. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS ............................................................... 12 1.6.5.2. QUALIFICATION FOR SENIOR CABIN CREW MEMBER ........................... 13 1.6.5.3. QUALIFICATION FOR CABIN CREW INSTRUCTOR ................................ 13 1.6.5.4. QUALIFICATION FOR CABIN CREW INSTRUCTOR/EXAMINER ................ 13 1.6.5.5. OPERATION OF MORE THAN ONE TYPE OR VARIANT ..13 1.7. TRAINING, CHECKING and SUPERVISING PERSONNEL................................................ 13 1.7.1. INTRODUCTION.................................................................................... 13 1.7.2. NEW ENTRANT CABIN CREW MEMBERS TRAINING..................................... 14 1.7.2.1. INITIAL SAFETY TRAINING - EU-OPS OPS 1.1005 ............................... 14 1.7.2.2. CONVERSION AND DIFFERENCES TRAINING (ref to EU-OPS 1.1010 Appendix 1) ............................................................................................................... 15 1.7.2.3. AIRPLANE VISIT ............................................................................. 15 1.7.2.4. FAMILIARIZATION FLIGHTS (ref to EU-OPS 1.1012) ............................ 16 1.7.3. SENIOR CABIN CREW TRAINING ............................................................. 16 1.7.4. INSTRUCTOR TRAINING ........................................................................ 16 1.7.5. RECURRENT TRAINING EU-OPS 1.1015 ................................................. 17 1.7.6. REFRESHER TRAINING - (Appendix 1 to EU-OPS 1.1020) ........................... 18 1.7.7. CHECKING EU-OPS 1.1025 .................................................................. 18 1.7.8. CROWD CONTROL................................................................................. 18 1.7.9. CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT TRAINING (CRM)S 1.1005/1.1010/1.1015 ................................................................................... 19 1.7.10. TRAINING RECORDS EU-OPS 1.1035................................................... 21 1.8. PERSONNEL RULES ............................................................................................................... 22 1.8.1. BEHAVIOR ........................................................................................... 22 1.8.2. IDENTIFICATION CARDS (ID) & NAME BADGES......................................... 23 Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 1 May 2010

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1.8.3. PERSONAL DOCUMENTS.......................................................................... 23 1.8.4. UNIFORM............................................................................................. 23 1.8.4.1. UNIFORM REGULATIONS ................................................................. 23 1.8.5. GENERAL APPEARANCE.......................................................................... 25 1.8.6. CIVIL DRESSING .................................................................................. 27 1.8.7. CREW BAGGAGE ................................................................................... 27 1.8.8. DEADHEADING ..................................................................................... 27 1.8.9. SMOKING ............................................................................................ 27 1.8.10. NIGHT STOPS/STOP OVER AWAY FROM HOME BASE ................................ 28 1.8.11. CUSTOMS REGULATIONS ..................................................................... 28 1.9. CREW HEALTH PRECAUTIONS ................................................................... 28 1.9.1. ILLNESS OR INCAPACITATION WHILE ON DUTY ........................................ 29 1.9.2. QUARANTINE REGULATIONS .................................................................. 29 1.9.3. BLOOD DONATION................................................................................ 29 1.9.4. DEEP SEA DIVING................................................................................. 29 1.9.5. FOOD HYGIENE, POISONING .................................................................. 29 1.9.6. HUMIDITY............................................................................................ 30 1.9.7. DIURNAL RHYTHM ................................................................................ 30 1.9.8. FATIGUE.............................................................................................. 30 1.9.9. USE OF DRUGS AND PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS ................................... 31 1.9.10. PROBLEMATIC USE OF PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES ............................... 32 1.9.11. CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL ................................................................ 32 1.9.12. VISION.............................................................................................. 32 1.9.13. IMMUNIZATION .................................................................................. 33 1.9.14. SURGICAL PROCEDURES...................................................................... 33 1.9.15. PREGNANCY ....................................................................................... 33 1.9.16. NUTRITIONAL GUIDELINES .................................................................. 34 1.9.17. COORDINATION BEFORE AND BETWEEN FLIGHTS ................................... 34 1.9.18. TROPICAL CLIMATE ............................................................................. 34 1.9.18.1. TROPICAL DISEASES..................................................................... 35 1.10. FLIGHT AND DUTY TIME LIMITATIONS & REST REQUIREMENTS ............................. 37 1.10.1. MAIN BASE ........................................................................................ 37 1.10.2. TEMPORARY BASE............................................................................... 37 1.10.3. RESERVE DUTY ................................................................................... 37 1.10.4. WORKING TIME .................................................................................. 38 1.10.5. POSITIONING..................................................................................... 38 1.10.6. FLIGHT DUTY PERIOD.......................................................................... 38 1.10.7. EXTENSION OF FLIGHT DUTY PERIOD .................................................... 39 1.10.8. BLOCK TIME....................................................................................... 40 1.10.9. FLIGHT TIME ...................................................................................... 40 1.10.10. REST PERIOD ................................................................................... 40 1.10.11. ANNUAL LEAVE ................................................................................. 41 1.10.12. RECORDS......................................................................................... 41 1.10.13. EXCEEDANCES OF FLIGHT AND DUTY TIME LIMITATIONS AND/OR REDUCTIONS OF REST PERIODS.......................................................... 41

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1.1 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

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1.2. NOMINATED POST HOLDERS (EU-OPS 1.175)
This section mentions the names and describes the functions of the Accountable Manager and of the nominated post holders responsible for flight operations, maintenance system, crew training and ground operations acceptable to the Authority as required by the EUOPS. In the absence of a nominated post holder, his deputy ensures continuity of supervision. A. POST HOLDERS Accountable manager: E-mail: Quality Assurance Manager: E-mail: Flight Operations Manager: E-mail: Training Manager: E-mail: Technical Manager: E-mail: Ground Operations Manager: E-mail: Bogdan Dimitrescu Elena Pasare Iuhas Dan-Sorin Pantelis Skamantzouras

Krunoslav Grganovic Gheorghe Prodan

B. THE MAIN FUNCTIONS OF THE MANAGEMENT ARE: 1. Determination of the operator's flight safety policy; 2. Allocation of responsibilities, duties, and issuing instructions to individuals, sufficient for implementation of Medallion Air policy and the maintenance of safety standards. 3. Monitoring of flight safety standards; 4. Recording and analysis of any deviations from Medallion Airlines standards in respect to "Passenger Comfort, Timetable Efficiency and Economy" and ensuring corrective action; 5. Evaluating the safety record of the MEDALLION AIR Airlines in order to avoid the development of undesirable trends; 6. Quality Assurance; 7. Liaison with the Authority.

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1.3. RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF OPS MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL
1.3.1. ACCOUNTABLE MANAGER The Accountable Manager is a nominated post holder acceptable and responsible to the Authority. He his responsible for providing the necessary resources to the other post holders to perform their tasks for which they are responsible to ensure safe operations and airworthy airplanes. He maintains direct reporting links to the Quality Manager and the Flight Safety Manager. He establishes the company's formal written quality policy statement defining the intent of the quality system and his commitment to it. He also establishes the companys safety commitment including a non-reprisal policy. 1.3.2. QUALITY MANAGER (EU-OPS 1.035) The Quality Manager is responsible to the Accountable Manager for the implementation and control of the quality system within the company i.e. for the definition, implementation, compliance, and monitoring of the appropriate procedures to comply with the airline quality policy. He reports directly to the Accountable Manager. He must be acceptable to the Authority and liaises with it regarding quality matters. The Quality Manager prepares an annual audit plan for Flight Operations, Training, Ground Operations, Cabin Services and Maintenance. He his responsible for all this audit activity and associated resources. He prepares reports for the Accountable Manager, and ensures with appropriate responsible that corrective actions are applied. 1.3.3. TRAINING MANAGER The Training Manager is the nominated post holder acceptable to the Authority responsible for the crew training. He reports to the Accountable Manager. He or his deputy shall be a current Type Rating Pilot and an active line pilot (commander) on a type operated under the AOC. He is in charge of organizing and completing the training necessary for the crews to acquire and maintain their legal licenses and qualifications and to adequately perform their assigned duties. In co-operation with the respective Chief Pilots and the Cabin Crew Manager, he monitors the operation and identifies problems that may require the provision of extra training or changes in operational procedures. He is responsible for the training of all training personnel, and ensures that common standards apply throughout. In collaboration with the Chief Pilots, the Cabin Crew Manager, the Training Manager defines the training requirements and ensures that the training facilities and equipment fulfill the required specification. He plans all long-term training activities and assesses the training development costs with the Accountable Manager. To ensure the functioning of the Quality System within the Training Department, his functions, duties and responsibilities are: To coordinate all questions and matters relating to flight operational standards, regulations provisions and training; - To establish training syllabi and check forms for all required training and checks, in cooperation with the Flight Operations Manager; - To establish the professional preparation concerning employment/ training/upgrading of flight crew members, in cooperation with the Flight Operations Manager and with the Chief Pilot/Cabin Crew Manager; - To coordinate with the other post holders the training relevant subjects of AOM (editorial responsibility for the AOM rests with Flight Operations Department; To appoint check and training personnel including type rating examiners in close cooperation with the relevant Section Chief Pilot and/or Cabin Crew Manager. The section Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 5 May 2010

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Chief Pilot and the Cabin Crew Department shall nominate persons having the required qualifications whom they consider suitable; To examine the professional qualifications of applicants, to recommend or discourage their employment; To ensure that all required checks and training of flight and/or cabin crew are conducted on time; To select the team leaders of the subordinate functions, respecting the veto right of the superiors and subordinates; To suspend team leaders and instructions from these functions.

1.3.4. GROUND OPERATIONS MANAGER The Ground Operations Manager is the nominated post holder acceptable to the Authority responsible for the ground operations. He is appointed by, and reports to the Accountable Manager. He is responsible for the safe, secure and economical conduct of all activities regarding the organization of ground handling activities for the airline. In particular, he ensures in cooperation with other company divisions and external enterprises, passengers, cargo and aircraft handling and dispatch. He makes sure that all the Stations Managers and subcontracted services, especially de/anti-icing services, undertake all required measures for the security of the passengers and then aircraft. 1.3.5. TECHNICAL MANAGER The Technical Manager is the nominated post holder acceptable to the Authority responsible for the maintenance system. He is appointed by and reports to the Accountable Manager. He is responsible for the definition, development and implementation of the maintenance procedures in accordance with the maintenance policy. He is responsible for the airworthiness of each aircraft. To ensure the functioning of the Quality System within the Maintenance Department, the Technical Manager is responsible for monitoring and ensuring that the entire maintenance system is being conducted in accordance with and conforms to EU-OPS 1 Subpart M, EU 145 and procedures approved by the Authority. He defines the whole system of maintaining or regaining the airworthiness of the MEDALLION AIR airplanes which includes: - Carrying out pre-flight checks, - Rectification to an approved standard of any defect and damage affecting safety, - Implementation of any operational or airworthiness directive, and any other airworthiness requirement made mandatory by the Authority, - Making modifications in accordance with approved standards. 1.3.6. FLIGHT SAFETY MANAGER (EU-OPS 1.037) The Flight Safety Manager is responsible for the implementation and control of the Accident Prevention and Flight Safety Program. He should aim to create awareness and understanding of accident prevention methods throughout the organization. He conducts investigation into, and reports on any accident, incident or occurrence involving a company airplane and liaises with the Authority if necessary. Having discovered, identified and assessed hazards, the Flight Safety Manager should make recommendations to eliminate them. He should keep management and pilots informed of safety trends and problems within the organization and within the industry. He circulates safety data, information concerning the experiences of other relevant safety information. He reports directly to the Accountable Manager on safety matters and is free to make recommendations to any manager within the organization if he considers it necessary in the interests of flight safety. To be effective, the Flight Safety Manager must be given full and visible support by all management and supervisory personnel. He shall regularly report about his function to the Quality Manager and to the Authority to guarantee the maintenance of flight operational safety. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 6 May 2010

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To ensure the functioning of the Quality System within his area of responsibility, his duties and responsibilities are: Cooperation with all concerned parts in the Flight Operations regarding safety matters including the safety training of flight crews and cabin crews; Supervision of aircraft handling regarding safety related matters in cooperation with ground support-services and ground-crew training. Test the knowledge of flight and cabin crews regarding the prescribed emergency procedures and supervision of the required safety training. Issue and check the validation of the "Emergency Proficiency and First Aid Certificate" for crew members. The Realization of all other duties of a Flight Safety Officer, like promulgation of flight safety bulletins to the flight crews and for Authority, international exchange of experience and dealing with safety-threats (sabotage) etc., and spot-checks of stored flight documents of scheduled and charter-flights. Cooperation with the Technical Department regarding the safety and emergency equipment on board.

1.4. RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF FLIGHT MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL


1.4.1. FLIGHT OPERATION MANAGER The Flight Operations Manager is the nominated post holder acceptable to the Authority responsible for the flight operations. He or his deputy shall hold a valid Airline Transport Pilot License with the status of commander. (ATPL) Note: In the case that the Flight Operations Manager does no longer hold a valid license or is not current, his deputy must be in possession of a valid license. He is appointed by and reports to the Accountable Manager and is the executive responsible for the day-to-day implementation of the company's policies and for direct supervision of the line operations on all fleets. This involves implementing and maintaining whatever procedures necessary to ensure the smooth operation of all fleets. Particularly he determines all flight operational standards and practices. He is responsible for editing the Operations Manual ensuring that it is kept up to date and includes all data necessary to comply with all relevant regulations and requirement and with the provision of the AOC. He ensures the functioning of the Quality Assurance System within the Flight Operations Management. The Flight Operations Post Holder has the right: To select the management members of the subordinate functions, respecting the vetorights of the superiors and subordinates. - To suspend subordinates from their duties, functions and rights where it seems necessary for a safe conduct of flight operations or for disciplinary sanctions. - To approve procedures valid for subordinate functions. - To approve the conduct of flights or series of flights concerning safety or flight operational aspects. - To prohibit flights or series of flights or to suspend flight operations for safety reasons. 1.4.2. CHIEF PILOT(S) Chief pilot is responsible for implementation of published policies, regulations and precautions pertaining to the flight crew and aircraft operations to provide the highest technical standard of flight safety, economy and efficiency. The Chief Pilot of each fleet is responsible to the Flight Operations Manager for the establishment of standards and the maintenance of discipline within the flight crew group. He liaises with the Training Manager and Flight Crew Training Chief Instructor on all flight crew training issues pertinent to his aircraft type and with the Crew Scheduling for all crew checks. The chief pilot is also responsible for the establishment and supervision of methods of record- keeping for flight crew licenses, type ratings, endorsements, appropriate renewal dates, and flight time/duty time records. He also assists the Flight Operations Manager in Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 7 May 2010

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establishing new policies and procedures for aircraft operations, flight crew duties, cabin crew duties and operational administration. He establishes and develops working relations with units from within the company and outside sources regarding his basic job area, he reports to Flight Operations Manager and all related personnel depicted on the organizational chart are his subordinates. 1.4.3. CABIN CREW MANAGER The Cabin Crew Manager reports to the Accountable Manager about the crew matters and liaises with the Training Manager on cabin crew training matters. She/He is responsible for line performance, discipline and the quality assurance of the cabin crew operations and for keeping the Accountable Manager informed. To ensure the functioning of the quality system within the Cabin Crew Department, her/his functions, duties and responsibilities are: - Manage the day-by-day activity of cabin crew members; - To supervise all cabin service related activities in the company in order to ensure a maximum of professional and friendly passenger service; - To cooperate with the Crew Planning Department in establishing the requirements for employment that cabin personnel (Cabin Crew) have to meet, and in establishing check and training syllabi and procedures; - Establishes, implements and monitors the planning of the cabin personnel for the execution of the flights in accordance with the mission profile, individual qualification and work/rest time limits; - To closely cooperate with the Flight Operations Manager, Training Manager and Quality Assurance Manager in the publication of cabin crew related directives as in the OM, AOM, and other instructions which shall aim to ensure the safety of cabin, passengers and cabin crew; - To conduct check flights, to check the professional standard and development of her/his personnel; to prescribe additional training; - To participate in regular assessments of the safety of the airplanes cabin installations and to recommend improvements; - To ensure, in cooperation with the Crew Planning and Training Department that checks of her/his personnel are being conducted in due time; - To ensure the exchange of information an experience within his and with interfacing departments; - To carefully process occurrence reports and other reports, to investigate cabinrelated irregularities and to recommend remedial action to the Quality Assurance Manager and Flight Safety Manager; - To request the Quality Assurance Manager and Flight Safety Manager to call a hearing, when such action seems appropriate (Accident, irregularity, violation) and to cooperate in the resulting investigation. - To cooperate in improving technical installations in the cabin, in improving passenger service and comfort, and improving on-board service. - To select the cabin crew to be employed, respecting the veto-right of superiors and subordinates and to suspend team leaders and cabin crew from these functions. - Proposes the licensing and the promotion of cabin crew; 1.4.4. DEPUTY CABIN CREW MANAGER A deputy cabin crew manager must be a Senior Cabin Crew Member. He/She helps with the duties of Cabin Crew Manager and takes over all responsibilities and duties in the absence of the Cabin Crew Manager. 1.4.5. CABIN CREW TRAINING MANAGER Cabin Crew Training Manager reports to Training Manager. - Conducts and is responsible for the quality of all cabin training. - Evaluates all ground and flight training and checking programs to ensure that they are being accomplished with established policies and standards. - Provides technical interface with other departments. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 8 May 2010

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Plans, schedules, delivers and conducts all cabin crew ground and flight training programs. Conducts all written tests, skill tests and evaluations. He/She keeps the training records of every cabin crew. Responsible for the selection, training and standardization of the cabin crew. Development and production of all training materials and devices used in cabin crew training. Conducts management duties according to the company policies and regulations. The up-dating of Cabin Crew Manual. The collaboration with Quality Department. The link between AACR and Medallion air.

1.5. LINE OF AUTHORITY, DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES OF CREW MEMBERS


The following chain of command shall be respected: Commander; Copilot; Senior cabin crew; Cabin Crew.

1.5.1. COMMANDER The Commander has the full authority: - As to the execution of his flight with regard to aircraft operation and safety; - Over all crew members while on duty and off duty when away from home base; - Over his passengers during flight, from closing until opening of cabin doors. The Commander has the authority and responsibility to declare an emergency situation whenever deemed necessary. While executing his emergency authority, the Commander shall keep the proper control station informed regarding the progress of the flight and actions taken. The Commander is responsible for: - The safety of his airplane, proper servicing and continuous airworthiness of it while executing the flight within the instructions and limitations of the relevant OM/AOM chapters; - The safe and efficient operations during flight in accordance with the company operating policy and common practices of good airmanship; - The safety of passengers and crew, as well as the safety and safeguard of the load on board; - The discipline and order on board during the flight. To maintain safety and good order, the Commander may temporally remove a crew member from his/her duty or off the airplane. If deemed necessary, the Commander may refuse passengers for onward transportation if after several requests they still do not follow the given orders. Persons obviously intoxicated with alcohol, or narcotics shall be refused. 1.5.2. CO-PILOT The co-pilot shall: - Act as the Commander's deputy upon delegation or in the latest absence; - Act as the main assistant of the Commander and as a monitoring crew member during all phases of flight; - Act as Commander in case of Commander's incapacitation. 1.5.3. CABIN CREW MEMBERS A cabin crew member is responsible for the proper execution of his duties specified in the job description, instructions and procedures laid down in the Cabin Crew Manual. A crew member is responsible for ensuring he is in possession of a valid and properly rated licenses, appropriate to his assigned function at all times when engaged upon flight duties. A crew member shall immediately inform Cabin Crew Manager when getting/renewing his license, special qualifications, medical certificate and produce the new license/certificate for a physical check and appropriate recording. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 9 May 2010

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A cabin crew member shall report to the Commander any fault, failure, malfunction or defect which he believes may affect the airworthiness or safe operation of the airplane, including emergency systems, as well as any incident that endangered or could have endangered the safe operation. A cabin crew member shall make use of the occurrence reporting and, when necessary, confidential reporting deemed. A crew member is not obliged to report an occurrence, which has already been reported by another crew member. 1.5.3.1. SENIOR CABIN CREW - EU-OPS 1.1000 Position: All cabin crew members on flight duty, as well as off-duty while away from home base, are subordinated to the Commander. The senior cabin crew takes orders directly from the Commander or his delegate. He acts as chief of the cabin crew and has authority over all cabin crew members on duty, regardless of seniority. In absence of the Commander at outstations (i.e. due to different rotations of flight and cabin crew), the cabin crew members are subordinated to the senior cabin crew. In all other situations, cabin crew members are subordinated to the Cabin Crew Manager. Duties: The senior cabin crew shall have responsibility to the Commander for the conduct and coordination of normal and emergencies procedures. The senior cabin crew is responsible for the good quality of the in-flight product in accordance with the Company procedures. The senior cabin crew shall: - Check if the cabin crew is complete before commencing flight duty; - Assign particular duties and responsibilities to all cabin crew members; - Brief the cabin crew members before each flight; - Be responsible for maintaining discipline of all cabin crew members while on duty; - Be responsible for observing the safety regulations in the cabin; - Be responsible for emergency preparations according to the Commander or special instructions; - Report all technical irregularities in the cabin to the flight crew; - Handle all operational cabin irregularities in coordination with the Commander; - Act as spokesman for all duty matters pertaining to cabin crew members; - Ensure the orderly handover of airplane to the new cabin crew members taking over at transit stations; - Ensure that the necessary documents are maintained and processed as laid down in the respective regulations; - Report any important incidents or irregularities occurring during the flight to the appropriate office. Reports about matters of mutual interest shall be coordinated with the Commander. 1.5.3.2. CABIN CREW MEMBERS Position: All cabin crew members are subordinated to the Commander. The Senior cabin crew acts as spokesman for the cabin crew relating to their wishes to the Commander and vice versa. Duties: All cabin crew members have to fulfill their duties to the best of their knowledge. The duties in case of an emergency are laid down in the respective regulations. All cabin crew members: - Carry out a proper in-flight preparation before taking over a flight; - Participate to the pre-flight briefing; - Act according to his duty and working position within the cabin crew; - Are responsible for the assigned duty; - Do the very best to fulfill the aim of always being better than the competition; - Show willingness to serve the passengers; - Approach the customer in a winning manner; Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 10 May 2010

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Maintain his knowledge up to date by studying all publications concerned; Have a good basic and supplemental training background; Communicate freely in English.

1.5.4. SUCCESSION OF COMMAND see chapter 4, 4.11.2, page 14 In special cases of cabin crew irregularities away from home base (e.g. sudden illness of Senior cabin crew), the next suitable qualified cabin crew may act as Senior cabin crew in the event of the nominated Senior cabin crew becoming unable to operate. The replacement shall take place as follows: - 1st priority: Second Senior cabin crew; - 2nd priority: Experienced cabin crew member.

1.6. COMPOSITION AND QUALIFICATION OF CABIN CREW


1.6.1. NUMBER AND COMPOSITION OF CABIN CREW All Medallion Air flights are planned and conducted with crew composition in accordance with the regulations of EU-OPS part 1. The following explanations of the methods for determining the crew composition shall be taken into account: - The type of operating airplane; - The minimum crew requirement; - The experience, regency and qualification of crew members, Medallion Air shall not operate an airplane with a maximum approved passenger seating configuration of more than 19, when carrying one or more passengers, unless at least one cabin crew member is included in the crew for the purpose of performing duties in the interests of the safety of passengers. In compliance with EU-OPS 1.990, MEDALLION Air shall ensure that the minimum number of cabin crew is the greater of: - One cabin crew member for every 50, or fraction of 50, passenger seats installed on the same deck of the airplane; - This aircraft is provided with eight (8) emergency exit doors. Four (4) exits door are on the floor level and four (4) over-wings. All cabin door exits are inward - outward plug - type openings. On the ground this exits may be operated from the inside and from the outside . Location The cabin has four door exits: - Forward passenger entry door (aircraft left) L1 - Forward galley service door (aircraft right) R1 - Aft. galley service door (aircraft left) - L2 - Aft passenger door (tail-cone door) Features The flour level doors are equipped with viewing windows, door operation handle, gust lock release handle, manual operated slide pack with girt bar and assist handle exception being made by tail-cone door which is provided with an automatic slide which can also be manually operated Each cabin crew must have successfully passed initial and conversion or differences training and familiarization flights and must have a valid emergency training/proficiency certificate on the respective aircraft type. No person may accept an assignment to duty knowing that he is not qualified and fit for duty. A Senior Cabin Crew Member (SCCM) shall be nominated whenever more than one cabin crew member is assigned. SCCM is responsible for all the crew members. The Cabin Crew Management will maintain a record of the training undertaken, the initial and recurrent checks completed and the current qualification status for each cabin crew member.

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1.6.2. MINIMUM CABIN CREW Senior cabin crew All flights with passengers shall be planned and carried out with one Senior cabin crew qualified for the respective type of airplane. He/she is included in the minimum number of cabin crew on board. Where required by EU-OPS 1.990 (minimum cabin crew) to carry more than one cabin crew member, Medallion Air shall not appoint a person to the post of senior cabin crew member unless: - that person has at least one years experience as an operating cabin crewmember has completed an appropriate course as required by EU-OPS 1.1000. Cabin crew All flights with passengers shall be planned and carried out with a number of cabin crew members qualified for emergency situations for the respective type of airplane (irrespective of other personnel assigned to perform a specific duty on the flight). In unforeseen circumstances the minimum required number of cabin crew may be reduced, provided that: - The number of passengers has been reduced so that there are no more than 50 passengers for each cabin crew; - Re-seating of passengers with due regard to exits and other applicable airplane limitation; - Relocation of cabin crew and any change of procedures; - A written report is submitted to the RCAA after completion of the flight. For passenger's comfort or other commercial reasons, on particular routes or rotations the Cabin Crew Manager, with the approval of the Flight Operations Director may establish a number of cabin crew that differs from the standard, but not less than the minimum cabin crew. Observer Cabin Crew Cabin crew which do not hold a valid license on type, but have completed the ground conversion course and hold a certificate of completion of the ground course, may be included in the crew in addition to the minimum cabin crew, provided the SCCM is an instructor. 1.6.3. EXPERIENCE Cabin Crew management assures a planned cabin crew composition in such away, that a minimum level of experience is granted. Cabin Crew Manager shall provide with limits for experience of cabin crew members on specific airplanes and routes. 1.6.4. ADDITIONAL CREW MEMBERS Additional crew members who are not required flight or cabin crew members (e.g. child escort, security staff), can be included in the crew. In such a cases, additional crew members must be trained in and be proficient to perform their assigned duties. Any personnel who undertake tasks in the cabin shall not wear a uniform which might identify them to passengers as a cabin crew member unless they comply with the requirements applicable to cabin crew members. 1.6.5. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS OF CABIN CREW 1.6.5.1. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS To become a cabin crew member, he/she must: - Be at least 18 years old; - Have passed an initial medical examination or assessment and be medically fit to carry out specified cabin crew duties; - Have successfully completed initial safety training, including emergency and first aid training, and the appropriate conversion course before operating as cabin crew member; - Be competent to perform duties as specified in the OM, and/or CCM if available. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 12 May 2010

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1.6.5.2. QUALIFICATION FOR SENIOR CABIN CREW MEMBER The minimum requirements for nomination as Senior Cabin Crew Member: - at least one year's experience as an operating cabin crew member; - minimum 500 flight hours; - have successfully completed senior cabin crew member Ground and Flight Training; - inclusion of mandatory minimum course content as specified in EU-OPS Subpart O 1.1000; - good performance in the last year examinations/checks; - being aware of the high level of exposure towards the passengers; - high degree of customer-oriented behavior and knowledge; - good communication skills; - to accept the responsibility of being senior cabin crew. 1.6.5.3. QUALIFICATION FOR CABIN CREW INSTRUCTOR REF TO RCCA-LPN5 In order to become an instructor, the applicant must: - be at least 25 years old; - have at least 1500 flight hours, and at least 100 hours as SCCM on the aircraft type. 1.6.5.4. QUALIFICATION FOR CABIN CREW INSTRUCTOR/EXAMINER - REF TO RCCA-LPN5 In order to become an instructor examiner, the cabin crew must have: - at least 2500 flight hours; - at least 200 hours as an instructor on the aircraft type. - demonstrated highest standards in performing duties as operating cabin crew; - accepted the responsibility of being instructor cabin crew. 1.6.5.5. OPERATION OF MORE THAN ONE TYPE OR VARIANT EU-OPS 1.1030 An operator shall ensure that each cabin crew member does not operate on more than 3 airplane types. With the approval of the RCAA, the cabin crew member may operate on four airplane types, provided that, for at least two of the types: - non-type specific normal and emergency procedures are identical; - safety equipment and type specific normal and emergency procedures are similar. For the purposes of subparagraph above, variants of an airplane type are considered to be different types if they are not similar in all the following aspects: - emergency exit operation; - location and type of portable safety equipment; - type specific emergency procedures.

1.7. TRAINING, CHECKING and SUPERVISING PERSONNEL


1.7.1. INTRODUCTION All commercial flights must be planned with a standard cabin crew, in accordance with the aircraft type. All cabin crew members of the standard cabin crew must be licensed for performing the tasks assigned and at least a number of cabin crew referred to as minimum cabin crew must hold a valid license on type, complying with the requirements of RCAA LPN 5. In order to obtain the required license and qualification all cabin crew members must complete the applicable training programs established under the authority of the Crew Training Postholder and published in the Operations Manual Part D. Training programs comply with the requirements of JAR-OPS 1 subpart O and RCAA LPN-5. After each training program, the crew member undergoes the required examination for obtaining the qualification and the license. All cabin crew members shall complete safety related training according the provisions contained in Medallion Air Operations Manual Part D. The Operations Manual Part D should identify the facilities, which are to be used for different parts of the training, and instructors should be listed together with their areas of expertise if appropriate. When external training facilities and organizations are to be used Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 13 May 2010

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they should be specified in the Operations Manual. 1.7.2. NEW ENTRANT CABIN CREW MEMBERS TRAINING Before undertaking assigned duties each cabin crew member must have completed the training specified below. He must also have passed the prescribed checks covering the training received in order to verify proficiency in carrying out safety and emergency procedures. For qualification to operate as one of the minimum required cabin crew each cabin crew member must have completed: 1. Initial safety training course - This course will contain the lessons required to operate as a cabin crew member in accordance with Medallion Air operations, both governmental and company specific; 2. Conversion or differences training - if they do not hold a valid license on Medallion Air airplane(s) type(s). 3. Airplane Visit 4. Observation and Familiarization Flights. The new entrant cabin crew member must participate in two familiarization flights of minimum four sectors, during each the new entrant cabin crew member is in addition to the minimum number of cabin crew. The familiarization flights are conducted by an instructor cabin crew. Note: Familiarization flights are conducted only after successfully completing the ground course and practical training. 1.7.2.1. INITIAL SAFETY TRAINING - EU-OPS OPS 1.1005 Initial safety training includes the following as a minimum: - Fire training and smoke training; - Water survival training; - Survival training; - Medical aspects and first aid; - Passenger handling; - Communication; - Discipline and responsibilities; - Crew Resource Management Initial safety training for cabin crew members is the basic requirement for all other parts of the training, including conversion training. It consists of: Theoretical and practical training on the ground about: - Company procedures, - Passenger handling, - Communications and crew coordination, - Cabin crew responsibilities and operating restrictions, - Normal duty procedures on board, Basic Emergency and Safety Equipment Training including: - Fire and smoke training, - Water survival training, - Survival training, if required (Polar, desert, jungle) - Airplane Evacuation/Crowd Control, Basic First Aid Training and Medical aspects, Crew Resource Management Training. The purpose of initial safety training for a cabin crew member is: - To familiarize him/her with the organization of the company, especially the organization of the flight operations department, - To ensure that he obtains the necessary skills and knowledge to deal with different types of emergency and survival situations, the emergency equipment and its location, - To inform him/her about the effect of lack of oxygen and the physiological phenomena accompanying a loss of pressurization (sudden decompression), Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 14 May 2010

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To instruct him in cabin safety general in relation to his flying duties, To familiarize him/her with the different airplane types and their equipment and furnishing, - To familiarize him/her with the company procedures in general and duties on board. During the course periodic written and oral tests monitor the trainee's ground training progress. Following completion of initial safety training each cabin crew member will undergo a check covering the training received in order to verify his proficiency in carrying out safety and emergency duties. 1.7.2.2. CONVERSION AND DIFFERENCES TRAINING (ref to EU-OPS 1.1010 Appendix 1) Conversion training includes the following as a minimum: - Normal procedures; - Fire training and smoke training; - Operation of doors and exits; - Evacuation slide training; - Evacuation and emergency procedures; - Crowd control; - Pilot incapacitation; - Safety equipment; - Passenger briefing/safety demonstrations; - Severe turbulence and rapid decompression - CRM CONVERSION TRAINING Conversion training follows initial safety training with emphasis on type specific emergency equipment and procedures. It consists of theoretical and practical training. Conversion training must be completed before: - Being assigned for familiarization flights, - First being assigned to operate as cabin crew member in MEDALLION AIR, - Being assigned to operate another airplane type. A review of previous initial safety training should be carried out in order to confirm that no item has been omitted. Following completion of initial safety training each cabin crew member will undergo a check covering the training received in order to verify his proficiency in carrying out safety and emergency duties on the airplane type. DIFFERENCES TRAINING Differences training must be completed before being assigned to operate: - On a variant of an airplane type currently operated, - With different equipment, equipment location, or safety procedures on currently operated airplane types or variants. SUBJECTS OF CONVERSION AND DIFFERENCES TRAINING - Fire and smoke training, - Operation of doors and exits, - Emergency evacuation slide training, - Evacuation procedures and emergency situations, - Crowd control, - Pilot incapacitation, - Safety equipment, - Passenger briefing/safety demonstration. 1.7.2.3. AIRPLANE VISIT The purpose of airplane visits is to familiarize each cabin crew member with the airplane environment and its equipment. Accordingly, airplane visits should be conducted by suitably qualified persons. MEDALLION AIR "Airplane Visit Form" should be completed by the qualified person for each applicant and should be forwarded to Cabin Crew Management. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 15 May 2010

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The airplane visit should provide an overview of the airplane's exterior, interior and systems including the following: - Interphone and public address systems; - Evacuation alarm systems; - Emergency lighting; - Smoke detection systems; - Safety/ emergency equipment; - Flight deck; - Cabin crew stations; - Toilet compartments; - Galleys, galley security and water shut-off valve; - Cargo areas if accessible from the passenger compartment during flight; - Circuit breaker panels located in the passenger compartment; - Crew rest areas; - Exit location and its environment. 1.7.2.4. FAMILIARIZATION FLIGHTS (ref to EU-OPS 1.1012) After completion of conversion training each cabin crew member undertakes familiarization flights prior to operating as one of the minimum number of cabin crew required. The number of familiarization fights required is prescribed by the Chief Cabin Crew/Crew training department according to RCAA LPN5 5603 and shall be appropriate to the type of airplane and taking account of the cabin crew member's previous training and experience as cabin crew member. The familiarization flights must be conducted by a Cabin Crew Instructor. 1.7.3. SENIOR CABIN CREW TRAINING For nomination of SCCM, it is required to at least 1 year flight experience as a cabin crew member and must complete the following training topics shown below: 1. Pre-flight briefing: - operating as a crew - allocation of cabin crew stations and responsibilities, - flight particularities, including airplane type, equipment, area and type of operation, and categories of passengers with particular attention to disabled, infants and stretcher cases, 2. Cooperation within the crew: - discipline, responsibilities and chain of command, - importance of coordination and communication, - pilot incapacitation 3. Review of operators requirements: - passenger safety briefing, safety cards, - securing of galleys, - stowage of cabin baggage, - electronic equipment, - procedures when fuelling with passengers on board, - turbulence, - documentation, 4. Accident and incident reporting 5. Flight and duty time limitations and rest requirements. 6. Human factors and crew resource management. CRM training: the operator shall ensure that all relevant elements in Appendix 2 to OPS1.1005/1.1010/1.1015 Table 1, Column (a) are integrated into the training and covered to the level required by Column (f), senior cabin crew course. 1.7.4. INSTRUCTOR TRAINING The Crew Training Post holder, in cooperation with Cabin Crew Manager, establishes the program for the theoretical and practical training and checking in full compliance with the Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 16 May 2010

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requirements RACR-LPN 6.901 and 904. After completion of the training program the candidate shall undergo an examination to demonstrate the required knowledge. The practical examination/check must be performed in compliance with RACR-LPN 5.904 by an examiner accepted by the RCAA. Instructor Training contains the following subjects: - Methods of learning - Methods of teaching - Learning philosophy - Learning techniques - Evaluation and validation of the information - Performing and improving the programs The instructors shall: - Act exemplary; - Inspire confidence and reliability; - Prove to have professional knowledge and sense of responsibility. 1.7.5. RECURRENT TRAINING EU-OPS 1.1015 Medallion Air will ensure that each cabin crew member undergoes recurrent training, covering the actions assigned to each crew member in normal and emergency procedures and drills relevant to the type(s) and/or variant(s) of airplane on which they operate in accordance with Appendix 1 to EU-OPS 1.1015. Medallion Air will also ensure that the recurrent training program approved by the Authority includes theoretical and practical instruction, together with individual practice, as prescribed in Appendix 1 to EU-OPS 1.1015. The period of validity of recurrent training and the associated checking required by EU-OPS 1.1025 shall be 12 calendar months in addition to the remainder of the month of issue. If issued within the final three calendar months of validity of a previous check, the period of validity shall extend from the date of issue until 12 calendar months from the expiry date of that previous check. The recurrent training includes the following: Every year: - Emergency procedures including pilot incapacitation; - Evacuation procedures including crowd control techniques; - Touch-drills for opening normal and emergency exits; - Location and handling of emergency equipment, including oxygen systems and the donning by each cabin crew member of lifejackets, portable oxygen and protective breathing equipment (PBE); - First aid and the contents of first aid kit(s); - Stowage of articles in the cabin; - Applicable dangerous goods procedures; - Security procedures; - Incident and accident occurrence review; - Crew Resource Management. Every three years (FLIGHT SIMULATOR): - Operation and opening of exits - The operation and actual opening of normal and emergency exits for passenger evacuation in airplane or representative training device. - Demonstration of all other exits, - Use of fire extinguishers and Protective Breathing Equipment (PBE) - Each cabin crew member being given realistic and practical training in the use of all fire-fighting equipment and protective clothing representative of that carried in the airplane, including each cabin crew member extinguishing a fire characteristic of an airplane interior fire except that, instead of Halon, an alternative extinguishing agent will be used. The donning and use of protective breathing equipment by each cabin crew member in an enclosed simulated smoke-filled environment. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 17 May 2010

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Pyrotechnics - Use of pyrotechnics - actual or representative devices Demonstration in the use of life rafts and slide rafts where applicable.

1.7.6. REFRESHER TRAINING - (Appendix 1 to EU-OPS 1.1020) Medallion Air will ensure that each cabin crew member who has been absent from all flying duties for more than 6 months and still remains within the period of the previous check required by EU-OPS 1.1025(b)3 completes refresher training specified in the Operations Manual as prescribed in Appendix 1 to OPS 1.1020. Medallion Air shall ensure that when a cabin crew member has not been absent from all flying duties, but has not, during the preceding six months, undertaken duties on a type of airplane as a cabin crew member required by OPS 1.990 (b), before undertaking such duties on that type, the cabin crew member must either: 1. completes refresher training on the type; 2. operates two re-familiarization sectors during commercial operations on the type. A cabin crew member must complete a refresher-training course after a period of absence from all flying duties for more than six months. Refresher training is only applicable for a period of six months absence from duty ending with the expiry of the previous check. Refresher training includes the following as a minimum: - Emergency procedures including pilot incapacitation; - Evacuation procedures including crowd control techniques; - Operation and actual opening of all normal and emergency exits for passenger evacuation in an aircraft or in a representative training device; - Demonstration of the operation of all other exits; - Location and handling of emergency equipment, including oxygen systems, and the donning of lifejackets, portable oxygen and Protective Breathing Equipment (PBE). Refresher training will be organized by the Training Department. 1.7.7. CHECKING EU-OPS 1.1025 At the discretion of the Authority, the Authority, the operator or the approved training organization providing the training course shall ensure that during or following completion of the training required by OPS 1.1005, 1.1010, 1.1015 and 1.1020, each cabin crew member undergoes a check covering the training received in order to verify his/her proficiency in carrying out normal and emergency safety duties. At the discretion of the Authority, the Authority, the operator or the approved training organization providing the training course shall ensure that the personnel performing these checks shall be suitably qualified. Medallion Air will ensure that each cabin crew member undergoes checks as follows: - initial safety training. The items listed in Appendix 1 to OPS 1.1005; - conversion and differences training. The items listed in Appendix 1 to OPS 1.1010; - recurrent training. The items listed in Appendix 1 to OPS 1.1015 as appropriate; - refresher training. The items listed in Appendix 1 to OPS 1.1020 1.7.8. CROWD CONTROL Training in the application of crowd control in various emergency situations will include: - communication between flight crew and cabin crew and use of all - communications equipment, including the difficulties of co-ordination in a smokefilled environment, - verbal commands and standard phraseology, - the physical contact that may be needed to encourage passengers out of an exit and onto a slide, - the re-direction of passengers away from unusable exits, - the marshalling of passengers away from the airplane, - the evacuation of disabled passengers, - authority and leadership.

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1.7.9. CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT TRAINING (CRM) Appendix 2 to EU-OPS 1.1005/1.1010/1.1015 CRM is the effective utilization of all available resources (e.g. crew members, airplane systems, and supporting facilities) to achieve safe and efficient operations. The objective of CRM is to enhance the communication and management skills of the flight crew member concerned. The emphasis is placed on the non-technical aspects of flight crew performance. During the training the emphasis will be placed on the importance of effective co-ordination and two way communications between flight crew and cabin crew in various abnormal and emergency situations including the use of correct terminology, common language, and effective use of communications equipment. The training includes: - Combined flight crew and cabin crew practice of airplane evacuations, - Joint discussion of emergency scenarios between flight crew and cabin crew, - Identifying unusual situations that might occur inside the cabin as well as activities outside the airplane that could affect the safety of the airplane or passengers, - The nature of operations as well as the associated crew operating procedures and areas of operations which produce particular difficulties, - Discussion of climate conditions and unusual hazards. CRM training should include the following elements: - Statistics and examples of Human Factor related accidents; - Human perception, learning process; - Situational awareness; - Management of workload, tiredness or fatigue, and vigilance - management of stress; - MEDALLION AIR Standard Operating Procedures; - Personality type, delegation, leadership, and effective communication skills; - The CRM loop: - Inquiry (or explore, examine, scrutinize) - Advocacy (support a cause; present a view) - Notion of Conflict resolution - Synergy Decision making - Critique - Feedback - Effective communication and co-ordination within the flight crew, and between crew members and other operational personnel (Air Traffic Controllers, maintenance personnel); - Error chain and taking actions to break the error chain; - Implications of automation on CRM. CRM training should also address the nature of the company's operations as well as the associated crew operating procedures. This will include areas of operations which produce particular difficulties, adverse climatologically conditions and any unusual hazards. CRM training should include both: - Classroom training, - Practical exercises including group discussions and accident reviews to analyze communication problems and instances or examples of a lack of information or crew management. Ideally, the CRM training course should last a minimum of 3 days, but providing the whole syllabus is covered, then a 2-day course may be acceptable. As part of the acceptance of the Operations Manual, the CRM course (for conversion and recurrent training) should also be accepted by the Authority. Crew Resource Management is the discipline within the larger field of Human Factors, focus on the skills and methods used by the aircrew to manage people, machines, policies, and the environment. CRM develops the skills, techniques, attitudes, and behaviors aircrews use to direct, control and co-ordinate all available resources towards the safe and effective operation of their aircraft. These skill, enhance the safety and effectiveness of your crew (pilots and cabin crew) as well as the expanded team (dispatch, line maintenance, ramp service, etc.) Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 19 May 2010

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Crew - Pilots, Cabin crew members, and expanded team. Resource - People, Skills, Equipment, and services. Management - To Direct, Control, Co-ordinate. Effective management and leadership are manifested in several ways, the most important of which is safety in flight operations: - A crew member must possess and apply good CRM skills; - Technical and procedural knowledge is the foundation for good CRM; - The more technically and procedurally proficient you are as a crew, the easier it will be to integrate CRM behaviors and techniques to create excellence; - Inquiry, advocacy, and assertion by crew/team members allow for better informed decisions but do not reduce Commander's authority. Over 60% of all accidents are caused by human factors breakdowns. Experience and research show that crews with very good crew management skills are less likely to make errors. A chart of different aspects that affects human factors is presented below:

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1.7.10. TRAINING RECORDS EU-OPS 1.1035 Medallion Air will: - maintain records of all training and checking required by OPS 1.1005, 1.1010, 1.1015, 1.1020 and 1.1025; - keep a copy of the attestation of safety training; - keep the training records and records of medical examinations or assessments up to date, showing in the case of the training records the dates and contents of the conversion, differences and recurrent training received; and - make the records of all initial, conversion and recurrent training and checking available, on request, to the cabin crew member concerned. All cabin crew training records are kept by the Crew Training Department.

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1.8. PERSONNEL RULES
1.8.1. BEHAVIOR Every crew member must be aware that he is a representative of the MEDALLION AIR and that people will identify his appearance with MEDALLION AIR. The image of an airline depends largely on the behavior of every employee. Crew members are always at the center of interest, also when traveling Deadhead. Therefore, loud welcome ceremonies are prohibited as well as confidential talks about MEDALLION AIR subjects in public or with other crews or other crew members on duty. Conduct yourself toward our customers, fellow employees and represent the company with professional integrity and courtesy. Conduct yourself, on or off duty, in a way that does not reflect negatively on the company. Create a happy, warm, welcoming atmosphere, greeting passengers with a smile and cheerfulness during boarding and at any time interacting with passengers during the flight. Help passengers to their seats, help stow their baggage and pay special attention to passengers with special needs ie: UM, mothers with infants, elderly passengers, wheelchairs, VIPs, etc. Ensure and maintain a clean environment before and during the flight, through constant monitoring of aircraft cabins, galleys, and toilets especially during night flights. Answer passenger call bells promptly and attend to their needs efficiently. If requirements can't be met, an explanation must be given and an alternative must be offered. During non-service times, cabin crew is expected to maintain passenger contact through canvassing, anticipation of passenger's needs. Ensure passenger belongings that are handed over to crew during flight for safe keeping are handled with care and returned to passengers at the end of the flight. Keep passengers informed at all times of any delays diversions and disruptions, giving reasons for such occurrences, updating passengers on any changes to ground arrangements, transfers, etc. Ensure proper hand over to the crew taking over so that existing requests, problems, needs etc are passed on and joining crew are fully briefed so that follow up actions can be taken. Report for duty on time, well rested, in a fit state and in possession of all required (valid) documents. Ensure conformance to uniform regulations, respect and obey the chain of command on ground and in flight. If a problem arises, report your absence as far in advance as possible to Cabin Crew Management. Display decent conduct whilst in uniform and when not in uniform either at base or outstations. Should adhere to local laws and regulations, dress neatly and modestly, and safeguard the image and reputation of during lay over periods. Politeness and kindness should be the outstanding characteristics of every crew member. With regard to public opinion, locations will not be visited even when not in uniform, where the possibility of a wrong impression to outsiders exists especially during night stops. All crew members should ensure that they themselves and their colleagues always comply with the above regulations. Conversations on the aircraft whether they are with other cabin crew members, passengers, or flight crew members must be pertinent to the cabin crew duties. All conversations are to be low key and discreet. Cabin crew members must avoid socializing with passengers or company personnel. Inappropriate conduct and disturbing of passengers is often caused by: Excessive drinking and/or noise; Inappropriate appearance; Boarding and deplaning prior to passengers; Discussions regarding personal affairs, Company rules, regulations and procedures, union business, gossip, etc; Cabin crew members should not: Sit or lean on arm rests, seats backs nor sit on their suitcase(s) while in uniform; Consume alcoholic beverages or frequent an area where alcoholic beverages are Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 22 May 2010

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served (i.e. lounge, bar, tavern, etc.) while in uniform; Chewing of gum while in uniform; Sitting down while talking to a passenger; Sitting down and reading news papers in front of a passenger. Note: Cabin crew members will tactfully refuse to accept tips and gratuities offered by passengers. Any cabin crew, who either misconducts or commits any act of an illegal nature which harms, or has the potential to harm the Company's public reputation, will be subject to disciplinary action which may include dismissal. Note: Cabin crew members traveling as extra crew or DHC shall not interfere with the operating crew during the flight. 1.8.2. IDENTIFICATION CARDS (ID) & NAME BADGES Each crew member has the responsibility to ensure that his/her identification card is valid. The ID card remains Medallion Air property and must be returned upon leaving the Company. The ID card must not be lent or disposed of in any manner. If the card is lost, it must be immediately reported to Cabin Crew Management or to the Station Manager (when away from home base), and a replacement card obtained. Medallion Air crew identification cards must be worn in plain view at any time the crew member is in uniform and is within a secure area of any terminal. Do not fix the ID to the inside flap of purse or underside of a lapel. 1.8.3. PERSONAL DOCUMENTS For flight duty, the crew members have to carry the following documents: - Valid license, - Medical certificate, - Identity card, - Valid passport, - Emergency training certificate simulator, - First aid certificate, - Dangerous goods certificate, - Visa - if required, - Vaccination card - if required, - SCCM certificate if applicable. Each crew member is responsible for the validity of his documents. He/she has to take care in time for issue, renewal, and extension of his documents. 1.8.4. UNIFORM The uniform portrays the image of MEDALLION AIR. The person that wears the uniform represents MEDALLION AIR. Unauthorized alterations of uniform are not permitted. Nonuniform items of clothing must not be visible when worn with uniform. The individual crewmember is responsible for laundry and dry-cleaning. 1.8.4.1. UNIFORM REGULATIONS Each cabin crew member should wear the uniform and accessories which is given by the company. In case of other than flight duties which are given by the company and no other instructions are determined there is no obligation to wear the uniform (eg. fares, Domestic positioning flights, etc.). Following the uniform regulations it is forbidden to wear any other clothes or accessories. MEDALLION AIR gives the uniform to all crew members free of charge. In case of missing parts and damage of the uniform or accessories, cabin crew members are responsible to obtain the same type of uniform or accessories. If the cabin crew requests another one, the company may ask for a fee. Resigned cabin crew members are obliged to surrender the uniform and accessories to the company. Wearing the uniform - or parts of it - is only allowed during flight duty, on the way from Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 23 May 2010

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and to the duty and on deadhead flights. It is not allowed to wear the uniform in bars, nightclubs, or dance halls. For unforeseen night stops the crewmembers should have spare clothes in the hand luggage. UNIFORM AND ACCESORIES - Uniforms must be clean, stainless and ironed. - Jacket and vest buttons must be complete. Brooch must be attached to the upper jacket pocket on the left. On boarding and de-boarding jackets must be worn. Only by the permission of the purser the whole cabin crew can take off their jackets due to the hot weather conditions. - Overcoat buttons must be buttoned up. Overcoats must not be worn during boarding and de-boarding. Only by the permission of the purser they can be worn at the door areas due to the cold weather conditions. - Shirts must be clean and ironed. Sleeves must not be folded up. Anything like accessories, brevets etc. should not be attached to the collars. Dark colored underwear should not be worn under uniform. - Foulards must not be worn as a necktie. - During the flights, standard suitcases and hand bags which are provided by the company can be used. If needed, suitable models and colored individual suitcases may be used. Cabin crew members can not use their company suitcases for their personal use. Stickers and accessories other than name labels cannot be attached to the suitcases and handbags. FEMALE: - Uniform skirts must not be shortened. It can be 5 cm above the knees at most. - The stocking color is designated by the Cabin Crew Management. Attention must be paid not to wear them laddered or worn out. Females must carry an extra pair of stockings and a spare blouse in their carry-on case. - Uniform Shoes: A smart dress shoe with a business-like look in smooth black leather is required. Only one style (plain pump-fully enclosed) is to be worn at ALL TIMES en route to/from the aircraft. Shoes shall be polished and in good condition at all times, paying particular attention to the heels. NOT ACCEPTABLE: wet look, patent leather, suede, canvas; wedges, chunky/loafer styles, platforms, crepe, cork or rubber soles; any styles with laces, bows, straps or buckle or excess gathering at seams. - Cabin Shoes: Plain pump with low walking heel, plain wedge or fully enclosed leather shoe in black color. Must look like normal shoes, without clips, plain, dark blue and leather. Galley shoes are to be clean, polished and in good condition at all times. NOT ACCEPTABLE: sling backs (open heels), open toes, sandals, clogs, chunky trims, styles with long ties, Chinese Slippers, moccasins or sued. Uniform Winter Boots: A plain, smooth, black knee length leather boot is the acceptable style. NOT ACCEPTABLE: Suede leather, wet look, patent leather; extreme, trendy styles, platform soles in excess of 1 cm; very thin, high heels, more than one zipper per boot. No fancy designs, adornments or excessive, elaborate stitching. - Watches: Each cabin crew must wear a watch in suitable color and size. Watches must be plain, fairly conservative and have a simple, complimentary strap, which is in harmony with the rest of the uniform. Over-size, trendy, ring or pendent watches are not acceptable. - Jewelry and accessories must be chosen with care. Piercing is not allowed. Rings: If worn should be simple, in good taste and smooth in style, so as not encumber your services or create a safety hazard. A total of 3 rings may be worn. No more than 2 on one hand, one on the other. A wedding/engagement set is considered as one ring. Bracelets: Very fine, small, gold or silver chain wrist bracelets permitted. Maximum width of the chain link must not exceed 1 cm. Only one bracelet may be worn. Medic Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 24 May 2010

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Alert bracelets are also allowed (this should be recorded on your personnel file). NO ankle bracelets may be worn with the uniform. Necklaces: It is not acceptable to wear a necklace or chain above the blouse or dress at any time. Earrings: One small earring, no bigger than 1 cm diameter, on each ear is allowed. Brooch: Only Medallion Air brooch is allowed. - Sunglasses: If worn are to be of medium size, in good taste and not excessively ornate, extreme or bright in color. They are not to be worn in terminal buildings, hotels, in the aircraft or anywhere else where you may be in contact with passengers. Eyeglasses: Contact lenses are preferred, however, if eyeglasses are worn, the following regulations must be adhering to: Eyeglasses must contain safe lenses; Frames must be conservative in style and in proportion with facial structure; Frames may be gold or silver metal or a conservative shade of plastic without adornment; Glasses must be conservative in size; oversized or extremely shaped lens or frames and half glasses are not permitted; Glasses are not to be pushed up on the head or worn on a chain around the neck; Sun sensitive or dark tined lenses are not permitted; A supplementary pair of eyeglasses must always be worn in the carry-on case. MALE: - Males must carry an extra shirt. In addition, it is advisable to carry a sewing kit at all times in order to ensure that the uniform is in good repair: buttons not missing, hems secured properly, etc. - Uniform Shoes: A smart dress shoe with a business-like look in smooth black leather is required. Shoes shall be polished and in good condition at all times. Uniform Winter Boots: A plain, smooth, black leather boot is the only acceptable style. - Watches must be and in general, compliment the uniform. They must be relatively plain, with a simple silver, gold, black, brown, or navy band. - Jewelry and accessories must be chosen with care and appear masculine, not gaudy, trendy or ostentatious. Bracelets: A very fine small gold chain wrist bracelet is permitted. Maximum width of the chain link must not exceed 1 cm. Only one bracelet may be worn. Medic Alert bracelets are also allowed. (This should be recorded on your personnel file). Necklaces/Chains/Religious Medals that are never removed are to be concealed inside the uniform. Rings: If worn, should be simple, in good taste and smooth in style so as not to encumber your service or create a safety hazard. Ornate and excessively large rings are not permitted. A total of 1 ring and 1 wedding ring may be worn. Cufflinks: Cufflinks are not permitted. The uniform shirt must have a buttoned cuff. - Sunglasses: If worn in uniform are to be of medium size, in good taste and not excessively ornate, extreme or bright in color. They are not to be worn in terminal buildings, hotels, on the aircraft or anywhere else where you may be in contact with passengers. The shape of the frame should compliment the shape of your face. Eyeglasses: See Female accessories. 1.8.5. GENERAL APPEARANCE Professional look should be maintained at all times; Cabin crew members should not sit or lean on arm rests or seat backs; Cabin crew members should not sit on their suitcase(s) while in uniform; Personal cleanliness and hygiene must be maintained at all times, including the use of an effective deodorant or anti-perspirant; Avoid eating foods containing garlic, onion or strong seasoning prior to report for Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 25 May 2010

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duty; Males are not permitted to wear beards, with the exception of moustaches which are to be well trimmed and not extend below the corners of the mouth (upper lip must be completely visible); Females should keep their legs and underarms free of apparent hair; Complexion should be clean, smooth and clear; Teeth must be clean and well cared for at all times; Fingernails are to be well cared for and clean at all times; Hair should be kept clean, neat, dandruff free and be styled simply and attractively as well as shaped and conditioned regularly; Combing hair in view of the public is not acceptable.

FEMALE - Hair: Must be clean, neat, well cared for and dandruff free. Hair styles should be simple, attractive and conventional, complimenting the individual and be conducive to uniformity. Trendy or unkempt styles are unacceptable. It is not acceptable to simply wash your hair and style without drying it properly prior to flight duty. Wet hair, wet look, excessive use of gel or mousse is not acceptable while in uniform. Extreme hair colors or styles are not allowed. Hairpieces: May be worn providing they appear natural and adhere to the hair regulations. They must match natural hair in color and texture and be of a good quality. Long hair must be tied in a knot or braid. It must be secured so as not to fall forward into your face while serving. Braiding may be used as part of a flattering hairstyle such as French Braids, rolled hairstyles, hair braided and secured in a bun. NOTE: Braids twisted around the ears like buns, looped at the sides, pinned over the top of the head, pigtails, extreme bouffant, long, loose styles or any obvious last minute attempt at makeshift hair arrangements are NOT acceptable. - Make-up: A cabin crew can not join a flight or a deadheading without makeup. It must be refreshed regularly during the flight. Extreme makeup colors are not allowed. When properly applied, it allows you to enhance your assets. The most important rule to remember is to keep your makeup natural. It should be compatible with your skin, hair and uniform color. A moisturizer and foundation prior to make-up application will help combat cabin dryness. Make-up is to be applied to achieve a natural, healthy glow. Muted shades of reds, pinks and clear polish are recommended. Colors such as chalk white, blue, etc. any fashion extremes are not acceptable. Lipstick color must be suitable with the uniform. As cabin lighting tends to give one a rather "washed out" look, pale make-up should be avoided. False eyelashes may be worn, however, they are not to be extremely long or thick, and are to be applied proficiently to the natural lash line. Use your utmost discretion when choosing the type of lashes, taking into consideration your natural coloring. When choosing a lipstick or lip gloss for duty flying, thought should be given to its moisturizing and long lasting qualities. Again, the shade you choose should compliment your hair and skin tone, as well as co-ordinate with the color of the uniform and nail polish (if worn). - Hand and nail care. Hands must be well cared and the nails must be buffed or polished. Nail polish colors must compliment the uniform and the lipstick. Extreme colors are not allowed. Muted shades of red, pinks and clear polish are recommended. - Every cabin crew member is responsible for keeping their weight at normal standards. - Undergarments: A bra must be worn when in uniform. - Perfumes/colognes: Are to be used conservatively. Some perfumes can be overpowering in a confined area as the aircraft. Light perfumes appropriate to the skin must be used. MALE - Hair: Hairstyles should be simple, attractive and properly shaped and trimmed on a regular basis. Hair must not fall forward and into your face while serving and should Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 26 May 2010

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not conceal the lower half of the ears, appear unkempt, nor should it extend below me top of your shirt collar while in uniform. Combing hair in view of the passengers is not acceptable. Hair should be kept clean, neat, dandruff free and conditioned regularly. Males should be clean shaven, with the exception of moustaches. Moustaches are permitted providing they are well shaped and properly maintained. They may not extend below the corner of the mouth and should not be grown while on flight status. Moustaches must be conservative. (Upper lip must be completely visible: false or waxed moustaches, beards, goatees are not permitted). Hand and Nail Care: Hands and nails are to be well cared for. Nails must be kept trimmed and clean. Nicotine stains are very unattractive; they may be bleached by the use of a lemon or a wet pumice stone. Hand lotion should be used regularly. Lotions/Colognes: Are to be used conservatively. Keep in mind that certain lotions or colognes for men can be very over-powering, particularly in a confined area such as an aircraft.

1.8.6. CIVIL DRESSING Every crew member must take care of her dressing, hair and make up whether they are in uniform or civil dressed at any place where they represent MEDALLION AIR. They must pay attention to dressing clean and tidy. Cabin crew members should not wear extremely striking clothes, mini skirts, shorts, tights overly sportive clothes at the seminars, meetings or courses provided by the company. 1.8.7. CREW BAGGAGE Only personal luggage is considered as crew baggage. It must have the special label for crew members, to be recognizable as Crew Baggage. Stickers on the baggage are not allowed. At no time crew baggage are to be left unattended in a public place. All checked baggage must have a personal identification tag, or a crew tag. Crew tag must contain the following information: full name, home base, flight number and destination. Crew members must not accept for carriage sealed parcels from the third parties. Any package belonging to a crew member shall at all times be carried by the crew member concerned. Each crew member is responsible for the handling and security of his personal baggage. Adherence to the following procedures is required: Keep the bags locked when not used; Maintain security of the entire carry-on bag; Make sure all items in his/her bags are his/her belongings, before leaving the hotel, and have not been tampered with; Keep the bags in view at all times in public areas such as lobbies, restaurants, restrooms, hotel or terminal buildings; Never accept anything for carriage, given by strangers, fellow employees or acquaintances. Note: Stow all personal belongings upon boarding the aircraft. Such items must not obstruct emergency equipment or aisles. All luggage and purses will be stowed for take-off, turbulence and landing. 1.8.8. DEADHEADING Deadheading Cabin crews are to be done in street clothing. Deadheading Cabin crews are to remain seated and let the Cabin crew working the trip perform their duties. A deadheading Cabin crew will not drink or be served any alcoholic beverage. Appearance standards are to be maintained by deadheading Cabin crews such as hair regulations, make-up, grooming, etc. All deadheading crew members must return on their scheduled deadheading flight. This includes all destinations. 1.8.9. SMOKING A Cabin crew may smoke in uniform when seated in a public dining room or restaurant, or when traveling in a car or while seated in the gate area out of view of passengers. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 27 May 2010

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1.8.10. NIGHT STOPS/STOP OVER AWAY FROM HOME BASE All crew members will comply with all instructions required for the specific country before leaving the aircraft. After the flight, they will meet the commander for the debriefing and in order to receive information for accommodation, transport to the hotel and departure from the hotel to the airport. Pick up time for crew transportation to the airport will be advised by the commander. It should be arranged so that the crew will arrive at the airport at least 1 hour 30 min. before scheduled time of departure. Usually all crew members will use crew transport and accommodation provided by MEDALLION AIR. In case no accommodation is required, the commander must be informed by the crew member and asked for permission prior to departing. He shall leave his contact details with the commander. CONTACT OF CREW ABROAD On crew station (hotel) abroad, crew members will be back at the hotel from trips outside the town at least 2 hours before pick-up time, but in no case later than at midnight the evening before departure. Each crew member shall always observe the minimum rest time according to OM. Crew members will keep the commander informed about their absence. The commander shall leave his phone number, or deposit his contact address at the hotel desk whenever he leaves the hotel for more than two hours. 1.8.11. CUSTOMS REGULATIONS DUTY FREE SHOPPING When on duty, Cabin Crew must ask captains permission before going duty-free shopping. A departure must never be delayed because the crew is duty free shopping, nor should passengers get such an impression. CUSTOMS AND CURRENCY REGULATIONS All crew members have to pass through customs, immigration, currency control, etc. locally as prescribed. Everybody has to comply with the local customs and other special immigration regulations, which may often be more restrictive for crew members than for passengers. Crew members must declare all duty liable goods and are responsible for duty charges on those goods. The same policy applies to restrictions on import or export currencies. VIOLATION OF CUSTOMS OR CURRENCY REGULATIONS It must be clearly understood that non-compliance with the customs regulations and other official controls is a very serious offence against the MEDALLION AIR Airlines regulations and the laws and regulations of a foreign country. Anybody caught smuggling or willfully breaking the currency or other regulations can expect immediate dismissal from the MEDALLION AIR as well as heavy fines or even imprisonment by the state concerned.

STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS A crew member's sickness/illness, his feeling unwell/indisposed or the impairment of his senses and reflexes by narcotics, drugs or pharmaceutical preparations/medicaments have quite often contributed to incidents and accidents. No person may serve as a crew member knowing that he has a physical deficiency or mental condition that would render him unable to meet the requirements of his current medical certificate, to discharge his responsibilities to a safe standard or could endanger the safety of the aircraft or its occupants. Crew members should not undertake flying duties whilst under the influence of alcohol, narcotics, drugs or any medicine that was not approved by the medical department for use for crew members like sleeping tablet. A crew member shall not perform duties on airplane if he is in any doubt of being able to accomplish his assigned duties or if he knows or suspects that he is suffering from fatigue, Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 28 May 2010

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or feels unfit to the extend that the flight may be endangered. Therefore, crew health is of the highest importance and has a direct impact upon flight safety. 1.9.1. ILLNESS OR INCAPACITATION WHILE ON DUTY Any crew member who become ill or incapacitated while on flight duty or during a stop over period at an outstation must report the mater to the commander at the earliest opportunity. Commander should be aware that a sudden deterioration in health might be an indication of the onset of a dangerous or infectious complaint. Carriage of a flight crew or cabin crew member who is ill is not authorized without permission from the medical department. Carriage of ill crew member could prejudice the company position in several ways: - International health regulations; - Liability to the staff member concerned, should a serious illness issue; The commander must ensure that a doctor is called at the earliest opportunity to examine the crew member concerned. A certificate must be obtained stating whether the individual is fit for duty, or alternatively for travel. The commander is authorized to arrange any tests necessary to ascertain the condition of the individual concerned. The commander and the crew member must submit a written report as soon as practicable after return to the main base. The commander should arrange for the arrival time of the crew member at the main base to be notified to the medical department. The commander has an overall responsibility for ensuring that all of the crew is fit for duty, even if report of sickness is not received. Where any doubt exists, the commander must ensure that the doctor sees the individual concerned and that the report from that doctor is forwarded to the main base, if possible on the flight concerned and failing this at the earliest opportunity. 1.9.2. QUARANTINE REGULATIONS When a person on board shows symptoms which might indicate the presence of a major disease, the commander must ensure that the aerodrome's medical or health authorities have been informed. It is the responsibility of the aerodrome medical authority to decide whether isolation of the airplane, crew and passengers is necessary. On arrival, nobody shall be permitted to board the airplane or, disembark or, attempt to off load cargo or catering until such time as authorized by the aerodrome medical or health authority. Each station, in conjunction with the aerodrome's medical or health authorities will devise a plan, which would provide, when necessary, for: - The transport of suspected cases of infectious diseases by selected ambulance to a designated hospital; - The transfer of passengers and crew to a designated lounge or waiting area, where they can be isolated from other passengers until cleared by the aerodrome medical or health authorities; - The decontamination of the airplane, passenger baggage, cargo and mail and any isolation lounges used by passengers or crew suspected of having infectious diseases. 1.9.3. BLOOD DONATION Crew members should not volunteer as blood donors whilst actively flying. A crew member should not donate blood within 48 hours before a flight assignment. 1.9.4. DEEP SEA DIVING Crew members whose sporting activities include deep sea diving to a depth exceeding 10 meters will not fly within 48 hours of completing such diving activity. 1.9.5. FOOD HYGIENE, POISONING Cases of acute food poisoning in the air continue to occur sporadically and surveys of Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 29 May 2010

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incapacitation of flight crew in flight show that of these cases, gastro-intestinal disorders pose by far the commonest threat to flight safety. No other illness can put a whole crew out of action so suddenly and so severely, thereby immediately and severely endangering a flight, as food poisoning. Any food, which has been kept in relatively high ambient temperatures for several hours after preparation, should be regarded with extreme suspicion. This applies particularly to the cream or pastry, which is commonly part of a meal-set. The re-heating process usually used in airplane for the main course of a meal rarely destroys food poisoning organisms and the toxins they produce. These toxins are tasteless and do not cause any unpleasant odors. Since the most acute forms of food poisoning frequently come on suddenly 1-6 hours after contaminated food is eaten, common sense rules should be observed as far as practicable in respect of meals taken within 6 hours of a flight. For any crew member, before and during flight it is essential to avoid eating easily perishable food as well as foods and drinks served cold. This is most important with milk and cream products, mayonnaise, sauces, salads, meat pies and other meat products. Symptoms and treatment of poisoning The character and severity of the symptoms depend on the nature and dose of the toxin and the resistance of the patient. Onset may be sudden. Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, intestinal gurgling, diarrhea and varying degree of prostration may be experienced. Severe cases should hospitalize. Treatment is mostly symptomatic and all cases should be seen by doctor. 1.9.6. HUMIDITY The relative humidity of cabin air is much lower in flight than we are normally accustomed to. Coffee and especially black coffee, being a diuretic (kidney stimulant) can be exacerbating the effects of reduced humidity symptoms resulting from low humidity, like dryness of the nose, mouth and throat and general fatigue. Consumption of water and soft drinks is a simple and efficient remedy that should not be neglected by the crew members. 1.9.7. DIURNAL RHYTHM It is well-established fact that our bodies have a diurnal cycle or rhythm. This means that our chemical, psychological and physiological activity is high during our normal sleeping. They reach the lowest point at about 4 a.m. When we fly across time zones, that are either east-west or west-east, we may interrupt our diurnal cycle. However, there is no proof that this harmful to our health. To minimize the truing effects of interruption to our day-night biological we should: - Adhere as much as possible to home time for sleeping and eating when away from home, - Take adequate rest before flight - Eat light snacks in three or four hour intervals to increase alertness. 1.9.8. FATIGUE Any crew member shall not commence a flight duty or continue a flight duty after an intermediate landing if he is aware that he is too fatigued or will be to fatigue before next landing. Basic responsibility in fatigue management rests with the individual crew member that should report for duty in a reasonably rested state and in a fit state to perform his expected duty. This includes attention to such factors as sleep, personal fitness and health, lifestyle and activities prior to flight due allowance for any adverse effects of factors should be taken into account to ensure that fatigue which would significantly affect operating performance is not encountered during flight duties. Negative occurrences, such as sleep disturbance and/or "circadian disruption" (resynchronizations of the internal body clock), may be successfully counteracted if proper preventive action is undertaken. Flight duty shall be commenced in good physical and mental condition, well rested with appropriate personal conduct with regard to sleep, suitable nutrition and consideration of Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 30 May 2010

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the effects of medicaments, alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, etc. 1.9.9. USE OF DRUGS AND PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS Crew members should not undertake flying duties while under the influence of any drug that may adversely affect performance. They should know that many commonly used drugs have side effects liable to impair judgments and interfere with performance. Ideally, crew members should not fly on duty whilst taking any medication. When in doubt, CC should contact the medical department to establish whether medication being taken precludes flight duties or not. The following are some of the types of medication in common use which may impair reactions. There are many others and when in doubt, a crew member should consult the medical department. Alcohol, combined with most of the types of medication is a most undesirable and dangerous combination. Analgesics (Pain killer) - With a lot of analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents, there is risk of gastric irritation or hemorrhage. Ideally doctor's advice should be sought before using them. Antibiotics - The underlying condition for which antibiotics are being taken may prevent a pilot from flying. However, most antibiotics are compatible with flying. Obviously, where any hypersensitivity is feared, the suspect antibiotic must not be used. A pilot should have previous experience of the antibiotic prescribed, or, alternatively, have a trial of it for at least 24 hours on the ground before using it during flight duties. Anti-diarrheas - As a lot of medications used in treating symptoms of gastritis and enteritis (diarrheas) may cause sedation, blurring of vision, etc., great care must be exercised in their usage by crew members. In most cases grounding for a time may be necessary. Anti-histamines - All antihistamines can produce side effects such as sedation, fatigue and dryness of the mouth. Quite commonly they are included in medication for treatment of the common cold, hay fever and allergic rashes or reactions. Some nasal sprays and drops may also contain antihistamines. Anti-hypertensive (Drugs for treating blood pressure) - Certain therapeutic agents are compatible with flying activity. They should be prescribed only by a doctor experienced in aviation medicine and sufficient time must be allowed to assess suitability and freedom from side effects before resumption flight duties. Anti-malarial - Most anti-malarial preparations used for prevention and taken in recommended dosage are considered safe for flight duties. Appetite suppressants - These preparations can affect the central nervous system and should not be taken during flight duties. Sleeping tablets - Use of the sleeping tablets is discouraged. - They may dull the senses, cause confusion and slow reactions. - On rare occasions the use of a sleeping pill may be considered necessary. However, only mild, short-acting sleeping pills are authorized. They need to have been prescribed by an authorized doctor. Steroids (Cortisone, etc.) - Use of steroids, with few exceptions, precludes flight duties. Tranquilizers, antidepressants and psychotic drugs - All these types of drugs preclude crew member from flight duties because of the underlying condition for which they are being used as well as the possible side effects resulting from them. Flight duties should not be resumed until treatment with these types of drugs has been discontinued and until the effects of the drugs have entirely worn off. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 31 May 2010

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This can take several days in some instances.

1.9.10. PROBLEMATIC USE OF PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The problematic use of psychoactive substances is prohibited. All flight crew members who are identified as engaging in any kind of problematic use of psychoactive substances shall be removed from safety-critical functions. Re-instatement of such person to safety-related duties shall be made gradually, only after healing has been achieved and documented through qualified institution. 1.9.11. CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL Under no circumstances may any crew member consume alcohol in any form within 8 hours of commencing flight duty or standby until the end of the flight duty or standby. Crew members must not commence a flight duty period with a blood alcohol level in excess of 0.2 grams per liter. Crew members while flying deadheading may consume alcohol if civilian clothing is worn and the restrictions as stated above are not affected. As a matter of company policy, crew members in uniform (e.g. after termination of flight duty; dead-heading crew members) will not consume alcoholic beverages where they can be observed by third parties, i.e., the public. Problematic Use of Alcohol The problematic use of alcohol is prohibited. All flight crew members who are identified as engaging in any kind of problematic use of alcohol shall be removed from safety-critical functions. Re-instatement of such person to safety-related duties shall be made gradually, only after healing has been achieved and documented through qualified institution. 1.9.12. VISION Vision Correction All flight crew members who are required by the licensing authorities to wear corrective lenses in order to satisfy visual requirements laid down for granting of licenses, are required to carry a spare pair of spectacles with them on all occasions whilst operating their license. Spectacles, either corrective or anti-glare, when worn by flight crew during flight, should be of a type of frame that allows maximum peripheral vision. The examination for the prescription of a spectacle correction should ideally be carried out by an examiner who is aware of the problems of vision in aviation. Near Vision Correction Where the only correction necessary is for reading, CC should never use full lens spectacles while flying, because the CCs task requires frequent changes from near to distant vision and the latter is blurred by reading glasses. Half moon spectacles or lower segment lenses with a neutral upper segment should be used in these circumstances. Near and Distant Vision Correction Where correction for both near and distant vision is required, bifocal lenses are essential and CCs should discuss with their medical examiner the shape and size most suitable for each segment. Where triple correction is necessary for reading, the instrument panel range and distant vision, then specialist advice is required. Use of Contact Lenses Contact lenses provide better peripheral vision and are not subject to misting. Therefore, many CC are attracted to the idea of wearing them instead of spectacles. But there are a number of problems; among these: - As the cornea does not have its own blood supply, it obtains its oxygen from the ambient air. Mild hypoxia and dehydration, caused by low humidity in the flight deck, increase the potential for cornea damage when using contact lenses; - Cabin decompression may result in bubble formation under the contact lenses; - The lens may be dislodged by careless rubbing of the eyes, an accidental knock or increased G forces. The use of the contact lenses by crew members is permitted only under authorized medical supervision. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 32 May 2010

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Bi-focal contact lenses are prohibited. Should a crew member be cleared by the Authorities to use contact lenses for flying, it will be on the provision that a pair of ordinary spectacles is carried at all times while practicing the privileges of his license. Sunglasses Sunglasses can reduce vision drastically; therefore, they should only be used when necessary. Sunglasses with maximum peripheral vision are recommended. These must not be polarized as they may cause blurred and reduced vision when used in airplane with laminated windshields. 1.9.13. IMMUNIZATION Medical advice is to be sought concerning the period to be observed before returning to flying duties following immunization. All crew members are responsible for the validity of their vaccination certificates. All data concerning the period of validity of a vaccination are given in the respective document. All crew members shall present their vaccination certificates to the appropriate authorities when required to do so. Flying personnel are liable to currently mandatory vaccinations recommended by domestic and international sanitary regulations. Furthermore, anti-A and -B hepatitis, anti-typhoid and anti-meningitis vaccination must be highly recommended. There is no contra-indication against vaccination for flying personnel except in cases of immunodeficiency, and vaccination must be strongly recommended. It induces no flying restriction. In accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) International Health Regulations many countries prescribe vaccination of crew members and passengers against defined diseases, often specifying that such immunization is only required upon entry "after leaving or transiting infected areas". Each crew member scheduled for flight duty abroad must satisfy any requirement(s) for vaccination(s), to have himself vaccinated in time, and to be able to produce - during his tour of duty - the appropriate WHO-approved "Certificate of Vaccination or Re-vaccination". Vaccination/re-vaccination will take place not less than 24 hours before commencement of flight duty; in case of strong reaction medical advice will be obtained in view of a possible impairment of fitness for flight duty. No alcoholic beverages will be consumed for a period of at least 24 hours after vaccination. Vaccinations, which may be obligatory, and their validity: - Yellow fever (from 10 days after, until 10 years after vaccination). Vaccinations, which are recommended, and their validity: - Cholera (from 7 days until 6 months after vaccination); - Typhoid (from 7 days until 3 years after vaccination); - Poliomyelitis (after 3 vaccinations up to 10 years); - Tetanus (after 3 vaccinations up to 10 years). Malaria prophylaxis, though not immunization in the strict sense of the word, should be mentioned here: crew members scheduled for flight duty to malaria infected countries will obtain, on the advice of their flight medical doctor, the appropriate medication and apply it as prescribed. 1.9.14. SURGICAL PROCEDURES Aero-medical advice should be sought prior to returning to flying duties following any surgical procedure. 1.9.15. PREGNANCY Any crew member who becomes pregnant must immediately, upon becoming aware of such pregnancy, notify her management. Certification of "unfit to fly" shall be in writing from the attending physician and shall indicate the expected date of delivery. Upon receipt of such notice, the crew member will be removed from flying duties.

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1.9.16. NUTRITIONAL GUIDELINES A balance diet is the foundation for a good health. A high carbonate and fiber, and low fat diet can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, strokes, diabetes and certain forms of cancer. Sources of carbohydrates include grains, vegetables, nuts, potatoes and fruits and should make up more than 50% of the calories consumed. The rest should come from lean meats and poultry, fish and low-fat dairy products. Never miss breakfast. Scientists state that breakfast should supply about 25% of the daily calorie intake. Never wait until you get on board the aircraft to eat. Losing Weight If an individual is overweight or obese there are obvious advantages in losing weight. The only practical way to lose weight is to eat less from a balanced diet containing the right mix of carbohydrates, proteins and fat. The use of "crash diets" must be avoided. They are ineffectual in the long term and may cause dangerous physical and emotional symptoms to CC. On no account should appetitesuppressants be taken unless under the direct supervision of an authorized doctor. 1.9.17. COORDINATION BEFORE AND BETWEEN FLIGHTS Flight duty shall be commenced in good physical and mental condition, well rested with appropriate personal conduct with regard to sleep, suitable nutrition and consideration of the effects of medicaments, alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, etc. 1.9.18. TROPICAL CLIMATE Two types of climate can be expected in the tropical zone: The dry desert climate with very high day temperatures and very cold nights. The humid hot climate with both day and night high temperatures and humidity around 90%. These very hot and humid conditions can be vary tiring and tend to reduce working intensity. When the surrounding temperatures are higher than those of the body are, the defense mechanism of the body gives off heat, in the form of perspiration. If we perspire a lot we should increase our liquid and salt intake. It is important to protect oneself from: - Ultraviolet radiation of the sun. This is the radiation that causes sunburn of snow blindness. Protection against ultraviolet radiation is best achieved by limiting our sunbathing to short periods, by the use of barrier creams and lotions and by the use of reliable sunglasses. - Infrared radiation. This is the radiation that cause "sun-stroke" and can be guarded against by the use of light colored headwear. Be careful of alcoholic intake. Siesta during the hot hours of midday is recommended. Hygiene Particular care should be taken regarding hygiene in hot countries. - Drinking water: Supply of pure drinking water is the exception in tropical and sub tropical areas. Water from the tap must be regarded as infected, even when it is merely used for brushing the teeth. A guiding principle should be not to drink any water that is not purified by boiling, or by chemical disinfection (chlorinate e.g.). The common infections dealing with water are typhoid or paratyphoid fever and dysentery. - Milk can be a source of infection. - Recommended drinks. Boiled drinks and beverages in bottles. Make sure the bottles are opened in your presence. - Ice. Ice is very often contaminated. Do not use ice in your drink. - Fruits. Avoid raw fruit without peel. Use fruit that can be peeled. Safe fruits: oranges, bananas, mangoes, pineapples, etc., wash fruit before peeling. Wash grapes before eating. - Salads and raw vegetables. Eating salads or raw vegetables runs the risk of worm infestation or of contracting amoebic dysentery. - Meat. Eat only fresh meat that has been freshly cooked. Avoid raw or cold meat. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 34 May 2010

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Fish. Eat only fresh fish freshly cooked. Avoid shellfish especially oysters. Bathing. Use only purified pools or open sea. Fungus diseases are common in hot humid climates. When bathing, it is advisable to plug your ears with cotton wool to prevent fungus infection of ear canal. Also, wear shoes at poolside to avoid fungus infection of feet.

1.9.18.1. TROPICAL DISEASES Tropical diseases are not confined entirely to the tropics but can occur almost anywhere. However, their incidence and frequency are influenced by local factors. Tropical diseases are mainly transmitted in the following ways: - Through insect stings or bites; - Through healthy skin by other parasites; - Through food and drink; - From the ground; - Person to person. 1. Following insects transmit disease: - Mosquitoes - transmit malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever - Tsetse fly - (Central Africa) transmit sleeping sickness - Lice - transmit typhus, relapsing fever, spotted fever - Rat fleas - transmit plague - Protective measures against insects: - Sleeping quarters should be free of insects. Use mosquito nets over beds. Nets should be taut and should not come in contact with body, or use insecticide. Protect the skin by using an insect repellant. 2. Following diseases are contracted through the skin: - Bilharzias - Aquatic snails act as intermediaries. The larvae of worms pass from such snails into the water and on contact with the skin into the human body. - Weil's disease - The germs of this disease are excreted in rat's urine. They can penetrate the skin of bathers. - Fungus diseases - The fungus is present in tropical and sub-tropical inland waters, in shallow rivers and lakes, hardly ever in seawater. Protective measures to avoid contagion through the skin: - Avoid inland water. Bathe only in pool with purified water or in the sea. Use cotton wool earplugs. Wear shoes when walking around the pool. Main Tropical Diseases Amoebiasis (Amoebic Dysentery) Causative parasite: Amoebas are due to the ingestion of a unicellular parasite (endameba histolytic). This is followed by an infection of the intestinal tract. Distribution: Although most prevalent as an endemic disease of tropical and sub-tropical countries unsanitary disposal of excreta and primitive methods of water purification may result in its introduction into temperate zones. Source of infection: Water polluted by infected faces is the commonest source of infection, hence the prophylactic importance of safe drinking water. Other sources of infection are, foods grown on soils mannered by infected excreta, flies and food handlers. Clinical features: The disease is characterized by an insidious onset, frequent febrile relapses and a tendency to chronic. Diarrhea is the outstanding symptom, but it may be absent. There is abdominal pain with blood and mucus in the stools. Complications: - Inflammation of the liver; - Liver abscesses; - Inflammation of the gall bladder and bile ducts. Treatment: Consists in rest, diet and a course of therapy that varies with the type of case. Prophylaxis: No vaccination or inoculation is available, nor is there any chemical prophylaxis such as is that used to prevent malaria. General hygiene measures.

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Malaria Transmission: Infection takes place through the bite of an infected anopheles mosquito and transmission of the parasite into the human blood stream. Geographical distribution: variable, consult medical department. Incubation period: usually ranges from 10 to 35 days. Morbidity: Malaria causes several million deaths each year. Symptoms: An acute, sometimes chronic, often recurrent, febrile disease characterized by periodic paroxysms of chills followed by high fever and sweating due to the presence of parasites in blood. The early stage of the illness can very easily be confused with many other infectious diseases, the more so if this occurs after return to a temperate region where your doctor may not think immediately of the possibility of malaria. Prophylaxis: Preventive measures include use of insect repellant sprays to protect skin, screens on doors and windows, mosquito netting in bedrooms, sufficient clothing to cover as much as the skin surface as possible against mosquito bites (this is important after sundown). It is not possible to produce permanent immunity either chemically or by the use of vaccines. Therefore chemical prophylactic drugs are only effective as long as they are taken regularity. Treatment: Under medical supervision. Malaria can be fatal if treatment is delayed. Therefore, after having been in a malaria area, if you feel unwell or have an unusual temperature within four weeks of leaving the area, tell your doctors, don't wait to be asked. Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fevers They are ingestion diseases characterized by high fever and intestinal symptoms. Transmission: Typhoid fever is conveyed by water contaminated by sewage; by article of food grown in or gathered from water, e.g. shellfish and watercress; or by diary or cooking utensils washed in such water. Paratyphoid fever is rarely water born; recorded epidemics are few. The disease is usually disseminated by foodstuffs contaminated by carriers. Incubation time: From seven to twenty one days. Geographical incidence: The disease is likely to occur wherever the water supply is impure. Generally speaking, the less satisfactory the sanitation and more prevalent is enteric fever. However, with the use of adequate drugs cases of death are now rare. Symptoms: Vague symptoms of illness tending to increase in severity throughout the first week. Lassitude, frontal headache, general aches and pains, disturbed sleep, anorexia and thirst, abdominal discomfort, temperature rising to 40C, diarrhea with or without bleeding. Precautions: Strict hygiene of food and drink. Prophylaxis: Is by inoculation. The inoculation is not an international requirement for entry into any country. Inoculation is strongly recommended when traveling to regions of poor general hygiene. Note: Aircrew should not fly within 48 hours after inoculation. Inoculation may be followed by a slight general feverish reaction. Cholera Geographical distribution: Outbreaks of the disease usually are explosive and limited. Cholera is endemic in many areas of Asia. Transmission: Cholera is spread by ingestion of water and foods contaminated by the excrement of patients. Incubation period: short, usually 1 to 6 days. Symptoms: Sudden onset. Initial symptoms are nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, with variable degrees of fever and abdominal pain. If diarrhea is severe the resultant dehydration may lead to intense thirst, muscle cramps and weakness. Prognosis: In many cases the outlook depends largely on early and adequate therapy. Prophylaxis: Strict hygiene of food and drink. In many countries cholera has been controlled by the purification of water supplies, proper disposal of human excrement. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 36 May 2010

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Dysentery Definition: An acute infection of the bowel, characterized by frequent passage of stools accompanied by abdominal cramps, malaise and fever. Incidence: worldwide, but it is particularly common in hot climates. Source of infection: The source of infection is the excreta of infected individuals. Organisms are spread from individual to individual by the direct fecal-oral route. Indirect spread by contaminated food and inanimate objects is common, but water borne disease is rare. Flies serve as carriers. Epidemics occur most frequently in overcrowded populations with inadequate sanitation. It is particularly common in younger children living in endemic areas, whereas adults of these regions are relatively resistant to infection and usually have less severe disease. Incubation period: Very short, some hours to a few days. Depend on severity. May have painful colic diarrhea. Maybe raised Symptoms: temperature and vomiting. The disease usually shows great individual variation. Prophylaxis: There is no effective inoculation. Strict hygiene of food and drink. Treatment: There are many effective medicines available for disinfecting of the gastricintestinal tract. It is advised to consult a doctor. Yellow Fever Definition: An acute infectious virus disease occurring in tropical and sub-tropical zones. Geographical distribution: Particularly in tropical Africa and South and Central America. Unknown in Asia. Incubation period: Three to six days. Causative organism: The virus that causes the disease is transmitted by the bite of a female mosquito which previously has become infected through feeding on the blood of a patient during the early stages of an attack. Symptoms: Characterized by sudden onset, fever with relatively slow pulse, the face is flushed; eyes infected, gums congested, and tongue red and pointed. Vomiting and constipation are common. Jaundice appears after the third day. Prophylaxis: By inoculation. Period of validity of vaccination is ten years.

1.10. FLIGHT AND DUTY TIME LIMITATIONS & REST REQUIREMENTS (OM CHAPTER 7)
This chapter is developed by MEDALLION AIR in accordance with the rules and regulations of RCAA. This section presents "Flight and Duty Time Limitations and Rest Requirements" in accordance with RCAA requirements, but MEDALLION AIR can adapt the roistering of their aircrew in another way provided it guarantees that fatigue will not endanger the safety of any flight. Terms of reference 1.10.1. MAIN BASE Any station whereby crew are staying in their own accommodation on a permanent basis. Main base may be at any domestic or foreign station. 1.10.2. TEMPORARY BASE Any station where crews are based on a temporary basis. - The company will provide accommodation at these temporary bases. - Crew will start duty at this station and return to the same station. - Temporary bases may be at any domestic or foreign stations. 1.10.3. RESERVE DUTY Reserve (standby) period is the period while a crewmember is available for the flight on the operator request. Standby can be performed at the airport or at the hotel / home base. During standby period at the airport, the crewmember will be provided with a quiet room and rest facilities that are not accessible to the public. Volunteered reserve period will not be considered as working time. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 37 May 2010

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Maximum reserve period spent before a flight duty period RESERVE PERIOD SPENT BEFORE A FLIGHT DUTY PERIOD At the hotel/home base Up Up Up Up Up Up to to to to to to 7 hrs 8 hrs 9 hrs 10 hrs 11 hrs 12 hrs At the airport Up Up Up Up Up Up to to to to to to 2 hrs 4 hrs 6 hrs 8 hrs 10 hrs 12 hrs ALLOWED FLIGHT DUTY PERIOD (hours) 14 13 12 11 10 9 8

1.10.4. WORKING TIME Working Time means any period during which a crewmember is working at the employer disposal and carrying out his activity or duties, in accordance with applicable national laws and requirements. Working Time Limits: The maximum working time is 60 hours in 7 consecutive days. The maximum working time is 190 hours in 28 consecutive days. The maximum annual working time is 2000 hours. The maximum annual working time shall be spread as evenly as practicable throughout the year. Other duties considered as working time: Positioning period Reserve period spent at the airport Reserve period spent at the hotel/home base, if followed by a flight duty period. 50% of reserve period spent at the hotel/home base, if not followed by a flight duty period 1.10.5. POSITIONING Positioning period is the time spent by a crewmember on board of an aircraft in order to be assigned to a flight from an airport, other than the airport where the preceding flight duty period has ended, without performing any duty. The positioning may be accomplished with any other transportation means. If it is immediately followed by a flight duty period, positioning period will be included in the flight duty period, without being considered as a sector. If an operational sector is immediately followed by a positioning sector, the positioning sector will be considered in determining the minimum rest time. 1.10.6. FLIGHT DUTY PERIOD The flight duty period is a continuous period that begins when a crewmember reports for duty at the working place, according to the established schedule, for the purpose of executing a mission and ends when he has completed all his duties in connection with the aircraft or with the mission performed. According to MEDALLION AIR regulations, flight duty period starts not later than 1.00 hours before the scheduled time of departure and ends 20 minutes after the completion of the final flight on which the crewmember is an operating crewmember. Other duties considered as flight duty period: The time spent in flight simulator training The positioning time, if it is immediately followed by a flight duty period. The time that is needed for reaching the airport by transportation means provided by Medallion Air, or, if this not the case, by own transportation means or by public transport. Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 38 May 2010

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Flight Duty Day Limitations: In 24 consecutive hours, a flight duty period shall not exceed 13 hours. For each sector, starting with the 3rd the day limit shall be reduced by 30 min without exceeding 2 hours. Reductions imposed by the circadian window: When the flight duty period starts during, or contains a whole circadian window, the above limits shall be reduced by case with the entire flight duty period contained by the circadian window. The reduction will not be less than 1 hour and will not exceed 2 hours. When the flight duty period ends during a circadian window the above limits shall be reduce by 50% of the flight duty period contained by the circadian window. The circadian window is the period of time between 02.00 and 05.59 base LT. For a 3 time zones difference between base L.T. and present location L.T., the circadian window will be correlated with base time. When the difference exceeds three times zones and 48 hours, the circadian window will be correlated to present location time. The allowed flight duty periods are given in table 1. Sectors Reporting time 06:00 - 13:00 13:00 - 14:00 14:00 - 15:00 15:00 - 16:00 16:00 - 17:00 17:00 - 04:30 04:30 - 05:00 05:00 - 06:00 1-2 13:00 12:30 12:00 11:30 11:00 11:00 11:30 12:00 3 12:30 12:00 11:30 11:00 11:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 4 12:00 12:00 11:30 11:00 10:30 10:30 10:30 11:00 5 11:30 11:30 11:00 10:30 10:00 10:00 10:00 10:30

Maximum planned flight duty periods (as given in table 1) are limited by the positioning time if no rest time is granted after positioning. For occasional operational needs, maximum flight duty period may be extended up to one hour provided these extensions not occur more than two times per seven consecutive days. For any 7 consecutive days, there shall not be more than 2 extensions of the flight duty periods. 1.10.7. EXTENSION OF FLIGHT DUTY PERIOD Using Augmented Crew Augmented Flight crew: A flight crew which comprises more than the minimum number required for the operation of the airplane and in which each flight crew member can leave his post and be replaced by another appropriately qualified flight crew member. The FDP can be extended, with no regard to the reporting time, using an augmented flight crew, as follows: - Up to 16 hours if every crewmember can leave his post for at least 25% of the total flight time; - Up to 18 hours if every crewmember can leave his post for 50% of the flight time; In addition, the following requirements must be complied with: - The FDP includes no more than 3 sectors; - The crewmembers who leave their posts are provided with comfortable reclining seats for resting during flight; - The minimum rest time following an FDP extended using augmented flight crew is increased with 6 hours Edition 2 Chapter 01 Page 39 May 2010

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Using Split Duty A flight duty period, which includes a break. The limits established for daily Flight Duty Period can be extended using split duty. Using a break, the FDP can be extended in accordance with the table below: Uninterrupted break FDP extension 0-2 hrs 59 min NIL 3 hrs -6 hrs 59 min 7 hrs- 9 hrs 59 min FDP Extension NIL 1/2 break duration 2/3 break duration

Extension of the FDP using split duty is subject to the following conditions: The method cannot be applied for the extension of a FDP already extended using augmented flight crew; Suitable accommodation during break is provided to the crew; Flight duty times before and after the break are limited to 10 hours; The extended FDP is limited to 20 hours; After the break only one sector shall be planned; The rest time is extended with 6 hours; 1.10.8. BLOCK TIME Block time is the total time from the moment the aircraft first moves under its own power or by ground vehicle for the purpose of taking off until the moment it comes to rest at the end of the flight (off block to on block time). Block Time Limits Maximum annual block time for a crewmember is 900 hours. It will be spread as evenly as practicable throughout the year. 1.10.9. FLIGHT TIME The time between the moment the aircraft commences take off (take off time) until the moment the aircraft touches down after the flight (landing time). 1.10.10. REST PERIOD The rest period is an uninterrupted period of time during which a crewmember is free of all duties, including reserve period, and is provided with rest facilities. Notwithstanding the minimum rest time, MEDALLION AIR will provide each crewmember with an uninterrupted rest period of minimum 36 hours, including two local nights, on every seven consecutive days. A seven-day period starts when a rest period starts. When the aircraft is not operated at home base, MEDALLION AIR will provide suitable accommodation. MEDALLION AIR ensures that his crewmembers receive days free of all duty and standby, planned and notified in advance, as follows: At least 7 days in each calendar month, which may include any free days established by law; At least 96 days in each calendar year, which may include any free days established by law but will not include the minimum paid annual leave Minimum Rest Time Before a flight duty period, a minimum rest time will be granted to each crewmember. At least eight hours of rest between 22.00 06.00 LT will be provided for each crewmember after operating flights that crossed more than three time zones.

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PREVIOUS FLIGHT DUTY PERIOD (hours) Up to 10 10 - 11 11 -12 12 - 13 13 - 14

MINIMUM REST PERIOD Before flying from home base 12 12 12 13 hrs hrs hrs hrs Before flying from a different location than home base 10 hrs 11 hrs 12 hrs 13 hrs n/a

MINIMUM REST PERIOD AFTER AN EXTENDED FLIGHT DUTY PERIOD** n/a n/a 16 / 14 hrs * 17 /15 hrs * 18 /16 hrs *

MAXIMUM REDUCED REST PERIOD (PICS DECISION) n/a n/a 12 hrs 13 hrs 14 hrs

n/a

* If minimum rest period before the extended flight duty period was also increased by 2 hours. ** If two consecutive flight duty periods were extended, the sum of the rest periods before and after the first extended flight will not be less than the sum of the two extended flight duty periods. 1.10.11. ANNUAL LEAVE The crewmembers are entitled to paid annual leave of at least 20 working days, in accordance with the rights and conditions established for this category of personnel and in accordance with the applicable laws. The period of paid annual leave not fulfilled cannot be replaced by an allowance in lieu, except where the employment relationship is terminated, according to the law. 1.10.12. RECORDS Records of Flight Duty, Duty and Rest Periods MEDALLION AIR will maintain sufficiently detailed records of crewmembers activities, regarding: Block times Flight duty periods with reference to starting time, ending time and duration Working times per day and per month Rest periods and number of days free of all duty and standby These records will be preserved for at least two years and must be accessible to the crewmembers for consultation or to the inspectors from the RCAA. All crewmembers shall also maintain an individual record, as appropriate, of his: Block times Flight duty periods Working times Rest periods and number of local days free of all duty and standby. MEDALLION AIR will preserve for at least six months all reports concerning exceeding of flight duty time/block time and reduction of rest periods. 1.10.13. EXCEEDANCES OF FLIGHT AND DUTY TIME LIMITATIONS AND/OR REDUCTIONS OF REST PERIODS The Commander acting as pilot-in-command has the power to extend duty/flight times according to the regulations within, or reduce rest periods. Any exceeding of the flight and duty time limitations and/or reduction of rest periods shall be reported to the Flight Operations Director using a Pilot's Report form. When such occurrences exceed 1 hour, the Flight Operations Department will send to the RCAA a copy of captains report within the following 28 days, stating the reasons for exceeding, the crewmembers involved and the related actions taken.

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UNFORSEEN CIRCUMSTANCES IN ACTUAL FLIGHT OPERATIONS In case of irregularities, the PIC may exceed the limitations given in these crew duty regulations, in order to complete a planned operation. The captain may exceed the maximum permitted work time/flight duty period by maximum two hours, should any of the following situations occur: off route diversion due to avoidance of bad weather; flow control/slot time allotment; prolonged flight/holding in terminal areas at ATC decision; emergency flight operations caused by natural calamities; flight irregularities or closed airports. Duty in excess of the limitations may only be carried out after: - PIC's careful consideration of all circumstances, on stress/fatigue on his entire crew, with emphasis on flight safety and security insurance, and only after consulting all other crew members. - PIC has convinced himself that any such modifications are acceptable to all other members of his crew and to himself. The captain shall not exceed a flight duty period already extended. If on the final sector within a flight duty period unforeseen circumstances occur after take off that will result in the permitted increase being exceeded, the flight may continue to the planned destination or alternate.

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Commanders discretion report - For extension of flight duty period
Medallion Air Aircraft Type: Crew Cmd: Flight Number: Date: Block hours 28 days 1 year

Off-duty Previous rest time Minimum Actual 22:00-06:00 time in flight

Voyage details Report time Departure Arrival Departure Arrival Departure Arrival Departure Arrival Departure Arrival Arrival FDP ended Break (Split duty) FDP

Route

Planned UTC Local

Actual UTC Local

Commanders Report:

Planned: Max:

Actual: Extension

Signature: Date:

Operators comments/Actions taken

Director Flight Operations

Name: Signature: Date: Report forwarded to RCAA (date):

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Note: All times must be recorded as groups of 6 digits, date/time UTC and local. OPERATOR: MEDALLION AIR FLIGHT NO: MDP DATE: Last FDP started at: Last FDP ended at: Minimum applicable rest time: Computed time for starting next: Actual start of next FDP: Rest time has been reduced with: Crewmembers affected A/C TYPE/REGISTRATION: COMMANDER:

Commanders discretion report - For reduction of rest time-

UTC/Local UTC/Local Hours UTC/Local UTC/Local Hours

Time Time Time Time

Commanders signature: Date: Operators comments/Actions taken:

Flight Operations Director

Name: Signature: Date: Report forwarded to RCAA (date):

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CABIN CREW MANUAL STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES TABLE OF CONTENTS


2. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES 2.1. GENERAL.......................................................................................................... 5 2.2. PRE-FLIGHT SAFETY BRIEFING OF CABIN CREW......................................................... 5 2.2.1. PRE-FLIGHT SAFETY BRIEFING CAPTAIN WITH CABIN CREW .............................. 5 2.2.2. PRE-FLIGHT SAFETY BRIEFING SCCM WITH CABIN CREW .................................. 6 2.3. PASSENGER HANDLING...................................................................................... 7 2.3.1. TICKETS/BOARDING CARDS .......................................................................... 7 2.3.2. FERRY FLIGHT ............................................................................................. 7 2.3.3. RESTRICTIONS FOR CARRIAGE ...................................................................... 7 2.3.3.1. PREGNANT MOTHERS ........................................................................ 7 2.3.3.2. UNACCOMPANIED MINORS ................................................................. 7 2.3.3.3. CHILDREN AND INFANTS ......................................................................... 8 2.3.3.4. OBESE PASSENGERS............................................................................... 8 2.3.3.5. SICK PASSENGERS AND PERSONS WITH REDUCED MOBILITY (PRMs) ...... 8 2.3.4. TRANSPORTATION OF INADMISSIBLE PASSENGER, DEPORTEES OR PERSONS IN CUSTODY OPS 1.265 Security Manual ....................................... 10 2.4. AIRCRAFT SEAT ALLOCATION PROCEDURES/RESTRICTIONS (ref to OPS 1.280) ....... 11 2.4.1. GENERAL PASSENGER SEATING ................................................................... 12 2.4.2. CABIN CREW SEATING ............................................................................... 12 2.4.3. PRIORITY STATIONS .................................................................................. 13 2.4.4. JUMP SEAT UNSERVICEABLE........................................................................ 13 2.4.5. CABIN CREW SEATING IN PASSENGER SEAT ................................................. 13 2.4.6. USE OF VACANT CREW SEAT ....................................................................... 13 2.4.7. COMPANYS POLICY REGARDING EXIT ROW SEATING ..................................... 14 2.4.8. SEAT DUPLICATION.................................................................................... 14 2.4.9. SEATING LIMITATION (Blocked Seats) .......................................................... 14 2.4.10. MULTIPLE OCCUPANCY OF ONE SEAT .......................................................... 15 2.4.11. MASS AND BALANCE................................................................................. 15 2.4.12. FREE SEATING ......................................................................................... 15 2.4.13. CABIN INFORMATION SHEET ..................................................................... 15 2.4.14. BOARDING .............................................................................................. 15 2.5. CARRY-ON BAGGAGE ....................................................................................... 16 2.5.1. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ....................................................................... 16 2.5.2. BAGGAGE LIMITATIONS.............................................................................. 16 2.5.3. STORAGE OF CABIN BAGGAGE AND RESTRICTIONS........................................ 17 2.5.4. CARRIAGE OF SPECIAL ARTICLES (musical instruments, glass, works of art) ...... 18 2.5.5. ITEMS NOT ACCEPTED AS CABIN BAGGAGE................................................... 18 2.5.6. CREWMEMEBERS PERSONAL BAGGAGE ......................................................... 19 2.5.7. PET ANIMALS IN CABIN (PETC) OM 8.2.2.7 ................................................. 19 2.5.7.1. SERVICE/GUIDE ANIMALS ..................................................................... 20 2.5.8. DELIVERY AT AIRCRAFT PROCEDURE ............................................................ 20 2.6. CO-MAILS.................................................................................................... 20 2.7. ACCEPTANCE OF LIVE ANIMALS IN CARGO COMPARTMENTS ............................... 21 2.8. CARGO CARRIAGE IN THE PASSENGER CABIN .................................................. 21 2.9. HUMAN REMAINS (HUM) OM 8.2.2.7.6 .......................................................... 21 2.10. DANGEROUS GOODS ................................................................................... 21 2.10.1. INFORMATION, INSTRUCTIONS AND GENERAL GUIDANCE ON THE TRANSPORT OF

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DANGEROUS GOODS ........................................................................................... 2.10.2. OPERATORS POLICY................................................................................. 2.10.3. CLASSIFICATION ............................................................................... 2.10.3.1. EXPLOSIVES...................................................................................... 2.10.3.2. GASES............................................................................................... 2.10.3.3. FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS .......................................................................... 2.10.3.4. FLAMMABLE SOLIDS ............................................................................ 2.10.3.5. OXIDIZING SUBSTANCES AND ORGANIC PEROXIDE ................................ 2.10.3.6. TOXIC AND INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES .................................................. 2.10.3.7. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL...................................................................... 2.10.3.8. CORROSIVES ..................................................................................... 2.10.3.9. MISCELLANEOUS DANGEROUS GOODS .................................................. 2.10.4. CARRIAGE OF WEAPONS, MUNITIONS OF WAR AND SPORTING WEAPONS ....... 2.10.5. HAZARD LABELS..................................................................................... 2.10.5.1 HAZARD LABELS..................................................................................... 2.10.6. ACCEPTANCE, HANDLING, LABELING, STOWAGE AND SEGREGATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS ........................................................................................... 2.10.6.1. HANDLING OF DANGEROUS GOODS ...................................................... 2.10.6.2. LABELING OF DANGEROUS GOODS ....................................................... 2.10.7. PROVISIONS FOR DANGEROUS GOODS CARRIED BY PAX OR CREW MEMBER ... 2.10.7.1. PROVISION OF INFORMATION .............................................................. 2.10.8. PROCEDURES FOR RESPONDING TO EMERGENCY SITUATIONS OR INCIDENTS INVOLVING DANGEROUS GOODS .......................................................................... 2.10.9. DANGEROUS GOODS EMERGENCY RESPONSE TABLE .............................. 2.10.10. REMOVAL OF CONTAMINATION ................................................................ 2.10.11. DANGEROUS GOODS REPORTING (ref to EU-OPS 1.1225) ............................ 2.10.11.1. DANGEROUS GOODS ACCIDENTS AND INCIDENTS REPORT ............................. 2.10.12. RESPONISBILITY OF THE COMPANY STAFF ................................................. 2.11.NORMAL FLIGHT OPERATION............................................................................ 2.11.1. REPORTING FOR DUTY .............................................................................. 2.11.2. SAFE MOVEMENT OF CREW TO/FROM AIRCRAFT........................................... 2.11.3. ASSIGNMENT OF DUTIES .......................................................................... 2.11.4. CREW BRIEFING ...................................................................................... 2.11.5. PRE-FLIGHT CHECKS ................................................................................ 2.11.5.1. AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY ................................................................. 2.11.5.2. AIRCRAFT SECURITY CHECK................................................................. 2.11.5.3. LAVATORY SEARCHES ......................................................................... When searching the lavatories, all compartments must be opened and examined. ..... 2.11.5.4. GALLEY SEARCHES ............................................................................. 2.11.5.5. SAFETY AND EMERGENCY SYSTEMS/EQUIPMENT CHECK .......................... 2.11.5.6. SCC SUPLIMENTARY CHECK ................................................................. 2.11.6. MISSING EQUIPMENT ............................................................................... 2.11.7. MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LIST ....................................................................... 2.11.8. CABIN MAINTENANCE LOG INSTRUCTIONS .................................................. 2.11.8.1. RESPONSIBILITIES ............................................................................. 2.11.9. PASSENGERS EMBARKATION ..................................................................... 2.11.9.1. COMMUNICATION WITH GROUND STAFF................................................ 2.11.9.2. MANDATORY DOCUMENTS BEFORE DEPARTURE ...................................... 2.11.9.3. PASSENGER ACCEPTANCE POLICY......................................................... 2.11.10. SAFE MOVEMENT OF PAX TO/FROM AIRCRAFT ............................................ Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 2 May 2010 22 22 24 24 25 25 25 26 26 26 26 26 27 27 28 29 29 29 30 32 34 37 37 38 38 41 41 41 41 42 42 42 42 42 45 45 45 45 45 46 46 46 46 47 47 48 49 49

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2.11.11. READY FOR BOARDING" REPORT ............................................................. 49 2.11.12. ADMISSION TO FLIGHT DECK ref EU-OPS 1.100 ......................................... 50 2.11.13. COORDINATION/COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FLIGHT CREW AND CABIN CREW51 2.11.14. PRE-BOARDING...................................................................................... 52 2.11.14.1. PRE-BOARDING PREPARATION............................................................ 52 2.11.14.2. CCM ACTIONS DURING PRE-BOARDING ............................................... 52 2.11.14.3. BOARDING PRIORITIES: .................................................................... 53 2.11.15. GENERAL BOARDING PROCEDURES........................................................... 53 2.11.15.1. CABIN CREW RESPONSIBILITIES DURING PAX BOARDING...................... 53 2.11.16. BEFORE TAKE OFF PREPARATIONS............................................................ 54 2.11.16.1. HEAD COUNTING PROCEDURE ............................................................ 54 2.11.16.2. CABIN PREPARATION FOR TAKE OFF.................................................... 54 2.11.16.3. PASSENGERS STANDARD BRIEFING (ref to OPS 1.285) .......................... 55 2.11.16.4. CABIN CHECKS BEFORE TAKE-OFF ...................................................... 57 2.11.16.5. READY FOR TAKE-OFF ....................................................................... 58 2.11.16.6. CABIN CREW SEATING AT STATIONS................................................... 58 2.11.16.7. SILENT REVIEW ................................................................................ 58 2.11.17. DURING THE FLIGHT............................................................................... 59 2.11.17.1. COCKPIT CHECK CALLS...................................................................... 59 2.11.17.2. CABIN MONITORING.......................................................................... 59 2.11.17.3. IRREGULARITIES DURING FLIGHT ....................................................... 59 2.11.17.4. GALLEY FIRE PREVENTION ................................................................. 59 2.11.17.5. FASTEN SEAT BELT SIGN ON USE OF SEATBELTS ............................... 59 2.11.17.6. SERVING OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES .................................................. 59 2.11.18. DESCENT FASTEN SEAT BELT SIGN IS ON ............................................... 60 2.11.18.1. CABIN CHECKS BEFORE LANDING ....................................................... 60 2.11.18.2. CABIN READY FOR LANDING............................................................... 60 2.11.19. ARRIVAL/POST LANDING DUTIES ............................................................. 61 2.11.19.1. DISARMING DOORS/DOOR OPENING ................................................... 61 2.11.19.2. DISEMBARKATION ............................................................................ 61 2.11.19.3. LOST/FOUND ITEMS .......................................................................... 61 2.11.20. TRANSIT ............................................................................................... 61 2.11.21. REFUELLING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD (ref Appendix 1 to OPS 1.305) ... 62 2.11.22. HANDLING OF FLIGHT IRREGULARITIES .................................................... 63 2.11.22.1. IRREGULAR OPERATIONS................................................................... 63 2.11.22.2. MAJOR GROUND DELAY ..................................................................... 63 2.11.22.3. SERVICE TO PAX ON GROUND ............................................................ 63 2.11.22.4. AIRCRAFT CHANGE ........................................................................... 64 2.11.22.5. FLIGHT DIVERSION ........................................................................... 64 2.11.22.6. LATE ARRIVAL AT HOME BASE CONNECTING FLIGHTS ......................... 64 2.11.22.7. DE-ICING PROCEDURES..................................................................... 64 2.11.23. REPORTING OF IRREGULARITIES .............................................................. 65 2.11.23.1. CABIN DEFICIENCIES ref to chapter 2, page 46 .................................. 65 2.11.23.2. CABIN CREW FLIGHT REPORT ............................................................. 65 2.11.23.3. FLIGHT IRREGULARITIES REPORT ....................................................... 65 2.12. SENIOR CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES SCCM STATION L1.............................. 71 2.13. CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES CCM 2 TAILCONE LEFT.................................... 72 2.14. CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES CCM 3 L2 ...................................................... 73 2.15. CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES CCM 4 R1...................................................... 74 2.16. CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES CCM 5 TAILCONE RIGHT ................................. 75 Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 3 May 2010

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2.1. GENERAL

One of the most important aspects of flight safety is that all cabin crew members should be aware that it is vital to communicate, cooperate, and work together as a team, in both routine and emergency situations. Safety regulations are established by RCAA in order to ensure minimum standards. Medallion Air provides each crew member with a manual containing specific company regulations and safety procedures. The cabin crew members should comply with all applicable regulations concerning flight safety and services on board. Phases of Flight BOARDING: Begins when the first passenger enters the aircraft, and ends when all the aircraft doors have been closed. PUSHBACK: Begins when the jet way is removed, and ends when the aircraft is pushed back. TAXI BEFORE TAKEOFF: Begins when the engines start, and ends before the takeoff roll. TAKEOFF AND INITIAL CLIMB: Begins when the takeoff roll starts, and ends when the flight crew authorizes the cabin crew to leave their seats. FINAL CLIMB: Begins when the cabin crew is authorized to leave their seats, and ends when seat belt signs are switched off, after climb. CRUISE: Begins when the passengers are authorized to leave their seats, and ends before the aircraft starts to descend. TOP OF DESCENT: Begins when the aircraft starts to descend, and ends before the approach. APPROACH, FINAL APPROACH AND LANDING: Begins at 10 000 ft (approximately 10 minutes before touchdown) and ends when the aircraft leaves the active runway. TAXI AFTER LANDING: Begins when the aircraft leaves the active runway, and ends after the Door Disarming procedure is performed. DISEMBARKATION: Begins when the jet way is positioned, and ends when the last passenger has left the aircraft. AFTER PASSENGER DISEMBARKATION: Begins when all passengers have disembarked, and ends either at the next boarding, or when the cabin crew leaves the aircraft.

2.2. PRE-FLIGHT SAFETY BRIEFING OF CABIN CREW


2.2.1. PRE-FLIGHT SAFETY BRIEFING CAPTAIN WITH CABIN CREW The Captain will conduct a Safety and Security Briefing. All cabin crewmembers may participate in this discussion or the PIC will brief the SCCM who will make another briefing with all CC members. Prior to the first flight of each calendar day. Following a crew change. Topics Review of flight, cabin and other crew member's names; Review of safety and security procedures, risk levels, discreet/emergency communication between cabin and flight crew; Review of selected emergency procedures and equipment; Regular Cabin-Cockpit communication (including periodic call from cabin to cockpit); Any other additional information necessary for the flight, including information regarding dysfunctional equipment or irregularities which may affect the safety of the flight;

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Meteorological conditions; Anticipated length of taxi; Estimated time of flight; Expected slots, or other events pertinent to the operation of the flight; Anticipated delays; Inviting for comments and other inputs from crew members. NOTE: When the briefing of the entire crew by the Commander is operationally unfeasible, Commander will brief only the SCC. Then the SCC would include in her briefing to the Cabin Crew those items included in the Commander's briefing. 2.2.2. PRE-FLIGHT SAFETY BRIEFING SCCM WITH CABIN CREW Safety briefing will be conducted by Senior Cabin Crew Member at the commencement of every flight duty. The safety briefing should be clear and concise so that every Cabin Crew Member should understand the duties and responsibilities during an emergency. Briefing consists of the following subjects: 1. Check that Cabin Crew possesses valid document and certificates, general appearance (complete uniform and ID), equipments (wrist watch, flashlight, MRT), updated and current CCM and Announcement Hand Book. NOTE: Every crew member is responsible for keeping his/her licenses and documents valid. 2. Passenger Service - Catering and passenger service related subjects are discussed to improve passenger service quality 3. Emergency Prepared-unprepared emergencies Evacuation procedures Fire fighting responsibilities as per working position Responsibilities for decompression Check that each Cabin Crew Member on assignment of working position is aware of: Seating position Assigned exit to be operated Emergency equipment to be carried out Area of responsibility for cabin preparation in case of prepared emergency In cases of over-water flights Exits to be operated in case of ditching/redirection of passengers Which way the slide-rafts are going to be used 4. First aid knowledge 5. Technical subjects (locations and usage of emergency equipments) NOTE: Deadheading CCs may travel in personal attire, but they must have their full uniform in a black/dark blue garment bag. Roll-aboard suitcases and garment bags containing uniforms are not to be checked when deadheading (shall be carried as cabin baggage). DE-BRIEFING The SCCM makes de-briefing after the flight. He/She declares the problems and the defects of the crew's performance. The captain may perform the de-briefing on his will. Crew members may ask for a briefing to state their about the flight opinions.

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2.3. PASSENGER HANDLING
2.3.1. TICKETS/BOARDING CARDS Passengers boarding cards must be checked when entering the aircraft: flight number, date, and route. Each passenger (Adult, Child or Infant) has to be in possession of a valid ticket. Adult: Age of 12 and over Child: Between 02 and 12 Infant: Between 0 and 02 2.3.2. FERRY FLIGHT Paid passengers must not be accepted on these flights. 2.3.3. RESTRICTIONS FOR CARRIAGE 2.3.3.1. PREGNANT MOTHERS Are able to fly without a doctors' report between weeks 01-27. With the expression stated at the doctors' report "able to fly" beginning of week 28 till end of week 36. Should not be accepted under any circumstances even with a doctors' report from week 36 on. If the pregnant mother travels with a doctors' report the date of issue must not be older than 4 days. Not recommended for air travel: Women within the last seven (7) days prior to confinement; Women within first seven (7) days after delivery; Healthy new-born babies within the first seven (7) days after birth; Premature babies, which shall be considered as MEDA cases. 2.3.3.2. UNACCOMPANIED MINORS Unaccompanied Minors (UMs)/Unaccompanied Young Passengers A UM who is accepted for passage is in Operators custody until surrendered to those responsible for the minors welfare at his/her destination. Medallion air may accept children between the ages of 5 and 12 who are traveling alone. Medallion air policies vary concerning connecting itineraries. Children 12 and older are considered young adults by most States including Romania. From check-in UM's have to be under supervision till they are handed over to the cabin crew. Medallion air should ensure all required documents have been filled out completely prior to boarding. When the UM's are handed over to the SCCM's they must be carrying a UM bag over their necks. It contains a passport, ticket, luggage tags, and all relevant documents for the child: childs name, address, persons name and phone number escorting the child to the airport, persons name and phone number meeting the child, list of connecting flights, special instructions/needs, and any medical conditions. At transit station, leave the UM on board, under the supervision of a cabin crewmember, if local regulations permit. At the destination station the UM will be handed over by the cabin crew to a member of the station staff. When handing over the child to the receiving party the station has to ensure that they are

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authorized. Ground staff must ask identification from the people that come to collect the UM's. The UM's must never be left alone before they are received. Cabin Crew Duties/Responsibilities for UM - He/she should be seated usually in first row Y/C. - A regular seat belt must be used. To tighten the belt to the child torso a pillow may be used. - SCC assigns a Cabin Crewmember working in the section to care about the UM. - Do not serve alcoholic beverages to any UM. - Supervise UM during meal times (offer your support at all times). Note: Children between 12-18 years old traveling alone may be considered UM and accepted as such on special request of the parent/ guardian. 2.3.3.3. CHILDREN AND INFANTS Children - Children between 2 and 12 years should be assigned their own seat. Note: Two children on one seat are not allowed. Safety precautions: Cabin crew must ensure that the seatbelt is securely fastened around the child torso, as close to the hips as possible. If the seatbelt cannot be adjusted so that is tight, a pillow can be placed behind the child to avoid in moving the child into the tightened belt. When a meal service is about to commence, tactfully advise parents/ guardian that children must not be moving in the aisles. Infants should be restrained for take-off, landing and whenever the Fasten Seat Belt sign is ON in an infant restraint device or by an adult with the infant seatbelt fastened around the adult passenger seat belt. 2.3.3.4. OBESE PASSENGERS Seat belt extensions should be provided to obese passengers. Such passengers should not be seated by an overwing exit/escape hatch. Note: An infant seat belt may be used as an extension belt when are more obese passengers than extension belt. 2.3.3.5. SICK PASSENGERS AND PERSONS WITH REDUCED MOBILITY (PRMs) The acceptance for transportation of sick, disabled and handicapped passengers is restricted in the interest of their own safety and that of other passengers. A person with reduced mobility (PRM) is understood to mean a person whose mobility is reduces due to physical incapacity (sensory or locomotors), an intellectual deficiency, age, illness or any other cause of disability when using transport, and whose situation requires special attention and the adaptation, to his needs, of the service made available to all passengers. The company therefore, is entitled to insist upon the production of a written report on fitness for travel, issued by a medical doctor of the company, or of the national carrier or the medical official at the airport. A medical certificate is required in the following circumstances: The passenger will require supplemental oxygen during the flight; The passenger's medical condition is such that there is reasonable doubt that he can complete the flight safely without required extraordinary medical assistance during the flight. Note: Medical clearance is valid only for the flight and the date specified on it.

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No transportation, under any circumstances, will be provided to: persons with a contagious infectious disease, e.g. open tuberculosis, infectious hepatitis, scarlet fever, diphtheria, chicken pox etc. persons with a fresh heart attack (i.e. less than 8 weeks after the attack) persons with a fresh stroke (i.e. less then 8 weeks after the stroke) persons requiring medical treatment by a pneumatically or electrically operated apparatus which - for specific reasons is not permitted to be operated on board. Incubator cases The following definitions of EAC Doc. 30 constitute commonly agreed indications for the degree and extent of the assistance required for the journey: MEDA - Passenger whose mobility is impaired, due to clinical cases with medical pathology in progress, being authorized to travel by medical authorities. Such passenger usually has social coverage in relation to the illness or accident in question. STCR - Passenger who can only be transported on a stretcher. Such passenger may or may not have social protection or specific insurance. Medallion air accept for carriage passengers traveling on a stretcher according with O.M. Normally, passengers on stretchers shall be accompanied either by a doctor/nurse or by a family member or other escort. The installation of the stretcher to the cabin compartment has to be performed by technical staff. WCHR - Passenger who can walk up and down stairs and move about in an airplane cabin. But can not walk long distances and will always need his wheelchair. Does not need companion, but needs assistance for embarking and disembarking of the aircraft. WCHS - Passenger who cannot walk up or down stairs, but who can move about in an airplane cabin and requires a wheelchair to move between the airplane and the terminal, in the terminal and between arrival and departure points on the city side of the terminal. Does not need companion, but needs assistance for embarking and disembarking of the aircraft. WCHC - Passenger who is completely immobile, who can move about only with the help of a wheel chair or any other means and who requires assistance at all times from arrival at the airport to seating in the airplane or, if necessary, in a special seat fitted to his specific needs, the process being inverted at arrival. There has to be a companion by all means. In case of a health problem which needs a doctors' report that certifies the ability to travel (expertise) is required. If the reservation holder has his/her own wheelchair (battery driven included) they will be carried in the cargo department free of charge as checked baggage even exceeding the free baggage allowance, but never in the passenger cabin. The wheelchair must be loaded last in order to be off-loaded first at the destination. WCHP - Passenger that is not mentally disabled but is paralyzed in the lower parts of the legs. When he/she stands up and sits down they will always need help. They can only move in the cabin if they are given an on-board wheelchair. BLIND - Blind, only able to move with the assistance of others. They are not considered as sick. They shall be accompanied between the terminal and the aircraft. If they are escorted by a seeing eye dog can accompany the passenger in the cabin. They should be seated on the corridor side and close to emergency exit door. DEAF/MUTE - Passengers that are deaf and passengers that have a speech problem. MAAS (meet and assist) - All other passengers in need of special help. Before accepting such passengers for transportation, the company shall have ascertained the availability, from departure to arrival, of staff trained and qualified to meet their needs and of the appropriate medical equipment. Normally, passengers on stretchers shall be accompanied either by a doctor/nurse or by a family member or other escort. The number of handicapped passengers should not exceed the number of able bodied Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 9 May 2010

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persons capable of assisting with an emergency evacuation. For the allocation of seats to other handicapped passengers reference is made to OM PART A 8.2.2.2. Sick and disabled passengers and PRMs should be boarded separately (normally prior to all other passengers) as well as disembarked separately: after all others passengers have left the cabin) in order to facilitate embarkation or disembarkation and to facilitate the necessary assistance by company and/or airport staff Information on passengers requiring any assistance at transit or destination airports, must be forwarded by telex, fax, e-mail or phone to the ground staff or handling agent. For the carriage of gas cylinders, drugs, medicines, other medical material, wet cell and lithium batteries, wheel chairs refer to OM PART A 8.2.2.7 and OM PART A 9. Medallion Air crew shall ensure that PRMs are not allocated, nor occupy, seats where their presence could: 1. impede the crew in their duties; 2. obstruct access to emergency equipment; or 3. impede the emergency evacuation of the airplane. Passengers with limited motion capabilities such as physical disability/old/sick appearance/ mental disability which may affect themselves and other passengers during flight are accepted as PRM. The following restrictions have to be applied: a health report or a doctors report is required. the health report has to be carefully examined either by the company doctor or airport doctor. The commander must be notified when PRMs are to be carried on board. 2.3.4. TRANSPORTATION OF INADMISSIBLE PASSENGER, DEPORTEES, OR PERSONS IN CUSTODY OPS 1.265 Security Manual Inadmissible Passengers (INADs) are passengers who are refused admission to a country by authorities of such country, e.g. due to lack of a visa, expired passport, lack of funds or suspected intent to illegally take up employment, lack of documents or false passport. Unless explicitly ordered otherwise by the authority refusing entry, an INAD shall normally be carried outbound again on a flight (flights) of the inbound carrier(s) to a country of his choice where there is no risk of his being refused entry again, but no further than his home country or country of permanent residence. In accordance with ICAO Convention, Annex 9, the transporting carrier is responsible for the removal of the passenger declared inadmissible by the Immigration Authorities. All INAD passengers will be boarded first. Do not serve alcoholic beverages to INAD passengers or to their escorts. INAD shall be treated with the same courtesy and tact as other passengers. During transit stops (of multi-leg flights) if local regulations permit, they should remain on board. Those passengers which have no admission into the country will be carried outbound with the same aircraft to their country. Deportees are foreign persons who had legally been admitted to a country by its authorities or who had entered a country illegally, and who at some later time are formally ordered by the authorities to be removed from that country. Apart from illegal entry, reasons for removal comprise expiry of residence permit, offenses or criminal acts committed in the deporting country, extradition at the request of another country. The identity of the deportee and reasons of deport have to be stated on the form. The commander shall be notified by Special Categories of Passenger Notification form prior to departure of the intended carriage of inadmissible passengers, deportees or persons in custody and of the reason for carriage. The commander has the right to refuse Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 10 May 2010

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transportation of such passengers if their carriage poses any risk to the safety of the airplane or its occupants. Therefore, the company and (via the company) the commander are entitled to be informed of the reason of the deportation and, if necessary, to insist on the deportee to be escorted during the flight by the representative of the deporting country, with a ticket at the applicable fare being provided for such a representative by the deporting authority. There are two categories of deportees: DEPA - Accompanied Deportees. DEPU - Unaccompanied Deportees. All deportees shall be seated the last row; they have to be boarded the first and disembarked the last. Border/Customs/Passport Police (domestic line flights the authority/authoritative regarding this matter of the relevant country) will inform the air transporter in writing if a guard is required or not in cases of any kind of deport of unconformable persons. The amount of the escorts has to be indicated especially. The escorts are required to identify themselves to the crew. These escorts must carry proper restraining devices with them. Persons in custody only one person in custody is accepted on board Medallion Air aircrafts. This person must be accompanied by at least 2 escorts. They should be boarded first, seated in the last rows in the middle seat between the two escorts and disembarked last. This person must be accompanied by the escorts everywhere including the toilet. Under normal circumstances, this person must not be tied to any part of the aircraft chairs, tables or any aircraft component. Mentally ill passenger A person suffering from a mental disease considered to be a threat to the safety of the flight can be accepted for traveling only if he/she is accompanied by an authorized medical professional, capable of physically handling any manifestation of the passenger. Medallion Air can refuse boarding of such passengers on recommendation from medical personnel or security department.

2.4. AIRCRAFT SEAT ALLOCATION PROCEDURES/RESTRICTIONS (ref to OPS 1.280)

See the attached seating chart of Medallion Air which is issued for each aircraft type and registration. During allocation of seats to passengers the restrictions on the plans should be taken into consideration. Emergency exit (EXIT) seats have to be allocated only for healthy and vigorous looking passengers.

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2.4.1. GENERAL PASSENGER SEATING Passengers have approved-type seats available on board. Each passenger seat is provided with approved "lap" safety belts. 2.4.2. CABIN CREW SEATING Crew Seats are specially designed to ensure maximum safety to the occupant against acceleration/deceleration forces occurring during the various phases of the flight. They are folding type seats kept in the folded position by a spring, in order not to obstruct the egress/evacuation path. As a restraining means, each jump seat is provided with a combined safety belt and shoulder harness. Cabin Crew Seating positions are determined so that they are: Located in the passenger cabin near floor level emergency exits Positioned so that the seat will not interfere with the use of a passageway or exit when seat is not in use and able to provide a good view of the areas of the passenger cabin for which the Cabin Crewmember is responsible. Provide access to the communications system when the Cabin Crewmember is seated. Evenly distributed throughout the cabin.

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2.4.3. PRIORITY STATIONS Aircraft exits and stations are prioritized in the following manner: The Cabin Crew seat located nearest to the passenger entry door. The Cabin Crew seat located adjacent to communications panels, evacuation horns, and emergency lights switch. MD-83 Station 1 L, next to passenger entry door, communications panel, and emergency lights switch. Station Tail Cone Left, next to ventral door and communications panel. Station 2 L next to rear service door and communications panel. These 3 stations are assigned to Minimum Cabin Crew. Station 1 R, next to a floor level emergency exit and communication panel. These 4 stations are assigned to Standard Cabin Crew. The fifth Cabin Crewmember shall be assigned station Tail Cone Right. 2.4.4. JUMP SEAT UNSERVICEABLE If the jump seal is unserviceable before the flight, the commander must be informed immediately and maintenance personnel must fix the situation. If the jump seat becomes unserviceable during the flight following action must be taken: Inform Commander. Block jump seat in folded position by means of the belt. Move into the nearest passenger aisle seat (relocate the passenger if necessary). Inform the rest of the Cabin Crew. Write up the situation in CDL. 2.4.5. CABIN CREW SEATING IN PASSENGER SEAT The operating Cabin Crew must sit in jump seats with shoulder harness. The minimum Cabin Crew must ALWAYS occupy jump seats with shoulder harness. Extra Cabin Crewmembers (more than 5 in case of augmented cabin crew) may seat in a passenger seat, if that seat is an emergency exit row seat. 2.4.6. USE OF VACANT CREW SEAT The occupancy of a crew seat in the passenger cabin by a person who is not member of the aircrew is permitted provided: The person is Medallion Air or other airline staff. Any applicable OM limitation is observed. The person is and has the authorization of the Commander. The person is an able bodied person and is properly briefed on safety procedures and equipment and relevant operating procedures. The person is in possession of valid ticket. The person shall not use the cabin crew seat that is the nearest to the cockpit door. Any other person may occupy a cabin Crewmember seat if the following conditions prevail: When there is only Minimum Cabin Crew on board, declared emergency exists, and the person is a Pre-Selected Passenger displaced from a passenger seat to a Cabin Crew member seat to enhance evacuation management. When a declared emergency exists and the person is a Pre-Selected Passenger displaced from a passenger seat to an available Cabin Crewmember seat to enhance evacuation management. When one Cabin Crewmember is incapacitated during the flight and there is only Minimum Cabin Crew on board the aircraft. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 13 May 2010

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2.4.7. COMPANYS POLICY REGARDING EXIT ROW SEATING Only Pre-Selected Passengers should be seated adjacent to over wing exits. The emergency exit row seats must not be assigned to the following category of passengers: Passengers under 18 years old Passengers with reduced mobility, strength, or dexterity in both arms and hands Handicapped passengers (i.e. mentally handicapped, invalid with missing limb, etc.) Passenger with leg in cast Deaf/blind passengers Unaccompanied Minors/Children and Infants, whether or not they are accompanied by an adult Persons whose physical size would prevent them from being able to move quickly (expectant mothers, obese passengers) Elderly and frail passengers Persons in custody and those who are being deported (INADs/Deportees) Passengers traveling with pet Passengers who cannot relay information to others or understand oral crew commands and cannot read or understand the written and graphic instructions provided Passengers who dont wish to help If such passengers have been assigned seats in the emergency exit row SCC shall inform ground staff to assign a new seat to the passenger. 2.4.8. SEAT DUPLICATION Cabin crew should handle the seat duplication in the following manner: Verify boarding documents of both passengers If a discrepancy does exist, notify the Gate Agent with passengers names and indicated seat number, then reseat the passengers accordingly SCC should inform the handling agent that should reseat the passenger in accordance to balance/seating restrictions. If the handling agent is not available, try to find an acceptable solution for both passengers. Adhere to applicable regulatory guidelines In the event that leaving the aircraft is not possible, cabin crew should use an alternate method of communication to inform the agent of seat duplication; i.e., have the flight crew request assistance from an agent. 2.4.9. SEATING LIMITATION (Blocked Seats) Seats may be limited due to: Government restrictions. Aircraft Balance. Payload restrictions. Crew Rest Seat. Extra Crew / Dead Head Crew / Security Officer on board. Number of qualified Cabin Crewmembers on duty. Technical/ aircraft equipment restrictions (unserviceable door/ oxygen mask, etc.)

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2.4.10. MULTIPLE OCCUPANCY OF ONE SEAT Two children on one seat are not allowed whatever their age. Adult with infant on lap is allowed. Attention must be paid in passenger allocation that every passenger aged 2 years or above provided with a seat and a seat belt. A child under 2 years old is considered infant. They have no right to own seat and meal tray but special Baby Meal may be ordered in advance. The infant passenger aged 2 years or less must be fastened on their parents lap with the infant loop belt. The belt must be attached with the loop to the seat belt of the parents belt while take-off, landing and when the seat belt sign is on. According to regulatory requirements of RCAA and EU-OPS, multiple occupancy of seats permitted is 10% out of the seating capacity. MD-83 Only 01 passenger with infant on seat maximum 16 infants 2.4.11. MASS AND BALANCE The limits of forward and rear centre of gravity of the aircraft ensure that the stability and control criteria are met during the whole flight. Large centre of gravity errors may occur when "free seating" permitted (freedom of passengers to select any seat when entering the aircraft). Although in most cases reasonably even longitudinal passenger seating can be expected, there is a risk of an extreme forward or after seat selection causing very large unacceptable centre of gravity errors. 2.4.12. FREE SEATING As a rule, all flights operate with seat number allocated to each passenger. However, in the event of a free seating flight (charter flights from small airports), handling agents restrictions and Commander's orders concerning passengers' seating areas will be carefully observed. Passenger with a fused or immobilized leg will be assigned a bulkhead seat or another seat that provides greater leg room. The seat will be on the side of the aisle that better accommodates the passenger's disability. Passenger traveling with a service animal will be assigned a bulkhead seat. Passengers with mobility, sight or hearing impairment that require a personal care attendant with them will be assigned seats together. Restrictions: - Random seating requested by passengers during embarkation on a free seating flight may be permitted provided weight and balance or other restrictions are met. - If there is any doubt, or no seating diagram has been provided, coordinate with handling agent. - Random seating requested by passengers during embarkation on a booked seat flight may be permitted only after take off. 2.4.13. CABIN INFORMATION SHEET Information of all passengers who may require special attention must be indicated on the Cabin Info Sheet. CIS will be handed by the ground staff to the cabin crew before boarding. 2.4.14. BOARDING Passengers with special conditions have priority during boarding. Then the boarding of transit passengers will be fulfilled. The name, ticket and ID of the passenger on the boarding card have to be controlled by the ground staff. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 15 May 2010

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Baggage's which are not in the status as hand baggage's have to be taken from the passenger during boarding and labeled and assured that they are loaded on the aircraft. If they are missing passengers, the names will be determined from the Passenger Manifest and their names will be announced in the aircraft. If there are still missing passengers 15 minutes before departure the name or names of the passengers which are determined the after ascertaining the baggage through the label process of unload will start. At the end of boarding, the amount of the passengers has to be corresponding with the cabin crew.

2.5. CARRY-ON BAGGAGE


2.5.1. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS Passenger baggage consists of checked baggage and hand or cabin luggage. All baggage must be locked and secured, in order to avoid it opens up and should not have any sharp corners. It should not contain easily inflammable goods, or any article considered as dangerous, according to the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. Hand or cabin baggage is limited by size, weight and contents. It is very important that the weight does not exceed 7 Kgs and the maximum acceptable dimensions are: 55 x 40 x 20 cm. The total sum of dimensions of a carry-on baggage must not exceed 115 cm. Any item exceeding these dimensions may not be accepted as carry-on passenger baggage. SCC should inform the handling agent in case of baggage weight non-conformities. Only following this procedures security and comfort can be granted. Free allowance All passengers (adults & children), except infants, are allowed to carry as follows: Type of flight Short/Medium Haul Flight Charter Checked Baggage 15 kg total 20 kg in total Cabin Baggage One bag max 7 kg One bag max 7 kg

For infants no free baggage is allowed. There are two types of baggage: - Checked baggage that is labeled and stowed in the aircraft hold (cargo compartment). - Unchecked baggage/Carry on baggage/Hand baggage that is a baggage carried in the cabin under the passenger's personal custody. All cabin baggage must be weight and labeled at check-in desk. In the aircraft, all cabin baggage must be securely stowed. During passengers boarding Cabin Crewmembers must ensure that: Baggage placed in overhead bins does not prevent doors from being properly closed. The total weight of all baggage placed in an overhead locker do not exceed the maximum weight allowed placarded inside the locker. Baggage does not impede access to emergency equipment or exits. All carry-on baggage is securely stowed. 2.5.2. BAGGAGE LIMITATIONS Carry-on baggage must fit under the passenger seat or in an overhead bin. Any item

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exceeding these dimensions may not be accepted as carry-on passenger baggage. Examples of cabin baggage include the following items: Clothing or garment bags. Laptop computers. Briefcases. Shopping bags. Trade tools (e. g. architectural blueprints in long tube). Child restraint devices/ systems that either will not or cannot be used in-flight. Items not counted as cabin baggage Purses of reasonable size Overcoat or jacket/wrap Umbrella Camcorders Reading material in reasonable quantity Assistance devices for persons with a disability (cane, crutches) Infant carrying basket. Following items are not considered as baggage and must be therefore treated as excess baggage items: Surfboards & Windsurfs. Water-ski equipment. Golf sets. Diving equipment. Bikes. Para gliders. PETC & AVIH. 2.5.3. STORAGE OF CABIN BAGGAGE AND RESTRICTIONS All personal belongings shall be restrained in approved stowage areas before the aircraft door is closed. Approved storage areas include: Cabin baggage must not be stowed: At any location where it would impede access to emergency equipment or to any exit At the over wing exits, under the seat in front and in the aisles. Against bulkheads. In lavatory compartments. On passenger seats. No open bags allowed under the seat. No canes and crutches stowed in the aisle or in gangways. Cane and crutches: Canes and crutches can be stowed along the fuselage wall, in an overhead bin, a closet or under a seat. Oxygen bottles: are only accepted as checked baggage if they are completely empty. Oxygen bottles belonging to sick passengers shall be carried in the cabin. Supplemental Oxygen Cases - ref to OPS 1.770 & Appendix 1 to OPS 1.770 Only Medallion air bottles (same type as portable oxygen bottles on board) may be used, free of charge. Supplemental oxygen needed (quantity needed in litter/min) should be requested at least 72 hours prior to flight. Any person using oxygen equipment in flight must be seated in a location that will not restrict access to any aisle of the passenger cabin or access to any emergency exit. The empty oxygen bottles must be securely stowed in another place than the original one.

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2.5.4. CARRIAGE OF SPECIAL ARTICLES (musical instruments, glass, works of art) All articles should be carried in an overhead bin, or closed compartment installed on the aircraft. As an exception, special objects, such as large musical instruments, may be carried on seats, subject to: - Being properly secured by a safety belt and other means to eliminate the possibility of shifting under all normally anticipated flight and ground conditions; - Being packaged or covered with blankets, pillows to avoid possible injury to passengers; - Not imposing any load on seats or on the floor structure that exceeds the load limitation for those components; - Not being located in a position that restricts the access to or the use of any emergency exit, or the use of the aisle between the crew and the passenger compartment; - Not obstructing any sign, demonstration, or screen where the safety information is given to the passengers. Note: Special equipment required by incapacitated passengers, if not carried in the passenger cabin, should be loaded in the baggage holds. Any such item must be properly identified and tagged, must always travel with the passenger, and should be loaded in such a way as to be readily and immediately available at transfer and destination points. SCC should be informed by handling agent about the positioning of these items. 2.5.5. ITEMS NOT ACCEPTED AS CABIN BAGGAGE Things which are prohibited for carriage in the baggage are as follows: Alarm devices placed in bags Compressed gas (inflammable and uninflammable gases or toxic gases) Corrosive or corroding substances (acids, damp cells) Inflammable liquids and solutions (excess amount of lighter, matches etc. Irritant substances Magnetized objects Oxidizable substances Toxics and radioactive substances Quicksilver and other dangerous substances Sports equipment Baseball sticks Any kind of hard or flexible sticks or truncheons Cricket, golf and hockey cudgels Skateboards, billiard sticks Fishing equipments Explosive, ammunition, inflammable and glistering substances CARRIAGE OF WEAPONS IN THE CABIN according to Security Manual Passengers as well as crew members are not permitted to carry fire arms aboard the aircraft. Firearms with carriage permission have to be preserved in the cargo compartment where passengers have no access. The ammunition is not allowed in the cabin. The weapons and the ammunition must be stowed in crates or locked containers in cargo. The commander must be notified by the Ground Handling Agent before the flight of the details and location on board the aerodrome of any weapons and munitions intended to be carried in NOTOC.

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Exceptions: Police officers on escort duty shall hand over their unloaded weapons to ground personnel to be stored for the duration of flight in the baggage compartment or in a place where they cannot be reached during flight. The ammunition shall be carried by the police officers in the cabin. After arrival the weapons shall be returned by the ground personnel at the aerodrome. Whenever those weapons are detected or surrendered voluntarily, they must be loaded into compartments inaccessible in flight. Sporting rifles, shotguns and pistols belonging to accompanying passengers, as well as any other kind of small arms may not be carried aboard the aircraft except as checked baggage stowed in one of the belly compartments, unloaded and suitably packed. All small arms ammunition may be accepted as checked baggage only. 2.5.6. CREWMEMEBERS PERSONAL BAGGAGE Company's carry on baggage limitation and restrictions policy applies for both passengers and Aircrew. Aircrew checked baggage allowance is limited to one suitcase of 20 kg Crewmembers must stow personal baggage only in approved stowage areas. 2.5.7. PET ANIMALS IN CABIN (PETC) OM 8.2.2.7 The carriage of live animals in the cabin is limited by aspects of the passenger's safety and comfort on the one hand, and the size of the cabin on the other (separation of individual animals from each other). Carnage in the holds depends on the type of cargo compartments available (heating, ventilation, and lighting). In general, the following guide line has been developed: With the exception of guide dogs for blind passengers, normally only pets shall be allowed for carriage if the weight of the animal and the bag or case does not exceed 10 kg. In order to control the number of pets carried the handling staff is entitled to refuse carriage in the cabin of such animals/pets unless prior approval has been obtained beforehand by the passenger concerned (e.g. via the reservation office). Pets shall be carried in suitable leak proof containers or bags, size 45x35x20 cm. The passengers will have been informed in advance that the pets must stay in the container/bag on the floor during the whole flight. The passenger under whose care the animal travels is responsible that all required documents could be submitted to the appropriate authorities at the destination. The handling staff and the commander shall exclude from carriage in the cabin all animals, which might impede an emergency evacuation. According to "IATA Live Animal Regulations", Medallion air accepts the carriage of common house pets in the cabin as accompanied baggage. Dogs, cats, rabbits, and small birds that will fit under the seat as cabin baggage should be allowed. The number of containers with pets in the cabin is limited to 5 (five). All accepted PETC must be of the same species. Common house pets will be handled as follows: The pet must be placed in a suitable container having both the total weight of no more than 8 kg. The hard or soft side kennel must fit under a seat. The animal must remain in the kennel at any time. No more than one pet per row and no pets in bulkhead or exit rows. The passenger is responsible for controlling the animal under all circumstances. If an animal becomes offensive or causes a disturbance to passenger comfort, the Commander may direct that the animal be moved to a less public area, preferably to a Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 19 May 2010

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lavatory which can be locked. Cabin crew must avoid any physical contact with the animal. All pets should remain in the approved containers during the entire flight. Passengers carrying pets should not be assigned seats in an emergency exit row or at a bulkhead row. Medallion air should adhere to required paperwork, including medical documentation and always should be aware of the customs and agriculture restrictions of states to which they provide service. Passengers are limited to one pet/carrier per passenger. Containers should be ventilated on at least two sides and should prevent any part of the animal from protruding outside of the container. 2.5.7.1. SERVICE/GUIDE ANIMALS Service or guide animals are not considered Pet in cabin. There are dog guides specially trained to perform essential services. A service animal considered acceptable must be harnessed, free of odor and parasites. "Seeing Eye" - dogs used by visually impaired passenger. "Hearing Ear"- dogs used by hearing impaired passengers The passenger may be seated in any seat except for emergency exit rows (service dog will lay on the floor at the owner's feet). 2.5.8. DELIVERY AT AIRCRAFT PROCEDURE Delivery at aircraft is a procedure for handling over and returning at the aircraft entrance the following items: - Fully collapsible baby strollers as per passenger's request; - Wheelchairs which are not needed during the flight and are difficult to store in cabin; - Regular carry-on baggage on small aircraft with limited stowage space in the cabin. At time of check-in, the check-in personnel must: - Check for any items, which qualify for delivery at aircraft; - Inform the passenger about loading of items in the hold due to lack of stowage space in the cabin; - Fill in the special baggage tag "Delivery at Aircraft" with passenger's name and destination and attach it to the bag; - Detach the passenger's stub and handed it to the passenger; - Ask the passenger to leave the items at the aircraft entrance (loading bridge or aircraft stairs); - Inform the passenger about delivering of items at the aircraft entrance at destination; - Inform the ramp agent about the number of "Delivery at Aircraft" items.

2.6. CO-MAILS

Co-mails are carried in Medallion Air aircrafts. Co-mails are sent in an envelope, if they are too many they are put in to mailbags. Medallion Air carries the co-mails of agencies and tour operators with which they work consistently. Special permission is only required for exceptional loadings. Co-mail process is arranged with CO-MAIL Delivery Form.

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2.7. ACCEPTANCE OF LIVE ANIMALS IN CARGO COMPARTMENTS

The carriage of live animals in cargo compartments shall take the specific needs of the animals into account. The basic environmental requirements shall be ascertained from all sources available. The temperature range and the oxygen requirements must be matched by the heating and ventilation capacity of the cargo compartment provided. Stowage and loading of animals shall follow the principles outlined in OM PART A. However, following additional guidelines shall be taken into account: - containers shall be stowed in such a manner as to ensure enough space to guarantee sufficient air circulation, - containers shall be accessible, without needing to be offloaded when care of the animal is required on transit stations, in the event of excessive delays, special care according to shipper's instructions shall be taken of the animal(s), - containers shall normally be loaded directly in front of/below air ventilation outlets or internal lighting, - in general, live animals shall not be loaded in close proximity to any other load which may have a negative effect on their well-being or health. The handling staff, by Special Loads Notification, shall inform the commander before departure of live animals, their requirements and their location; the commander briefs the cabin crew on all animals carried in the cabin. The handling staff informs all down-line stations by appropriate messages. All devices used in carnage shall be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected immediately after unloading. MD-83 FRONT CARGO 3 cats or dogs

2.8. CARGO CARRIAGE IN THE PASSENGER CABIN

If the carriage of cargo in the passenger cabin is necessary, the following precautions must be followed: Dangerous goods are not permitted under any circumstances. The weight of the cargo does not exceed the structural loading limit of the seats and cabin floor. All cargo shall be stowed such that, it will not hinder egress nor impair the cabin crew's view.

2.9. HUMAN REMAINS (HUM) OM 8.2.2.7.6

Non-cremated human remains shall be contained in hermetically sealed inner coffin of lead or zinc inside a wooden coffin. The wooden coffin may be protected by outer packing and should be covered by canvas or tarpaulins in such a way that the nature of its content is not apparent. Such human remains shall not be loaded in close proximity of food for human or animal consumption or edible materials Note: Mourning ceremonies on the apron should be avoided. The commander, by Special Loads Notification, and the down-line stations shall be informed

2.10. DANGEROUS GOODS

The definition of a Dangerous good (Hazardous material) is: A substance or material which has been determined to be capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health, safety, and property when transported in commerce and which has been so designated. Medallion AIR DOES NOT CARRY DANGEROUS GOODS. This chapter is for operation information for air crews and ground personnel to know to recognize and refuse dangerous goods on board. In addition, this chapter is for information for carrying weapons on board.

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2.10.1. INFORMATION, INSTRUCTIONS AND GENERAL GUIDANCE ON THE TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS Dangerous Goods are products/articles which might be a risk during transportation for the health or safety of the passengers and / or crew and the safety of the aerodrome specified by IATA - Dangerous Goods Regulations and/or the ICAO - technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of the dangerous Goods by Air (Doc.9284.-AN/905). Nevertheless there are dangerous goods required to be on board the airplane for operating reasons, such as: The airworthiness of the airplane. The safe operation of the airplane. The health of passengers and crew. Such dangerous goods include but are not limited to: Batteries Fire Extinguishers First aid Kits Insecticides and Air Fresheners Life saving Appliances Portable Oxygen Supply Categories of Dangerous Goods Dangerous Goods are divided into three categories as follows: Goods that are generally allowed to be transported by aircraft considering the respective IATA - instructions for packing and transportation; Goods for which exceptional regulations exist; Goods that are excluded from air transport. Dangerous Goods are farther divided into nine hazard classes. For transport they must be marked by stickers corresponding to the respective directions laid down in the IATADangerous Goods Regulations. A four-digit number (UN Number) assigned by the United Nations Committee of Experts on the Transport of the Dangerous Goods serves to identify a substance or a particular group of substances. Substances and articles of me same danger are combined in classes (UN classes of risk. e.g. 1.4). Divisions (three letter code. e.g. RCL = Restricted Cryogenic Liquid) distinguish the cause of the effect. 2.10.2. OPERATORS POLICY The operator/handling Agent is responsible for the acceptance, inspection, storage, loading and provision of information. The operator is responsible that only those dangerous goods will be transported which are labeled and marked according to IATA/ICAO regulations. Passengers should be informed in such a manner that they are warned as to the types of dangerous goods that must not be taken on board an aerodrome. Warning notices and/or placards should be prominently displayed at ticket and checking counters, in boarding areas and baggage claim areas. The ticket should also contain a warning on the ticket itself, on the ticket wallet or on a leaflet. This passenger's information may include reference to those dangerous goods, which may be carried on board an airplane. Pictograms may be used in addition or as an alternative to proving written information DEFINITIONS AND TERMINOLOGY Acceptance Check List. A document used to assist in carrying out a check on the external appearance of packages of dangerous goods and their associated documents to determine Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 22 May 2010

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that all appropriate requirements have been met. Cargo Aircraft. Any aircraft, which is carrying goods or property but not passengers. In this context the following are not considered to be passengers: - A crewmember; - An operator's employee permitted by the instructions contained in the OM; - An authorized representative of an Authority - A person with duties in respect of a particular shipment on board. Dangerous Goods: Articles or substances which are capable of posing a significant risk to health, safety or property when transported by air and which are classified according to Section 3 of IATA DGR. Dangerous Goods Accident. An occurrence associated with and related to the transport of dangerous goods which results in fatal or serious injury to a person or major property [damage. (See EU-OPS 1.1150 (a)(3) and (a)(4).)] Dangerous Goods Incident. An occurrence, other than a dangerous goods accident, associated with and related to the transport of dangerous goods, not necessarily occurring on board an aircraft, which results in injury to a person, property damage, fire, breakage, spillage, leakage of fluid or radiation or other evidence that the integrity of the. packaging has not been maintained. Any occurrence relating to the transport of dangerous goods which seriously jeopardizes the aircraft or its occupants is also deemed to constitute a dangerous goods [incident. (See EU-OPS 1.1150 (a)(3) and (a)(4).)] Dangerous Goods Transport Document. A document, which is specified by the Technical Instructions. It is completed by the person who offers dangerous goods for air transport and contains information about those dangerous goods. The document bears a signed declaration indicating that the dangerous goods are fully and accurately described by their proper shipping names and UN numbers (if assigned) and that they are correctly classified, packed, marked, labeled and in a proper condition for transport. Freight Container. A freight container is an article of transport equipment for radioactive materials, designed to facilitate the transport of such materials, either packaged or unpackaged, by one or more modes of transport. (Note: see Unit Load Device where the dangerous goods are not radioactive materials.) Handling Agent. An agency, which performs on behalf of the operator some or all of the latter's functions including receiving, loading, unloading, transferring or other processing of passengers or cargo. Over pack. An enclosure used by a single shipper to contain one or more packages and to form one handling unit for convenience of handling and stowage. (Note: a unit load device is not included in this definition.) Package. The complete product of the packing operation consisting of the packaging and its contents prepared for transport. Packaging. Receptacles and any other components or materials necessary for the receptacle to perform its containment function and to ensure compliance with the packing requirements. Proper Shipping Name. The name to be used to describe a particular article or substance in all shipping documents and notifications and, where appropriate, on packaging. Serious Injury. An injury which is sustained by a person in an accident and which: - Requires hospitalization for more than 48 hours, commencing within seven days from the date the injury was received; - Results in a fracture of any bone (except simple fractures of fingers, toes or nose); - Involves lacerations which cause severe hemorrhage, nerve, muscle or tendon damage - Involves injury to any internal organ; - Involves second or third degree burns, or any burns affecting more than 5% of the body Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 23 May 2010

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surface; - Involves verified exposure to infectious substances or injurious radiation. State of Origin. The Authority in whose territory the dangerous goods were first loaded on an aircraft. Technical Instructions. The latest effective edition of the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (Doc 9284-AN/905), including the Supplement and any Addendum, approved and published by decision of the Council of the International Civil Aviation Organization. UN Number. The four-digit number assigned by the United Nations Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods to identify a substance or a particular group of substances. Unit Load Device. Any type of aircraft container, aircraft pallet with a net, or aircraft pallet with a net over an igloo. (Note: an over pack is not included in this definition; for a container containing radioactive materials see the definition for freight container.) 2.10.3. CLASSIFICATION Dangerous goods are defined as those goods which meet the criteria of one or more of nine UN hazard classes and, where, to one of three UN packing groups according to the provisions of this section. The nine classes relate to the type of hazard where as the packing groups relate to the degree applicable of change within the class. Wastes should be should be transported under the requirements of the appropriate of the class considering their hazards and the criteria of the Regulations. Wastes not otherwise subject to these regulations, but covered under the Basel Convention on the Control of Tran boundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal (1989), may be transported under Class 9. Many of the substances listed in Classes 1 to 9 are deemed, without additional labeling, as being environmentally hazardous. Medallion Air shall take all reasonable measures to ensure that articles and substances are classified as dangerous goods as specified in the Technical Instructions. HAZARD CLASSES Dangerous Goods Risk Classification is as follows: Class 1 Explosives Class 2 Gases Class 3 Flammable Liquid Class 4 Flammable Solids Class 5 Oxidizing Substances and Organic Peroxide Class 6 Toxic and Infectious Substances Class 7 Radioactive Material Class 8 Corrosives Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods Due to country and operator regulations all air transport routes and operators must be considered the physical characteristics of the substance in question must be determined unless there is a method which can differentiate the components of the substances. Therefore, the details stated below must be taken into consideration as addition to the chemical name of the substance to make a right classification. 2.10.3.1. EXPLOSIVES Division 1.1 Articles and substances having a mass explosion hazard. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 24 May 2010

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Division 1.2 Articles and substances having a projection hazard Division 1.3 Articles and substances having a fire hazard Division 1.4 Articles and substances that present no significant hazard. Division 1.5 Very insensitive substances having a mass explosion hazard, Division 1.6 Extremely insensitive articles, which do not have a mass explosive hazard. Eg:TNT, dynamite, torpedo Explosives (REX) are not allowed in air transportation. Most of the explosives are not accepted to passenger aircrafts because of their evident damages. Some of them may be classified according to some special criteria. Especially some explosives which involves limited explosive substances and the ones which the damage stays inside the package like cartridges and power devices can be carried (UN0323). IATA DGR, paragraph 3.1.5.1 states that classification of the explosives can be made only by the approval of the shipper or the approval of the producer country authorities. In certain cases explosives and/or munitions can be carried only by the official permissions of the country authorities. Local authorities must take these permissions from the related departments and the stations before these kinds of carriage demands. (IATA DGR 2.9.2 state and operator regulations). All explosives requiring official permission must not be accepted unless all permissions are approved. 2.10.3.2. GASES Division 2.1 Flammable gas (RFG) Example: Butane, hairspray, lighters Division 2.2 Non-Flammable, Non-toxic gas (RNG or RCL) Example: Compressed air, fire extinguishers Division 2.3 Toxic gas (RPG) Example: Normally Forbidden on Aircraft (Chlorine, carbon monoxide) Forms of gases carriage are as follows: Compresses gases Liquefied gases Refrigerated gases Dissolved gases The mean effects of the gases reveals in case of an unexpected heat increase or pressure loss. In both cases, the pressure of the gas increases and results in blasting. As a result of this blasting, gases change the temperature and the oxygen level of the environment. Also, they are harmful because of their poisoning and deadly affects on living creatures. 2.10.3.3. FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS It comprises liquids or mixtures of liquids or liquids containing solids in solution or in suspension which give off a flammable vapor at temperatures of not greater than 60.5 C (141 F), according to closed-cup test; or not greater than 65.6 C (150 F), according to open-cup test, normally referred to as the flash point. Example: paints, varnishes, lacquers, etc. 2.10.3.4. FLAMMABLE SOLIDS Division 4.1 Flammable solid (RFS): Matches, magnesium, sulfide, etc. Division 4.2 Substances liable to spontaneous combustion (RSC): Phosphorus Division 4.3 Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases (RFW): Potassium, sodium, lithium, etc. This class involves the solids in forms of dust, granules or pastes which can burn on its own or causes fire as a result of fraction. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 25 May 2010

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Note: Solids having melting point less than 55C is considered as liquids. 2.10.3.5. OXIDIZING SUBSTANCES AND ORGANIC PEROXIDE Division 5.1Oxidizer (ROX) Examples: Bleaching powder, potassium permanganate Division 5.2 Organic peroxides (ROP) Examples: Methyl, ethyl, ketone, peroxide, etc. Oxidizing substances are substances, which, in themselves are not necessarily combustible, but may generally cause or contribute to the combustion of other material by yielding oxygen. Such substances may be contained in article. This division is made up of organic substances, which contain the bivalent structure and may be considered derivatives of hydrogen peroxide in which one or both of the hydrogen atoms have been replaced by organic radicals. 2.10.3.6. TOXIC AND INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES Division 6.1 Toxic substances (RPB) Toxic substances are substances, which are liable to cause death or injury or to harm human health if swallowed, inhaled or contacted by the skin. Division 6.2 Infectious substances (RIS) Infectious substances are substances known to contain or reasonably expected to contain, pathogens. Pathogens are defined as micro-organisms (including bacteria, viruses, rickettsia, parasite, fungi) or recombinant micro-organisms (hybrid or mutant) that are known or reasonably expected to cause infectious disease in humans or animals. 2.10.3.7. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Category I White (RRW) Low radioactivity Transport Index: 0 Category II Yellow (RRY) Average radioactivity Transport Index: 0.1 - 1.0 Category III Yellow (RRY) High radioactivity Transport Index: 1.1 - 10.0 Radioactive materials are articles or substances which spontaneously and continuously emit certain types of radiation (ionizing radiation) which can be harmful to health - but which, nevertheless, cannot be detected by any of the human senses ; sight, hearing, smell, touch. Radiation level can only be determined and measured by special instruments like Geiger counter. The Transport Index (T.I.) indicates the radiation level the package at 1-meter-distance. These radiations are also harmful for human, animals, undeveloped films etc. These affects can be reduced by isolated packaging and less contact. The contact durations and dose limitations are determined and published by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) 2.10.3.8. CORROSIVES Substances, which by chemical action can cause severe damage, when in contact with living tissue or, in the case of leakage will materially damage or even destroy, other goods or the means of transport. Example: Batteries, mercury, sulfuric acid, etc 2.10.3.9. MISCELLANEOUS DANGEROUS GOODS Examples: Cars, Motorcycles, solid-dry ice, magnetized materials, articles or substances, which during air transport, present a danger not covered by other classes. Electrical wheelchairs (UN 3171) and internal combustion engines (UN 3166) are listed in arrangements. Special packaging instructions must be applied. Vehicles must be loaded in straight position and the tires must be attached to the floor. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 26 May 2010

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There must be no slopes. Fuel tank must be emptied at rate of 3A. Tank tap must be tightly closed. Liquid batteries must be fastened upright and preserved not to result in short circuit. Engine vehicles' doors must not be locked and the key must be attached at a place clear to be seen, eg; to the steering wheel. 2.10.4. CARRIAGE OF WEAPONS, MUNITIONS OF WAR AND SPORTING WEAPONS - according to Security Manual MEDALLION AIR does not carry war weapons and munitions on board. Passengers as well as crewmembers are not permitted to carry firearms aboard the aircraft. Police officers on escort duty shall hand over their unloaded weapons to ground personnel to be stored for the duration of flight in the baggage compartment or in a place where they cannot be reached during flight. The ammunition shall be carried by the police officers in the cabin. After arrival the ground personnel at the aerodrome shall return the weapons, before the passengers disembark. The transport of such items is therefore permitted only provided they are stored in compartments of the aircraft not accessible to passengers during flight. Whenever those weapons are detected or surrendered voluntarily, they must be loaded into compartments inaccessible in flight. Sporting rifles, shotguns and pistols belonging to accompanying passengers, as well as any other kind of small arms may not be carried aboard the aircraft except as checked baggage stowed in one of the cargo compartments, unloaded and suitably packed. Special containers for firearms shall be offered for sale to passengers not having suitably packed their rifles/shotguns. These containers should be made of light but tough Styrofoam, with an inside foam rubber padding, thus preventing any damage of the rifle. All small arms ammunition may be accepted as checked baggage only. The commander must be notified by the Ground Handling Agent before the flight of the details and location on board the aerodrome of any weapons and munitions intended to be carried 2.10.5. HAZARD LABELS

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2.10.5.1 HAZARD LABELS

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2.10.6. ACCEPTANCE, HANDLING, LABELING, STOWAGE AND SEGREGATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS Although MEDALLION AIR does not carry dangerous goods, the operational personnel will be informed by the following procedures and information so that to be able for segregation and refusal of the category of goods considered dangerous. 2.10.6.1. HANDLING OF DANGEROUS GOODS Dangerous Goods shall be accompanied by a dangerous goods transport document unless otherwise specified in the Technical Instructions. When dangerous goods will be transported on a flight that takes place wholly or partly outside the territory of a State, the transport document, labeling and marking must be in the English language in addition to any other language requirements. Under any circumstances may not be transported articles and substances or other goods that are identified in the Technical Instructions as being forbidden for transport. Medallion Air will provide an acceptance Check List for the transport of dangerous goods for use by the Company staff and the handling agents. The Checklist shall allow a complete check of all relevant details. The results of the acceptance check shall be recorded on the checklist manually, mechanically or by computer. All package, over packs and freight containers have to be inspected for evidence of leakage or damage immediately prior to loading on an aircraft or into a unit load device according to the Technical Instructions. Leaking or damaged package, over packs or freight containers shall not be loaded on an aerodrome. When a package of dangerous goods will be found on an aerodrome that appears to be damaged or leaking it shall be removed from the aerodrome and inspected to ensure that it is in a proper condition for transport and that no damage or contamination has occurred to the aerodrome or its load. If leaking it shall be packed properly before re-loading Contamination found as a result of the leakage or damage of dangerous goods shall be removed immediately. An airplane that has been contaminated by radioactive materials has to be taken out of service immediately. It shall not be returned into service until the radiation level at any accessible surface and the non-fixed contamination are not more than the values specified in the Technical Instructions. Attention must be paid to Packing Groups: 1. Substances of high danger 2. Substances of medium danger 3. Substances of minor danger The Compatibility Group is specified by a letter behind the division number only with explosive materials. There are instructions for combined loading with other explosive materials. 2.10.6.2. LABELING OF DANGEROUS GOODS All packages, over packs and freight containers must be labeled and marked as specified. Marking and Labeling Proper Shipping Name = name of the dangerous item as shown in the alphabetical list of the DRG; UN/ID number = four digit number, assigned by the UN (UN-no.) or IATA (ID no.); Name/address of shipper and consignee; Hazard label must comply with label specification Specification marking: identifies the packaging for having been tested according Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 29 May 2010

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to UN-guidelines Additional markings for: Explosives: net quantity and gross weight of package; Refrigerated liquefied gases: "Keep upright"/"Do not drop - handle with care"; Infectious substances: name/phone no. of a person responsible for the shipment; Radioactive material: permissible gross weight of package if this exceeds 50 kg; Over packs: total net quantity of dangerous goods within the over pack. Handling labels: - "Package Orientation" (This Way Up) labels must be used on combination packaging and over packs containing liquid dangerous goods. At least two labels must be affixed (on opposite sides). Single packaging does not need to show arrows; - "Cargo Aircraft Only" labels must be used on packages, which have been prepared according to a COA" - Packing Instruction, or on packages where the net quantity exceeds the limits, which would be permitted for passenger aircraft. 2.10.7. PROVISIONS FOR DANGEROUS GOODS CARRIED BY PAX OR CREW MEMBER Dangerous goods are not allowed to be carried in or as passengers or crew luggage except as otherwise provided in the table below. It is allowed to take along those articles and substances which would otherwise be classified as dangerous goods and which are listed in parts below: Articles and substances carried as catering or cabin service supplies; Veterinary aid or humane killer for an animal; Safety matches and cigarette lighter in a pocket; Implanted cardiac pacemaker with radioactive material or radio-pharmaceutical medication in the body of a passenger for medical treatment; Non radioactive medicinal and cosmetic articles (including aerosol) but not more than 2 liters or 2 kilograms; Alcoholic beverages not exceeding 70% by volume when packed in receptacles of less than 5 liters. Only with authorization by the company: Gaseous oxygen or air in small cylinders for medical purpose; A self-inflatable life jacket with a small CO2 cylinder.

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Provisions for Dangerous Goods Carried by Passengers or Crew Dangerous goods must not be carried in or as passengers or crew checked or carry-on baggage, except as otherwise provided below. Security type attached cases incorporating dangerous goods, such as lithium batteries or pyrotechnic devices, are totally forbidden. Permitted in or as carry-on baggage Permitted on or as checked baggage Permitted on one's person
YES YES YES YES YES NO NO The approval of the operators required The Pilot-in-Command must be informed of the location NO Alcoholic beverages not exceeding 70% by volume, when packed on receptacles of less than 5 liters. NO Non radioactive medicinal or toilet articles (including aerosols) when the total net quantity of all such articles carried by each passenger or crew member does not exceed 2 kg (4.0 lb.) or 2 liters (2 qt) and the net quantity of each single article does not exceed 0.5 1 (0.5 qt) Hair curlers containing hydrocarbon gas, no more than one per passenger or crewmember, provided that the safety cover is securely fitted over the adding Element. These hair curlers must not be used on board the aircraft at any time. Gas refills for such curlers are not permitted in checked or carry-on baggage. Dry ice in quantities not exceeding 2 kg (4.4 lb.) per passenger when used to pack perishables in carry-on baggage provided the package permits the release of CO2 gas (see Note 2). Safety matches or a lighter intended for use by an individual. However, lighters containing unabsorbed liquid fuel (other man liquefied gas), lighter fuel and lighter refills are not permitted on one's person, or in checked or carry-on baggage. Small CO2 gas cylinders worn by passengers for the operation of medical limbs. Also spare cylinders of a similar size if required to ensure adequate supply for the duration of me journey. Radio isotopic cardiac pacemakers or other devices, including those powered by lithium batteries implanted into a person, or radio-pharmaceutical contained within me body of a person as the result of medical treatment Small gaseous oxygen or air cylinders required for medical use. Securely boxed, cartridges for sporting purposes (in Division 1.4S), in quantities not exceeding 5 kg (11 lb.) gross weight per passenger must not be combined into one or more packages. Wheelchairs or other battery powered mobility devices with non-spillable batteries (see Packing Instructions 800 and Special Provision A67), provided that the battery is disconnected, the battery terminals are insulated to prevent accidental short circuits and the battery is securely attached to the wheelchair or mobility device Wheelchairs or mobility devices with spillable batteries. A mercurial barometer carried by a representative of a government weather bureau or similar official agency (see Note 3). One small CO^ cylinder fitted into a self-inflating life jacket plus one spare cartridge. Heat producing articles such as underwater torches (diving lamps) and soldering irons. Small oxygen generators for personal use. Small medical or clinical thermometer, which contains mercury, for personal use, when in its protective case.

YES

YES

NO

NO

NO

YES

YES

YES

NO

NO

NO

YES

NO

NO

YES

YES

YES

NO

NO

NO YES NO

NO YES YES

YES NO

NO YES YES

NO NO NO

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YES

NO

NO YES YES YES NO YES

YES NO YES NO YES YES

YES NO NO YES

YES YES YES YES YES NO

YES YES NO NO NO NO

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2.10.7.1. PROVISION OF INFORMATION NOTIFICATION TO CAPTAIN - NOTOC


Medallion Air, as soon as practicable prior to departure of an aircraft in which dangerous goods are to be carried, must provide the pilot in command with accurate and legible written information concerning dangerous goods which specifies at least the following: The Air Waybill Number (when issued); The Proper Shipping Name (supplemented with the technical name(s) if appropriate; and UN Number or ID number as listed in these regulations; The Class or Division, and subsidiary risk(s) corresponding to Columns C and D of subsection 4.2 List of Dangerous Goods (see also 8.1.6.9.1, Steps 2 and 5), by numerals and in the case of Class 1, the compatibility group; The Packing Group as shown on the shipper's Declaration; (For non-radioactive material) the number of packages, the net quantity, or gross mass if applicable, of each package, except that this does not apply to radioactive material or other dangerous goods where the net quantity or gross weight is not required on the Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods, and their exact location; (For radioactive material) the number of packages, over packs, or freight containers, their category, their transport index, if applicable, and their exact location; Whether the package must be carried on cargo aircraft only; The airport at which the package(s) is to be unloaded; and (Where applicable) an indication that the dangerous goods are being carried under a State exemption. This information to the pilot in command should be presented on a NOTOC form or by another form by the forwarder and should not be by means of Air Waybills, "Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods", invoices, etc. When written information is provided, the pilot-in-command must indicate on a copy of it, or in some other way, that the information has been received. The information to the pilot-in-command must also include confirmation that there is no evidence that any damaged or leaking packages have been loaded on the aircraft. The written information to the pilot in command must be readily available to him during flight preparation. A legible copy of the written information to the pilot in command must be retained on the ground at a readily accessible location until after the flight to which the written information refers is finalized.

Information to Ground Staff

Medallion Air shall ensure that, information is provided to enable ground staff to carry out their duties with regard to the transport of dangerous goods, including the actions to be taken in the event of incidents and accidents involving dangerous goods; Where applicable, the information referred to in sub-paragraph (a)(1) above is also provided to his handling agent.

Information of Passengers and Other Persons (See OPS 1.1215(b).)

Medallion Air shall ensure that information is promulgated as required by the Technical Instructions so that passengers are warned as to the types of goods which they are forbidden from transporting aboard an airplane; and Medallion Air and the handling agent shall ensure that notices are provided at acceptance points for cargo giving information about the transport of dangerous goods.

Information to Crew Members

Medallion Air shall ensure that information is provided in the Operations Manual to enable crew members to carry out their responsibilities in regard to the transport of dangerous goods, including the actions to be taken in the event of emergencies arising involving dangerous goods.

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2.10.8. PROCEDURES FOR RESPONDING TO EMERGENCY SITUATIONS OR INCIDENTS INVOLVING DANGEROUS GOODS On the ground If an unknown or suspicious substance is found on or near Medallion Air property, it should not be moved from its original place of discovery. The following procedure should be followed: Do not handle or move the item or substance. Do not allow anyone access to the immediate area where the item is located. Call the appropriate authority and report the finding. Call Medallion Air Dispatch who will notify all appropriate Medallion Air personnel. Have written statements prepared by all parties with any connection to the incident and forward to your manager Medallion Air is not a carrier of hazardous materials, with the exceptions of certain items necessary for the safe operation of the aircraft and the conveyance of passengers. Warning labels have been developed for each category of Hazardous materials. Labels are not necessarily black and white and are approximately 10 centimeters square. Items with such labels are restricted in the passenger cabin. If you notice a package bearing any of these or similar labels being boarded or already in the cabin, notify the Captain or agent immediately. Notice of such circumstances must be followed up by a detailed written report to your immediate supervisor. The hazardous material incident reporting system will investigate the circumstances and correct any and all procedural infractions, During the Flight 1. Notify Pilot in Command - Any accident concerning dangerous goods should be notified immediately to the Commander who should be kept informed of all actions taken and of their effect. It is essential that the cabin crew and the flight crew coordinates their actions and that each be kept fully informed of the other's actions and intentions 2. Identify the Item - Ask the passenger concerned to identify the item and indicate its potential hazards. The passenger may be able to give some guidance on the hazard(s) involved and how these could be dealt with. In Case of Fire Standard emergency procedures must be used to deal with any fire. In general, water should not be used on a spillage or when fumes are present since it may spread the spillage or increase the rate of fuming. Consideration should also be given to the possible presence of electrical components when using water extinguishers. In Case of Spillage or Leakage 3. Collect dangerous goods kit. This contains: - A small broom and a dustpan - A bag of sand - Gloves - Plastic bags If not available, collect for use in dealing with the spillage or leakage: - A supply of paper towels or newspapers or other absorbent paper or absorbent fabric (e.g. seat cushion covers, head rest protectors). - Oven gloves or fire -resistant gloves, if available. - At least two large polyethylene waste bin bags - At least three smaller polyethylene bags, such as those used for duty-free or bar sales or, if none available, airsickness bags

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4. Don Rubber Gloves and Smoke Hood or Smoke Mask-Portable Oxygen. The hands should always be protected before touching suspicious packages or items. Fire-resistant gloves covered by polyethylene bags are likely to give suitable protection. equipment should always be worn when attending to an incident involving smoke, fumes or fire. 5. Move Passengers Away from Area The use of therapeutic masks with portable oxygen bottles or the passenger drop-out oxygen system to assist passengers in a smoke or fume -filled passenger cabin should not be considered since considerable quantities of fumes or smoke would be inhaled through the valves or holes in the masks. A more effective aid to passengers in a smoke or fume -filled environment would be the use of a wet towel or cloth held over the mouth and nose. A wet towel or cloth aids in filtering and is more effective at doing this than a dry towel or cloth Cabin crew should take prompt action if smoke or fumes develop and move passengers away from the area involved and, if necessary, provide wet towels or cloths and give instructions to breathe through them at the brace position level. 6. Place Dangerous Goods Item in Polyethylene Bags Using the Emergency Response Kit If it is absolutely certain that the item will not create a problem, the decision may be made not to move it. In most circumstances, however, it will be better to move the item and this should be done as suggested below. Place the item in a polyethylene bag as follows: Prepare two bags by rolling up the sides and placing them on the floor. Place the item inside the first bag with the closure of the item, or the point from which it is leaking from its container, at the top. Take off the rubber gloves whilst avoiding skin contact with any contamination on them. Place the rubber gloves in the second bag. Close the first bag whilst squeezing out the excess air. Twist the open end of the first bag and use a bag tie to tie it sufficiently tight to be secure but not tight that pressure equalization cannot take place. Place the first bag (containing the item) in the second bag, which already contains the rubber gloves and secure the open end in the same manner as that used for the first bag. If No Emergency Response Kit Pick up the item and place it in a polyethylene bag. Ensure the receptacle containing the dangerous goods is kept upright or the area of leakage is at the top. Using paper towels, newspaper, etc., mop up the spillage, after having ascertained 'there will be no reaction between what is to be used to mop up and the dangerous goods. Place the soiled towels, etc., in another polyethylene bag. Place the gloves and bags used to protect the hands either in a separate small polyethylene bag or with the soiled towels. If extra bags are not available, place the towels, gloves, etc., in the same bag as the item. Expel excess air from the bags and close tightly so as to be secure but not so tight that pressure equalization cannot take place. 7. Stow Polyethylene Bags If there is, a catering or bar box on board, empty any contents, and place the box on the floor, with the door upward. Place the bag(s) containing the item and any soiled towels, etc., in the box and close the door. Take the box or, if there is no box, the bag(s) to a position as far as possible from the flight deck and passengers. If a galley or toilet is fitted, consider taking the box or bag(s) there, unless it is close to the flight deck. Use a rear galley or toilet wherever possible, but do not place the box or bag(s) against the pressure bulkhead or fuselage wall. If a galley is used, the box or bag(s) stowed in an empty waste bin container. If a toilet is used, the box can be placed on the floor-or the bag(s) stowed in Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 35 May 2010

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an empty waste container. The toilet door should be locked from the outside. In a pressurized aircraft, if a toilet is used, any fumes will be vented away from passengers. However, if the aircraft is un-pressurized there may not be positive pressure in a toilet to prevent fumes from entering the passenger cabin. Ensure when moving a box that the opening is kept upward or when moving a bag that either receptacle containing the dangerous goods is kept upright or the area of leakage is kept at the top. Wherever the box or bag(s) have been located, wedge them firmly in place to prevent them from moving and to keep the item upright. Ensure that the position of the box or bags will not impede disembarkation from the aircraft. Treat Affected Scat Cushions/Covers in the Same Manner as Dangerous Goods Item Seat cushions, seat backs, or other furnishings, which have been contaminated by a spillage, should be removed from their fixtures and placed in a large bin bag or other polyethylene bag, together with any bags used initially to cover them. They should be stowed away in the same manner as the dangerous goods item causing the incident. Cover Spillage on Carpet/Floor Cover any spillage on the carpet or furnishings with a waste bag or other polyethylene bags, if available. If not, use airsickness bags opened out so that the plastic side covers the spillage or use the plastic covered emergency information cards. Carpet which has been contaminated by a spillage and which is still causing fumes despite being covered, should be rolled up, if possible, and placed in a large bin bag or other polyethylene bag. It should be placed in a waste bin and stowed, when possible, either in the rear toilet or rear galley. If the carpet cannot be removed it should remain covered by a large bin bag or polyethylene bags, etc., and additional bags should be used to reduce the fumes 8. Regularly Inspect Items Stowed Away/Contaminated Furnishings Any dangerous goods contaminated furnishings or equipment that have been removed and stowed away or covered for safety should be subject to regular inspection. After Landing Identify to Ground Personnel Dangerous Goods Item and where Stowed Upon arrival, take the necessary steps to identify to the ground staff where the item is stowed. Pass on all information about the item. Make Appropriate Entry in Cabin Crew Discrepancy Log SCC should make an entry in the CDL and report to the Commander so that proper maintenance action is undertaken and that the emergency response kit or any aircraft equipment used is replenished or replaced when appropriate. In case of an emergency the commander should inform ATC about the dangerous goods on board. The information should include the proper shipping names, class and subsidiary risks for which the labels are required, the compatibility group for class 1 and the quantity and location of the dangerous goods aboard the aircraft, and UN No. (if assigned). The operator of the involved aerodrome shall, on request, provide any information required to minimize the hazards created by any dangerous goods carried. In case of an accident the operator of an aerodrome involved shall give all information about the dangerous goods carried to the authority of the state in which the aerodrome accident occurred.

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2.10.9. DANGEROUS GOODS EMERGENCY RESPONSE TABLE

2.10.10. REMOVAL OF CONTAMINATION Medallion shall ensure that: Any contamination found as a result of the leakage or damage of dangerous goods is removed without delay; and An airplane which has been contaminated by radioactive materials is immediately taken out of service and not returned until the radiation level at any accessible surface and the nonfixed contamination are not more than the values specified in the Technical Instructions.

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2.10.11. DANGEROUS GOODS REPORTING (ref to EU-OPS 1.1225) 2.10.11.1. DANGEROUS GOODS ACCIDENTS AND INCIDENTS REPORT Medallion Air must report dangerous goods incidents and accidents to the appropriate authority of the State in which the accidents or incidents occurred, as required by that authority. An initial report shall be dispatched within 72 hours of the occurrence unless exceptional circumstances prevent this. 1. Any type of dangerous goods incident or accident should be reported, irrespective of whether the dangerous goods are contained in cargo, mail, passengers' baggage or crew baggage. 2. Carriage or proposed carriage of dangerous goods in contravention of applicable regulations including incorrect labeling and packaging of dangerous goods. 3. Initial reports may be made by any means, but in all cases a written report should be made as soon as possible. 4. The report should be as precise as possible and contain all data known at the time the report is made, (see Medallion Air Dangerous Goods Incident Report); Date of the incident or accident; Location of the incident or accident, the flight number and flight date, if applicable; Description of the goods and the reference number of the air waybill, pouch, baggage tag, ticket, etc; Proper shipping name (including the technical name, if appropriate) and UN number, where known; Class or division and any subsidiary risk; Type of packaging, if applicable, and the packaging specification marking on it; Quantity involved; Name and address of the shipper, passenger, etc; Any other relevant details; Suspected cause of the incident or accident; Action taken; Any other reporting action taken; Name, title, address and contact number of the person making the report 5. Copies of the relevant documents and any photographs taken should be attached to the report.

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DANGEROUS GOODS INCIDENT HAZMAT REPORT


DATE NAME OF COMMANDER CREW MEMBERS SCC CCM 2 CCM 3 CCM4 1. HAZMAT INCIDENT IN : PAX CABIN 2. FOLLOWED BY: EXTINGUISHER USED: PAX CARPET 5. OWNER IDENTIFIED: NAME: ADRESS: 6. CONTAMINANT IDENTIFIED: YES NO TYPE: 5. PAX EXPOSED: YES NO SEAT NO. NAME: ADRESS: 8. BAGGAGE HAZMAT LABELLED: 9. INCIDENT REPORT TO: SAFETY OFFICER 10. CML FILLED OUT: YES NO YES NO CLEANING CAPTAIN MAINTENANCE HATRACK FIRE YES YES FLOOR SMOKE NO NO HALON WATER SEAT CLOSET FUMES TOILET SMELL FLIGHT No ROUTE

3. RESPONSE KIT USED:

4. CONTAMINATED ITEMS: PAX BELONGINGS FLOOR YES NO OTHER SEAT NO.

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11. FACTUAL DESCRIPTION:

NAME:

DATE:

SIGNATURE: MDP CC FORM 010

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2.10.12. RESPONISBILITY OF THE COMPANY STAFF The following table shows the responsibility of the company staff to inform the passengers regarding dangerous goods rules. The numbers below correspond to the numbered columns in the table: 1. Staff engaged in the acceptance of dangerous goods. 2. Personnel engaged in cargo handling and/or documentation, ground handling, storage and loading of dangerous goods; 3. Passenger handling staff and security staff dealing with the screening of passengers and their baggage; 4. Flight crewmembers; 5. Other crewmembers.

2.11. NORMAL FLIGHT OPERATION


2.11.1. REPORTING FOR DUTY Prior to leaving for the airport, check required equipment: Updated and current Cabin Crew Manual Complete uniform with I.D. All other additional items required while on duty, (i.e., flats, spare panty hoses, spare blouse, needle & thread, etc.) Wristwatch. Working alarm clock (for layovers). Current License and Passport. NOTE: If a CC does not have a Cabin Crew Manual when departing from their domicile or layover, they are permitted to work the flight, but only one CC per aircraft may fly without a manual. At the airport All working or deadheading Cabin crewmembers will report at the airport one (1) hour and 30 minutes before departure, whether at the origination of their trip, either at their domicile, or at a layover station. Flight dispatch can adjust check-in times for operational need. All Cabin crewmembers are to be fully prepared, in accordance with RCAA and Company policies. If a crewmember is missing at check in time, crewmembers must inform Crew Scheduling and the Captain, that the crewmember is late. It is the Cabin crewmember's responsibility to call Flight Dispatch if they are unsure of the scheduled check-in time. Personal business is to be completed prior to your scheduled show time. A late check-in will result in disciplinary action. 2.11.2. SAFE MOVEMENT OF CREW TO/FROM AIRCRAFT The apron area of an airport is of Ugh accident risk. It is not allowed to walk over the apron; appropriate crew vehicles must carry Crewmembers to and from the aircraft. When no transportation is available (e.g. some small airports) be aware of: Running engines, aircraft jet intake and exhaust. Aircraft being pushed or towed. Contaminated tarmac (grease, fuel, ice, etc). When duties require to moving outside the aircraft, use extreme care. Under wing area must be carefully avoided.

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Aircrews are not permitted to stay below or near an aircraft being pulled or pushed. Running engines are of great danger. Persons can be sucked into a running engine inside a distance of 10m. The blast area behind a running engine is about 100 meters. Loose objects being blown away can cause injuries.

2.11.3. ASSIGNMENT OF DUTIES Cabin crewmember seniority will determine cabin crewmember position on the aircraft. This should be determined prior to aircraft boarding. If there are any changes in Cabin crewmember's positioning, during the trip or trip pairing, the Captain must be notified. All Cabin crewmembers will follow Senior Cabin Crewmember's direction for service and safety, in accordance with Company policies and the RCAA, however; the Captain is the Pilot in Command and has ultimate authority over the aircraft, the crew and the passengers. 2.11.4. CREW BRIEFING Cabin crew members must board the aircraft no later than 1 hour prior to departure, whether at their domicile or at a layover station. When the aircraft is late inbound, the outbound crew must board as soon as they are able to do so. Stow crew bags, uniform articles, and personal items in the appropriate overhead compartments. Whenever possible, avoid using two adjacent overhead bins. 2.11.5. PRE-FLIGHT CHECKS Cabin Crewmembers must perform pre-flight checks prior to each flight and after any layover. 2.11.5.1. AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY Each cabin crewmember has her own primary area of responsibility on board the aircraft; however, there is no beginning or ending row, or section, when doing compliance checks, serving beverages, or picking up used service items. 2.11.5.2. AIRCRAFT SECURITY CHECK An aircraft security search is to be conducted: when the crew arrives at the aircraft, prior to passenger boarding after pax disembarkation, after cleaning/catering/other services If the aircraft door has an intact security seal when the crew arrives at the aircraft, only the Captain can authorize breaking the security seal. Cabin crewmembers conduct an interior search of the aircraft according to Security Check List. This check is also to be accomplished between flight sectors and during stops. Maintenance will usually conduct the life vest search, but CCM may also do it. If anything found. Cabin Crewmembers must notify the Commander. Cabin Crewmembers should report to SCC "SECURITY CHECK PERFORMED"

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2.11.5.3. LAVATORY SEARCHES When searching the lavatories, all compartments must be opened and examined. The spring action on the covers of trashcans must be checked. Trash compartments must have been emptied. Check the running tap water in sinks and that the toilets flush in the lavatories. In all lavatories, check the supply of soap, air freshener, paper towels and toilet paper. If lavatories have an unpleasant odor and need to be serviced, notify technical personnel/Captain. If the forward lavatory is inoperative, notify the Captain immediately. 2.11.5.4. GALLEY SEARCHES When searching the galley for security checks, all compartments must be opened and examined. Any spillage on galley floors/compartments/work areas must be cleaned immediately. The spring action on the covers of trashcans must be checked. Trash compartments must have been emptied. Check the running tap water in galleys. Ascertain that all supplies have been boarded and that carts have been stocked. 2.11.5.5. SAFETY AND EMERGENCY SYSTEMS/EQUIPMENT CHECK A pre-flight check of all Emergency equipment and cabin systems, cabin cleanliness, and galley supplies must be conducted prior to passenger boarding. However, galley supplies may be put away as people are being pre-boarded. Do not delay passenger boarding while waiting for missing supplies. Advice the Gate Agent that needed supplies must be on board before the door is closed. Keep the Captain informed as to the situation and its progress. Check the following items: The assigned door (slide, warning flag, barrier strap). Check assigned station/jump seat. Check cabin systems and equipment within designated area of responsibility (i.e. interphone, fire extinguishers, oxygen bottles, first aid kit, , etc.). Check passengers seatbelts/life vest. Check seatback pocket free of unauthorized items (items in plain view). Check seatback pocket for passenger safety cards and airsickness bags; ensure there are enough spare cards and airsickness bags for the returning flight. Tray tables are upright and in locked position/Seat backs are upright and in locked position. Window shades are pulled up. Secure curtains by means of restraint. 2.11.5.6. SCC SUPLIMENTARY CHECK When arriving at aircraft, check stairs to be properly positioned and not obstructing door movement. If door open, check the safety latch to be in place in order to keep the door secured against wind gusts. - Ensure that the Cabin Crew Documentation - A/C CCM, security check-list, equipment checklist, flight report - is available on board the aircraft. If not, inform Cabin Crew Department. - Check CML for previous complaints/measures taken. - Test Video Safety Demo cassette (where applicable). - Check flight paper works (Mandatory Documents) and aircrew names on Gen Dec.

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2.11.6. MISSING EQUIPMENT Every missing/unserviceable equipment must be reported to SCC and to Captain, which shall check with the Minimum Equipment List and decide accordingly. At home base, maintenance personnel must take corrective measures in due time. 2.11.7. MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LIST The MEL is a list that provides for the operation of the aircraft, under specified conditions, with particular instruments, items of equipment or functions inoperative at the commencement of the flight. This list is prepared for each aircraft type taking into account the aircraft, relevant operational and maintenance conditions in accordance with a procedure approved by AACR. All items related to the airworthiness of the aircraft and not included in the list are automatically required to be operative. Non-safety related such as galley equipment, passenger convenience items, are not listed. 2.11.8. CABIN MAINTENANCE LOG INSTRUCTIONS 2.11.8.1. RESPONSIBILITIES Senior Cabin Crew Member and Authorized Technical Personnel are responsible for the implementation of this instruction. Authorized Technical Personnel take necessary actions for the recorded defects giving priority to airworthiness of the aircraft depending on the ground time. APPLICATION OF CABIN MAINTENANCE LOG (CML) 1. CML is written in English. 2. These sections below should be filled by Senior Cabin Crew Member/Authorized Technical Personnel: A/C REG: The aircraft registration FLIGHT NO: Flight Number DD/MM/YY: Day/Month/Year of the flight STA-DEP: Departure station DEFECT DESCRIPTION: Shortly describe the location, position and nature of defect, using words like inop, out of service. NEXT: If the spaces of defects are not sufficient, tick the block next and continue on the next page. PRINT NAME: The name of the SCC who is making the entry. SG: Signature of SCC. Note: If there is no defect, CML is closed for that flight writing "NIL DEFECT". 3. The sections on the right side of the page should be filled by Authorized Technical Personnel: MAINTENANCE ACTIONS: Action which is taken for the entered defect. If there is a part change for that specific defect, the section below "MAINTENANCE ACTIONS" is filled as follows; POS/OUT Position out P/N Par number of removed component S/N - Serial number of removed component (If present) POS/IN Position in P/N - Number of installed component S/N - Manufacturer Serial Number of installed component (If present) Tag number: Tag number of component Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 46 May 2010

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APPROVAL CERTIFICATE NO: Certificate Number and name of person approving part. LICENCE NO: The technicians license number DATE: Close-up Date of defect item HOUR: The time of close-up of defect item SG: Signature of Authorized Technical Personnel who corrected the defect. 4. CML consists of three copies: ORIGINAL WHITE COPY: Authorized Technical Personnel, who checks the CML after arrival of the aircraft, removes it and transfers it to Medallion Air Maintenance Management. PINK COPY: Left in the CML, and shouldn't be removed ever. YELLOW COPY: SCC removes it and attaches it to the other flight documents to be handed over to CC management. 5. A spare CML is kept on board. It is the responsibility of Technical Department to provide the CML, when CML pages are finished. It is SCCs or technician's responsibility to replace the CML with a new one when CML pages are all used. Completely filled, the CML will be taken and kept by Medallion Air Maintenance Management.

2.11.9. PASSENGERS EMBARKATION 2.11.9.1. COMMUNICATION WITH GROUND STAFF Effective communication between ground staff and Cabin Crew is essential to prevent human injury and damage of the aircraft. Ground staff should use the standard signals (i.e. thumbs up and/or knocking at the door), in situations such as: The operation of cabin access door and integrated steps. The positioning / removal of ground support equipment (i.e.: stairs/bridges, etc.) Passengers embarkation, disembarkation and during transit stops. Refueling the aircraft with passengers on board. Additionally, the Handling Agent must inform SCC about: Pre-boarding of Special Needs Passengers. Special meals requested by passengers and listed on PIL. Any other information concerning the passengers.

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2.11.9.2. MANDATORY DOCUMENTS BEFORE DEPARTURE 1. Load Sheet Load Sheet is a weight calculation which must be issued for each flight to ensure that: No structural and operation weight limit of the aircraft is exceeded; The number of passengers accepted for the flight does not exceed the maximum number specified for the respective cabin configuration; Note: Balance calculation must be made to ensure that the aircraft is loaded and the passengers seated in such a way that balance conditions are within prescribed limits. Weight and balance calculation can be carried out either manually or using the EDP system. In either case qualified personnel shall carry out this calculation. 2. General Declaration (domestic flights and EU-flights not applicable). Gen Dec is a mandatory written declaration form only for international flights which contains details about flight and crew; 3. Cargo Manifest (even if no cargo on board). Cargo Manifest is a mandatory document issued for all flights. It contains details of cargo loading, other than crew and passengers baggage. If there is no cargo on board the document must be filled in with NIL. 4. Passenger Manifest (Passenger List). 5. Passenger Information List (PIL) is a printed message delivered by Departure Control System (DCS) that provides the cabin crew with necessary information concerning passengers on board, and optionally about seats blocked for other purposes. A passenger appears on the PIL when he has a confirmed special service requirement (SSR code). IATA "SPECIAL SERVICE REQUIREMENT CODES"- (SSR)
AVIH BLND BSCT CBBG COUR DEAF DEPA DEPU DIPB EXST FQTV INAD LEGB LEGL LEGR MAAS MEDA OXYG PETC SEMN STCR UNMR/UM WCBD WCBW WCHC WCHR WCHS WCMP XBAG Animals in hold Blind passenger Bassinet carrycot Cabin baggage Commercial Courier Deaf passenger Deportee accompanied by escort Deportee without escort Diplomatic baggage Extra-seat Frequent traveler Inadmissible passenger Legs in cast - both Leg in cast - left Leg in cast - right Meet and assist Medical case Oxygen Animal in cabin Ship's crew - seaman Stretcher passenger Unaccompanied minor Dry battery wheelchair Wet battery wheelchair Wheelchair for cabin - immobile passenger Wheelchair for ramp Wheelchair for steps Wheelchair manually powered Baggage excess

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2.11.9.3. PASSENGER ACCEPTANCE POLICY Only passengers whose physical or mental condition or conduct will not jeopardize the safety of the aircraft or its occupants are accepted for traveling. 2.11.9.3.1. NOT ACCEPTABLE PASSENGERS Persons who refuse to permit screening/search of their person or property for explosives or a concealed deadly weapon or article. Persons who refuse on request, to produce positive identification. Persons who are, or appear to be, intoxicated. Unruly, obnoxious, or disorderly passengrs. Persons under the infuence of drugs. Persons with a contagious disease. A serious ill person who cannot or refuse to provide a physician written permission to fly. 2.11.9.3.2. PASSENGERS UNFIT TO TRAVEL In the event that Cabin Crewmembers suspect that a passenger is not fit to travel, or may represent a threat to themselves or to the passengers, they must inform the Commander immediately. The Commander shall determine appropriate action in close co-ordination with ground staff. 2.11.9.3.3. STOWAWAYS If a person conceals himself in any compartment, such as a coat closet, baggage bin, the Medallion air personnel handling the situation, whether in the air or on the ground, must determine that the person is a stowaway. Stowing away or attemping to stow away is a more serious offense and the deciding factor in this case is the intent of the person. It should never be considered definite intent to obtain passage by fraud. The Commander must be notified immediately and he will take appropriate action whenever there is a possibility that an unauthorized person is on board. 2.11.10. SAFE MOVEMENT OF PAX TO/FROM AIRCRAFT Usually, passengers board the aircraft directly from the terminal, using the loading bridge. When transportation is necessary from the terminal to the aircraft, the following precautions must be followed: The transportation bus must be parked near the aircraft, in a location that avoids passenger exposure to hazardous conditions. Ground operations personnel provide adequate guidance to ensure the passengers move only inside the controlled area. Passengers are directed along the correct and safe route and prompt attention to stragglers must be given where necessary in order to avoid exposure to fuelling equipment, jet blasts, engines. Smoking restrictions are enforced 2.11.11. READY FOR BOARDING" REPORT When all pre-flight checks have been completed, cabin crewmembers report to SCC, who will report to Commander "Cabin ready for boarding".

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2.11.12. ADMISSION TO FLIGHT DECK ref EU-OPS 1.100 General The cockpit door shall be closed and locked from the time passenger embarkation begins until disembarkation of passengers has been completed, except when necessary to permit access or egress by authorized persons. Admission to the flight deck is under the authority of the Commander. The persons who are allowed to entry the cockpit, subject to Commander's permission are: Medallion Air crewmembers or other Medallion Air staff, Persons designated by RCAA prior to the flight, with assigned duties, required in the cockpit. Usually, a key of the cockpit door is provided, and its location must be known by all cabin crew members. Alternatively when the unlocking of the door requires the use of keypad, the Commander will discuss the access code during pre-flight briefing. The key or the access code shall be used only if requested by the flight crew or in abnormal/emergency situations when there are reasons to assume equipment failure or pilot incapacitation. Entering the Cockpit The entry of authorized persons into the cockpit is normally limited to non-critical phases of flight. Whenever required, intercommunication system must be used for granting the permission for entry. Note that before unlocking the cockpit door the flight crew shall visually verify who is at the door and the exact circumstances in that area. The specific coded signals established during the pre-flight briefing are required for entry. Exit from the Cockpit When a person wishes to exit from the cockpit, that person, before unlocking the door should: Verify and confirm with cabin crew that the adjacent lavatory is not occupied by passengers and the CC are positioned to block passenger access to the door area when this is unlocked; Visually determine the exact circumstances existing outside the door, to ensure that any person is not within easy access to the cockpit door. It is essential that the cockpit door be opened for the minimum time required for quickly leaving or entering the flight crew compartment. Passengers' Presence in the Cockpit Door Area Passengers' presence in the cockpit door area other reasons than toilet should be discouraged. During any disturbance involving passengers, no passengers' presence should be permitted in this area other than in a role of physically assisting cabin crew in prevention or attempted cockpit intrusion. Visit to the Flight Deck Passengers' visits to the flight deck are forbidden. Travel on the Flight Deck It is Medallion Air policy that passengers are not allowed to travel on the flight deck. Cabin Crew members on Flight Deck Cabin crew trainees are authorized to access the cockpit at the Commander's discretion during familiarization flights. This observation experience is restricted to non-critical phases of flight (see "Sterile cockpit concept') and only after the seat belt sign has been turned off. The Commander may approve the presence of a cabin crew on the flight deck during take off and/or landing, provided the cabin crew is a member of the operating crew and is not on emergency duty. Sterile cockpit concept Crew members will only permit those activities related to the safe operation of the aircraft Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 50 May 2010

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during critical phases of flight such as: Pushback; Taxi; Take-off; Heavy turbulence; Landing; Flight below approximately FL100 (except cruise). Examples of activities not permitted during critical phases of flight are eating meals or engaging in non-essential communications between the flight crew and cabin crew members. 2.11.13. COORDINATION/COMMUNICATION BETWEEN FLIGHT CREW AND CABIN CREW Calling the cockpit Two-way communication between cockpit crew and cabin crew is essential for the safety of the flight. The interphone system is an indispensable mean for such communication since the cockpit door shall be closed and locked as long as the a/c doors are closed. Cabin crew must refrain from calling the cockpit during critical phases of flight except for situations when applicable procedures ask for such call, or when vital information for the safety of the airplane must be urgently communicated to the flight crew: fire/smoke etc. Standard calls for flight crew/cabin crew communication Communication between flight crew and cabin crew can be established by: Interphone 1 chime for normal conditions and at least 3 for emergency Passenger Adress flight crew to cabin crew or passengers Direct communication face-to-face. Flight phase Before engine start Condition Cabin to Cockpit Cockpit to Cabin CONFIRM (INT) CONFIRM, CLOSE THE DOORS (INT) CHECKED (INT) CONFIRM (INT) CONFIRM (INT) CABIN CREW TAKE YOUR SEATS. TAKE-OFF IN(INT) CABIN CREW PREPARE FOR INITIAL DESCENT. LANDING IN (INT) CONFIRM (INT) CABIN CREW TAKE YOUR SEATS. LANDING IN (INT)

Before push During taxi Before take-off Cruise Before landing

After pre-flight check Ready for boarding (INT) All pax and docs pax on board, are on board according to load sheet, request permission to close the doors (INT) After closing doors Doors closed (INT) Ready for pushCabin ready for pushback back (INT) Pax briefed and Cabin secured for takecabin checked off (INT)

20 min before landing Pax briefed, cabin checked Cabin secured for landing (INT)

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2.11.14. PRE-BOARDING Pre-boarding is a service offered to Special needs Passengers before the general boarding begins. 2.11.14.1. PRE-BOARDING PREPARATION Pre-boarding is a service that is usually offered on all flights to allow certain passengers to board the aircraft before general boarding begins. The Gate Agent should inform the Lead Cabin Crewmember that pre-boarding is beginning. Ensure that the minimum required cabin crew are onboard and uniformly distributed throughout cabin in accordance with regulations OPS 1.990 and company policy. When it is announced that the passengers are on their way finish what you are doing as soon as possible and ensure that: The cockpit door shall be closed and locked from the time passenger embarkation begins. Lights are switched on BRIGHT position. Aisles and exits are free of obstacles. Curtains are secured. Boarding music is turned on (if available). Demo equipment is ready but not visible. Each Cabin Crewmember at assigned station. 2.11.14.2. CCM ACTIONS DURING PRE-BOARDING Greet the special needs passengers. Direct and settle them in assigned seat. Ensure seat assignments comply with exit seat criteria. Assist passengers with special needs in stowing hand baggage. CCM2 will make an individual briefing for each Special need Passenger. After briefing, cabin crewmember confirms completion to SCC. Brief them/their escort individually. Blind briefing: Guide the passenger from the seat to the nearest exit in order to headcount the rows of seats and feet steps. Do not guide a blind passenger by pulling him. Just keep your arm bended and put his hand onto your forearm. Always speak loud about next movement, such as "Left, right, steps forward, etc." Advise the person the location to place the cane/service dog if applicable. Tactile familiarization with the equipment required to using (safety belt, tray table, air vents, and toilet location). Tactile familiarization with the equipment that might be required to use (oxygen compartment door, life vest). Brace position Deaf/Mute Briefing: Brief the passenger showing the safety instructions card, brace position, point out the emergency exits Speak slowly, using simple words, permitting speech reading. Keep voice low If necessary, use pen and paper Pregnant women briefing: Own seat belt fastened under the abdomen. Mothers with infants briefing: Infant seat belt use and infant life vest donning. Oxygen mask donning instructions: first her and then the baby. Infant holding in protective position for take off/ landing/turbulence. Recommended brace position. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 52 May 2010

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Diaper changing table (if applicable). Used diaper discarded only into lavatory waste bin. Help with the baggage but do not carry the infant. Stretcher briefing: Call button, lights. Route to the closest floor level door exit Location of all other floor level door exits He will be disembarked/evacuated last. The use of oxygen masks: first the escort and after the stretcher. UM briefing: Assist UM to be seated Brief on seat appliances such as call button, lights, tray table. Demonstrate to child on how to fasten and unfasten seatbelt. Offer game kit/coloring book/magazine Check regularly on childs needs, food and beverage, general comfort and the need to go to the toilet etc Prepare child to sleep, and if not, keep him/her occupied by playing, speaking Advise him/her to wait for you before disembarking after the rest of pax. WCHS, WCHR, WCHC briefing: Brief on seat appliances such as call button, lights, tray table, seat belt Route to the closest floor level door exit and location of all other floor level door exits He will be disembarked/evacuated last. 2.11.14.3. BOARDING PRIORITIES: Passengers with Reduced Mobility. Disabled persons unable to sit upright INAD and DEPO. Passengers traveling with infants and children. Unaccompanied minors. Expectant mothers. Deaf/blind passengers. Business Class passengers may be boarded on their own convenience. SCC should inform the Commander about Special Needs Passengers. 2.11.15. GENERAL BOARDING PROCEDURES Boarding begins 30 minutes before the standard time of departure (STD). 2.11.15.1. CABIN CREW RESPONSIBILITIES DURING PAX BOARDING Senior Cabin Crewmember Greet boarding passengers. Perform boarding announcements and renew them every 10 minutes (seat number, hand baggage stowage) Cabin Crewmembers Greet boarding passengers. Direct the passengers to their assigned seat. Assist passengers to stow their hand-baggage. Open carefully the overhead bins in order to prevent personal injury. Assist passengers traveling with a pet (ask the passenger to stow the container under the seat; remind the passenger to keep the pet in the container during the Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 53 May 2010

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flight); All Cabin crewmembers will monitor passengers during boarding, and in flight, to prevent improper stowage of carry-on items in the Emergency Equipment overhead compartments. Keep a visual watch of the cabin at all times. Be alert for possible carriage of dangerous goods not accepted in the cabin; Ensure that the no smoking rule is strictly observed. Ensure cabin baggage and exit row criteria are met. Note: In the event cabin crew members suspect that a passenger is unfit to travel, or may represent a threat to themselves or to the passengers, they should inform the Commander and determine appropriate action in close co-ordination with ground staff. Exit row PSP briefing: CCM3 should stand at first row of exists, in the aisle. The briefing must be made with a loud, clear voice. Ensure that all pax from exit rows are paying attention. May I have your attention please! These are the emergecy exit rows. Please read the safety cards now. In case of an emergency, after the aircraft comes to a complete stop, you will hear the command evacuate/open seatbelts. Check outside conditions for fire, smoke, obstructions. If its safe, open the door like this show You throw the door outside and then you sit and slide off the back of the wing. Do you understand? Would you like to change your seats if you dont want to help? 2.11.16. BEFORE TAKE OFF PREPARATIONS 2.11.16.1. HEAD COUNTING PROCEDURE Once all passengers have boarded, CCM should perform an accurate passenger counting and then shall report to SCC. SCC should compare the final number of passengers with load sheet figures and report to the Commander by interphone: "X PASSENGERS ON BOARD, ACCORDING TO LOAD SHEET, REQUEST PERMISSION FOR CLOSING DOORS". 2.11.16.2. CABIN PREPARATION FOR TAKE OFF Removing of Loading Bridge/Stairs or Catering Vehicles Removal of passenger loading bridge/stairs or catering vehicles is permitted only in agreement with the Cabin crewmember and the responsible ground personnel, and after the door has been closed. The Cabin crew member that has given the order to remove the stairs/loading bridge shall remain at the closed door until the loading bridge/stairs have been removed. When reopening a closed door at which a passenger stairs/loading bridge is still docked special care shall be taken. Is there any doubt about the secured condition of the stairs the cabin crew must request a new clearance from the stairs operator. Closing the Doors In general, doors should be closed as long as loading bridge/stairs or catering vehicles are still docked. If the structure of these vehicles does not permit this, doors must be closed immediately after undocking. During normal closing of entry/service doors, a condition known as "false latching" may occur. A "false latched" door may result in a pressure leak after take off. After closing of door check the door control handle is in the fully closed position. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 54 May 2010

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Door cannot be closed Should inadvertent door movement/closing occur during closing procedure, the assigned Cabin Crewmember to that door immediately reports to SCC and to Commander. Door should be guarded until maintenance personnel arrive. Inoperative Door Should a floor level door be inoperative for various reasons (i.e. slide cannot be armed, no slide, etc.) the following action must be taken: The inoperative exit must not be used for passenger embarkation/ disembarkation. The corresponding EXIT lights and signs must be deactivated and the crew informed. The safety demo and announcements shall be made only for operating doors. The passenger number and seating shall be adjusted accordingly. Cabin Crewmembers shall be repositioned. Cabin Crewmembers responsibilities reassigned. After receiving permission from CDT to close L1 door, SCC closes the L1 door and orders by P.A. "CABIN CREW, PREPARE FOR DEPARTURE, ARM ALL SLIDES, CROSS CHECK AND ALL CALL" SCC and CCM4 move the red flag in the warning position (across door window), and arm the slide by attaching the girt bar to the floor brackets. All call procedure: Verbally: - R1: R1 ARMED AND CROSS CHECK - L1: L1 ARMED, CROSS-CHECK COMPLETE CCM3 moves the red flag in the warning position (across door window), arms the slide by attaching the girt bar to the floor brackets, cross-checks with A1. CCM2 moves the headrest to the down position, crosschecks with door L2. All call procedure: Via interphone: - L2: L2 ARMED AND CROSS-CHECK - A1: HEADREST DOWN, CROSS-CHECK COMPLETE Slide cannot be armed Should any obstruction occur during attaching the girt bar, the assigned CCM to that door immediately reports to SCC and to Commander. Girt bar should be attached immediately to the door brackets and door should be guarded until maintenance personnel arrive. After all passengers are seated and all evacuation routes are unobstructed, SCC reports to Commander "Cabin Ready for Pushback and Taxi" [Push back is the initial aircraft movement time (if moved by a tug) or engines start time if the aircraft will move under its own power]. After push back report, SCC shall initiate Passenger Briefing Sequence. 2.11.16.3. PASSENGERS STANDARD BRIEFING (ref to OPS 1.285) Passengers briefing is mandatory. SCC is responsible for the passengers briefing according to the CCM. SCC shall use P.A. for passengers announcements. The information given to the passengers shall always be accurate. Another CCM when delegated by SCC should perform the Announcements according to the Announcements collection. When departure/arrival point is Romania, safety announcements for demo should be performed in Romanian and English. When the operating base is outside Romania (long term leasing) or on charter flights, safety announcements for demo should be performed in English and another language requested by the client. Announcements topics prior to take-off Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 55 May 2010

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1. Welcome announcement: Destination, flight time, altitude, speed Proper stowage of carry-on baggage. Seat back must be secured in the upright positions. Tray table must be secured in the upright positions. The requirements to obey No Smoking sings throughout the flight. The requirements to pull up the sunshades. Restrictions concerning portable electronic devices.

Passenger Electronic Device Interference (ref to EU-OPS 1.110) The use of electronic devices may interfere with the aircraft electronic systems by electromagnetic interference. For interference to aircraft systems to occur from the use of portable electronic devices, the following conditions would have to occur simultaneously: The device is radiating above the threshold at which system (receiver) disruption can occur. The device is located in the worst-case position in the aircraft cabin (i.e. in a seat with a window near the aircraft antennae). The frequency of emission from the device falls within the aircraft receiver system operational frequency band. Because there are many conditions and independently variable, the chances of all occurring simultaneously are very low. However, the vulnerability of aircraft radio-navigation and communications system may be greatest during take-off, climb, approach, and landing phases of flight. During these phases, the aircraft is at lower altitudes and may be in close proximity to numerous ground-based interference sources, which could increase the likelihood of disruptive interference due to combined interference effects. Therefore, any electronic device should not be used during take-off and landing and all Cabin Crewmembers must be alert and must ensure that the prohibited electronic equipment are switched off and remain switched off during the whole flight once the doors are closed. If interference from a portable electronic device is suspected, the Commander of the aircraft shall prohibit the use of the device. Electronic devices not to be used on board the aircraft Cellular phones Radio sets AM/FM/TV transmitters Walkie-talkies Computer/laptops with separated printer or mouse (optical mouse) Wireless microphones Remotely controlled toys Any other electronic devices that have not been determined as not causing interference with aircraft systems. Cabin Crew Members must check that passengers comply with these restrictions. Allowed personal electronic equipment during the flight Pocket calculators Wrist watches Tape recorders with headsets Electronic games without remote control Cameras Computer/laptops with integrated mouse, etc Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 56 May 2010

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Compact disc with headsets Electronic shavers Portable voice recorders Medical equipment (Hearing aids may be used without restrictions) However, any electronic devices should not be used during take-off and landing. They should be properly stowed similar to other carry-on baggage. 2. Safety announcements: The Light Line/Emergency Lighting system. The location of emergency exits. How to fasten,unfasten and adjust the seat belt. The location and operation of drop-down oxygen masks, including location, presentation, actions to be performed in order to obtain, don and secure the mask, activate the flow of oxygen and instruction on the priority for persons assisting other. The location and use of life vest, including how to remove from its stowage and a demonstration of their location, method of donning and inflation and when to inflate the life vest. The location, purpose of, and advisability of reading the safety information card. Safety demonstration - ref to EU-OPS 1.280, 1.285, 1.330, 1.335, 1.730, 1.731 At least two Cabin Crewmembers should perform a realistic (live) demonstration, one per each passenger compartment. - Light line: Point to location. - Emergency exit: Position of doors. - Seatbelt: Demonstrate seatbelt fasten, tighten, and release. - Oxygen masks: Oxygen masks location and demonstrate pulling down on gold mask. Show mask on face, elastic band tightening. - Life vests: Hold life vest high while pointing under pax seat. Demonstrate donning of life vest, buckle and tightening. Demonstrate pull red tabs, manual inflation and location of water-activated light and tab. - Safety cards: Show safety card and position of safety card in seat back pocket. Note: During announcements and the demonstration of emergency equipment other activities such as newspaper distribution, offering welcome drinks or talking to passengers are not allowed. 2.11.16.4. CABIN CHECKS BEFORE TAKE-OFF When passenger briefing is completed, all CCM will perform a compliance check. All toilets are closed and no passengers in; All aisles and exits are free of obstruction; All curtains are secured open; All stowage bins are securely closed; Check Emergency Equipment compartments for the improper stowage of carry-on items. All seatbelts are fastened; All children are secured by placing the tightened seatbelt low on the child torso; just above the legs; All expectant mothers are secured by placing the seatbelt below the abdomen so that it applies force to the pelvis only; All tables are in locked positions; All seatbacks are in upright position; Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 57 May 2010

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All window shades are fully opened; All service pre-departure items are removed; TV monitors and In-flight Entertainment (IFE) equipment are stowed, if applicable Infant life vests are distributed, as applicable; Galleys are secured, and all catering items are properly stowed; Passengers comply with portable electronic devices restrictions; Passengers are observing the "No Smoking" sign. Report to SCC: "CABIN READY FOR TAKE OFF" Note: The cockpit door shall be closed and locked from the time passenger embarkation begins until disembarkation of passengers has been completed, except when necessary to permit access or egress by authorized persons. 2.11.16.5. READY FOR TAKE-OFF SCC performs a visual final check of the cabin FWD-AFT-FWD. SCC shall adjust cabin lights to match outside ambient conditions and reports to Commander via interphone: "CABIN PREPARED FOR TAKE-OFF". Take-off Imminent Signal Commander must warn cabin crew by PA when take-off is imminent "CABIN CREW TAKE YOUR SEATS FOR TAKE OFF". 2.11.16.6. CABIN CREW SEATING AT STATIONS All Cabin Crewmembers must be seated, with seatbelt properly fastened (including shoulder harness), as follows: During taxi and take-off, from Commander's take-off imminent signal until the "Fasten Seat Belt" sign has been switched off. During approach and landing - from Commander's landing imminent signal until the aircraft reaches the final parking position and the Fasten Seat Belts sign is turned off. Whenever deemed necessary by the Commander in the interest of safety (Fasten Seat Belts sign on). 2.11.16.7. SILENT REVIEW During take-off and landing, CCM should be seated with seat harness securely fasten and complete a 30 second "Silent Review". Topics for the silent review Type of aircraft Operation of assigned exit Type of emergency that could arise depending on the flight phase Location of Pre-Selected Passengers Location of the emergency equipment Location of disabled passengers requiring assistance Crew coordination Brace for impact Evacuation commands Evacuation procedures Note: Cabin crew shall not read magazines or engage themselves in matters considered as neglect in respect to their duties during take-off.

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2.11.17. DURING THE FLIGHT 2.11.17.1. COCKPIT CHECK CALLS SCC should check the cockpit regularly, by interphone calls, according to the pre-flight briefing. 2.11.17.2. CABIN MONITORING To be able to detect or prevent a fire on board, either in flight or on the ground, the cockpit and the cabin must be observed continuously. Ensure that no smoking rule is strictly adhered to. Check lavatories for smoke; check that flaps and doors of waste containers are closed (because of automatic extinguisher). Check smoke detectors not covered. These checks must be performed: Shortly before meals. Every 15 minutes during periods when lavatories are not frequented. After Fasten Seat Belts signs have been switched ON. Any other time spot checks. 2.11.17.3. IRREGULARITIES DURING FLIGHT All in-flight incidents that may affect flight safety must be reported to Captain. These include noises, odors, or observations. Passengers falling ill as well as the use of emergency equipment must also be reported to Flight Crew. Cockpit must be informed about failure or defect electrical equipment in the cabin. Reactivating a popped circuit breaker without knowing the reason for popping may cause a considerable fire hazard. SCC must stop serving alcoholic beverages to passengers who affect safety and order on board. 2.11.17.4. GALLEY FIRE PREVENTION Galley fire prevention can be maintained by keeping work areas clean and free from debris such as paper products and by using equipment only for their intended purposes. 2.11.17.5. FASTEN SEAT BELT SIGN ON USE OF SEATBELTS SCC must reinforce the use of seat belts whenever the Fasten Seat Belt sign is ON: For take-off. For Landing. During Turbulence. Additionally, passengers should keep their seat belts fastened whenever seated. Cabin Crew must check that passengers have fastened their seat belts while the Fasten Seat Belts sign is ON. 2.11.17.6. SERVING OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Cabin Crewmember should not allow any passenger to consume any alcoholic beverages that have not been provided by cabin crew. No Cabin Crewmember shall provide an intoxicating liquor to any person on board the aircraft where there are reasonable grounds to believe that the person is impaired by alcohol or a drug to an extent that may present a hazard to the aircraft or persons on board the aircraft Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 59 May 2010

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Cabin Crewmember should not offer alcoholic beverages to passengers: Under the age of 18. Under the influence of drugs. Appear to have drunk more than they can stand. DEPU. DEPA and their escorts; INADs; Unruly/Disruptive passengers. 2.11.18. DESCENT FASTEN SEAT BELT SIGN IS ON SCC contacts PIC via interphone for information regarding ETA and temperature. SCC will switch the lights to BRIGHT and will initiate the passenger briefing/announcements. SCC Should renew the Special Needs Passenger information to the Commander (i.e. wheelchair needed, UM). CCM should collect blankets and pillows from the passengers and pick up newspapers, plastic bags, used cups and cans from the floor. 2.11.18.1. CABIN CHECKS BEFORE LANDING After landing announcements, Cabin Crewmembers will complete a cabin compliance check: All galley equipment is secured and trolleys are stowed in the appropriate areas; All toilets are closed and no passengers in; All aisles and exits are free of obstruction; All curtains are secured open; Hand baggage securely stowed and all stowage bins are securely closed; Check Emergency Equipment overhead compartments for the improper stowage of carry-on items. All seatbelts are fastened; All children are secured by placing the tightened seatbelt low on the child torso; just above the legs; All expectant mothers are secured by placing the seatbelt below the abdomen so that it applies force to the pelvis only; All electronic equipment should be switched off; All tables are in locked positions; All seatbacks are in upright position; All window shades are fully opened; Smoking restrictions observed. TV monitors and In-Flight Entertainment equipment are stowed, if applicable Report to SCC :" CABIN READY FOR LANDING" Cabin crew should remain seated during this time unless there is a safety-related occurrence in the cabin. 2.11.18.2. CABIN READY FOR LANDING SCC shall perform a final check of the cabin FWD-AFT-FWD, adjusts cabin lights to match outside conditions and reports to the Commander via the interphone: "CABIN READY FOR LANDING". Landing Imminent Signal Commander must warn cabin crew by PA when landing is imminent "CABIN CREW TAKE YOUR SEATS FOR LANDING" CCM take their seats on jump seats and begin silent review.

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2.11.19. ARRIVAL/POST LANDING DUTIES Cabin Crewmembers shall remain seated with seat harness fastened until the aircraft is parked. SCC shall perform the appropriate after landing announcement of smoking regulations and the use of seat belts according to the Announcements Booklet. 2.11.19.1. DISARMING DOORS/DOOR OPENING After the plane stops completely, the captain announces on PA: "Cabin Crew disarm slides and open doors". SCCM repeats the command on PA: "CABIN CREW PREPARE FOR ARRIVAL, DISARM ALL SLIDES, CROSS-CHECK AND ALL CALL". SCC and CCM4 move the red flag from the warning position to the top of door window and disarm the slide by disengaging the girt bar from the floor brackets and placing it in the stowage hooks. They cross-check each other. All call procedure: Verbally: - R1: R1 DISARMED AND CROSS-CHECK - L1: L1 DISARMED, CROSS-CHECK COMPLETE CCM3 moves the red flag from the warning position to the on top of door window, disarms the slide by disengaging the girt bar from the floor brackets and placing it in the stowage hooks; cross-checks with A1. CCM2 moves the headrest to the up position, cross-checks with door L2. All call procedure: Via interphone: - L2: L2 DISARMED AND CROSS-CHECK - A1: HEADREST UP, CROSS-CHECK COMPLETE 2.11.19.2. DISEMBARKATION SCC may open the L1 door provided that: The aircraft reaches the final parking position. The engines have been stopped. Seat belt signs have been turned off: Commander gives permission to open the door(s). - air bridge, stairway: SCC gets clearance from ground personnel to open the door (knocking/thumbs-up signal). - If not available, SCCM opens the door and extends the airplanes own stairway. In both cases, SCCM waits for permission from handling agent to disembark. SCCM should coordinate disembarkation with the handling agent concerning strollers, hand luggages etc, and maintain passenger flow. SCC should ensure that Special needs Passengers disembark after all the other passengers. After pax disembarkation, all CCMs perform security check within designated area of responsibility and report to SCC "SECURITY CHECK PERFORMED" SCC should always report verbally or thumbs up - to Handling Agent that security check has been carried out and no suspicious items were left on board. 2.11.19.3. LOST/FOUND ITEMS All lost/ found items left behind by passengers should be delivered to Handling Agent. SCC will describe the lost/found items in SCC Report. 2.11.20. TRANSIT During a transit stop, all passengers may remain on board if local airport regulations permit. If transit passengers stay on board, the following procedures must be observed: CCM 3 counts the remaining pax and informs SCC, who will inform CDT and handling agent. Cabin Crewmembers will perform security check and hand luggage identification Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 61 May 2010

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within the designated area of responsibility Cabin Crewmembers shall check ID of cleaning/catering staff and supervise catering and cleaning as well. Cabin Crewmembers shall supply seat pockets with Safety Instruction Card and airsickness bags (if necessary). Cabin Crewmembers shall check for the comfort of the passengers during the stop. At least minimum cabin crew must be on board and be prepared for an immediate emergency evacuation. NOTE: When (all) passengers disembark and re-board at transit stations, Cabin Crew must perform passenger counting and relay the information to the handling agent. 2.11.21. REFUELLING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD (ref Appendix 1 to OPS 1.305) Fuel vapors may be present during aircraft fuelling so the danger of ignition is so real that safety regulation / precautions must be enforced. Fuelling/de-fuelling with passengers on board is allowed when in addition to regulations in OM the following safety regulations are adhered to. Ground Personnel Precautions Only authorized personnel must carry out the fuelling procedure. The airport fire brigade has to be informed before fuelling/de-fuelling is commenced. If very strong fuel odors or other hazardous conditions are detected, fuelling operation must be suspended at once until the safety condition is corrected. All fuel spills, irrespective of size, must be regarded as a potential source of fire. Ground activities outside the aircraft must be conducted in such a manner that they do not create a hazard. All the ground areas beneath exits must be kept free of any obstructions. In case of severe lightning or electrical storm near the airport, fuelling operations must be suspended. Aircrew Precautions One flight crew must remain in the cockpit for communication/coordination with cabin crew and ground personnel. The aircraft's main engines are shut down. Cabin Crew must be warned that fuelling will take place, when it starts and ends. At least minimum Cabin Crew must be on board and positioned at assigned stations to ensure evacuation through specific exits if necessary. The "Fasten Seat Belt" signs are switched OFF. The "No Smoking" signs are switched ON, together with interior lighting to enable emergency exits to be identified; SCC must inform the passengers (by PA announcement) that during fueling operations they must be seated with their seat belt unfastened and refrain from smoking. Cabin Crew must check the compliance and monitor adherence to safety regulations within the cabin. Exit L1 and Aft Tail Cone door must be open, with stairs in position, and the aisle shall not be blocked by catering or cleaning material. R1 and L2 doors must be closed and L2 door slide must be in the armed position. All evacuation routes must be kept free of obstacles. All vehicles and ground equipment must be positioned in such a way that immediate slide inflation at these exits is ensured. No catering truck through Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 62 May 2010

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these exits is permitted. The Flight Crew, respectively the station personnel, must be informed and the fuelling must be stopped, if: Fuel vapors are noticed in the cabin. Safety precautions are not adhered to. Restrictions The use of oxygen bottles is not allowed. No lighters, no matches, nor flashes or photo cameras. All items of personal electrical equipment are switched off. Passengers must not be allowed to loiter near exits. Fuelling/De-fueling during Passenger Boarding/Disembarking It is permitted to board passengers while fuelling/de-fuelling is in operation, provided the following precautions are taken: Must be authorized by the Commander. Fuelling/de-fuelling is restricted to the right side only. Passengers must be under the supervision of authorized staff. A route to the aircraft, outside the appropriate restricted zone, to be advised for the passengers. A gathering in the entrance area shall be avoided. No smoking rules are to be rigidly enforced. 2.11.22. HANDLING OF FLIGHT IRREGULARITIES 2.11.22.1. IRREGULAR OPERATIONS During irregular operations (such as a delay) SCC will coordinate with the Captain and the Agent to determine: What information is to be given to the passengers, and by whom. Estimated time of delay. Whether passengers are to be allowed to deplane Whether beverages should be served on the ground. 2.11.22.2. MAJOR GROUND DELAY If SCC is advised of a delay of 20 minutes or more: Brief other CCs with known information. Update CC with new information, as it becomes available. If the Captain requests, SCC will make an announcement giving passengers known information. Inform deaf passengers (in writing) of delay. Ensure that passengers are kept advised of the situation. Update announcements should be made every 10 minutes, or as new information becomes available. Initiate service of assorted complimentary soft drinks, with the Captain's approval, leaving ample time for pick up and stowage of used service items. Tray service is preferred when beverages are served on the ground. 2.11.22.3. SERVICE TO PAX ON GROUND The service normally begins after take-off. However, during extended ground stays in case of irregularities, personal contact between cabin crew and passengers may advantageously assist in handling the situation. Cabin Crew should provide drinks, napkins and newspapers. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 63 May 2010

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The service must be conducted on the ground provided that: Remind to the passengers the No Smoking and seat belt regulations (Passengers' seat belts unfastened) and Cabin Crew provide a cabin check. At least one cabin door must be open and integrated stairs lowered. The exits and the egress path must not be obstructed at all times. After service completion, garbage from waste bins must be removed Catering stock must be replenished accordingly 2.11.22.4. AIRCRAFT CHANGE When an aircraft change is deemed necessary, SCC will make a PA announcement to inform passengers about the situation. Good coordination with ground personnel for passengers disembarking, catering unloading and passenger re-embarkation are essential to minimize passenger's inconvenience. 2.11.22.5. FLIGHT DIVERSION The Commander should coordinate with SCC to ensure that the passengers are advised of the diversion. A PA announcement must be made by SCC as appropriate. 2.11.22.6. LATE ARRIVAL AT HOME BASE CONNECTING FLIGHTS Be very careful to avoid promising or implying to the passengers that connecting flights will be held. If advised by Commander, the SCC will inform the passengers of the situation and let them know that handling agents will be waiting to assist them upon arrival. 2.11.22.7. DE-ICING PROCEDURES Clean Aircraft Concept The most critical ambient temperature range is experienced between 3C and -10C. However, ice may form on the upper and under side of the fuel tanks with large amounts of cold fuel at much higher temperatures, possible up to 15C or more. In conditions conducive to airplane icing during ground operations, take off shall not be attempted when frost, snow, ice, etc. adhere to the airplane critical surfaces. This requirement is known as "The Clean Airplane Concept". The Effects of Icing-up to the Aircraft Operation Builds-ups on the aircraft modify the aircraft aerodynamic characteristic, raise the aircraft weight, and a total loss of control may result. Critical Aircraft Surfaces Critical aircraft surfaces are those surfaces which must be clear of adhering frozen contamination before beginning take-off roll. Critical aircraft surfaces include, but may not be limited to: Wings, slats, flaps, ailerons, spoilers; Stabilizer, rudder and elevator; Engine and APU inlets and exhausts, etc. Reporting of Contaminated Surfaces It is cabin crew responsibility to report to Commander any contaminated surface when discovered. De-Icing/Anti-icing Procedure - Definitions De-icing is the procedure by which frost, ice, slush or snow is removed from an aircraft in order to provide clean surfaces; Anti-icing is a precautionary procedure which provides protection against the formation of frost, or ice and accumulation of snow or slush on treated surfaces of the aircraft for a limited period of time. Edition 2 Chapter 2 Page 64 May 2010

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Exclusively personnel trained and qualified must carry out these procedures with appropriate devices. De-Icing Procedure Precautions Doors shall not be closed unless all ice or snow has been removed from the surrounding area. Prior to the application of de-icing/anti-icing fluids, all doors and windows must be closed to prevent galley floor areas being contaminated with slippery de-icing fluids and upholstery becoming soiled. Engines are normally shut down but may remain running at idle Fluids shall not be directed onto cockpit or cabin windows as this can cause crazing of acrylics or penetration of the window seal. SCC must advise the passengers by PA when de-icing procedure will take place. Possible Hazards during De-icing/Anti-icing Procedures Cabin Crew should be alert during de-icing procedure with passengers on board (APU running) because uncontrolled ingestion of combustible de-icing fluids and solutions can cause internal damage to APU hot section parts and this is a potential fire hazard. During de-icing procedure uncontrolled ingestion of de-icing fluids and solutions into APU/ running engines can cause the presence of glycol fumes in the cabin via air conditioning system. The Commander must be informed immediately and an appropriate announcement must be made to the passengers in order to explain the situation and prevent panic 2.11.23. REPORTING OF IRREGULARITIES 2.11.23.1. CABIN DEFICIENCIES ref to chapter 2, page 46 All deficiencies related to cabin equipment should be recorded in the Cabin Maintenance Log by the SCCM. All complaints shall be written in English on the first copy of the set, using black or blue ball point pen; 2.11.23.2. CABIN CREW FLIGHT REPORT SCC should fill in the report for every flight. The report will be rendered to Cabin Crew Department. 2.11.23.3. FLIGHT IRREGULARITIES REPORT If an Irregularity Report has been generated, it must be given to Cabin Crew Department at the termination of the trip or trip pairing.

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SENIOR CABIN CREW REPORT


COMMANDER: FLIGHT NO: DEPARTURE DATE: LEG 1 LEG 2 LEG 3 LEG 4 LEG 5 NO INSTR SCC CC 2 CC 3 CC 4 CC5 RCAA COMMUNICATION WITH GROUND STAFF: SATISFACTORY EMBARKATION CO-MAIL RECEIVED CARGO DOCUMENTS RECEIVED ADITIONAL REPORTS FILLED: FLIGHT IRREGULARITY FOOD POISONING TECHNICAL PROBLEMS SPECIFY: FLIGHT DISTURBANCE MEDICAL INCIDENT DANGEROUS GOODS INCIDENTS YES NO DISEMBARKATION YES YES NO NO NO SEAL NO: UNSATISFACTORY TRANSIT NAME REGISTRATION: ROUTE: DEP/ARR TIME: PAX NO: PAX NO: PAX NO: PAX NO: PAX NO: B/C B/C B/C B/C B/C Y/C Y/C Y/C Y/C Y/C INF INF INF INF INF TEAMWORK/ COMUNICATION

BRIEFING CONDUCT/ PUNCTUALITY APPEARANCE/ EFFICIENCY

FIRST AID/MEDICAL KIT OPENED YES

CABIN DISCREPANCY LOG COMPLETED

YES

NO

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CATERING EQUIP MEET THE REQUIRED STANDARD FOR NO OF PAX EQUIPMENT MISSING EQUIPMENT CATERING EQUIP MEET TECHNICAL STATUS CATERING EQUIP MEET HYGENE QUANTITY BEVERAGE QUALITY DETAILS/COMPLAINTS QUANTITY CORRESPONDS TO NO OF PAX MEAL QUALITY SPECIAL MEAL OBSERVATIONS INTERIOR CLEANLINESS AMENITY AND HYGENE MATERIALS

B/C

Y/C

YES

NO

B/C B/C B/C B/C B/C

Y/C Y/C Y/C Y/C Y/C

YES YES YES YES YES

NO NO NO NO NO

B/C B/C

Y/C Y/C

YES YES

NO NO

PASSENGERS (COMPLAINTS, INCIDENTS, MEDICAL PROBLEMS, SMOKING ON BOARD, SAFETY-RELATED MATTERS)

SENIOR CABIN CREWMEMBER:______________________________ SIGNATURE: _____________ Form MDP-CCM 003

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FLIGHT IRREGULARITY REPORT


DATE NAME OF COMMANDER CREW MEMBERS SCC CCM 2 CCM 3 CCM4 1. DELAY FROM: BASE 1ST STOP YES TRANSIT hour(s) minutes NO TO: HANDLING LATE CONNECTION DESTINATION 2. FLIGHT DELAYED BY 3. FLIGHT DIVERTED 4. REASON OF DELAY: TECHNICAL CATERING SLOT PIC SCC WEATHER MISSING PAX OTHERS OTHERS (SPECIFY) YES YES NO NO RESTAURANT COFFEE HOTEL NO NO B/C Y/C OTHERS FLIGHT No ROUTE

5. ANNOUNCEMENTS MADE BY: 6. PAX REMAINED ON BOARD: 7. SERVICE ON GROUND: PROVIDED BY DRINKS SANDWICHES BY: CABIN CREW COMFORT

CABIN CREW MEALS VOUCHER YES YES

8. AIRCRAFT CLEANED: 9. PAX COMPLAINING: REASON:

CLEANING STAFF MISSED CONNECTIONS

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10. DESCRIPTION OF IRREGULARITY:

NAME:

DATE:

SIGNATURE: Form MDP-CCM 004

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2.12. SENIOR CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES SCCM STATION L1
PREFLIGHT Turn cabin lights to bright; Check A/C CCM, emergency equipment and security check-lists, flight report availability Check emergency equipment according to check-list, jump seat, shoulder harness, P.A, interphone, ELS. Check CML for previous complaints/measures taken; Operational agent: boarding time, pax load, special needs pax; Captains briefing: get info: taxi, flight time, weather, crew names, door code, etc. Inform captain of agents stated boarding time, special needs pax, report cabin discrepancies; Pre-flight briefing with all CCM about safety and service; Verify the catering load; Security check before passenger boarding. BOARDING Inform CCM of boarding time; Facing L1, back to galley: greet pax, monitor carry-on items; When all pax on board: welcome and electronic devices announcement; Get pax count from CCM 3; Get report from CCM 3: emergency exit row and special needs pax briefing performed; Receive flight documents: General Declaration, Passenger Manifest, Cargo, Load Sheet and Co-mail; Verify pax figure on Load Sheet; Inform CDT: Pax on board according to documents; DEPARTURE Get Captains permission to close L1 door. P.A. order: CC prepare for departure, arm all slides, cross-check and all call; Close L1 door. Arm the L1 door, and cross-check R1; All call: verbally: L1 armed, cross-check complete Via interphone: answer L2, A1. Inform Captain: Cabin ready for push-taxi; Close and lock cockpit door; TAXI Make demo announcements; Final cabin checks forward-aft-forward; Cabin light: sidewall off, ceiling dim; Verify that forward lavatory is locked; Inform Captain via interphone: Cabin secured for take-off; Secure galley for take-off; Take jump seat closest to L1; Silent review; IN FLIGHT All No Smoking/Seatbelts announcements; Check on cockpit; Initiate cabin service; Aisle check every ten minutes; On descent: remind Captain of Special Needs Passengers; PREPARATION FOR LANDING Make announcements: seatbelts, electronic devices; Initial compliance checks, trash pick-up; Final cabin checks forward-aft-forward; Forward lavatory locked; secure galley for landing; Inform Captain: Cabin secured for landing; Final approach announcements; Cabin lights: sidewall off, ceiling dim; Take jump seat; Silent review; ARRIVAL Ask Cdt permission to open door/wait for agent to attach jet way and knock on door Turn lights to bright PA order: CC prepare for arrival, disarm all slides, crosscheck and all call; Disarm, and cross-check with R1; Open and latch L1 door, lower the stair if no jet way; Confirm Special Needs Passengers with handling agent; Give agent the flight documents; Deplane passengers; After deplaning, PA order: security check

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2.13. CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES CCM 2 TAILCONE LEFT
PREFLIGHT Check aft jumpseat, demo pouch, PA, emergency equipment according to check-list; Check tailcone door for red emergency cover/decal present and unpunctured/headrest is up; Check aft lavatories; Check safety information cards stock/air sickness bags/head covers/seatbacks/tray tables/seat belts; Open all overhead bins; Check for articles left on board; Report discrepancies to SCCM; BOARDING Greet and assist pax overwings to aft; Brief Special Needs pax; Prevent stowage in emergency equipment locations; Make boarding announcements if decided by SCCM; IN FLIGHT Initiate cabin service aft to forward; Answer call bells; Aisle and lavatory checks every 10 minutes; Check Special Needs Pax;

DEPARTURE Arm tailcone door/cross check L2 with thumbs up; Respond to all call: Headrest down and cross-check complete; TAXI Make demo at overwing exits; Safety compliance checks overwings to aft; Check lavatories for pax and lock doors; If SCCM has not finished the compliance checks, give thumbs up to indicate compliance; Secure galley for take-off; Secure restraining strap; Take aft-jumpseat A/C left; Silent review.

PREPARATION FOR LANDING Initial compliance checks/trash pick-up throughout the cabin; Remind UMs to wait for you before deplaning; Final overhead bins compliance checks; If SCCM has not finished compliance checks, give thumbs up Secure galley for landing; Secure restraining strap; Take jumpseat; Silent review; ARRIVAL Make arrival announcements (if requested by SCCM) At All call, raise headrest to disarm tailcone/cross check L2 with thumbs up Complete All call procedure via interphone; Answer All call with: Headrest up/down and cross-check complete Release restraining strap; If requested, disembark pax through tailcone; Complete security checks after deplaning of pax; Check ID of all service personnel; Supervise the cleaning team;

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2.14. CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES CCM 3 L2
PREFLIGHT Check mid cabin jumpseat, demo pouch, PA, emergency equipment overwings to aft; Check catering in aft galley/all galley compartments Check safety information cards stock, air sickness bags, headcovers, seatbacks, tray tables, seat belts; Report discrepancies to SCCM; BOARDING Greet and assist pax overwings to aft; Prevent stowage in emergency equipment locations; Make exit-row briefing; Compliance checks throughout cabin; Complete pax count; DEPARTURE Arm L2 door/cross-check tailcone with thumbs up; Respond to all call: L2 armed and cross-check; IN FLIGHT Initiate cabin service aft to forward; Answer call bells; Aisle and lavatory checks every 10 minutes;

PREPARATION FOR LANDING Initial compliance checks/trash pick-up throughout cabin; Secure galley for landing; Final compliance checks throughout cabin; Take L2 jumpseat; Silent review; ARRIVAL At All call, disarm L2 door and cross check tailcone with thumbs up Complete All call procedure via interphone; Answer All call with: L2 disarmed and cross-check; Complete security checks after deplaning of pax; Supervise the cleaning team;

TAXI Make demo at galley area; Safety compliance checks throughout cabin; Check lavatories for pax and lock doors; Secure galley for take-off; Take L2 jumpseat; Silent review.

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2.15. CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES CCM 4 R1
PREFLIGHT Check jumpseat and shoulder harness, demo pouch, breathing barrier, emergency equipment according to check-list; Check catering in frw galley/all galley compartments/trash can lid springs back; Check safety information cards stock/air sickness bags/headcovers/seatbacks/tray tables/seat belts; Report discrepancies to SCCM; BOARDING Greet and assist pax first row of seats; Prevent stowage in emergency equipment locations; Compliance checks throughout cabin; Verify briefing of exit-rows with CCM 3; DEPARTURE At all call, Arm R1 door, cross-check with L1; All call: verbally: R1 armed and cross-check; TAXI Make demo at first row; Safety compliance checks throughout cabin; Remain in front while SCCM makes final compliance check; Secure galley for take-off; Check and lock forward lavatory for take-off; Take forward jumpseat, next to L1; Silent review. IN FLIGHT Initiate cabin service; Collect trash Answer call bells; Aisle and lavatory checks every 10 minutes;

PREPARATION FOR LANDING Initial compliance checks/trash pick-up throughout cabin; Secure galley for landing; Final compliance checks throughout cabin; Take jumpseat next to L1; Silent review; ARRIVAL At All call, disarm R1 door and cross check with L1; All call: verbally: R1 disarmed and cross-check; Assist pax with deplaning; Ensure galley trash is removed; Supervise the cleaning team; Responsible for catering received/secured;

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2.16. CABIN CREWMEMBERS DUTIES CCM 5 TAILCONE RIGHT
Check in at the same time as the other CCMs, attend the briefing and report to the A/C. Assist with the cabin security checks. Check seatback pockets for safety cards. Assist other CCM as directed by SCCM. Move throughout the entire cabin, greet and assist pax with seat location and carry-on luggage. Assist CCM 3 in securing aft galley for take-off. Perform demo in front of the aft cabin. Occupy the aft jumpseat with CCM 2 for take-off and landing. Assist CCM 4 with galley preparations and cart set-up. Replace SCCM on the frw side of the frw beverage cart, working with CCM 4. Assist with the collection of trash following the beverage cart. Assist pax throughout the flight, as needed. Participate in all cabin safety checks, walkthroughs and trash collection for the duration of the flight. Supervise the cleaning team.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 3. IN-FLIGHT SERVICE GUIDELINES


3.1. FOOD SAFETY AND HYGIENE............................................................................. 3 3.1.1. RISKS AND PREVENTION ............................................................................ 3 3.1.2. PERSONAL HYGIENE ................................................................................... 3 3.1.3. PROTECTION OF CREW ............................................................................... 4 3.1.4. DELAYED FLIGHTS ..................................................................................... 4 3.1.5. SPECIAL NEEDS ......................................................................................... 4 3.1.6. SUSPECTED FOOD POISONING .................................................................... 4 3.1.7. ACTION TO BE TAKEN IN CASE OF FOOD POISONING ..................................... 5 3.1.8. DELIVERY AND LOADING OF FOOD ON AIRCRAFT ........................................... 5 3.1.9. REPORTING OF SERVICE DELIVERY IRREGULARITIES...................................... 5 3.1.10. INSECTS ................................................................................................. 5 3.1.11. MEAL AND BEVERAGE SERVICE TO THE FLIGHT DECK ................................... 6 3.2. ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES................................................................................... 6 3.3. IATA MEAL CODES........................................................................................... 7 3.4. CUSTOMER CARE........................................................................................... 12

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3.1.1. RISKS AND PREVENTION Food is responsible for the transmission of a large number of diseases. Poor hygiene or unsatisfactory disposal of food wastes may cause the contamination of food and thus influence safety on board, either directly or indirectly in the following ways: - Sudden incapacitation or collapse of a member of crew due to a short incubation type of food poisoning due to bacterial toxins; - Subtle incapacitation in one member of the crew at a critical phase of flight as may occur in cases where is toxaemia prior to the onset of gastric-intestinal symptoms, as may occur in food poisoning; - An acute outbreak of food poisoning affecting a significant number of passengers, may influence the flight crew to divert to an alternative airport to which they may not be accustomed or where the landing aids are not up to the normal high standard. 3.1.2. PERSONAL HYGIENE Cabin crew should follow the same code of practice as food handlers on the ground: - Hands should be washed with soap and plenty of warm water, if available, before and after handling food; - They should wash their hands again if they have handled any article likely to be contaminated: air sickness bags, babies, clothing, etc., combing, brushing or touching the hair, smoking, eating, coughing or blowing the nose, handling waste, cleaning, putting on a waterproof dressing, dressing toilet areas (pre-flight and inflight) or giving medical assistance; - Hands should be dried using paper towels, as a means of disposal in a convenient covered receptacle should be available; - Clothing should never be used to dry hands; - Food should never be touched. Note: When in the galley or serving food it's not allowed: - To smoke; - To scratch the head; - To brush or comb your hair; - Touch the mouth or nose or bite your fingernails; - To blow into glasses. A report must be provided if: - Suffering from sickness or diarrhoea, a bad cold or from septic skin lesions such as boils; - Food poisoning or other food borne disease; - You have been in close contact with someone with food poisoning or sickness or diarrhoea; - You see a pest; - A passenger makes a complaint; - There are no waterproof dressings or other first aid equipment; - There is no soap or hand drying facilities. Medallion Air policy regard jewellery must always be complied with. When handling food: - Cabin crew always must use provided utensils; - Cabin crew with septic lesions should never handle food (non-septic lesions on hands should be covered with waterproof dressings); - Cabin crew should never sneeze or cough over food, utensils or galley working

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surfaces; Fingers should not be placed inside cups or glasses and cutlery should be picked up only by handle; Fingernails must be short and clean; The long hair must be tied back.

3.1.3. PROTECTION OF CREW Crew members should be advised on practical ways of avoiding food and waterborne illnesses, for example: - The boiling of all drinking water if the source is doubtful; - Avoidance of unpeeled fruit; - Adequate disinfecting of all uncooked vegetables such as salads; - Avoidance of ice-cream, unless it is known to have been produced by an established, reputable firm; - Avoidance of shellfish of which the source is unknown; - Maintenance of high standard of personal hygiene. 3.1.4. DELAYED FLIGHTS In the case of unexpected delays, after the food has been loaded on the aircraft, the length of the delay will determine the course of action to be taken. Delays of less than one hour may necessitate cabin crew to serve the meal at an earlier stage of the flight than programmed. Delays of several hours may necessitate the off-loading of food and the recatering of the flight with completely fresh meals. A previous consulting with the Commander and OCC is mandatory. 3.1.5. SPECIAL NEEDS There are occasions when special action is needed during flight - for example when a sick passenger soils seats or carpets. This sickness might be the result of an infection- and apart from the nuisance caused to other passengers-there might be a health hazard. Since a major cleaning, involving the replacement of soiled seat covers cannot be undertaken until arrival at home base, the cabin crew should be supplied with material appropriate for use in such an emergency in order to decontaminate the area. 3.1.6. SUSPECTED FOOD POISONING At one time or another everybody is carrying food poisoning organisms on their hands, in the noses, mouth, intestine and septic cuts/boils. Consequently cabin crewmembers must always observe the highest standards of food hygiene to avoid contaminating food. High-risk food is usually ready to eat protein food such as cooked meat, poultry, fish, dairy produce, eggs and egg products, sauces (mayonnaise), gravy and stock, shellfish and also cooked rice. These are the foods that are usually implicated in food poisoning outbreaks. There are 10 main reasons for food poisoning: CAUSE HAZARD Preparation too far in advance and Multiplication of bacteria storage at ambient temperature Inadequate cooling Multiplication of bacteria Inadequate reheating Survival of bacteria Contaminated/processed/canned food Contamination with bacteria Undercooking Survival of bacteria Inadequate thawing Survival in cooking of bacteria

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Cross-contamination Raw food consumed Hot food stored below 63C Infected food handlers Contamination with bacteria Contamination with bacteria Multiplication of bacteria Contamination with bacteria

3.1.7. ACTION TO BE TAKEN IN CASE OF FOOD POISONING The action to be taken will depend on whether the poisoning is restricted to an individual passenger or affects a whole group of people. In case of poisoning involving individual passengers, the cause can usually be traced back to food consumed prior to boarding the aircraft. When several persons are taken ill with suspected food poisoning, the source is more likely to be meals either eaten on board or taken together shortly before departure. Food poisoning is often acute: symptoms can appear in a matter of minutes. In some cases it can be prove fatal. Therefore, even if only one passenger falls ill, prompt and appropriate action is essential. SCC shall inform the commander. Cabin Crew administers first aid and asks whether there is a doctor on board. SCC has to ascertain: What has been consumed on board by those affected; Whether other passengers or crewmembers have eaten the same; What was consumed, and where, in the last 8 hours prior take-off. In all cases at least one, and preferably several cooled specimen meals are to be sent top priority for bacteriological analysis. Specimen meals for bacteriological analysis must be: - Untouched by hands (hold the meals by tray); - Wrapped in clean aluminum foil; - Kept cool and preferably frozen; if available, dry ice can be used for this purpose. If any drink served on board is suspected to have a contribution to the food poisoning, specimen drinks shall also be sent to be bacteriological analyzed. If agreed with local station manager extra specimen meals may be sent to local bacteriological laboratories for prompter determination of the cause of food poisoning. Contact address and telephone numbers for all passengers affected and for some unaffected passengers should be noted and appended to the SCC report. 3.1.8. DELIVERY AND LOADING OF FOOD ON AIRCRAFT The Senior Cabin Crewmember should check: - The number of meals is according to the number of passengers on board; - Food is sufficiently protected against heat, dust and insects during loading; - Food has been date/time stamped on leaving the cold store; - The delivery corresponds to the catering order. Note: In the event of a delay; SCC should decide the measures to be taken to prevent spoilage of food. 3.1.9. REPORTING OF SERVICE DELIVERY IRREGULARITIES Any discrepancies with respect to the delivery irregularities shall be reported in the SCC Report. Food should not be served if cabin crew has any doubts: in respect to the quality of the food (e.g. abnormal smell, texture, etc.) A standard report "SCC Report" is available on board to report feedback to Cabin Crew Manager. 3.1.10. INSECTS Cabin crew should keep a careful watch for insects, especially cockroaches, and examine

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each tray, including the underside, as it is taken from the container. The presence of insects should be reported immediately. If flying insects are seen on board, cabin crew should spray with an approved insecticide aerosol. 3.1.11. MEAL AND BEVERAGE SERVICE TO THE FLIGHT DECK To prevent the remote possibility of both pilots being incapacitated at the same time, food service to the Commander and other flight crewmember should not be served at the same time. In addition, certain types of foods which are particularly liable to cause acute gastricintestinal symptoms should be avoided (shellfish, custards, etc.) should be avoided. Beverages should be served separately from the meal in order to avoid spillage. No alcoholic beverages should be served to anyone on the flight deck at any time. For safety reasons, cabin crew should check on a regular basis with the flight deck.

3.2. ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

It is recommended that cabin crew do not serve alcoholic beverages to anyone on board the aircraft where there are good reasons to believe that the person is impaired by alcohol or drugs to an extent that he could jeopardize the safety of the aircraft or persons on board the aircraft. Special policy regarding alcohol Drunken passengers are a danger to themselves and to others when on board an aircraft, especially in the event of an emergency situation. It is the responsibility of the passengers not to be drunk or to get drunk on the aircraft. Boarding A drunken passenger boarding a Medallion Air aircraft conflicts with the goals of our company to be a safe and secure airline. According to General Conditions of Carriage, Medallion Air is entitled to refuse travel for drunken passengers. The Company will therefore support all crews and ground staff who deny boarding of drunken passengers. Passengers under the age of 18 Alcohol must never be served to passengers under 18. This rule applies even when the child or young adult is travelling with its parents or an adult and that parent or adult has requested that alcohol be served. Medallion Air will therefore support crews enforcing this rule. Drunkenness on board the aircraft It is important that cabin crews should exercise discretion serving the alcohol to passengers who appear near the limit of drunkenness. If there is any doubt in the minds of cabin crew they should act on the side of caution and tactfully refuse to serve the passenger with more drinks. The commander must be informed immediately if a passenger's behavior threatens flight safety or the safety of the other passengers or crew. Removal of drink The crew may, at the absolute discretion of the Commander, remove alcohol (including the passengers duty free) for safe custody. This should only be done where safety would be compromised if the passenger retained the alcohol and any duty free must be returned when the passengers leaves the aircraft. Drugs Crews must not serve alcohol to passengers who they think are under the influence of drugs. Medallion Air will support crews enforcing this rule. No alcohol in the cockpit Alcohol must never be taken onto the cockpit except in a sealed bottle.

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Passengers' special meal needs should be handled at the time of reservation, and reflected on the Passenger Information List (PIL) or Passengers & Baggage Weight Sheet (PBWS). Cabin crew should be familiar with the characteristics of the different meal types in order to be able to identify such meals and respond appropriately to the passenger needs. Special meals are available to Medallion Air passengers for the following reasons: - Medical or health reasons; - Religious or personal beliefs. When kosher meals are boarded the entire sealed package either tray or boxes, must be presented to the passenger concerned. The passenger will break the seal, assess the meal, and return it to you. If it involves a meal that requires heating, place the casserole in an empty oven and heat it. If it involves more than a kosher meal, all casseroles must be placed in one separate oven. If it is in a box lunch kosher meal, all items are to be left in the box and served to the passenger who ordered it. When Diabetic meals are boarded, check with the passengers who ordered them as to what time the meal should be served. The cabincrew should identify special meals by the attached special meal tag or label to the cart or container that meals are in. Cabin crew should verify that the appropriate number correspond to the information provided on the Passenger Information List.

3.3. IATA MEAL CODES

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GUIDING RULES FOR C/C - Conversation in galleys should be quiet - Never discuss private or Company problems in front of the passengers. - Trolleys' and containers' doors have to be closed quiet - Whenever you handle with food observe hygienic aspects, e.g.: don't put trays or bottles on the floor. - Never take a seat in the cabin (while on duty) - Don't eat bin the cabin - Don't drink in the cabin - No chewing gum when in uniform; Don't consider that the work is completed after the service. Hints for an excellent service: - Each C/C has to be informed about the offered meals for the concerning flight; - Good knowledge about galley equipment and beverage stock; - Well prepared "mise-en-place"; - Service according flying time and number of passengers; - Children and babies should be served before or after others (ask parents); - Ladies first, otherwise start at window seat; - Face passenger while talking with him; - Don't pile up trays; - Clear passengers table during service, don't pile trash on trolleys; - Always serve with tray (e.g. drinks, cutlery); - Use tray with cream, sugar and lemon for coffee/tea service (put cup on tray); - Turn label of bottle always towards passenger; - Don't put plastic cups on tin or bottle; - Work quietly (don't slam doors of trolleys). Special Needs Passengers Irrespective of their physical or medical condition, passengers with reduced mobility are categorized into various groups. These are identified in airline messages by the codes presented in IATA SSR Codes" and different types of handicaps you may encounter on the flights are discussed below. Passenger with Limited Endurance - these passengers may have limited endurance due to a heart or lung condition, or simply old age. They should avoid unnecessary exertion, especially at high altitudes. Elderly Passenger with Common Physical Problems of Old Age - these passengers sometimes have difficulty hearing, especially above the drone of the engines. Stand directly in front of them so they can see your face. Speak more slowly than normal, and increase your volume a little. Elderly passengers will usually ask for your assistance if they need it. Be attentive to their needs, and offer to help them. Passenger with Arm or Leg in Casts or Splints (LEGB)- ask these passengers how you can best assist them. Often propping up the limb with a cast on it will relieve swelling and discomfort. Passenger with Paralysis of the Arms and/ or Legs - a paralyzed person may not be able to feel pain or touch. Be careful not to injure this person. They often can take care of themselves. Check the passenger's comfort throughout the flight. Show both travelers consideration and understanding. Passenger Affected by a Stroke - this passenger will suffer from paralysis in varying

3.4. CUSTOMER CARE

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degrees. His/ her sense of balance may be impaired. He/she may become easily confused, have difficulty in finding words to express themselves, have slurred speech, or have trouble understanding or remembering what you say. He/ she may be unable to perceive objects on his/ her paralyzed side. Be understanding and compassionate. For a passenger with a weakness on one side of their body (due to a stroke, artificial limb, cast, splint, brace), it is generally safest and easiest for the passenger to move toward his/ her strong side to get up. This passenger may want your help with two-handed activities, such as cutting meat. Offer your assistance. If the passenger is confused, speak slowly and distinctly, in short, simple phrases. Emphasize the important words or the action words. Stand directly in front so he/ she can see your face clearly. Use gestures. Ask short, simple questions ("seat number?") that can be answered with a word or gesture. Wheelchair Passenger (WCHC) - is brought to the aircraft ahead of other passengers. He/ she is assisted on and off the aircraft by a travelling companion or passenger services agent. If the passenger has his/her own collapsible wheelchair, it will be carried in the baggage compartment and will be made available for deplaning upon arrival. SCC receives the information concerning the place where is located the wheelchair from the ramp agent. Passenger Lacking Muscular Control - this passenger may have uncoordinated movements and unclear speech. These disabilities (slurred speech, a staggering gait, or other slight signs of motor difficulties) may be misconstrued. Do not assume that passengers with severe speech problems or no speech are intellectually impaired. Se common sense when you aid these passengers. Blind Passenger (BLND) - Ask the blind passenger how you can help. The passenger will tell you if they will need assistance, and what kind. If it appears appropriate, offer assistance. It may be accepted or rejected. If you guide a blind passenger, give him your right arm or elbow to hold. Stay approximately one-half step ahead of him, so he can anticipate your movements. Be specific in your directions (left, right, straight-ahead). Most blind passengers prefer to board and deplane along with the other passengers, and to move under their own power. When you serve his meal, tell him what is being served, and where the utensils and beverage are located. They may ask for assistance with their meal. If a blind passenger has a guide dog, it should remain with its owner throughout the flight, including during take-off and landing. For maximum comfort and protection, they should be seated in the first row seat of a section next to the bulkhead. When you go over emergency procedures also tell them about the passenger comfort features, including air vents, C/C call lights, audio system, lavatories, etc. Give verbal directions, or, if the passenger prefers, place their hand on the objects you are describing and even ask him to count the steps he has to do in order to reach the nearest exit, the lavatory, etc. Deaf Passenger (DEAF) - be conscious of the problems your deaf passenger faces in flight. You may be able to communicate with gestures, or they may be able to read your lips. You can always write information for them. Deaf passengers may use hearing aids in flight; they will not interfere with navigational equipment. Special instruction card is required for these passengers. Mentally ILL or Retarded Passenger - a mentally ill or retarded passenger is often an interesting, talented individual. Try to engage them in a conversation about their skills or interest. Travelling companion will usually accompany these passengers. Autistic Passengers - autistic people who travel by air generally go unnoticed because outwardly there is little to distinguish them from other travelers. Autistic passengers need special understanding. However, autistic people can easily be intimidated by occurrences,

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which other people accept as normal such as: Being jostled in a crowd; Being abruptly spoken to by a stranger; Being suddenly approached by a uniformed official; or Changes to the expected procedures. They do require a special understanding and it is recommended that cabin crewmember have some familiarity with the characteristics of such persons. The objective is to maintain as stress-free an environment as possible and the best results are achieved when airline staff works in close cooperation with the families or escorts. This liaison helps the staff to establish a good understanding with the passenger concerned. The following measures can help to relieve stress: - Explaining in advance what is going to happen; - Presenting information by means of diagrams or pictures when this would be helpful; - Ensuring continuity of contact between escorts and autistic passengers - Avoid anxiety and rushing; - Avoid crowded areas whenever possible; - Boarding before other passengers and disembarking first or last. - Do not touch an autistic passenger. The implementation of these practices can also be extended to benefit other intellectually impaired passengers.

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CABIN CREW MANUAL SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES TABLE OF CONTENTS 4. SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
4.1. CLASSIFICATION OF INCIDENTS/EMERGENCY/ACCIDENTS.......................................3 4.2. EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION.............................................................................3 4.3. CONDENSATION.................................................................................................6 4.4. APU TORCHING ..................................................................................................6 4.5. ENGINE TORCHING.............................................................................................6 4.6. CONTROLLED DISEMBARKATION ..........................................................................6 4.7. INADVERTENT RELEASE OF OXYGEN MASKS ..........................................................7 4.8. MISSED APPROACH ............................................................................................7 4.9. REJECTED TAKE-OFF...........................................................................................7 4.10. TURBULENCE ...................................................................................................8 4.10.1. PRE-DEPARTURE CREW BRIEFING ............................................................... 10 4.10.2. UNANTICIPATED TURBULENCE (CAT) ........................................................... 10 4.10.3. ANTICIPATED TURBULENCE PROCEDURES DURING FLIGHT .......................... 10 4.10.4. TURBULENCE INJURY PREVENTION .............................................................. 11 4.11. CREW INCAPACITATION .................................................................................. 12 4.11.1. FLIGHT CREW INCAPACITATION .................................................................. 13 4.11.2. CABIN CREW MEMBER INCAPAICITATION DURING FLIGHT .............................. 14 4.12. EMERGENCY SITUATIONS ................................................................................ 14 4.12.1. DECOMPRESSION...................................................................................... 14 4.12.1.1. SLOW DECOMPRESSION ....................................................................... 15 4.12.1.2. RAPID/EXPLOSIVE DECOMPRESSION ...................................................... 16 4.12.1.3. HYPOXIA ........................................................................................... 17 4.12.1.4. TIME OF USEFUL CONSCIOUSNESS TUC ............................................... 18 4.12.1.5. THE CONTINUATION OF FLIGHT WITH NO-PRESSURIZED CABIN ................ 18 4.12.2. FIRE AND SMOKE ...................................................................................... 18 4.12.2.1. FIRE IN CABIN .................................................................................... 18 4.12.2.2. FIRE PREVENTION................................................................................ 19 4.12.2.3. TRIANGLE OF FIRE ........................................................................... 19 4.12.2.4. THEORY OF FIRE FIGHTING................................................................... 19 4.12.2.5. CLASSIFICATION OF FIRE ..................................................................... 19 4.12.2.6. CABIN CREW FIRE DRILL ...................................................................... 20 4.12.2.7. MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC FIRES.............................................................. 21 4.12.2.8. SMOKE IN CABIN ................................................................................. 24 4.12.2.9. FIRE PREVENTION................................................................................ 25 4.12.2.10. CIRCUIT BREAKERS............................................................................ 25 4.12.3. SECURITY ................................................................................................ 26 4.12.3.1. SEARCHING AND GUARDING OF AIRCRAFT ............................................. 27 4.12.3.2. POSITIVE SEARCHING AND GUARDING FOR HIGH RISK SECTORS .............. 28 4.12.3.3. GUARDING OF AIRCRAFT ...................................................................... 28 4.12.3.4. SEALING OF AIRCRAFT ......................................................................... 28 4.12.4. DISRUPTIVE/UNRULY PASSENGERS ............................................................. 29 4.12.4.1. SMOKING VIOLATION ........................................................................... 32 4.12.4.2. UNNACEPTABLE BEHAVIOR ON BOARD ................................................... 33 4.12.5. BOMB AND SABOTAGE THREATS ................................................................. 33 4.12.6. HIJACKING ............................................................................................... 35 4.12.7. EMERGENCY EVACUATION .......................................................................... 41

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4.12.7.1. UNPLANNED EMERGENCY EVACUATION - LAND........................................ 53 4.12.7.2. PREPARED EMERGENCY EVACUATION - LAND .......................................... 54 4.12.7.3. EVACUATION COMMANDS ..................................................................... 60 4.12.7.4. UNPLANNED DITCHING......................................................................... 61 4.12.7.5. PLANNED DITCHING............................................................................. 62 4.12.7.6. MAIN PROCEDURE FOR DITCHING WHEN NO LIFE RAFTS .......................... 66 4.12.7.7. AFTER EVACUATION ............................................................................. 70 4.13. SEARCH AND RESCUE, SURVIVAL- GENERAL ...................................................... 76 4.13.1. SEARCH AND RESCUE (SAR)....................................................................... 76 4.13.2. BODY SIGNAL ILLUSTRATIONS.................................................................... 77 4.13.2.1. GROUND-AIR VISUAL CODE FOR USE BY SURVIVORS ............................... 77 4.13.2.2. IDENTIFICATION OF SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT ............................................ 77 4.13.3. GENERAL SURVIVAL INFORMATION ............................................................. 81 4.13.4. SURVIVAL AT SEA ..................................................................................... 82 4.13.5. SURVIVAL IN DESERT REGIONS .................................................................. 90 4.13.6. SURVIVAL IN POLAR REGIONS .................................................................... 94 4.13.7. SURVIVAL IN JUNGLE REGIONS................................................................... 96 4.13.8. SURVIVAL IN SEA SHORES ......................................................................... 98

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4.1. CLASSIFICATION OF INCIDENTS/EMERGENCY/ACCIDENTS
The perfect knowledge and execution of the duties assigned to each crew member it is of extreme importance for a successful conclusion of an emergency situation. Incidents may classify depending on their nature in: In-flight medical occurrences; Disruptive/unruly passengers (smoking, alcohol, physical aggression, etc.); Aircraft equipment failure; Dangerous Goods incidents in the passenger cabin in-flight, etc. As a general rule all incidents shall be reported. An emergency/abnormal situation may be determined by: Rejected take off; Pilot/crew member incapacitation; Suspect package (bomb threat); Turbulence; Smoke in the cabin; Prepared/ unprepared landing/ditching; Aircraft decompression; Fire on board; Hijacking; Emergency descent; Accidents may classify in: Accidents involving loss of life or serious injury; Accidents involving serious damage or structural failure of the aircraft; Accidents in which the aircraft is missing or completely inaccessible. Any time an incident or abnormal situation, which is either dangerous or potentially dangerous, occurs in flight or on the ground, notify the Captain immediately. Examples are unusual sights, sounds or odors, etc. If practical at the time of notification, give the Captain a complete assessment of the situation Continue to advise the Captain of any changes as they occur Await the Captains instructions

If the commander has an urgent message for the cabin crew call button can be pressed several times. In such case all CC should reach immediately the assigned stations to receive the information. In a prepared emergency situation, SCC should obtain the following information from the commander: the type of emergency, evacuation required, evacuation signal and the time available, special instructions. Acronyms like the one below aid in memorizing necessary actions: Type of emergency; Evacuation is necessary; Signals to evacuate; Time available; Special instructions.

4.2. EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION

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Different communication methods between cockpit and cabin are listed below as example: EMERGENCY CALL; EMERGENCY ALERT (URGENCY CALL); IMMINENT IMPACT; BRACE FOR IMPACT; INITIATING EVACUATION; EVACUATION NOT REQUIRED; COMMUNICATION IN CASE OF HIJACKING/ BOMB. All of these are pointed out during the pre-flight briefing and/or in an emergency briefing. Standard Emergency Calls for Flight Crew/Cabin Crew Communication Communication between flight crew and cabin crew can be established by: Interphone - initialization through 1 chime for normal conditions and at least 3 chimes for emergency conditions; Passenger Address (flight crew to cabin crew/ passengers); Direct communication (face to face). It is difficult to identify and establish procedures for all situations requiring urgent intervention. It is possible that any abnormal situation to develop into an emergency one. For this reason good judgment is required to identify the best course of action. Any abnormal situation that is observed in the passenger cabin has to be announced to the cockpit, as the cockpit crew can not identify it in due time. An emergency announcement requiring an imperative action without delay will be preceded by "ATTENTION" An emergency announcement shall be given twice.

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STANDARD EMERGENCY CALLS FOR FLIGHT CREW/CABIN CREW COMMUNICATION
FLIGHT PHASE On ground CONDITION Rejected take-off CABIN TO COCKPIT COCKPIT TO CABIN

In flight

ATTENTION CABIN CREW ON STATIONS (P.A.) Evacuation not required CANCEL ALERT (P.A.) EVACUATE (specify exits) (P.A.) - Evacuation must be announced when Evacuation required a/c has stopped, parking brake set and engines shut down. ATTENTION PRESSURIZATION Rapid/explosive FAILURE/ DECOMPRESSION, USE Decompression OXYGEN MASKS (P.A.) CABIN CREW RESUME YOUR After pressurization DUTIES O2 MASKS ARE NO LONGER is restored REQUIRED (P.A.) ATTENTION EMERGENCY Emergency descent DESCENT CABIN CREW RESUME YOUR After emergency Situation in the DUTIES O2 MASKS ARE NO LONGER descent and cabin cabin is (INT) REQUIRED (P.A.) altitude below 3000 m ATTENTION DUE TO TAKE YOUR If smoke/fumes/fire Fire/smoke in SEATS AND FASTEN SEATBELTS is detected area (INT) (P.A.) ATTENTION CABIN CREW ON STATIONS if no time available (P.A.) ATTENTION PURSER TO COCKPIT Cabin prepared for if time available (P.A.) Ditching ditching IMMINENT IMPACT (P.A.) short time before emergency landing BRACE FOR IMPACT (P.A.) 30 sec Cabin prepared for ATTENTION CABIN CREW ON emergency landing STATIONS if no time available (P.A.) ATTENTION PURSER TO COCKPIT if time available (P.A.) Emergency landing IMMINENT IMPACT (P.A.) short time before emergency landing BRACE FOR IMPACT (P.A.) 30 sec ATTENTION PURSER TO COCKPIT Pilot incapacitation (P.A.) We have a crew member CCM incapacitation incapacitated and (intentions) (INT) ATTENTION PURSER TO COCKPIT Bomb threat (P.A.) Captain I must Hijacking come to the cockpit immediately (INT)

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4.3. CONDENSATION
At times, as the air conditioning system cools the air, more moisture is created than is carried off by the air conditioning ducts. A vapor resembling smoke occurs. Notify the flight crew and offer an explanation to the customers. During flight, moisture in the air may freeze on the inside skin of the aircraft. As the aircraft descends for landing, the ice melts and is carried away in drains. At times, there is more water than can be carried off and water may drip into the cabin. If this happens inform the flight crew, and relocate passenger(s) if safe to do so. Occasionally, small ice crystals from the air conditioning units may tumble through the air vent system sounding like pebbles. Should a customer question this, discreetly inform them of this circumstance.

The APU (Auxiliary Power Unit) provides air conditioning and electrical power to the aircraft when the engines are not running. An excess of fuel or oil being burned causes APU torching (flames blown out the exhaust duct). This can occur prior to starting the engines at the gate and also right after landing while taxing to the terminal. APU torching usually lasts only a matter of seconds. The flames are more visible at night. Procedures Cabin crewmembers should reassure passengers and explain that what they saw (APU torching) is common. Always be aware of your exits and your surroundings.

4.4. APU TORCHING

4.5. ENGINE TORCHING

Engine torching occurs when fuel is pumped into the engine but not ignited. When the engine starts, the turbine fan blows the excess fuel out and ignites it in a "torch like" manner. The flames can reach in excess of 8 feet but last only a few seconds. While not a normal event during engine starts, this "engine torching" occasionally takes place and does not pose imminent danger. On aircraft with wing mounted engines, this may be seen and misconstrued by passengers and even company employees as an engine fire and lead them to assume they are in danger. This is not the case. It is cabin crewmembers responsibility to: Calmly assess the situation Contact the flight deck crew. Be alert for a Passenger Initiated Unwarranted Evacuation.

4.6. CONTROLLED DISEMBARKATION

A situation may develop during passenger boarding, push-back or prior to arrival which warrants a rapid disembarkation but not an evacuation via the Slides. In such circumstances the following will apply. SCCM will be called to the cockpit using the standard alert signal: Attention, Purser to the Cockpit" SCCM - Report to the cockpit for TESTS briefing from the Flight Crew. - Use the P.A to advise pax and crew to disembark via the nearest boarding door in an expeditious manner without any luggage.

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- Assist with pax disembarkation. - When cabin is clear, communicate with the captain and brief cabin crew. CCM Stop passenger boarding. Await SCCM's PA announcement. Encourage pax to leave quickly through the nearest boarding door. Remain at station and await instructions.

4.7. INADVERTENT RELEASE OF OXYGEN MASKS

If the mask compartment doors for the fixed 2 system are open, notify Captain and request further instructions.

4.8. MISSED APPROACH

In the interest of safety, the Captain may initiate a missed approach procedure. During landing, when the aircraft attitude from normal nose-down changes briskly to noseup and the engines noise increase, it is unmistakable that a missed approach procedure was initiated. Cabin Crewmembers must remain seated, with shoulder harness securely fastened, waiting for Captains instructions. When workload and time permit, CDT shall inform SCC about the action to follow (Holding/Go-Around/Diversion), the remaining flight time, and the information to be conveyed to passengers. SCC must make an announcement to the passengers in accordance with Commander's instructions. Passengers must be seated and securely fastened. If the remaining flight time and aircraft attitude permit the before landing announcement must be renewed and a cabin compliance check must be performed followed by the adequate reports.

4.9. REJECTED TAKE-OFF

A rejected take-off is a take-off that is discontinued prior to reaching take-off speed, indicated usually by a rapid deceleration. The decision to reject a take off rests solely with the Commander. Usually, the take-off is rejected for: - System failure - Unusual noise or vibration - Tire failure - Engine Failure (Engine Fire). - Commander decides that the aircraft is unsafe or unable to fly. Cabin Crew Action: Remain at your stations until the plane comes to a full stop When the aircraft comes to a standstill, release seat belts. Wait for Commander's order: "Cabin Crew at Station". If no order from cockpit comes within 20 seconds, SCC contacts Flight Crew via intercom. Other CCM assess the outsides conditions. If cabin crew sees anything unusual (fire/smoke, intensity) they must inform the Captain on the interphone and they must wait at their stations until a second command is made. Assess and monitor the cabin. Keep passengers under control. Do not initiate interphone calls between stations with no serious ground.

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No evacuation is required Commander should order "Cancel Alert Keep passengers calm until the ground personnel arrive. Disarm the doors on captains request and assist pax to disembark by stairs. Evacuation is required CDT will indicate the exits that are to be used. "Evacuate on the LH/RH side" Open the indicated exits and begin evacuation. Gather the passengers far from the aircraft (at least 30 m). If there is no response from the Flight Crew (pilots dead or seriously injured) Cabin Crewmembers should make an independent decision to initiate an evacuation if and only if: The situation is a serious life threatening (heavy smoke/flames, impact forces resulting in structural damage, ditching). The aircraft has an abnormal attitude and there is no doubt of danger.

4.10. TURBULENCE

Turbulence is the result of atmospheric or environmental effects. En-route turbulence accounts for a substantial number of cabin crewmembers injuries and can occur at anytime and at any altitude. Turbulence can be expected or can be sudden and unexpected. That is why passengers are required to keep their seat belts fatened at all times while seated. The main causes of turbulence are: Convective currents: Are localized vertical air flows caused by warm air rising. TheY can be encountered at any alttitude and may result in the formation of clouds. When convection is carried to high altitudes, cumulo-nimbus clouds result. In same cases,however, if the air is very dry, clouds may not form. Wind Flow Obstructions: this is also known as mechanical because it is caused by a mechanical disruption of wind flow by obstacles such as trees, buildings or mountains. Windshear: wind traveling at different speeds and/or directions cause a shearing condition. Windsheares occur at all altitudes and are found in conjunction with low level temperature inversions, frontal zones and high level jet streams. Thunderstorm formations may be caused by any type of front, mountainous terrain, convective currents or convergence. Thunderstorms associated with cold fronts are normally the most severe ones found anywhere except in squall lines. Thunderstorms are often associated with warm fronts. Gusts are the numerous irregular, random, sudden&brief turbulent motion called gusts. This gusts have a significant effect upon the aircraft, causing pitch, yaw and roll movements. The severity of a thunderstorm may be classified by the intensity&the frequency of its gusts. Rime ice often accumulates on the leading edge of aircraft flying through wet snow. Since the freezing level is also the zone where the most severe turbulence&rain most frequently occur, this particular altitude appears to be the most hazardous. In areas where individual thunderstorm are widely dispersed, icing usualy does not present too serious a problem because the flight time in each storm is relatively short. Mountain waves: cap clouds often exist over the mountains ridge&may progress down the lee side giving the impression of a waterfall. Frontal: thunderstorms associated with old fronts are normally the most severe ones found anywhere except in squall lines. Thunderstorms are often associated with warm fronts. Squall Lines: usually form in a continous line and are easy to recognize by a pilot aproaching the front from any dirrection. Air Mass: air masses form within a warm, moist air mass, and are in no way associated with fronts. They are generally isolated or widely scaterred of a lrge area. Air mass thunderstorm may be classified as convective, orographic, or nocturnal. Edition 2 Chapter 4 Page 8 May 2010

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Aerographic: these developed when wind forces moist, unstable air up mountain slopes. They tent to be more frequent during afternoon and early evening. Nocturnal: although the term nocturnal means occurring at night is sometimes applied to convective thunderstorms, which form offshore Locations of Light Turbulence Over hills or mountains In and near small clouds In clear-air convective currents over heated surfaces With weak wind shears In the lower 500 feet of the atmosphere when wind speeds are near 15 knots or where the air is colder than the underlying surfaces Locations of Moderate Turbulence Mountains where there are wind components of 25-50 knots In and near dissipating thunderstorms In and near other towering cumulonimbus clouds In the lower 5000 feet of the atmosphere when surface winds are 30 + knots, heating of the surface is strong & where there is an invasion of very cold air In fronts where vertical wind shears exceed 6 knots and/or horizontal shears exceed 18 knots Locations of severe turbulence Mountainous areas where wind components exceed 50 knot In & near developing and mature thunderstorms Occasionally in towering cumulonimbus clouds Within 50-100 miles on the cold side of the center of the jet stream Locations of Extreme Turbulence Mountain wave situations, in and below the level of well developed rotor clouds In severe thunderstorms Wake Turbulence Every aircraft generate a wake while in flight. A pair of counter rotating vortices from the wing tips causes these disturbances. The vortices from large aircraft pose problems to encountering aircraft. Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) Clear air turbulence (CAT) is commonly used to denote the rough, washboard-like bumpiness, which sometimes buffets the airplane in a cloudless sky. CAT is usually found above 15,000 feet. Not all CAT is associated with jet streams, but the most likely location of CAT, and especially the most severe cases, is considered to be with jet stream situations.
Cause: Thunderstorm Gusts Icing Clear Air (CAT) Mountain Waves Wake Where to Expect: South & Central States Of Europe Up to 10 miles ahead of storm Areas around clusters of Thunderstorm High Altitudes-Associated with jet stream Downwind side of mountains Any airport What to Expect: Pilots avoid Bumpiness Random bumps Random bumps Rough washboard like bumps Pilots avoid-Mild chop or severe turbulence Rolling Movements When to Expect: July/August with most frequency Take-offs & landings near a storm. Up to 6,500ft At altitudes above 15,000ft Altitudes above 15,000ftWinter Flying near or over mountains Taxi, Take-off or Landings

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4.10.1. PRE-DEPARTURE CREW BRIEFING The PIC should include a weather/turbulence briefing with the standard pre-departure briefing, and cabin crew should pay particular attention for turbulence forecasts. The weather briefing should contain the following: Discussion of critical Exposure Periods (take-off, cruise over known areas of turbulence and descent) Expected en-route weather Forecasted turbulence location (in terms of flying time and degree of reported turbulence) The timing of weather updates to SCCM Communication of possible service modifications prior to expected turbulence encounters Establishment of the all clear signal 4.10.2. UNANTICIPATED TURBULENCE (CAT) When moderate or greater turbulence is encountered unexpectedly, cabin crew shall: Immediately take the nearest seat or jump seat and fasten seat belt and shoulder harness. Direct passengers via PA to fasten seat belts. Do not take time to secure loose items/galley If a reasonable amount of time has elapsed with no more turbulence and the Fasten Seat Belt sign remains on, the cabin crew may initiate contact with the Flight Deck crew to determinate that it is safe to resume duties. 4.10.3. ANTICIPATED TURBULENCE PROCEDURES DURING FLIGHT Turbulence is the most common cause of injury to passengers and crewmembers, and must be taken seriously. When Captain announces that turbulence is anticipated, SCC will ask how much time is available before the encounter, anticipated intensity and duration, the "all clear" signal and any other specific information. SCC will communicate this information to the other CCM and use the following guidelines: Light turbulence: - Momentary, slight, erratic changes in altitude and/or attitude; - Passengers may feel a slight strain against seatbelts or shoulder straps; - Unsecured objects may be displaced slightly; - Beverage/snack service may be continued. Little difficulty is encountered when walking. CCM actions: SCC will make an announcement when the fasten seat belt sign is turned on; Do seatbelt compliance check; Secure unattended carts and stow loose cabin, galley items and continue service carefully; SCC communicates with CDT; If turbulence persists, announcement should be repeated every 20 minutes; If a passenger insists on using the lavatory, remind them that this is dangerous and that they do so at their own risk. Moderate turbulence: - Changes in altitude or attitude occur, airspeed fluctuations occur, but the aircraft remains in positive control; - Passengers feel definite strains against seatbelt or shoulder straps; - Unsecured objects are dislodged; - Beverage/snack service is suspended. Walking is difficult.

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CCM actions: SCC will make an announcement when the fasten seat belt sign is turned on; Return carts to galley, secure loose items in the cabin and galleys, do compliance check; Ensure all lavatories are vacated; Sit in jump seat; SCC communicates with CDT via interphone; If turbulence persists, announcement should be repeated every 20 minutes; Remain seated until "all clear" signal from flight crew. Severe/extreme turbulence: - Large and abrupt changes in altitude/attitude occur. Ussualy large airspeed fluctuations occur. Airplane may be momentarily out of control. May cause structurual damage. - Passengers are forced violently against seatbelts or shoulder straps. - Unsecured objects are tossed about. - Beverage/snack service is suspended. Walking is impossible. CCM actions: SCC will make an announcement when the fasten seat belt sign is turned on. If PA is inop, shout to pax Sit down, hold on Secure cart and self immediately. Place coffee on floor. If seat is unavailable, seat on floor. Do not attempt to ensure passenger compliance check; SCC communicates with CDT, if practical. Remain seated until "all clear" signal from flight crew; Inspect cabin and report damages/injuries to CDT when turbulence is finished. Communication must flow two ways. Cabin crew should not wait for the flight crew to turn on the Fasten Seat Belt sign. If conditions dictate, the cabin crew should make PAs instructing passengers to return to their seats and fasten seat belts, then request the flight crew to turn on the Fasten Seat Belt sign. If a reasonable amount of time has elapsed with no turbulence and the Fasten Seat Belt sign remains on, cabin crewmembers should initiate contact with the flight crew via interphone in order to determine if it is safe to resume duties. Turbulence is much worse in the aft section of the aircraft, especially on larger airplanes, when most cases the pilots report only moderate turbulence in the flight deck. Cabin crewmembers in the aft cabin or galley areas experience the greatest injuries. Often, severe turbulence occurs 10 to 15 minutes before landing. If a crewmember is injured, assess the situation. Keep in mind they may be confused or disoriented and unaware of how severely they are hurt. It may be necessary to follow your incapacitated cabin crewmember procedures. Post turbulence duties: Flight crew advises cabin crew when it is safe to resume duties; Cabin crew may get up and resume duties; Verify that passengers are not hurt; calm them down; Check the toilets; Inform flight crew of the status of the cabin, if injuries or damage have occurred. 4.10.4. TURBULENCE INJURY PREVENTION At all times to prevent injury from turbulence the following measures must be taken: Secure the galleys immediately after each service; Re-stow carts/equipment in their stowage after each use;

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Latch galley equipment after each use; Minimize the amount of service equipment left out on galley surfaces. Where items must remain available, they must be placed inside drawers and space kept easily accessible in carts/ stowage to enable the drawers to be put away quickly, if required; Never left the trolley unattended in the aisle. Use brakes to lock the trolley every time you stop it for service; During the PA announcement after take-off, passengers are instructed to keep seatbelts fastened whenever seated; Cabin crew must not risk injury by continuing service during unsafe conditions; They must not wait for flight crew's advice to be seated if the conditions in the cabin warrant them do so; Cabin crew must advise the flight crew if conditions in the cabin require the Fasten Seat Belt sign to be switched ON; let the Captain know about conditions in the back of the aircraft. Once again, things feel different in the flight deck. When the Captain tells you to sit down - DO IT! Pilots are trained to alert you if turbulent weather conditions arise. So, listen to the warning and protect yourself. CCM should continually assess the level of turbulence and follow the procedures.

4.11. CREW INCAPACITATION

Incapacitation of a crew member is defined as, any condition which affects the health of a crew member during the performance of duties which renders him incapable of performing the assigned duties. Incapacitation is real air safety hazard which occurs more frequently then many of the other emergencies which are the subject of routine flight. Incapacitation can occur in many forms varying from obvious sudden death to subtle, partial loss of function. It occurs in all age groups and during all phases of flight and may not be preceded by any warning. However, the most critical situation would be during the approach and landing. Mild Incapacitation Cases of mild incapacity are probably common though not reported because no incident or accident occurred. Many crewmembers continue to fly when, for example, they are suffering from head cold, when fatigued by sleep loss, or when worried or anxious. The effects of mild incapacity include awareness of the state of reduced alertness, mental preoccupation that may result in a lack of appreciation of significant factors, slow reaction times, and an impairment of judgment. The incidences may affect one or more members of the crew when the casual factors are common, but the effects are rarely so significant as to promote a hazard in themselves. Minor omissions are misjudgments by an individual are usually readily exposed and corrected by another crewmember, provided that standard monitoring procedures are properly and conscientiously carried out. Severe incapacitation Reasons: heart attack, epilepsy, food poisoning and hypoxia Symptoms of beginning of an incapacitation: Incoherent speech Strange behavior Irregular breathing Pale fixed facial expression Jerky motions that are either delayed or too rapid

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4.11.1. FLIGHT CREW INCAPACITATION If incapacitation should occur, the other flight crew member must, as soon as practicable, call SCC. The best way to request assistance is giving the command "ATTENTION PURSER TO COCKPIT" by using the PA. SCC immediately proceeds to the cockpit. The SCCM must then: Secure the collapsed pilots hands in the full shoulder harness to prevent him from falling forward or sideways. Tighten and manually lock the shoulder harness of the incapacitated pilot. Slide the seat aft using either the manual or electrical controls. Recline seat back fully. Remove feet from the rudder controls. If the situation is deemed critical and Oxygen is required, the SCCM should use the Quick donning mask located in the cockpit. Care must be taken to ensure the oxygen flow is changed from "on demand" to "free flow". If the incapacitation is less severe the SCCM can use a portable Oxygen bottle from the cabin. Make doctor announcement. Discreetly check if there is a Medallion Air pilot on board (i.e. deadheading, traveling as passenger) with same type rated license; he may replace the incapacitated pilot in cockpit. If there is a pilot on board, with a different type rated license, he should occupy the observer's jump seat in cockpit and the incapacitated pilot shall not be removed from his seat. If there is no other pilot on board, SCCM shall assign a cabin crewmember to remain in cockpit, seated on observer's jump seat, in order to help the remaining pilot (reading check list, etc.). This must not be the Purser as she will be needed in the cabin in case a problem occurs during on landing. - Read checklist aloud clearly; - Wait until received response from flight crew member before moving to the next item on the check-list; - Cabin crew member reply Check-list complete after final check-list response from remaining pilot. The incapacitated crew member must be restrained from any further participation in the flight, even if they feel fit. Removal of unconscious pilot from jump seat 1. Move the pilots seat to the aft position. Forward and aft movement is controlled by a vertical lever or by an adjustment handle, on the side of the seat. The center handle will move the seat forward to aft. 2. Remove any headsets and Oxygen masks from the pilot and move them out of the way. 3. Open the seatbelt. Rotate the reel to release the straps. 4. Enlist the assistance of another crewmember. 5. Reach under the arms of unconscious pilot and grasp the pilots wrists. To avoid injury to yourself, do not attempt to lift the pilot. 6. Drag the pilot sideways from the seat and lower the pilot to the floor. With the legs free, drag the pilot to the front galley. 7. Administer first aid. Partial incapacitation of pilot Where a pilot is only partially incapacitated, it may be desirable for him to remain at his crew station and perform such operational duties (i.e. reading check list, etc.), as he is able.

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4.11.2. CABIN CREW MEMBER INCAPAICITATION DURING FLIGHT The most important consideration is to assess the seriousness of the cabin crewmember's condition and to decide on the urgency of obtaining medical attention. In the event, a CC who is part of the required crew complement becomes incapacitated in flight and can no longer perform their evacuation duties if called upon, advise the Captain and obtain a substitute in the following order: A supplemental/additional Cabin crewmember An off duty Cabin crewmember in uniform An off duty Cabin crewmember not in uniform A deadheading pilot - Assign to jump seat of incapacitated cabin crewmember Any technical personnel on board Any PSP - Assign to passenger seat nearest the primary exit of the incapacitated cabin crewmember In the event of a CCM being unable to perform his/her duties: One CCM should notify the flight deck crew Other cabin crewmembers render first aid as necessary Incapacitated CCM should sit in cabin seat so as not to block anyone from moving to an exit in an evacuation Assign an assistant to help the incapacitated CCM in the event of an evacuation Incapacitation of Senior Cabin Crewmember If during a flight the Senior Cabin Crew Member becomes unable to operate, the Captain of that flight will nominate as Senior Cabin Crewmember the most experienced person from the rest of the cabin crew. When, during flight, the senior cabin crew member becomes incapacitated or unfit for continued duty, the commander must be informed immediately. The commander always retains responsibility for the safety of the flight. Subject to the commander's decision, the usual succession of command will be as follows: 1. Another Senior Cabin Crew (if present in the crew) 2. The cabin crew next in line who has the most experience. She undertakes all duty and responsibilities of the senior cabin crew member. Duty arrangement is made according to one absent crew member. After completion of the flight, an entry must be made in the Cabin Voyage Report and Cabin Crew Management must be informed as soon as possible.

It is absolutely essential that all aircrew have their crash/ditching procedures at their fingertips. They must acquire and maintain a full knowledge of all the information in this manual, and make an effort to review the emergency procedures frequently enough to maintain a meticulous and accurate working knowledge of them. Cabin crew must review crash/ditching procedures before flight at least once per flying day. A general idea is not good enough: cabin crew must know exactly where to go and what to do. 4.12.1. DECOMPRESSION Jet aircraft operate at an altitude of approximately 7 miles above the earth. The human body can not tolerate this altitude for more than a few seconds, so the aircraft is pressurized. Pressurization creates an artificial altitude well within natural breathing capacity. Should the pressure in the aircraft be changed to the actual aircraft altitude, due to a mechanical failure or rupture of the fuselage, you must know how to use the equipment

4.12. EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

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and procedures necessary for this situation. A release of pressure in the aircraft cabin, causing the pressure inside the cabin to equalize with the pressure outside the aircraft, is called decompression. Pressurization is controlled automatically from the cockpit. An aircraft flying at 35,000 ft is usually pressurized to maintain a cabin altitude of 8000ft. If a pressurization failure occurres it is essential that a supply of oxygen is available for every passenger and crew member. The time required for the internal and external pressure to equalize depends on the size of the opening, the volume of the pressurized compartment, the pressure differential and the altitude at which the decompression has taken place. There are two types of decompression: Slow: Gradual loss of cabin pressure. Rapid/explosive: Loss of cabin pressure in between 1 to 5 seconds. 4.12.1.1. SLOW DECOMPRESSION Causes: Pressure leak Cracked window Defective door seal Cabin Characteristics: Possible hissing/whistling noise near a window or door The cabin may cool and objects may appear hazy. You will feel weak and-dizzy and signs of hypoxia become apparent. If pressure leak is slow, there may no obvious cabin changes until the masks drop. If aircraft remains above 14,000 feet, PSUs will open automatically and oxygen masks will drop down. There may be no indications prior to the masks dropping. Body changes: Blurred vision Headache Dizziness Fatigue PROCEDURES FOR A SUSPECTED SLOW DECOMPRESSION: 1. Notify the captain and warn other crew members. 2. Move passengers away from the whistling door or window. 3. If signs of hypoxia are visible, notify the captain so the altitude and pressure can be altered. 4. Advise passengers to fasten their seat belts. 5. Get the portable oxygen and prepare it for use. CONTROLLED SLOW DECOMPRESSION The First Officer monitors the cabin pressurization system constantly and would be the first to notice the conditions of a failure in the system. If the instruments indicate that a slow decompression is in progress, even if there is no immediate danger, he would advise the Captain immediately. The Captain would take action to prevent the cabin pressure from getting low enough to necessitate the use of supplemental oxygen. He would begin descent to an altitude lower than 14,000 feet. He may not consider it necessary to inform passenger of the decompression. Captain would advise the SCCM of the failure in the cabin pressurization and of his decision

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to descent to a lower altitude. The Captain may ask the SCC to tell passengers to fasten seat belts or he may make the announcement. UNCONTROLLED SLOW DECOMPRESSION When the cockpit crew observes the cabin pressurization decreasing at a rate, which will cause the cabin altitude to reach 14,000 feet, it is considered to be an uncontrolled slow decompression. CCMs would be advised by the Captain that an uncontrolled slow decompression is in progress and that he intends to descend to a lower altitude as soon as possible. The Captain may inform passengers about the possibility of oxygen masks being required. If time permits, a CCM should use the PA system to instruct the passengers on use of the oxygen masks. A rapid decompression is obvious, but a slow decompression can develop almost unnoticed. Both are dangerous. In addition to decompression procedure, aircrew must be alert to symptoms of hypoxia, a sign of slow decompression. Door or Window Air leaks in-flight If you hear or see an air leak/crack in an external door or window or if an external door latch opens: STEP CABIN CREWMEMBERS ACTION 1. 2. 3. 4 5. 6. Keep away from faulty door/window. Immediately inform Captain through interphone. The Flight Crew will turn on the "Seat Belt" sign (if not on already) and depressurize the A/C, if necessary. Notify other CCMs and tell passengers to fasten seat belts. Sit in your jump seat, unless the door you are responsible for is the reason of the air leak/crack. In this case, sit in another available seat. Grab an oxygen mask and place it over your nose and mouth. Remain seated until Captain gives clearance to move throughout the cabin by giving Cabin crew resume your duties command. If needed administer first aid O2 to passengers.

4.12.1.2. RAPID/EXPLOSIVE DECOMPRESSION Cabin Characteristics: An explosion Extreme structural damage Failure of A/C pressurization Blown window, rip in fuselage, or cracked door seal Explosive noise, violent rush of cabin air toward damaged area Fogging in cabin, rapid drop in temperature Emergency compartments will open in PSUs and 02 masks will be presented when cabin altitude reaches 14,000 feet. Unsecured items may be pulled toward the opening in the fuselage. Body Changes: Chest expansion, rapid loss of air from lungs Severe pain in ears and sinuses Difficulty in speaking, due to lack of air in lungs Discomfort due to pressure of gases trapped in the body Edition 2 Chapter 4 Page 16 May 2010

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PROCEDURES FOR RAPID/EXPLOSIVE DECOMPRESSION 1. Grab the nearest oxygen mask. (There is a minimum of seven per row). Take care of your 02 needs first. 2. Secure yourself, immediately sit down and fasten seat belt, preparing for a rapid descent. Have passengers hold you if seat is not available. 3. Instruct passengers to don their oxygen masks and fasten their seatbelts 4. Remain seated until aircraft levels out and captain makes announcement. When emergency descent is over and the plane has reached a safety level (10 000 ft), the PIC gives the command: Cabin crew resume your duties. CCM go from mask to mask to obtain the nearest portable O2 bottle. Check and assist all the other crew members. Check and fit masks to unconscious passengers and infants and assist them as required (first-aid, blankets) Check the toilets for fire, smoke or injured pax. Enforce no smoking and switch off galley electrics. If possible, relocate passengers from the danger area. Monitor the situation and keep the cockpit informed: pax, structural damage Remain on oxygen until advised by the Captain. NOTE: Cabin crew should not attempt to repack oxygen masks. Only authorized personnel should repack oxygen masks. However, to remove any depleted oxygen masks from obstructing passengers during the remainder of a flight, the cabin crew should place the mask and tubing in overhead bins and close the door. Do not pull pins from any units that have not already been activated. 4.12.1.3. HYPOXIA see chapter 6, 6.25, page 31 Oxygen is essential to life and the brain will suffer the most from lack of oxygen. The technical term for lack of oxygen is "hypoxia". The effects of hypoxia become apparent at the altitude above 10,000 ft. SYMPTOMS: Loss of self criticism Euphoria or depression Blurred vision Light headedness and perhaps disorientation Reduction of hearing Blueness of the lips and fingernails. Semi consciousness. There are a number of factors which increase the susceptibility of hypoxia: Fatigue Alcohol Physical exertion Age or illness of any kind. Smoking it lowers the ability to withstand altitude. NON SMOKER Actual Altitude (Ft) SEA LEVEL 10,000 20,000 SMOKER Apparent Altitude (Ft) 7,000 14,000 22,000

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4.12.1.4. TIME OF USEFUL CONSCIOUSNESS TUC The time of useful consciousness is the time in which a person is able to effectively or to adequately perform flight duties with an insufficient supply of oxygen. This time is variable, depending on the individual, the altitude and whether the decompression is rapid or slow. Altitude (feet) 22 000 25 000 30 000 35 000 40 000 TUC Sitting Quietly 10 minutes 5 minutes 1 minute 45 seconds 25 seconds TUC Moderate Activity 5 minutes 3 minutes 45 seconds 30 seconds 18 seconds Rapid Decompression 3 minutes 2 minutes 30 seconds 20 seconds 12 seconds

4.12.1.5. THE CONTINUATION OF FLIGHT WITH NO-PRESSURIZED CABIN STEP CABIN CREW MEMBERS ACTION 1. Keep Portable Oxygen Bottle donned and ready to use it whenever necessary. 2. CCMs with no remain seated and replace the walk around cabin crew at regular intervals of time. 3. 4. Carefully monitor the cabin, especially infants, children and old persons, and assist them with oxygen when necessary. Do not serve food or drinks to passengers for the rest of the flight.

4.12.2. FIRE AND SMOKE 4.12.2.1. FIRE IN CABIN Fire is the emergency most likely to produce panic, and therefore all crewmembers must maintain a positive and calm attitude. Any passenger showing signs of panic must be dealt with firmly. Although prompt action is called for, it must be the correct action. Speed is vital when dealing with a fire - however it is worth taking a second to assess the situation and decide the correct action necessary to control the particular fire - so think then act. It is absolutely essential that the captain is informed of the condition of the fire at all times, in order to make decisions on how to proceed. In some circumstances, a fire may not exist and the fire fighting effort will be limited to preventing an outbreak of fire. For example, overheating fluorescent light ballast units may create electrical smoke, or overheating air pack (air conditioning) units may cause smoke to enter the cabin through air ducts. If smoke is emitting from overheated ballast: Turn off the cabin light switch immediately. Notify the cockpit. Obtain the nearest Halon extinguisher and continue to monitor the area while keeping the cockpit informed of the situation. Likewise, if smoke is emitting from air conditioning ducts, immediately notify the cockpit so that the air conditioning pack can be shut off continue to monitor the area and keep the cockpit informed. Notify the cockpit via the interphone using the pre-established emergency signal, 3 bells

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Be precise and accurate: l have smoke in the cabin at I have fire in the cabin at I have fire and smoke in the cabin at The type of fire will determine the fire fighting method. If fire appears to be electrical, ensure power is shut off. In some instances, cabin fires can be extinguished with materials readily at hand, such as blankets or cold, non alcoholic beverages. Then, an extinguisher can be used to ensure the fire is completely out. In other cases, when time permits and based on the severity of the fire, the fire fighting method may require use of a fire extinguisher, heat resistance gloves and a PBE hood as protection against smoke and heat. NOTE: Do not open the cockpit door if smoke or harmful gases are present in the cabin. Always be sure that you have a way out of the area. Fight the fire with your back to your exit path. Do not turn your back to the fire. 4.12.2.2. FIRE PREVENTION Always be on the alert for potential fire hazards. Cigarettes, cigars and pipe ashes, matches and lighters, represent the biggest danger - watch for those who are smoking. Ask them to extinguish their cigarettes. Enforce the "No Smoking" rules as laid down in the smoking regulations. Check toilets frequently to see that rubbish containers are not overfilled. Where applicable ensure the extinguisher in the rubbish container has not been discharged and that the door to this area is firmly closed. In galleys, electrical faults are also a potential source of danger. 4.12.2.3. TRIANGLE OF FIRE There are three elements required for a fire to exist: Combustible material (fuel), oxygen, and heat. Remove any of them, and fire will go out. OXYGEN

HEAT

FUEL

4.12.2.4. THEORY OF FIRE FIGHTING Remove any one of these elements and the fire will extinguish: Removing the fuel Removing the 02 - Halon will disperse the O2 element Removing the heat. 4.12.2.5. CLASSIFICATION OF FIRE CLASS A (ASHES) Flammable Solids Class A fires are those that occur in common combustibles such as cloth, paper and wood. They are normally extinguished by cooling (i.e. water). For Class A fires any extinguisher will give a good result and no harm. CAUTION: In case of fire in the Cockpit or Galley do not use water and H20 fire extinguisher!

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CLASS B (BURN) Liquid Fire Class B fires involve flammable liquids or chemicals, the most common examples being petrol and oil. These fires are best extinguished by smothering or excluding oxygen. CAUTION: Water should never be used on a Class B fire as it only serves to increase the volume of the burning liquid, thus spreading rather than reducing the fire. For Class B fires use the Halon fire extinguisher. CLASS C (CURRENT) Electrical Fire Class C fires are those with electrical equipment and wiring. A non conductive extinguishing agent is required to prevent electrical shocks. CAUTION: Water should not be used. For class C fires use the Halon Fire Extinguisher. Before starting to put out the fire the switches must be turned OFF. CLASS D (METALS) Metal Fire Some aircraft have magnesium parts, such as brake drums. If a fire of this nature occurs, magnesium is non-extinguishable and will continue to burn until it burns itself out. TYPICAL LOCATIONS A (Ashes) Seat and rug fires Ordinary combustible caused by careless materials: smokers, etc. newspapers, magazines, clothes, trash receptacles, wood, rubbish, paper, etc. (Burn) Galley ovens, caused by Flammable and grease. Toilet articles, combustible liquids perfume or other (oil, grease, alcohol base substance, gasoline, alcohol) A/C fuel and oil. (Current) Any area that has Electrical electrical equipment or (electronics, and wiring in close feeder systems) proximity, circuit breakers and fuses. D (Metals) Aircraft Breaks. (Magnesium, Titanium, Zirconium) 4.12.2.6. CABIN CREW FIRE DRILL The Fire Drill involves three groups: 1. FIRE FIGHTER The crew member who discovers the fire, or is informed of the fire by a passenger, is the "Fire Fighter" and must immediately tackle the fire and: Alert other CCM; Immediately locates the source of the fire; Turns off electric source, where applicable; Obtains the nearest adequate fire extinguisher; Fights the fire. CLASS OF FIRE EXTINGUISHING COMMENTS AGENT Halon extinguishers H2O/Total Halon extinguisher or additional will put out a Class extinguishing agents: A fire, but they do non-flammable liquid, not cool; a wetting canned sodas, coffee. agent is required Smother with to put out the blankets/cloth. base of fire. Total Halon/CO2 or dry chemical. Caution: Do not use water on class fires; water causes fire to spread. Caution: Do not use water on class fires; water conducts electricity. Caution: Do not use water or other liquids.

Total Halon/CO2 or dry chemical.

Dry Chemical.

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2. COMMUNICATOR The second crew member must alert the Captain. Having alerted the Captain, the "Communicator" must keep him fully informed of the situation. The Captain must be told: Location; Source, if it has been established; Severity/Density (Color of smoke/odor); Fire-fighting progress; Number of fire extinguishers used; Time fire-fighting started; Maintains the communication link between the cabin and the flight crew, via interphone that is near the fire-fighting scene; Provides the flight crew with an accurate description of the fire-fighting effort, and of the situation in the cabin. 3. ASSISTANT The assistant will: Supply extra fire-fighting equipment; Support the fire-fighting effort; Remove flammable material and O2 from the area; Give out wet towels, advice passengers to stay at floor level. Move passengers appropriately, use other crew members to help. Must be prepared to replace the Firefighter, and exchange roles with him, as required. NOTE: To stop the fire occurring again after it has been put out the cabin crew must keep an eye on that area and check it frequently. If possible keep the passengers away from this area. 4.12.2.7. MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC FIRES FIRE ON A PERSON Immediately smother the flames using a coat or blanket; Simultaneously inform the cockpit; To stop the burning on the person, stop the oxygen, to do this put a blanket or coat on top and press with your hands from top to bottom; Never use a chemical extinguisher on a person. VOLATILE FLUID IN THE CABIN Volatile mixtures, such as gasoline, may cause flash ignition or an explosion, which could cause structural damage to the a/c and passenger or crew casualties. Do not attempt to dilute any fluid that has been spilled in the cabin if it is suspected of being volatile. Get the halon fire extinguisher and have another crewmember don the PBE to assist with fire fighting. Do not use a water extinguisher; Simultaneously inform the cockpit and describe the situation; Keep the cockpit door closed; Move passengers away. OVERHEAD BIN (HAT RACK FIRE) Take the halon extinguisher. Simultaneously inform the cockpit. Feel the door compartment before opening it, and if it is hot, try to gain access through the next door compartment. If access its not possible through the next compartment door, crack open the compartment in case and open it wide enough to squeeze the halon

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extinguisher nozzle inside. Discharge the halon extinguisher inside the compartment and immediately close the compartment door. Repeat the procedure after a few seconds. After the fire has been extinguished, carefully check the status of the compartment and the surroundings. Remove the coats and other items that are not burning to gain visual access the area. After you remove the materials one by one from the compartment, place them in an ice container and douse the burned materials with non-flammable liquids. ex: water. If PIC approves and if possible relocate the passengers from that area. If relocation of the passengers is not possible and smoke persists in that area request them to breathe through the wet headrests or wet napkins given by the cabin crew. Monitor the area. NOTE: Use the axe crash only if the compartment door is blocked and there is no other way to access the fire location. Never use the portable oxygen bottles in that area. VIDEO UNIT FIRES where applicable Take the BCF extinguisher and don the PBE; Simultaneously inform the cockpit; If smoke is emanating from the video equipment immediately shut off the master control unit to cut electrical power. OVEN/GALLEY FIRES Pull circuit breakers (keep door closed); Simultaneously inform the cockpit; Get appropriate fire extinguisher and monitor the situation; If flames are visible discharge halon around the outside of the door; If necessary open oven door slightly (max. 5cm) and discharge fire extinguisher; Close door and do not open until smoke has subsided; Keep an eye on the area. ELECTRICAL FIRES Pull circuit breakers; Simultaneously inform the cockpit; Use Halon Fire Extinguishers and carry on spraying until extinguisher is empty. LOWER SIDE-WALLS FIRES Flammable items over the return air grill have become ignited and not immediately observed because the airflow direction carried the smoke and fumes away from the passengers. The CCMs should maintain surveillance of the floor areas to keep clothing, bags, papers, etc., from being deposited where there may be fire hazard. Take the halon fire extinguisher and don the PBE; Simultaneously inform the cockpit; If the smoke is the result of a side wall light fire than immediatelly turn off the side wall lights from the SCC control panel. CEILING LIGHT FIRE Take the halon fire extinguisher and don the PBE; Simultaneously inform the cockpit;

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If smoke is emanating from the ceiling light (ballast) unit, immediately turn off the cabin lights at the SCC control panel.

SEAT FIRES Use The Curtain or any liquid that can be used; Simultaneously inform the cockpit; Keep under supervision. GALLEY CURTAIN FIRES Any liquid that can use; Simultaneously inform the cockpit; Start (aim) at the bottom and work up the curtain.

WASTE BIN FIRES Any liquid that can used; Simultaneously inform the cockpit; Open waste bin flap and discharge extinguisher into the bin; Saturate with water. TOILET FIRES Frequent checks of the lavatories should be made to assure that smoke detectors have not been tampered with and you do not smell cigarette smoke. If the smoke detector alarm is started, a powerful alarm sound will be heard. This alarm is meant to be heard by all the crew members, flight crews or cabin crews. In case of smoke in the toilet do not disarm the alarm sound of the smoke detector. The smoke detector alarm is design to shut off automatically when smoke particles dissipated in the air does no longer exists. Only in case of the malfunctioning of the smoke detector alarm and after double checking the absence of smoke or fire you may reset the alarm. The alarm may be turned off by pushing the small button located in the middle orifice of the smoke detector panel by using a MRT or a sharp pen. Inform the cockpit. If fire is detected in a toilet compartment, it is important to first assess the conditions. If smoke is seen escaping from around the door, before entering the toilet: Feel the toilet door with the back of the hand. IF IT IS COLD: Obtain the nearest fire extinguisher and if time permits put on a PBE. Open the toilet door. (Take care when opening the door in case of "flash back" which could occur when more oxygen is allowed into the toilet.) Locate the source of the fire and extinguish it by aiming at the source of the fire. Hold the extinguisher at a 45 angle and discharge it by moving up and down. Close door after discharging and open it after 10 seconds. Monitor the area and restrict the access of passengers. IF IT IS HOT: Keep door closed. Obtain a Halon Fire Extinguisher and put on PBE and heat resistance gloves. Assess fire with a tactile search by staying low and opening the door slowly, just wide enough to get extinguisher nozzle in. Empty contents of extinguisher into compartment. Close toilet door. Obtain second extinguisher and fire axe if necessary. Open toilet door slowly,

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locate source of fire and continue to fight fire until fire is out or break the piece of plastic that writes "occupied" with the sharp edge of the axe. Use the second halon extinguisher as well to build up a high concentration in the lavatory. Cool embers with water and continue monitor. IF TOILET IS OCCUPIED when detector activates: Knock firmly on the door. Announce loudly: cabin crew member, I must enter. Open the door. If the pax was smoking, extinguish it outside the lavatory. Check trash bin for burning materials. NOTE: When detecting a fire behind a panel/door, never open the door to check for fire. Use the back of your hand against the panel to detect high heat levels. Do not use your finger tips as they may burn or break the piece of plastic that writes "occupied" with the sharp edge of the axe and spray the chemical fire extinguisher until it finishes threw the breakage in the door (2 items). NOTE: In the attack on the fire, the extinguisher should be directed at the base of the flames, at the near edge and bottom of the fire first, and then progressing forward and upward. The discharge nozzle should be moved rapidly. 4.12.2.8. SMOKE IN CABIN The cockpit door must remain closed when there is smoke in the cabin. The cockpit door louvers will be closed to prevent smoke from entering the cockpit. The Captain will descend and raise the cabin altitude to increase the airflow. This will reduce the amount of smoke in the cabin. Cabin crew member will keep the pilots informed of smoke dissipation.Cabin crew member will need to determine the source and severity of the fire (i.e. color of smoke, smell exactly where it is coming from), and use the interphone to communicate this information to the Captain. Pilots may personally investigate, if feasible. If smoke is detected in the cabin: Inform the cockpit immediately. Do not open the cockpit door. Use interphone. Every effort should be made to prevent smoke and fumes from contaminating the cockpit; Obtain fire fighting equipment (Fire extinguisher, PBE, etc.) and investigate the source. Fight the fire. If possible, move passengers away from smoke. Keep passengers calm; If smoke is heavy and dense in the cabin use the PA or oral shouted commands to instruct passengers to get their heads down and breathe through clothing/cloth. Time permitting, wet cloths should be distributed in the cabin and passengers should breathe through this cloth if there is fire. Do not deploy oxygen masks, or administer first aid oxygen. If the smoke in the cabin persists and becomes a threat to the passengers health then proceed the Smoke Removal Procedure. SMOKE REMOVAL PROCEDURE After descending to a safe altitude and the PIC has depressurized the cabin, he gives clearance to the Purser through the interphone to start the smoke removal procedure. Purser coordinates through PA the simultaneous actions of the cabin crew member responsible for R1 door and Aft Tail Cone door. Cabin crew member should first disarm R1 door and Aft Tail Cone door.

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For up to 10 seconds the R1 door should be cracked open with the door handle to the unlocked position and the Aft Tail Cone door should be fully opened and latched on the toilet door. After 10 seconds the Purser commands to close the door and arm the slides. Purser informs the PIC that the procedure of smoke removal has been accomplished and he informs about the cabin status. If smoke persists in the cabin and with PIC approval the operation of smoke removal may be repeated in the same manner as previous. Purser informs the PIC after repeating the smoke removal procedure. If the smoke has been removed from the cabin the cabin crews should start assisting the passengers. NOTE: before proceeding to remove the smoke from the cabin first the cabin crews should exclude the possibility of a fire existence in the cabin. ESCAPING AND SURVIVING SMOKE if no PBE available or not possible to don Encountering smoke during your escape calls for a retreat in the opposite direction. But if theres no route to safety except through smoke, follow these basic precautions: Drop to hands and knees and crawl, keeping head down. This will help you to breathe the clean air. Smoke and heat accumulate at the ceiling and bank downward. If water is available, hold a wet cloth or towel over mouth and nose. Although the wet cloth is not a good filter against toxic gases, it can help screen some irritants from the smoke and make breathing more comfortable. Take shallow breaths to avoid deep inhalation of toxic gases. Navigate through the smoke-filled area with eyes tightly closed, if possible, to avoid irritation and severe discomfort. Crawl slowly, using your sense of touch; occasionally open your eyes to determine the correct line of travel; proceed until out of the smoke-filled danger area. 4.12.2.9. FIRE PREVENTION Cabin crew must ensure and always do the sufficient controls so they can eliminate potential fire hazards and situations. FIRE PREVENTION PRACTICES INCLUDE: Monitor the passengers all the time. Monitor the passengers smoking in the lavatories. Monitor cabin floor for excess paper (i.e. newspapers, magazines) they should be picked up. Be alert to circuit breakers that may have popped out. Place discarded aerosol cans and perfume bottles in garbage bags and keep them secure in the galley. All galley electrical equipment that is out of order must be written in CML. 4.12.2.10. CIRCUIT BREAKERS If a circuit breaker should pop out and if the edges are white: Check for further damage (sparking, electrical smell, smoke) then proceed accordingly. Inform the Pilot-in-Command. To reset the circuit breaker the Pilot in-Command must be asked. With his permission, wait two minutes (cooling period), and push circuit breaker in once If breaker pops a second time: Inform the cockpit.

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Do not reset the circuit breaker again. Make an entry in CML. NOTE: According with the pilots check-lists the PIC always set the galleys power swich on off position during take-off and landing. This switch removes all the electrical power in the galleys. 4.12.3. SECURITY Security procedures are a prime responsibility for all crewmembers. Through observation and alertness, many threatening situations can be prevented. The Company has established a ground security program to prevent people, intent on committing an act of unlawful interference, from gaining access to vulnerable areas of a facility or to an airplane on the ground. This security program is approved by the RCAA to specific requirements, which concern all employees. Company employees are urged to be alert for any suspicious person(s) observed around aircraft that do not appear to have authorization, to challenge such person(s), and to contact local security, if necessary. All Company employees are responsible for compliance with the requirements of the security program. Identification badges are provided for all Company employees. All employees shall have the identification badge on their person, when on duty, at all Company facilities. Employees should be prepared to present their badges whenever challenged, and to challenge those who do not have appropriate identification. Restricted Areas Security measures have been established to prevent unauthorized persons from entering Company aircraft at any time the aircraft is on the ground. The following areas are restricted for unauthorized persons: Aircraft undergoing maintenance in the hangar or on the ramp. Unattended aircraft in parking or terminal areas, sealed or unsealed. The Airport Operation Area (AOA) at all stations. Boarding Company aircraft is permissible only if an official need exists to be on board the aircraft. Employees shall not escort visitors into restricted areas without receiving prior permission. Ground Security: Terminal and Boarding Area It is a crime to carry a concealed weapon aboard an airplane. This applies to crewmembers as well as to passengers. Crewmembers must continuously be conscious of their personal belongings, i.e., flight bag, tote bag, purse, briefcase, garment bag, and suitcase. These items must be kept in sight at all times. They are not to be left unattended in restaurants, departure lounges or terminals. CCM are not to act as couriers in the delivery of personal mail or parcels. Company mail can only be accepted when boarded by a Company employee. Jetway doors will be unlocked only during passenger enplaning or deplaning operations. They will be attended at all times. Aircraft Security: Access to Aircraft Personnel servicing the aircraft, as part of their normal assigned duties, are to be alert for suspicious materials, packages, or persons. Any suspicious items shall not be moved or examined, but reported to management and to the local police, if appropriate. Unauthorized or non-badged personnel shall be challenged and reported to law enforcement, airline or airport authorities, as appropriate. Any indication of tampering or

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unauthorized entry into the aircraft will be immediately reported to the Captain. Aircraft Cabin Security Checks The aircraft cabin itself offers the greatest opportunity to hide explosives or other destructive devices. Carry-on baggage, a small parcel in the overhead compartment, or a device placed in the lavatory while in flight, offers the opportunity for extortion of the following flight. It is a security violation for passenger destination baggage tags to be within access of passengers. F/As are not to leave such tags on the aircraft, jetway or boarding area, or to carry them in their luggage. If baggage tags are not returned to the agent, they should be destroyed. 4.12.3.1. SEARCHING AND GUARDING OF AIRCRAFT Aircraft Checking, Searching and Guarding procedures are necessary to protect Passengers, Crew and Aircraft operating on all services and on the ground before, between and after flights. Responsibility for ensuring these procedures are undertaken to the required standards rests with the aircraft operator. The searches are made according to the AIRPLANE SEARCH CHECK LISTS. If an aircraft has been serviced or left unattended in an area outside the Airfield's Restricted Zone (ramp area) the airframe, including holds, are to be searched by trained security staff or by operating crew taking guidance from the search schedules in the aircraft document file.(If searched by contract staff a search certificate must be given to the Commander.) Access to the aircraft must then be guarded and controlled by either contract staff or operating crew until departure. On flights operating in the absence of a specific threat, provided that the aircraft has remained in the Restricted Zone or has been sealed post previous flight, and that the seal has not been broken, a security check must be made by the Operating Crew and confirmation of cabin security check completion be reported to the Commander by the Purser. Again, access must be controlled until departure. On all occasions it remains the Flight Crews' responsibility to security search those areas directly concerned with the flight safety of aircraft including the flight deck and the airframe exterior. ROUTINE CHECKING - INTERIOR & EXTERIOR FLIGHT DECK AND EXTERIOR The aim of checking pre-flight is to ensure that the aircraft has not been interfered with in a manner which would jeopardize its safety. Checking of aircraft flight decks is directly concerned with the safe operation of the aircraft and only flight deck crew and designated airline staff are competent to check this area. The exterior of the aircraft should generally be checked by the Commander or his representative in the course of ensuring that the aircraft is airworthy. Before the aircraft undertakes the first flight of the day, and if circumstances dictate on turnarounds, flight crews when inspecting the aircraft exterior, should be mindful of security considerations. Additionally, all easily accessible quick release panels should be inspected. These measures are sufficient to meet the risk of interference with aircraft in the absence of a specific threat. AIRCRAFT INTERIOR The passenger cabin, toilets, galley and interior cargo holds are not directly concerned with the safe operation of the aircraft and may be checked by cabin staff and cleaners who are

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familiar with the aircraft type. Cleaning staff not directly employed by the company should be subject to supervision at all time. NOTE: Galley waste bins and toilet refuse bins should be emptied by cleaners after every sector. This should be monitored. Cabin staff should then check toilet drawers and stowages. WHEN CLEANERS ON BOARD When the cleaners are on the aircraft, the cabin crew must always keep them under supervision. There must be 1 cabin crew at the front and 1 at the back of the aircraft so they can keep an eye on the cleaners. ASK TO SEE IDS OF SERVICE STAFF BOARDING AIRCRAFT If any doubt exists, PIC must call the security staff for a search to be carried out in the suspected areas. Post-flight checks must include the passenger cabin, toilets, galley areas and are undertaken to ensure that passengers who have disembarked have left nothing on board which will hazard the aircraft. 4.12.3.2. POSITIVE SEARCHING AND GUARDING FOR HIGH RISK SECTORS All areas of the aircraft not directly concerned with the safe operation including the passenger cabin, toilets, galley and cargo hold must be searched by security staff who are trained to identify potential explosive devices, are familiar with the aircraft type and who will be provided with a search schedule for the aircraft. It is a mandatory requirement that a signed search record is given to Commanders before the departure of high risk flights, departing in either direction, as evidence that this search has been completed. Crews are normally not suitably qualified to undertake the search for high risk devices in areas other than the flight deck and the exterior, and therefore must not depart before the cabin search is completed by trained Security staff. . At all outstations: Advice should be taken from Operations Center or senior Station Official to arrange a qualified Search Team. 4.12.3.3. GUARDING OF AIRCRAFT Before departure for high risk flights it is a mandatory requirement that aircraft should be guarded from the time they are searched until the time of departure. This also applies to all airports en-route. Similarly, an aircraft, which has been checked, should be guarded until crew arrival, THE AIM IS TO: - Prevent unauthorized persons gaining access to the aircraft i.e. checking credentials of those persons seeking access to the aircraft; - To prevent weapons or explosive devices being placed on an aircraft after it has been searched or checked. Security staff will 'guard' the aircraft post search until the time of departure. All crew members will accept responsibility for stopping and reporting to the CDT or airline representative any person suspected of endeavoring to take on board any weapon or potential explosive. If the Commander is not satisfied that access to an aircraft has been controlled post search, he may require a full security re-search before the aircraft may depart on High Risk flight. Where an aircraft has been checked, crews must ensure that no persons have access to the interior other than authorized persons, operating crew members, persons acting on the course of a statutory duty or departing passengers. 4.12.3.4. SEALING OF AIRCRAFT

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When aircraft are left unattended away from their normal scheduled operating base, all doors and holds will be sealed by the authorized technician who is responsible for aircraft security. Seals must be used to seal all access doors, cargo holds and certain access hatches, according to aircraft type. The seals are numbered and relevant numbers must be entered into the technical log. When the aircraft is re-attended the aircraft technical log is to be annotated when tags are removed. If the aircraft seal has been breached, a full check by crew or search by trained security staff must be undertaken. 4.12.4. DISRUPTIVE/UNRULY PASSENGERS according to Security Manual General Classification Main categories of disorderly/unruly passengers are: Those who disregard repeatedly the instructions of the crew; Those who behave abusively in general; Those who strictly refuse to follow the company regulations (non-smoking, use of electronic equipment, etc.) Those who related to the use of excess alcohol or the use of both prescription and non-prescription drugs. Pre-flight Handling: Several possibilities exist for staff to recognize the potential troublemaker. These include check-in, the lounges and the boarding gate. If the passenger is a trouble maker, then the flight crew should be informed, so no problems occur and so they can be precautious. Initial action to refuse carriage will normally be taken by the station manager or the senior staff member present who must exercise discretion whether to: - If the passenger carries on causing problems and uses violence then he/she will not be allowed on the aircraft. - The ground management and the PIC must decide if the passenger is to board the aircraft or not. - If the passenger is not allowed on board inform the security immediately and write a report. - Confer with the commander and SCCM to decide on the appropriate course of action if allowing the passenger to travel is being considered and inform security accordingly. - Station Managers have clear guidelines on the correct procedure to be followed when this course of action is considered appropriate. Once a passenger has been identified as a potential troublemaker, and the decision is made not to refuse carriage, SCCM must be informed so that special attention can be given. In Flight Handling: The handling of disorderly/unruly passengers in flight is at the discretion of the Commander and in co-ordination with the SCC. The discretionary action could range from the senior cabin/crew cockpit crew talking to the disorderly passenger, the refusal of cabin crewmembers to serve alcohol, or to the physical restraint of the passenger. Note: The cockpit crew should not leave the cockpit to deal with passengers' problems for any reason and the cockpit door will be kept locked throughout the flight. It is important that all crewmembers have a common understanding of the situation and act in such a way to prevent escalation of the events rather than handling the aggravated situation.

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Medallion Air will not accept: - Physical or verbal assault by passengers on employees whilst they are on duty; - Disorderly or drunken behavior by passengers or any person on board; - Medallion Air fully supports all employees in their handling of disruptive passengers provided the employee acts in a prudent, reasonable manner. The report shall be given to the Security personnel, at home base and reported in the SCC Report as well. Crew Actions Flight crew and cabin crew must co-operate to prevent, and limit the escalation of, any incident. SCC should inform the Commander whenever possible before any action is taken with problem passengers and kept informed of all developments. For actions taken in accordance with Tokyo convention, neither the Commander, any other member of the crew, any passenger, the owner or operator of the aircraft, nor the person on whose behalf the flight was performed shall be responsible in any proceeding on account of the treatment undergone by the person against whom the actions were taken (Tokyo Convention chapter III/article 10). Table for categorizing the in-flight incidents
Category 1 Step One Step Two Step Three There is no further action required by CCM. Such an incident needs not to be reported to the cockpit, Medallion Air headquarters or RCAA. END OF THE CONFLICT Step Three CCM requests passenger to Passenger complies with comply with the regulation. request. (These are actions which do not interfere with flight safety, i.e. verbal abuse) Step One Step Two CCM requests passenger to Passenger continues comply. disturbance that interferes with cabin safety such as continuation of verbal abuse or continuing refusal to comply with safety regulations (such as failure to fasten seat belt when sign is illuminated, operation of unauthorized electronic equipment, smoking).

Passenger fails to comply with the Final Warning Card

After attempting to defuse the situation, CDT and SCC will coordinate on the issuance of a No smoking Violation or Unacceptable Behavior Final Warning Card and the completion of the Level 2 section of Flight Disturbance Report. If applicable, the pax shall not be served with any alcoholic beverage, and shall be asked to hand any alcoholic beverage in his possession to SCC. If passenger complies with the request, then END OF THE CONFLICT. At home base, the report shall be given to Flight Ops and Security personnel. Examples: Advise CDT, then CDT requests the - When crewmember duties are appropriate law enforcement office to disrupted due to continuing meet the flight upon arrival. Level 3 interference; section of the - When a passenger or Flight Disturbance Report shall be crewmember is injured or filled. After landing, copies of the subjected to a credible threat of report shall be handed to local law injury; enforcement organization and station - When an unscheduled landing manager. is made due to the disruptive At home base, the report shall be behavior. given to Flight Ops and Security personnel.

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If at any time a cabin crewmember notices unusual behavior on the part of a passenger, SCC must be advised. If a passenger's behavior results from the non-observance of a legal requirement, then the SCC is to clearly advise the passenger of the regulation. The passenger is to be left in no doubt as to legal requirements if this exists. SCC is a key person in relation with disruptive passengers. Practically the events may follow the sequence described below. 1. After receiving a verbal warning passenger stops the disturbance. In this case no other action is needed. If the unruly behavior continues or even became illegal, then 2. SCC reports to the Commander and ask for the "No Smoking Violation" card or "Unacceptable Behavior on Board this Aircraft" card, as appropriate. The card is handed to the disruptive passenger. SCC shall fill the Level 2 section of the Airline Passenger Disturbance Report including his name and signature. SCC shall keep the Report until the end of the flight. If the passenger behaves acceptable, the level 3 section shall be cancelled, the Commander shall sign the appropriate section and the SCC shall hand-over the report to Flight Ops and Security at home base. If the disruptive behavior continues, 3. CDT decides the necessary actions to enforce discipline on board. SCC fills the Level 3 section of the Flight Disturbance Report and submits it to the Commander for completion and signature. In extreme cases, when the disruptive behavior of the passenger is an obvious danger for the safety of the flight, CDT can consider to land the aircraft at the nearest available location. Early communication of the Commander's decision is essential to allow Head-office staff to connect, if necessary with Station Manager to determine the best course of action when the aircraft lands. The Flight Disturbance Report forms the basis of a formal complaint on arrival. It is possible that some sections of the Flight Disturbance Report are filled in the presence of the authorities (passenger identification). The distribution of the report is as follows: Level 2 report to the Head Security. Level 3 report to: - station manager, who shall make and distribute copies to: - the passenger, - the Commander, - the local authorities and - the Head Security via co-mail. One copy shall be kept in the Station file. Head Security shall inform all units involved in accordance with Aeronautical Security Program. Assault by Passenger on Crewmembers In the event that a passenger physically or verbally assaults a crewmember, the case shall be handled as any disruptive passenger event. Security will advise the Chief pilot and Cabin Crew Management and connect with Medallion Airs Legal Department who will assist the crewmember in the proceedings. Besides criminal proceedings, it is open to the employee to pursue a civil action for the assault. The CDT may require or authorize the assistance of other crewmembers and may request or authorize, but not require, the assistance of passengers to restrain any person whom is entitled to restrain. Any CC or passenger may also take reasonable preventive measures without authorization when he has reasonable grounds to believe that such action is immediately necessary to protect the safety of the aircraft or of persons or property therein.

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In case the passengers help to restrain an aggressive pax, handcuffs or any restraining devices should be used (plastic seals, duct tape). Cabin crew must notify the captain, who will request police assistance upon arrival. After landing, the cabin crew should not remove the restraining device, as this would be performed by security personnel or the police. The restrained pax should be seated in the last rows, under the supervision of a CCM, so he can be released quickly in case of an evacuation. 4.12.4.1. SMOKING VIOLATION ref to EU-OPS 1.335 Airport authorities prohibit smoking in designated areas of the aerodrome, even in airplanes while at rest on the ground. The commander shall ensure that no person on board is allowed to smoke: - whenever deemed necessary in the interest of safety; - while the airplane is on the ground unless specifically permitted in accordance with procedures defined in the Operations Manual; - in cargo compartments and/or other areas where cargo is carried which is not stored in flame resistant containers or covered by flame resistant canvas; - in those areas of the cabin where oxygen is being supplied; NO SMOKING VIOLATION NCALCAREA AVERTISMENTULUI "NU FUMAI" FINAL WARNING ULT1MUL AVERTISMENT You have been told not to smoke by the Cabin Crew, because: Echipajul de cabin v-a informat s nu fumai, pentru c: This is a non-smoking Flight. Acesta este un zbor n care nu se fumeaz. Smoking is prohibited in the area you are seated in. Nu se fumeaz n zona n care suntei aezat. Smoking is prohibited in the aisles and in lavatories. Nu se fumeaz pe culoar i n toalete. Smoking is prohibited when the "No Smoking" signs are on. Nu se fumeaz cnd semnalul Nu Fumai" este aprins. If you smoke, or attempt to smoke again, the Commander will request the police to meet this aircraft on arrival and your conduct will be reported to them for possible prosecution. Dac mai fumai, sau mai ncercai s fumai, Comandantul va cere poliiei s ntmpine avionul la sosire i comportamentul dumneavoastr va fi raportat poliiei, pentru o posibil inculpare. This notice is given by the Commander of this aircraft. Aceast avertizare este dat de ctre comandantul aeronavei. MDP-CC-FORM 005

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4.12.4.2. UNNACEPTABLE BEHAVIOR ON BOARD

NOTICE OF LAW VIOLATION NOTIFICARE A NCLCRII LEGILOR UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR ON BOARD THIS AIRCRAFT COMPORTAMENT INACCEPTABIL LA BORDUL AERONAVEI FINAL WARNING You have already been told by the Cabin Crew that your behavior on board this aircraft is unacceptable and may have been in violation of international laws. ULTIMUL AVERTISMENT Vi s-a spus deja de ctre echipajul de cabin c purtarea dvs la bordul acestui avion este inacceptabil i c ar putea fi n contradictie cu legile internationale.

Din acest moment: With immediate effect: 1. Nu vei mai bea nimic alcoolic. 1. You must not drink any alcohol. 2. You must hand all alcohol in your 2. Vei preda buturile alcoolice pe care le avei unui membru al echipajului de possession to a member of Cabin Crew. cabin. Ele v vor fi napoiate cnd vei It will be returned to you when you leave prsi aeronava. this aircraft. 3. You must not behave in a manner likely 3. V vei abine s v purtai ntr-un mod ce ar putea: to: pune n pericol sigurana zborului, sau endanger the safety of the aircraft, or cauza ngrijorare echipajului sau cause concern to the crew or to other celorlali pasageri. passengers. 4. You must comply with the crew's 4. Trebuie s v conformai instruciunilor echipajului. instructions. If you fail co comply with the above instructions, the commander may decide to land the aircraft at the nearest available location and off-load you. You will be liable for the diversion costs and your ticket will be invalidated for further carriage. Dac refuzai s respectai instruciunile de mai sus, comandantul poate decide s aterizeze pe cel mai apropiat aeroport i s v debarce. Vei fi rspunztor pentru costurile modificrii programului de zbor, iar biletul dvs va fi anulat.

On arrival, details of your conduct will also La aterizare, comportarea dvs va fi raportat be reported to the police for possible poliiei, pentru o posibil urmrire contravenional sau penal. prosecution. This notice is given by the Commander of this aircraft. Aceast notificare este dat de ctre comandantul aeronavei.
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4.12.5. BOMB AND SABOTAGE THREATS The action to be taken in the event of a bomb threat against an aircraft, or any Medallion Air property or ground installation, is dependent upon the nature of the threat and the way in which it is made. Airline experience indicates that the majorities of "bomb warnings" received are of a nonspecific nature, and rarely refer to an individual flight or location. They are usually made by anonymous telephone callers, and the greatest encouragement to such persons is publicity of any kind. It is normal policy to keep these warnings confidential, to avoid any tendency towards sensational reports and to endeavor to dissuade the press and other news media from affording them any publicity. At most airports, national rules or local regulations require an airline to notify the local security or airport authorities when a bomb threat is received. Many airports and civil aviation authorities have the power to delay and search an aircraft in these circumstances should they consider it necessary, regardless of the wishes of the airline. In some countries the authorities require ATS to pass any warnings to airborne aircraft; in others the matter is left entirely in the hands of the airline. Classification of Threats RED = Specific: Threat is identified by flight number, departure time, or bomb location and includes positive identification to aircraft. AMBER = Non-specific: Threat is one in which the caller may identify the flight by destination or origin, flight number or time of departure or arrival. Dispatch and/or commander or management should conduct determination of bomb threat type. GREEN = False alarm: the information received must be of a general nature such that it is not possible to identify any particular flight or installation. Note: While most of bomb threats are hoaxes, the threat should be treated as genuine. RED Procedure when Aircraft on Ground SCC- to flight crew advise the nature of the threat against the airplane; Commander makes the PA announcement. No announcement should be made to passengers concerning bombs or bomb threats. Disembark the passengers either at the gate or a suitable area nominated by ATC when cabin evacuation/disembarkation signal received from cockpit; If the airplane is away from the gate, disembarkation is to be via external/ internal stairs rather than escape slides, unless there is a reason to believe that an explosion and/or airplane damage is imminent; In a controlled disembarkation via stairs, passengers and crew should take all cabin baggage; this requirement should be reflected in a PA announcement by SCC; If an evacuation via slides is required, passengers and crew should leave all cabin baggage on board the airplane; Cabin crew members and ground personnel will be responsible for moving passengers for a safe location. Cabin Crewmembers should not assist in a bomb search. Note 1: Evacuate passengers through normal and emergency exits on the opposite side of the "bomb" location; Note 2: Do not use the door just in front of the location of the "bomb". Procedure when Aircraft in Flight The Commander will be told that a threat has been received and given any information that

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might help him assess its credibility. The following procedure is recommended: Keep ATC and Medallion Air OCC fully informed of flight intentions, particularly the intended landing aerodrome, so that appropriate ground measures can be initiated (Diversion to the suitable aerodrome is recommended); Set transponder to code 7700 unless otherwise instructed by ATC; If operationally possible descend to reduce cabin differential without raising cabin altitude, and reduce speed to minimize possible damage in the event of fuselage rupture. Prepare for possible use of crew oxygen/smoke mask. Brief cabin crew to make an unobtrusive inspection of aircraft toilets, galleys and the passenger compartments as far as is practicable without alarming passengers; In general passengers should not be told in the air of the situation. Announcements concerning return or diversion should indicate that it is for "Operational Reasons". Brief cabin crew to be prepared for a possible emergency evacuation upon landing, followed by the PA announcement: It's imperative that passengers leave the aircraft without delay, please follow the instructions given by the cabin crew". On contact with the aerodrome of landing, request details of remote parking requirements and IMMEDIATE availability of passenger steps. If an evacuation appears to be the only choice, SCC shall follow Commander's order to evacuate the passengers as soon as the airplane has been brought to a stop after landing. After evacuation of the aircraft, assemble passengers and crew at least 400 meters clear of the aircraft. AMBER/GREEN When the aircraft is not under a "RED" threat, an aircraft search is designed to locate, as far as possible, any object which appears to be foreign or out of place in the normal aircraft surroundings. It is not the responsibility of the search team to confirm that such an object, when found, is explosive or an incendiary device, but simply that its presence on the aircraft is suspicious. ON NO ACCOUNT MUST A SUSPICIOUS OBJECT BE TOUCHED OR MOVED The searcher should clearly mark its location with a handkerchief or tie and request a second opinion from an engineer or security specialist. If it is confirmed by second opinion that the object is indeed suspicious, all personnel are to be withdrawn from the aircraft and the Police/bomb squad informed. 4.12.6. HIJACKING Unlawful seizure or interference with an airplane in service is a crime wherever it occurs and such will be dealt with by the police or security forces in the same manner as any crime of violence. The situation may require adjustment and adaptation. In case of an unlawful seizure (hijacking), SCC should immediately advise the commander on the interphone system use three bells - of a hijacker presence in the cabin by using the international hijack code: "Captain I must come to the cockpit immediately" or act according to the preflight briefing. Categories of hijackers 1. Criminal - This hijacker is purely interested in financial gain, using passengers, crew and the aircraft for ransom. Though armed and dangerous, they are not expected to be overly violent and can normally be handled by police negotiators. 2. Refugee - Normally regarded as a low-threat as these hijackers are seeking refuge and

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political asylum. 3. Psychotic - Media coverage is often this hijacker's aim. Usually a lone hijacker with possibly a fake weapon. This hijacker will be unpredictable and should be considered dangerous. 4. Politically Motivated Terrorist - Again, media coverage to undermine confidence is often the aim. Also, political demands i.e. ransom, or the release of political prisoners. This category should be regarded as highly professional, well trained and armed and dangerous. Medallion Air policy is that the safety of passengers and Crew is paramount and that in the event of a hijack incident this can best be fulfilled by the policy of "nil resistance" on the aircraft. It is true that there have been some cases where mentally disturbed hijackers have been overpowered. Nevertheless, in the case of well-armed "terrorist type" hijack teams, with possibly other team members remaining uncommitted and unidentified amongst the other passengers, any attempt to resist or overpower the hijackers on the aircraft must be recognized as being potentially dangerous. In extreme cases, however, (e.g. if the hijacker attempts to sabotage the aircraft) the Crew may take any appropriate action. The behavior expected from these 4 main types of hijacker can vary widely; therefore Crewmembers should try to establish at the earliest time the category of the hijacker. COMMANDER'S AUTHORITY The Commander's normal authority and responsibility for the safety and welfare of his aircraft, Crew and passengers continues even in the event of unlawful interference. In cases of unlawful seizure, protection of the aircraft itself and its dead load are of secondary importance and are not to be taken into account unless it is clear that no other risks are involved. Unlawful seizure of or interference with an aircraft in service is a crime wherever it occurs. As such it may be investigated and dealt with by the Police in just the same manner as any other crime. Commanders should, therefore, anticipate that the Police, who have the necessary powers of arrest and entry on premises and property without warrant, will begin possible after an incident is reported. When the Police take over control, the Commanders responsibility is diminished and he becomes subject to their instructions. The nature of the offence is such that Government representatives as well as the Police are bound to become involved. When this occurs it is likely that the Government will assume control of strategy while the Police remain in tactical control on the spot. While the aircraft is in the air and until the Police or the Government start to exercise their powers, the Commander is solely in control and his actions are to take account of the demands of the hijacker, in so far as they can be met without placing passengers and Crew in unnecessary danger. Commanders are, however, reminded that they themselves have powers of arrest in respect of criminal activity on board their aircraft, as do the Aircrew under their authority, though this power should not be exercised until it is clearly safe to do so. The first objective should be to get the aircraft safely on to the ground. The safety of passengers and Crew is foremost in the minds of the authorities, who will be receiving technical advice and assistance from the operator, as well as from the Commander. He should, however, recognize that his assessment of his situation is bound to be limited by the confines of the aircraft and the duress to which he is subjected, and no independent action should therefore be taken unless absolutely necessary. It is his duty to comply with instructions received from the competent authorities to the best of his ability consistent with the safety of his passengers and crew. CREW ACTION Airline experience of hijack incidents indicates that it is advisable to follow the guidelines

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given in the following paragraphs. 1. DO NOT LOOSE CONTACT WITH THE COCKPIT, OBEY THE PILOT IN COMMANDS RULES. 2. THE SAFETY OF PASSENGERS AND CREW COMES FIRST Achieve this by complying with the demands of the hijacker, and avoid conflict on the aircraft. 3. COMPLY BUT DON'T SURRENDER. It may be possible to persuade the hijacker to modify his demands. 4. BE GUIDED BY THE AUTHORITIES. Your own assessment of the situation will be constrained by the confines of the aircraft, and the Authorities are bound to have a wider picture; trust their actions, and where possible, comply with their instructions. 5. WHERE POSSIBLE KEEP THE GROUND AUTHORITIES FULLY INFORMED. Be observant. They will require objective and detailed information about the situation on board the aircraft. IDEAL PRIORITIES FOR PASSING INFORMATION ON HIJACKERS AND HOSTAGE TAKERS Cabin crewmembers should observe and assess the situation and if possible, provide as much of the following information to the flight deck: - Number of hijackers - Sex - Weapons/explosives - Names used - Assessment of mood, determination, expertise on weapons/explosives/aircraft systems - Assessment of ages - Ethnic group (mixed?) - Terrorist tactics, usual positions etc. - Details of hostages in distress or under specific threat IF YOU GET A CHANCE TO COVERTLY USE THE INTERPHONE: Speak quickly but clearly (you will be recorded) Don't pause to think about all the above points Don't ask questions Don't express opinions Just pass information 6. DO NOT TAKE INDEPENDENT ACTION. Resist the temptation to "have a go". Independent action should not be taken except in extreme circumstances, and then only with prior agreement of the Commander. Remember, there may be members of the hijack team who have not revealed their identity. FLIGHT CREW It is probable that the hijacker is in a tense and nervous state and possibly mentally unstable. Extreme tact is therefore necessary in dealing with him, and any conversation or action, which might cause irritation, should be avoided. An attempt should be made to establish a port between Aircrew and hijacker: this can probably be best developed through one person's approach. Although probably quite contrary to any Crewmember's natural reaction, the existence of an essentially hostile and uncooperative relationship could only be expected to heighten fears and tensions and seriously inhibit essential flight deck activity. Should the instructions of a hijacker endanger the operation an attempt should be made to reason with him, explaining the problem and consequences this is more likely to succeed if a satisfactory relationship has already been established.

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Any action or movement, instinctive or otherwise, which the hijacker might construe as hostile, should be avoided. Prior warning before operating any controls, switches or radio, or extracting documentation from stowage's, etc., is essential. CABIN CREW Cabin Crew in all incidences where a hijacker(s) has taken over control of the aircraft should initially comply and establish to the perpetrator(s) that they pose no threat. A calm, professional bearing on the part of the cabin crew may impress the hijacker(s) to moderate their demands. On no account should a belligerent attitude be adopted and every effort must be made to avoid the discharge of firearms/explosives/incendiary devices. PURSER Stay calm and control yourself. Inform the Commander. Inform the remainder of Cabin Crew. Supervise and reassure the passengers. Comply with demands without prejudicing safety. Only one person from the crew should negotiate with the aggressors same sex principle. Negotiate patiently. Do not antagonize or argue. Do not empathize with aggressors beware of Stockholm syndrome. Intercede on behalf of passengers wherever possible and try to ensure their comfort. Maintain close liaison with the controlling authorities on the ground. ALL CABIN CREW Stay calm and control yourself. Be open with the hijacker in respect of operational problems and difficulties. Comply with demand without prejudicing safety. Negotiate patiently, intercede with on behalf of passengers wherever possible and try to ensure their comfort. Do not antagonize or argue. Make the hijacker do his own thinking and make his own decisions. Care for the needs of the passengers and keep them informed. Plan the rationing and distribution of food and water on the assumptions that the incident may be prolonged. Check lavatories periodically. Try to delay every action - give time to the authorities to intervene. NEGOTIATION As hijacking is a criminal offence the local police will assume command once the aircraft has landed. A police negotiator will be assigned to set-up communications with the hijacker. This can take time and patience must be exercised by all crew and passengers. The negotiator is highly trained to achieve the successful passing of hijacker's deadlines and the release of passengers and crew. At this period of a hijacking the hijackers tactics towards crew and passengers may change, suggesting their long awaited release is in the hands of the authorities and not the hijackers. These psychological tactics can cause passengers and crew to find themselves resenting the police and siding with the hijacker. Crew particularly must be aware of this and remember whose side they are on! POST HIJACKING At the conclusion or a hijacking it is important to point out that the police will assume all persons on board may still constitute a possible threat and thus subsequent treatment by Police., until full identity of all persons on board has been established, may be harsher than

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normally would be expected. After any incident of this nature, crews must expect to have to face official enquiries and severe media/press attention. No statement should be made without permission of the Accountable Manager or his designated deputy and a brief will be made available for your guidance. Comments should be restricted to Personal experience and reaction. Detailed descriptions of the techniques used by either side throughout the incident must be avoided at all costs.

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FLIGHT DISTURBANCE REPORT It must be completed for all disturbances caused by unruly passengers.

FLIGHT DISTURBANCE INCIDENT REPORT


DATE PASSANGER NAME NAME OF COMMANDER CREW MEMBERS SCC CCM 2 CCM 3 CCM4 1. LOCATION OF INCIDENT AISLE SEAT OTHER (SPECIFY) DOOR GALLEY TOILET FLIGHT No ROUTE SEAT No

2. NATURE OF INCIDENT PAX TO PAX PAX TO CREW DAMAGE ENDANGERMENT OF AIRCRAFT 3. SPECIFIC CAUSE (IF KNOWN) ALCOHOL BOMB THREAT DRUG RELATED ELECTRONIC DEVICES OTHER (SPECIFY) 4. SPECIFIC OUTCOME VERBAL ASSAULT OTHER (SPECIFY) 5 MEASURES TAKEN OFF-LOAD PRE-FLIGHT POLICE CALLED PSIHICAL ASSAULT HAND LUGGAGE HIJACK MOBILE PHONE

USE OF WEAPON OTHER (SPECIFY) SEATING SEXUAL OFFENCE SMOKINKG POLICY VERBAL ABUSE

SEAT BELT REGULATION

SEXUAL ASSAULT

WARNING CARD ISSUED UNSCHEDULED LANDING

RESTRAINT APPLIED ARREST MADE

CANCELLATION OF ONWARD TRAVEL DOCUMENTS OTHER (SPECIFY)

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WITNESS No1 NAME ADDRESS WITNESS No2 NAME ADDRESS TIME SEAT No TEL No CREW MEMBER SEAT No TEL No

FLIGHT DISTURBANCE INCIDENT REPORT (personal account to include evidence of intoxication, words spoken, gestures, threats physical or verbal and danger to others)

Captains signature

Level of incident Level I Passenger complies with Cabin Crew request and no further action is required Level II Passenger continues disturbance in spite of Cabin Crew request to comply and crew has to inform flight deck. Issuance of written warning to passenger. Level III Passenger disrupts Cabin Crew duties due continuous interference; and/or a passenger or crew is injured or subjected to a serious threat of injury; and/or restraint device has to be used; and/or a diversion or unscheduled landing is made.
Level of Incident Level I Level II Level III *

* Police officer in Charge (Only completed in case of Level III Incidents)


Name Address MDP-CC-FORM 007 Tel No

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4.12.7. EMERGENCY EVACUATION GENERAL The captain is primarily responsible for the safe operation of the airplane. You are responsible for the passenger's safety within the cabin. You must know emergency procedures. Emergency situations are relatively infrequent, but since they happen quickly, there is rarely time for reading directions on equipment or reviewing basic emergency procedures. Your appearance, attitude and degree of outward composure before, during, and after, is extreme importance in averting passenger anxiety and/or panic. A flight operating under emergency conditions greatly magnifies your responsibility. Many lives have been saved by quick thinking and fast action by cabin crew. It is impossible to compile a list of instructions for use in all emergencies, since no two are exactly alike. Swift and intelligent action is based on your knowledge of cabin safety procedures and use of emergency equipment. Emergency situations are relatively infrequent, but since they happen quickly, there is no time for reading directions on equipment or reviewing the manual. EMERGENCY BRIEFING In order to be fully prepared to handle any type of emergency, the Purser must conduct a pre-flight briefing at the beginning of each sequence. The Purser must conduct an emergency review in every briefing. The review is to include the following: Areas of responsibility for each CCM in an emergency. General emergency questions, such as: Equipment Operation Bracing Positions Evacuation Commands ABP Responsibilities First Aid Situations Cabin crew is responsible for physically checking that all cabin emergency equipment is operable and reported to the SCCM. The Purser is responsible for informing the Captain of any cabin equipment or procedural discrepancy, which is in violation of company, or JAR requirement. It is the captain's responsibility to determine which items is classified as "NO-GO" items for that specific aircraft. However, all crewmembers must be aware of the location of all cabin emergency equipment as outlined on the aircraft diagrams. EMERGENCY EXITS: CONSIDERED AS EMERGENCY EXISTS ARE: COCKPIT CLEARVIEW WINDOWS CABIN DOORS AND HATCHES COCKPIT TO CABIN CALLS IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY THREE CHIMES: Emergency Originating from the cabin or cockpit means immediate emergency. Cockpit and Cabin Crew will communicate on interphone before unlocking cockpit door. SIX CHIMES: Evacuation Originating in the cockpit, it signals CCM to evacuate the cabin immediately.

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EVACUATION PRINCIPLES Passengers and crew shall evacuate the aircraft if they are endangered due to the condition of the aircraft. Every evacuation is a risky procedure and should therefore be performed only when absolutely necessary. Each evacuation should be initiated as quickly as possible after the aircraft has completely stopped, in order to get the passengers-without their hand baggageout of the aircraft and into a safe distance. The aircrew must use common sense and be prepared to modify standard procedures for the best safety advantage, in coping with each situation of danger. CCM who have a clear understanding and working knowledge of standard procedures and emergency equipment will be able to handle such situations with confidence and success. In evacuating personnel from an aircraft on LAND, floor level doors are the PRIMARY exits and over wing exits are SECONDARY. In a DITCHING the over wing exits are the PRIMARY and the floor level doors are SECONDARY. Where a large number of persons are involved, the initial plan should be to use all exits so as to speed the evacuation process. However, when the aircraft has come to rest, such a plan may need to be radically changed, perhaps because of fire in a particular location or, in the ditching situation, the probability of water ingress through one or more of the floor level doors. Floor level doors and/or over wing exits MUST NOT BE UNLOCKED or opened BEFORE IMPACT since they may fly adrift and injure persons in their vicinity. In addition, such fuselage openings can allow FIRE OR WATER in the case of a ditching, immediately to enter the cabin and thus DRASTICALLY REDUCE THE TIME available for PASSENGERS EVACUATION. It is important in any evacuation that measures are taken if time allows to re-position HANDICAPPED PASSENGERS or those who need the assistance of Guardians. These passengers should be the LAST TO LEAVE THE AIRCRAFT allowing the physically fit to EVACUATE THE AIRCRAFT IMMEDIATELY. During evacuation it must be expected that only emergency exit lights are available. Principally, there is a possibility for panic reaction amongst passengers. This has to be avoided by immediate and rigorous action of cabin crew. Evacuation might be performed in the following principles: Without any preparation at all (for example during boarding). Without specific, but after routine preparation (after passenger briefing). After specific preparation in accordance with the specific procedures. This may be necessary because of problems developed in flight that may require an evacuation. The preparation will include crew, passengers, and ground organizations. If an emergency requires an immediate evacuation, it shall be performed according to the "Evacuation Order", irrelevant if it is a prepared or unprepared evacuation. Evacuation guidelines: Be prepared for more than one impact; Evacuation should not be initiated until the aircraft has come to a complete stop; Ensure engines are not running before opening door directly forward or aft of an engine; CC should begin evacuation immediately upon signal from the flight deck crew; CC should follow any additional instruction the cockpit crew may give over the P.A. system; CC should make an independent decision to initiate an evacuation only if there is severe structural damage, a life-threatening situation (fire, smoke, impact

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forces, ditching) or abnormal aircraft attitude exists and there is no response from the cockpit crew; If one CC initiates an evacuation, all CC should follow evacuation procedure immediately; Use positive commands in a strong and forceful voice when directing the evacuation, Take action to speed up hesitant passengers. For hesitant passengers within your reach, push at waist level to move them out through the exit. Do not push at knee or shoulder level. If there are no more passengers approaching your exit and the exit across from you (passenger flow has ceased) take appropriate actions to attract additional passengers to come toward your exit (use strong, loud, positive commands or, if necessary, continue to monitor and protect your exit. CC maintain his/her position in the assist space, keeping the exit path clear to prevent interfering with passenger evacuation. When the assist space is against a vertical surface (such as a partition, lavatory, or galley) keeping the heels and upper back pressed against that surface helps to ensure the CC to stay clear of the exit path. When a crewmember's life is directly and imminently in danger, the crewmember's personal safety should always take priority.

EVACUATION ORDERS The order to evacuate is principally given by the Captain. All commands from cockpit including possible limitations shall be given twice via PA. Because of cockpit activities, there may be a relative long time between stand still of the aircraft and further commands (Cancel Alert", Evacuate"). This should not lead to hasty actions by cabin crew. In case an evacuation is not required, the Captain will give the command: "CANCEL ALERT. For an immediate evacuation the command is: "EVACUATE". After this command the evacuation must be started immediately, cabin crew shout evacuation orders to passengers, and then they open the doors and inflate slides. If due to specific circumstances the Captain cannot declare all exits free for evacuation (i.e. fire on one side) he shall restrict this by the command: "PASSENGER EVACUATION THROUGH ...LEFT/RIGHT HAND-SIDE". However, each CCM eventually has to decide, after carefully check of the actual conditions outside and inside the cabin, whether an exit is usable. After a ditching, the evacuation can be started immediately by cabin crew as soon as the aircraft comes to rest even without an order from the cockpit. DEGREE OF URGENCY IN AIRCRAFT EVACUATION Emergency situations, concerning which there may or will be a need for evacuation procedures, will fall within one of the following categories: UNPLANNED - there is not time at all for preparation prior to the emergency, (it happens during taxi, take-off, or landing) i.e.: a sudden and severe accident occurring during Take-Off and Landing, where an aircraft suffers an unexpected landing gear collapse, or other severe damage on landing and Immediate Evacuation is thought necessary. - Crew has no time to coordinate a course of action with the Captain. - Cabin Crew cannot count on the Flight Crew for notification prior to impact or for instructions and assistance in passenger evacuation. - Most emergency landings are unplanned.

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PLANNED - there is ample time to carry out a full preparation for the emergency (it happens during the flight), i.e.: ditching or crash landing made necessary by operational circumstances, crash landing on an airfield runway due to known or suspected deficiency in the landing gear, or evacuation is expected to be necessary due to Bomb Scare or Fire. - Captain tells crew the nature of the emergency and what he/she wants you to do. - CCMs use cabin preparation procedures for land or water to prepare the cabin. - A planned emergency landing may be precautionary in nature and may not require an evacuation.

INITIATED EVACUATION Flight deck - The cockpit will always initiate the evacuation. The evacuation orders will be given by PA Evacuate, or Evacuate on L/H side or R/H side. If PA is inop, the evacuation signal will be 6 chimes or as pre-established at briefing. If the flight crew has not provided the necessary direction, cabin crew will attempt to contact the flight deck either by interphone or in person. If with no result, SCC will give the order to evacuate. Cabin Crew CCMs may initiate an evacuation under extraordinary circumstances, such as: Severe structural damage; Threatening fire or smoke; Ditching; Obvious danger for pax; No response from the flight deck. If no answer from cockpit, and safety is jeopardized, SCC picks up PA and announce Evacuate. If under the above mentioned circumstances no command is given by SCC (i.e. incapacitated/injured) ever, CCM may start the evacuation. Other CC assess their environment and conduct evacuation by saying "Open seatbelts and get out". Remember that redirection may be needed if an exit is not safe to evacuate from. Therefore, be careful when saying "Come this way" because you may have to say "Exit Blocked, go back" or "Exit blocked, go across the aisle", etc. When an evacuation is not warranted, an announcement, i.e. "Remain seated will be given. EXTRA CREW MEMBERS REDEPLOYMENT Where crew members additional to the basic minimum are carried, they must occupy passengers seats adjacent to aircraft exits in case of a premeditated ditching or crash landing situation. If its necessary, they must replace passengers already seated at emergency exits. SUPERNUMERARY CREW ABOARD When supernumerary crewmembers (deadheading crew or other aircrew positioning in company aircraft) are carried, they should remain inactive in emergency situations until briefed otherwise by Captain or CCM. This is so that any activities they might undertake should not hinder or interfere with the proper drill as being effected by the official crew. However, it is best that such persons should contribute in such cases by assisting the crew in an orderly way. INITIAL EMERGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT If time permits, a clear announcement must be made to the passengers, which indicates the nature of the emergency situation and the intended course of action. Note that such an announcement must dispense with introductory courtesies if time is short.

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Captains Emergency Announcements As soon as possible after circumstances indicate that a crash landing or ditching is likely, the Captain should make the Captains Emergency Announcement. This announcement should be made on the PA system, or if its inoperable, another CCM should use the megaphone and inform passengers. CREW TASKS FLIGHT CREW In the preparation phase of a crash/ditching emergency, the operating crew will be preoccupied with the handling and configuration of the aircraft, in accordance with the Emergency Checklist. Because of this, they cannot be expected to contribute much to the cabin preparation procedure. If time allows, it is desirable that at least one operating crew member, preferably the captain, should make the announcement. Warn and advise SCCM. This must be done as soon as possible after the onset of the emergency. This advice (TESTS, NITS) must include: the nature of emergency and estimated time to impact, if the Captain will make his own Emergency Announcement or will require the announcement to be made by cabin crew, whether post-impact sustenance will be critical, and in case of ditching, if any emergency equipment or personnel should be repositioned before impact. BRIEFING AND PREPARATION OF PASSENGERS The amount of time available for briefing and preparation of passengers will depend upon the nature of the aircraft emergency. However, as the time of impact approaches or, when the need for actual evacuation procedures arises, whether suddenly or not, it is essential that crew members adopt an authoritative attitude to impress the passengers with the need to obey orders promptly. In any situation of possible airfield emergency, crash landing or ditching, as much of the full appropriate briefing and preparation as time allows should be given. Cabin crew action SCC turns cabin lights to Bright and reads emergency announcements from forward PA. When safety and emergency items are being demonstrated to the passengers as required in the emergency announcement, all CCMs should be positioned in their demo positions. Emergency announcements Location of exits Life line Baggage stowed. Cloths put on. Necktie and collars released. Sharp objects (spectacles, false teeth, ball point pens, etc.) removed. High heel shoes removed (ladies). Life Vest put on (prepared ditching). Seat belt securely fastened. Tray table and seat back secured in vertical position. Demonstrations Exits Emergency lights (Light Line/Light Path). Life vest location, donning, and inflation (prepared ditching). Brace position.

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Passenger assistance CCMs will distribute pillows and blankets for head protection. Each CCM will brief Special Needs Passengers and their attendants in her/his assigned area of responsibility. Each CCM will brief 3 PSPs for each exit. Each CCM will help mothers to prepare the infant/ child (will show how to hold the infant for more protection, will wrap the child in blankets, will don the life vest). Cabin preparation Exits and aisles free of obstacles. Cabin baggage securely stowed (overhead bins latched). Galleys secured (power off, loose items securely stored, carts secured) Toilets checked (nobody in) and locked. Window blinds pulled up. Cabin Lights dimmed. Compliance checks When passenger preparation is ready, all CCMs will make a compliance check and will report to SCC. SCC will make a final compliance check and will report to captain Cabin ready for emergency landing/ditching". Pre-Selected Passengers A Pre-Selected Passenger (PSP) is a passenger that is selected to assist in an emergency evacuation. PSP should: Be physically fit. Speak the same language. Not be of a nervous disposition. Traveling without children. Not drunk. Look authoritative. Be willing to help. Be over the age of 16. Police officers, firefighters, military personnel, or other crewmembers are all excellent candidates for selection. BRACE POSITIONS When anticipating any emergency situation, passengers must be advised when to brace, how long to brace and how to brace. Brace Positions There are two reasons for establishing brace positions: To reduce flailing of the body during an impact To reduce secondary impact In planned emergencies, bracing should be under-taken when the command is announced from the flight deck (e.g., Brace, Brace). In unanticipated emergencies, it is possible that no command will be announced from the flight deck. Cabin crew should always be prepared to give passengers commands (e.g., Bend Down, Stay Down). All bracing positions should be maintained until the airplane has come to a final stop. The following figure and table describe example standard brace positions: Captain's signal to assume the brace position will be a PA announcement to "Brace, Brace" or 3 bells. CCMs will then begin shouting commands to passengers to brace.

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Adult pax brace position Fasten your seatbelt tight. Push the seatback in front of you as forward as you can. Lean forward as possible, cross your arms, put over your head and lean on the seatback in front of you. Separate your legs as much as possible and step on the floor tight.
Direction of Aircraft

Alternative brace positions For passengers seated in front of a bulkhead or by an Emergency Exit. This position is also suitable for children. Seat back upright. Seat belt securely fastened, tray table stowed. Feet placed flat on the floor as far back as possible. Put something covering on your knees. Put your face on the cover. Lean forward and hold your knees.

Mother and child brace position Seat back must be upright, seat belts fastened. Place the feet flat on the floor as far back as possible with knees together. Lay the child across the lap with one arm supporting the child's head. The mother should lean forward over the child and protect her own head with the other arm.

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Alternative brace position for pregnant women Stack pillows/blankets on lap. Have passenger rest head on pillows and hold knees. Stack pillows/blankets on lap. Have passenger cross arms and lean forward with palms of hands against the back of the seat in front.

CABIN CREW FWD FACING JUMP SEAT: Seat belt and shoulder harness securely fastened with buckle in centre of lap and as low as possible. Feet slightly apart/flat on the floor for stability. BEND DOWN, HEAD DOWN Hands may be placed under hips, palms up or arms may be folded and locked (not holding on to harness). AFT FACING JUMP SEAT: Seat belt and shoulder harness securely fastened with buckle in centre of lap and as low as possible. Feet slightly apart/flat on the floor for stability. Head positioned solidly against headrest. Hands may be placed under hips, palms up or arms may be folded and locked (not holding onto harness)

EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT STOWAGE Generally, it is not Company policy for emergency equipment to be unshipped from stowage before impact. This is because it is thought that the danger of injury to personnel, from loose items of equipment flying about, is more critical than the small additional time needed to unship items after the aircraft has stopped. However, in cases of ditching in bad sea conditions, it may be that the captain will order that certain survival equipment be moved from the normal storages to prevent its loss in the event of fuselage break-up.

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PREFFERED USE OF EXITS/EXIT OPERATION All CCMs must realize that the Captain is in complete charge of the aircraft, and their orders are to be obeyed, even if they may be at variance with written instructions. Immediately notify the Captain of an emergency or dangerous situation. Availability of various exits differs from one situation to another. The CCMs must make the decision to which exits would be the most preferable to use under the prevailing circumstances. For example, circumstances may suggest or window exits would be preferable instead of door exits. In an emergency evacuation, you must assess personal risk and determine a course of action that is safe, realistic to the situation at hand, and facilitate the evacuation of as many occupants as possible. Move to the outside of the aircraft when it is no longer safe to assist the evacuation from inside or when there is an imminent danger of personal harm by staying to further assist passengers. Generally, each CCM position is given more than one exit choice. The first choice exit SHOULD be reported to first. The second, when listed, is to be considered for the following reasons: 1. The first exit is blocked. You could either operate the next exit indicated (conditions permitting) if it is unmanned by a CCM or assist as needed if it is already being manned. If getting to the exit indicated would involve moving through the cabin, but other exits/points of egress in the area are available and danger is imminent (e.g. cabin filling with smoke), move to the nearest available exit and assist as needed. 2. Once you have established evacuation flow at the first exit indicated, you SHOULD also attempt to operate the second exit indicated, provided: it is in the same area; it is not already manned; conditions permit; and doing so would expedite the evacuation without endangering yourself If your specified exit(s) are blocked, or moving to them is not possible without placing yourself in danger, be as helpful as possible in the evacuation, using your best judgment in determining how you can assure your own safety. An effective means of "assisting as needed" (if smoke is not present) is to step up on a seat located out of the flow of traffic to observe evacuation flow. If bottlenecks exist, shout or use megaphone to give commands that will direct passengers to exits that are not being used to their potential. Remember, every evacuation is unique, and your good judgment is an important element. DIRECTING PASSENGERS FROM UNUSABLE EXITS Open door or exit if safe to use. If door opens normally, verify evacuation device properly deployed and absence of hazards in the evacuation area. If door cannot or should not be opened, re-direct passengers to an appropriate alternative exit. If evacuation device does not deploy, deploys abnormally, or does not inflate, or if a hazardous condition exits on the ground, re-direct passengers. Inform passengers why exit will not be used, e.g. Fire outside", Door jammed", No slide". Direct passengers to nearest usable exit. Do not spend undue time and effort on passengers directly in front of you, as they will be unable to move immediately because of passengers accumulated behind them. If active exits exist both forward and aft of the unusable exit, direct a suitable number of passengers in each direction. As flow is established toward active door(s), move forward/aft clearing galley or aisle areas in front of you. If necessary climb over the backs of unoccupied seats to assist in clearing any blockage that may occur to the flow. EVACUATING PASSENGERS Passengers will be evacuated in the order of their arrival at the exit. Most probably, this

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order will be: adults, passengers with children, infants, elderly pax, PRM, stretcher cases.

EVACUATING DISABLED PAX AND THEIR ATTENDANTS Disabled, handicapped, and invalid passengers shall be the last ones to evacuate Notwithstanding natural human compassion for the handicapped, it must be accepted that their disabilities must not be allowed to prejudice the survival chances of other passengers. In any evacuation procedure, the object must be to get the maximum possible number of passengers out of the aircraft as quickly as possible. Studies have shown that the best way for the disabled to evacuate is via the escape slide, feet first, using the sit and scoot method. Under most conditions, canes and crutches should remain stowed along with other personal belongings. BUDDY" SYSTEM Unless a friend accompanies a handicapped passenger or relative, it is necessary to appoint a buddy" from among the other passengers, to help him/her leave the aircraft - generally after all the others have already left. This is asking a lot and it is necessary to be prepared for refusals. Little can be said about the selection of buddies" other than it is, perhaps, best left to cabin crews' own knowledge of the psychology of their passengers. EVACUATING ANIMALS Evacuating Seeing Eye Dogs Passengers with Seeing Eye Dogs should place them on their lap, to avoid burning the pads on the dog's paws, and go down the slide together. Evacuating Pets Passengers with carry-on pets should leave them in the carrier, place the carrier on their lap, and go down the slide together. EVACUATION OF UNCONSCIOUS PILOTS 1. Restrain his hands in the harness. Move the pilot's seat to the aft position. Forward and aft movement is controlled by a vertical lever or by an adjustment handle, on the aisle of the seat. If it is by an adjustment handle, there will be three on an aisle panel on the side of the seat. The center handle will move the seat forward or aft. In the event of an aisle side floor mounted vertical lever, pull lever aft seat will slide fwd or aft. 2. Remove any headsets and/or oxygen masks from the pilot and move them out of the way. 3. Open the seat belt. This will operate on an inertia reel that connects all the seat belt and shoulder harness straps. Rotate the reel to release the straps. 4. If possible, enlist the assistance of a PSP. 5. Reach under the arms of the unconscious pilot and grasp the pilot's wrists. To avoid injury to yourself, do not attempt to lift the pilot. 6. Drag the pilot sideways from the seat and lower the pilot to the floor. With the legs free, drag the pilot to the nearest usable exit. 7. If evacuating down the slide, have a PSP place the unconscious pilot between their

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legs, go down the slide, and take the pilot away from the aircraft. 8. If evacuating to a raft, drag the pilot to the closest floor level exit and hand the pilot to a PSP inside the raft. FLIGHT DECK WINDOW EVACUATION PROCEDURES Sit on windowsill. Hold on to the escape rope. Lower to the ground hand-under-hand. Get away from the plane.

CROWD CONTROL IN EVACUATION Aside from adherence to laid down drills and procedures, successful emergency evacuation of passengers from an aircraft requires also an understanding, by aircrew, of crowd control. Generally, courtesies must be dispensed with authority firmly reasserted from the outset. As soon as the aircraft has come to a complete stop, make a firm statement by PA, megaphone or even voice, e.g. Open seat belts", Leave everything". When supervising evacuation through a door or exit, stand to the side of it so as not to obstruct any part of the exit area. Make verbal contact with the approaching passengers as far back in the galley area or aisle as is possible. Maintain contact to the point where you

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are sure they have made a positive commitment to jump out of the door. Use whatever physical and verbal measures are necessary to keep the passengers moving. Do not interfere with passengers who are moving rapidly towards a door or if they appear to be accelerating as they approach the door. At this stage, do not interfere with a passenger who may be carrying a small item such as a handbag or briefcase unless it is of such size that it is likely to impede the flow. Attempt to establish a sustained rate of one or more passengers per second through the door. If irregularities in the passenger flow occur, re-establish even flow as soon as possible. When using escape slides, if a passenger sits down in the doorway and pauses for too long, physically push him/her on to the slide. Remain as far to the side of the traffic lane as possible while still getting enough leverage to apply the required force to move the passenger. Use whatever means are necessary to establish normal flow rates. Return to station as quickly as possible. All instructions given to passengers as they reach the area of the door should be short, concise and directive; delivered in a forceful, positive and authoritative manner, e.g. Jump.....Jump.......Jump", Jump and slide", Move faster - hurry", Stay close together". Avoid using negative commands such as: "Do not grab the sides", Don't wait, Do not hesitate". As the passenger flow to your exit diminishes, check the distribution of passengers at other exits. If a delay has developed at an adjacent door, direct an appropriate number of passengers to your exit. Before deciding that some should be re-directed to your door, remember that by the time you can get them to your door and to the ground, at least 20 passengers could be probably evacuated via another door. After Evacuation When flow of passengers to your door is depleted, quickly check activity at all other exits. If a trouble area exists, take action to assist. If no problems are apparent then make your own exit. Once on the ground direct passengers to a secure and area well away from the aircraft and give any aid that may be necessary and practicable. Morale It is absolutely essential, that by their calm demeanor, behavior, and example, all crewmembers inspire confidence in their ability to make a successful ditching/ crash landing and evacuation, and an early rescue. Nothing assists the individual more to achieve this than a thorough knowledge of the procedures, drills, and equipment concerned with emergency situations. 4.12.7.1. UNPLANNED EMERGENCY EVACUATION - LAND Minimum time to prepare. This situation will most likely occur during takeoff or landing. The Captain's signal for CCM to begin commands will be a PA announcement using the words "Brace! Brace! Brace!" or, in the event the PA is inoperable, three (3) bells (CCM are to be in their jump seats, in brace position with seatbelts and shoulder harnesses on, for each take off and landing). In an unplanned emergency, CCM will prepare passengers for an immediate emergency landing by shouting commands: "Bend Down, Stay Down!" Once the A/C has come to a complete stop, the Captain's signal to all cabin crew to evacuate will be a PA announcement using the words "Evacuate! Evacuate! Evacuate!" or six (6) bells. Emergency landings or other abnormal conditions do not always require an evacuation. The cockpit will evaluate the situation, and initiate an evacuation if deemed necessary. If the Captain decides that an evacuation is unwarranted, he will command the passengers and crew to "Remain seated!" CCM will shout the command "Remain seated!" until they have

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passenger compliance, and will then reassure the passengers. (Remember that the P.A. System operates on emergency power and may be available.) The pilots' first priority is to maintain control of the A/C and communication with the cockpit may not be possible. Once the aircraft has come to a complete stop, CCM must be aggressive in recognizing an emergency and initiate an immediate evacuation if fire, dense smoke or fuselage break-up are present. Advise the Captain, either via the interphone or three-(3) bell signal, if feasible. Passenger Initiated Unwarranted Evacuation Most passenger-initiated evacuations are unwarranted and must be stopped immediately. Cabin Crew Procedures Immediately notify Flight Crew (will prevent further aircraft movement) providing specifics (e.g. exits being used, number of passengers outside) and receive instructions. Make an announcement to the passengers to stay seated. Proceed to the scene of the unwarranted evacuation and make every attempt to halt the evacuation process. If Captain orders it, use repeated positive commands, by PA such as: "STOP! STAY SEATED! STATI! RAMANETI PE LOCURI!" taking full command of the situation. If pax have already evacuated, one Cabin Crewmember should exit to assist, conditions permitting. Exercise extreme caution when exiting and ensure another crewmember or PSP is blocking the exit(s) from further use. Shout commands for the passengers to stay in a group. Direct them to a safe area, if applicable. The other CCMs in the cabin assist in restoring order in the cabin. Obtain assistance from a Flight Crewmember, if necessary. The outside Cabin Crewmembers provides an assessment of the situation to the inside CC, or to the Flight Crew directly, if possible. Await further instructions from the Captain. 4.12.7.2. PREPARED EMERGENCY EVACUATION - LAND Planned Land Evacuation The preferred emergency signal between the flight deck and the cabin is a PA requesting "Purser to the cockpit", or three (3) bells if an announcement is not possible. SCC will go directly to the cockpit to obtain information from the Captain. The other cabin crewmembers will start securing the cabin and galley, check their assigned exits, retrieve their Emergency Checklists, and prepare for emergency briefing with SCCM. All CC should be ready to prepare the cabin for a planned emergency landing. STEP 1: OBTAIN INFORMATION FROM CAPTAIN T: Type of emergency: you must be aware of the problem and how it will affect the evacuation. E: Evacuation is necessary? Not all landings require evacuation. S: Special instructions? Topography (land, sea, mountains), weather, or the expected landing position. T: Time remaining to prepare? Gauge your actions accordingly. S: Signal to Brace and to Evacuate? The Captain will make an announcement to "Brace. Upon landing, the Captain will order "Evacuate or if no danger "Remain seated". The Cabin Crew should initiate an immediate evacuation if fire, dense smoke or

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fuselage break up are present by shouting: "Evacuate! Evacuate! STEP 2: BRIEF OTHER CABIN CREWMEMBERS Brief other Cabin Crewmembers out of sight of passengers. Calm yourselves, get organized, and remain in control. STEP 3: TURN CABIN LIGHTS TO BRIGHT Captain will make announcement, advising passengers of emergency (unless he informs you otherwise). If possible, the cabin crew should be in full view of passengers during the advisory announcement (in order to monitor passengers and to discover any sign of incipient panic). STEP 4: EMERGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT MUST CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING Fasten seatbelts Place seatbacks in upright position Stow carry-on baggage Review exit location Review appropriate emergency equipment CC must be in demo positions in the cabin BRACE POSITION DEMO CC should be sitting on seatbacks to increase visibility. NOTE: SCC should check to see that all Cabin Crewmembers are coordinating their demos with the announcements. Allow enough remaining time for them to complete cabin checks. STEP 5: SECURE CABIN AND GALLEY SCC and no.3: lock all lavatories, close and secure all overhead compartments. CC no.2: pull out galley circuit breakers CC no.2 and 3: secure galley supplies and loose equipment. SCCM, CCM 2, CCM3, and CCM 4 secure all carry-on baggage away from aisle. STEP 6: RESEAT SPECIAL PASSENGERS AND PSPs with captains approval Reseat PRMs and special needs passengers near floor exits. Each Cabin Crewmember will select 3 PSPs for their primary exit. STEP 7: SET UP "BUDDY" SYSTEM: Designate assistants, or "Buddies", for passengers who need assistance due to injury, disability, panic, or age. Keep families seated close each other. STEP 8: PASSENGERS PREPARATION: Have passengers remove jewelry and sharp objects (glasses, pens, watches, ties, scarves, high heeled shoes, prosthesis). Place such items in an airsick bag and stow in seat back pocket. Distribute pillows and blankets for mothers with infants. Time permitting, have passengers practice bracing positions. STEP 9: BRIEF PSPs Select and brief 3 PSPs for each exit. If a PSP becomes confused or he panics, have him/her sit down, then select other PSP.

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STEP 10: PERSONAL PREPARATION Remove loose articles of clothing, nylon stockings, and jewelry. Confirm with all CC that cabin is secured SCC adapts the lights to the outside conditions. STEP 11: CABIN READY Advise the Captain that the cabin is secure. Cabin Crewmembers secure themselves in their assigned jump seats and assume brace positions when ordered by Captain. STEP 12: SIGNAL TO BRACE/SILENT REVIEW Begin silent review of: Location and operation of exits. Location and operation of emergency equipment. Evacuation commands. BRACE FOR IMPACT "30 SECONDS TO LAND BRACE BRACE" As it might not be possible that the brace signal will be given by the cockpit at this time the cabin crew must take up their own brace position and signal to the passengers to brace. All cabin crew must try to synchronies their commands, thereby amplifying and intensifying the instruction. Crew must keep shouting until the aircraft comes to a complete stop. GUARDIAN/BUDDY BRIEFING The cabin crew should: Select and seat a guardian next to special needs passengers to assist them; Brief the guardian on assisting unaccompanied minors, elderly, disabled or injured passengers; to assist passengers sliding down the wing flaps; Advice the parents to take their infants on their laps, hold them with one arm, the other arm stretched forward. Note: Children slide between the legs of their parents or accompanying person. PRE-SELECTED PASSENGERS BRIEFINGS SCC briefs 3 PSPs for L1 CCM 4 briefs 3 PSPs for R1 CCM 3 briefs 3 PSPs for L2 Time is critical in any emergency; therefore, time must be carefully monitored and used with the utmost efficiency. Briefing each PSP is very important. Information must be presented quickly and effectively. To insure understanding of their duties, have the PSPs repeat their duties when you are finished. EXIT/DOORS To all PSPs: "When the aircraft comes to a complete and final stop. Listen for the commands Evacuate or Open seatbelts". Briefing for PSP no. 1: Look at PSP. Make eye contact as you assign duties. "You are number 1. I will open the door, then you will JUMP AND SLIDE down the slide, get away from the plane and call other people to you. Keep them away from the plane. If I am unable to open the door, follow these instructions: - Look out the window for danger, smoke, fire or obstruction - If exit is not safe - turn around and send passengers to a safe exit

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- If exit is safe - with two hands, rotate handle in direction of arrow (aft to forward). Door will came in at hinge, then push door out. Hold the assist handle so that you do not get pushed out. With your other hand, keep pushing the door until it is fully opened and locks against the airplane. The slide will release from the slide pack. - Reach down and pull red inflation handle on the right side of the metal bar (point to girt bar) to inflate the slide (it will take 5 to 7 seconds). - Direct passengers to come to you, leave their luggage. JUMP and SLIDE down the slide, and to get away from the plane. - Repeat your duties to me Briefing for PSP no.2 and no. 3: Look at PSPs. Make eye contact as you assign duties. "You are number 2 and you are number 3. Number 2, you will stand facing the cabin and shout: "Stand back! Stand back! - If exit is not safe - turn around and send passengers to a safe exit - If exit is safe - you will be the first to JUMP AND SLIDE down the slide. - After you go down the slide - stay at the bottom. Help people off the slide and send them away from the aircraft. - Repeat your duties to me. Number 3, you will stay facing the cabin and keep passengers back until the door is opened. - If exit is not safe - turn around and send passengers to a safe exit - If exit is safe - you will be the second to JUMP AND SLIDE down the slide. - After you go down the slide - stay at the bottom. Help people and send hem away from the aircraft. - If I am injured-number 3, you will open my seatbelt and shoulder harness (give specific instructions on operation of seatbelt and shoulder harness) and remove me from my jumpseat. You will take me down the slide and tell someone to take me away from the plane - Repeat your duties to me. TAILCONE EXIT CCM 2 briefs 3 PSPs for Tailcone Exit To all PSPs: "When the aircraft comes to a complete and final stop. Listen for the commands Evacuate or Open seatbelts Briefing for PSP no.l: Look at PSP. Make eye contact as you give each their duties. "You are number l. If I am unable to open the door, follow these instructions: - Look out the window for danger, smoke, fire or obstruction. - If exit is not safe - turn around and send passengers to a safe exit. - If exit is safe - rotate handle from left to right. The door will come in and secure against lavatory wall and the Tailcone will fall off. The slide inflates automatically. Tell number 2 and number 3 to hold people back. If slide does not inflate, stay low and shuffle to the end of the Tailcone. Pull the handle located between your knee and waist on the right side. If the slide does not inflate, pull up and back on the strap located on the slide pack cover, then pull the manual inflation handle. - Turn back toward the cabin, and stand on the right platform (hold on to a solid structure). Call passengers to you. Tell them to leave their luggage, JUMP and SLIDE down the slide, and to get away from the plane. - Repeat your duties to me.

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Briefing for PSPs no. 2 and no. 3: Look at PSPs. Make eye contact with them as you give each their duties You are number 2 and you are number 3. - If the exit is not safe - turn round and send passengers to a safe exit. - If exit is safe - Enter the Tailcone. Stay low. You will be the first ones to JUMP and SLIDE down the slide. You will stay at the bottom, help passengers off the slide and send them away from me plane. - If I am injured - number 3, you will open my seatbelt and shoulder harness (give specific instructions on operation of seatbelt and shoulder harness) and remove me from my jumpseat. Enter the Tailcone. Stay low. You will take me down the slide and tell someone to take me away from me plane. - Repeat your duties to me". OVERWING EXITS There are 8 total PSPs for the overwing exits (OWEs). They should be briefed and positioned as follows: CCM 3 - 2 PSPs for the left FWD OWE and 2 PSPs for the right FWD OWE. - 2 PSPs for the right AFT OWE and 2 PSPs for the left AFT OWE (1 to open the exit and 1 to hold back the passengers for each OWE). Briefing for PSP no. 1 and no. 2 Look at PSPs. Make eye contact with them as you give each their duties. You are number 1 and number 2. - You will be seated next to the window exit. - When the aircraft comes to a complete and final stop, listen for the commands: "Evacuate!" Open seatbelts!" - If exit is not safe - turn around and send passengers to a safe exit. - If exit is safe - you, number 1: Look out the window for danger, smoke, fire or obstruction. Feel the surface of the window with the back of your hands lo check for extreme heat. Face the back of the /. Use the hand closest to the aisle - grasp the upper pull lever and pull. Place other hand in lower handhold. Lift window slightly and throw it out. You will go out the window, you will sit and slide off the wing. Help passengers off the wing and away from the A/C - you, number 2: You will hold passengers back until the exit is open. You will jump onto a seat next to the OWE to assist with passenger evacuation. Call passengers to you and send them out of the window, Leg, body, leg. Tell them to leave their luggage, to slide off the back of the wing and to get away from the plane. - Repeat your duties to me. INDIVIDUAL EVACUATION DUTIES STANDARD CABIN CREW EXIT L1 - SCCM Turn on Emergency Lights Switch. Command first passenger approaching the exit "You! Hold people back!" Assess outside conditions. Open door and pull manual inflation handle to inflate slide (secure yourself by holding onto assist handle). Grab flashlight with other hand.

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Shout Commands: "Come this way!" "Leave everything!" Instruct 2 passengers, "You and you, stay at the bottom and send people away!" Command door evacuation: "Jump and slide!" "Get away from the plane!" Check on Flight Crew. If both are unconscious, have PSP assist you in evacuating them. Take megaphone, medical kit and flashlight and evacuate.

TAILCONE EXIT CCM 2 Command first passenger approaching exit "You hold people back!" Assess conditions. Open door. Take flashlight, stay low and shuffle to the end of the Tailcone. If Tailcone does not deploy, pull the handle located between your knees and your waist on your right. If the slide does not deploy automatically, pull up and back on the manual deployment strap on the slide pack, than pull inflation handle. Stand on platform (aircraft right). Hold onto solid structure. Assess conditions. Shout commands: "Come this way! "Leave everything" Instruct 2 passengers "You and you, stay at the bottom and send people away! Take megaphone and evacuate. EXIT L2 EXIT R1 - CCM 3 Command first passenger approaching exit "You hold people back!" Assess conditions at door. Open door and pull manual inflation handle to inflate slide (secure yourself by holding onto assist handle). Shout Commands: "Come this way!" "Leave everything!" Instruct 2 passengers, "You and you, stay at the bottom and send people away" Command door evacuation: "Jump and slide!" "Get away from the plane!" Take first aid kit(s) and flashlight and evacuate. CCM 4 Command first passenger approaching exit "You! Hold people back!" Assess outside conditions. Open door and pull manual inflation handle to inflate slide (secure yourself by holding onto assist handle). Grab flashlight with other hand. Shout Commands: "me this way!" "Leave everything! Instruct 2 passengers, "You and you, stay at the bottom and send people away!" Command door evacuation: "Jump and slide!" "Get away from the plane!" Check on Flight Crew. If both are unconscious, have PSP assist you in evacuating them. Take first aid kit and flashlight and evacuate.

OVERWING/WINDOW EXITS (Secondary Exits: ALL) If unable to reach windows, shout instructions to passengers for window removal. Assess conditions as you proceed to window exit look for smoke, fire or any

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obstruction. Proceed to window exits shouting: "Get out of my way!" "Coming through!" Instruct passengers nearest window exits "you hold people back!" Assess conditions at window exit (Feel window with back of hands. Look outside window). Face AFT. Pull window in with handle at top of window and throw it out the window. Shout commands: "Leg, body, leg! "Slide of the wing!" "Get away from the plane!"

FLIGHT CREW DUTIES Captain Assist all crewmembers in evacuating passengers and opening unused exits. When all passengers/crew have evacuated, or it is no longer safe to stay, leaves the aircraft and take command of situation outside of the aircraft First Officer Assist in opening unused exits and, as soon as possible, leaves the aircraft and direct passengers away from the aircraft. 4.12.7.3. EVACUATION COMMANDS The following commands must be memorized for use in an evacuation. BEFORE TOUCH DOWN "Brace, Brace! Bend down! Stay down! Brace, brace! Capul jos! Stati aplecati!, - before touch down, when the Captain commands "Brace! Brace! Brace!" or a three-bell signal is given (as established in TESTS briefing). AFTER EVACUATION ORDER "Emergency! Open seatbelts!"- "Pericol! Desfaceti centurile!" - This command should be given to initiate the evacuation. "You! Hold people back!" Tu! Tine pasagerii pe loc! - This command is used to get the first passenger to hold other passengers back so that the Cabin crewmember can get the exit open. "Evacuate! Come this way!" - "lesiti! Veniti aici!" -This command should be given to direct passengers to a usable exit "Leave everything!"- "Lasati bagajele!" - The Cabin Crew will use this command to prevent passengers from bringing any on items with them during an evacuation. AS PASSENGERS GO THROUGH EXIT DOORS "Stand Back. Stand Back!"- "Inapoi, inapoi!" - The Cabin Crew will use this command to keep passengers away from exit so the door can be opened. "Jump and slide!"- "Sariti si alunecati!" - Inform passengers of how to go down the slide quickly. OVERWING EXITS "Leg, body, leg!"- "Intai un picior si dupa aceea, restul corpului!" - Instruct evacuation at the over wing exit or Hatch exit by commanding passengers to move through the exit Leg, body, leg, then their body, then their other leg. "Sit and slide!"-"Asezati-va si alunecati!" - To instruct the passenger to go off the wing. Point direction to go. When Exit Is Unusable "Go that way!"- "Mergeti acolo!" - To offer passengers direction to another exit, in the event that an exit is blocked. To Move From One Exit To Another

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"Get out of my way! Coming through!" - "La parte! Trebuie sa trec!" This is used by the CCs if they have to get to a secondary exit. To First Two Passengers As They approach Exit (Select replacement PSP(s) if one or both PSP(s) run and leave the bottom of the slide/wing.) "You and you, stay at the bottom and send people away!" - "Tu si tu, stati langa tobogan si indepartati pasagerii!" - This command should be given to passenger assistants when they approach all exits. AFTER EVACUATION "Run away from aircraft!"- "Fugiti de langa avion! - This command should be given as passengers exit the aircraft to send them away from the aircraft area. HAND-HELD SLIDE PROCEDURES If door slide fails to inflate, but the exit must be used: Select four Pre-Selected Passengers. One PSP climbs down the edge of the slide, followed by a second PSP. The selected PSPs grasp the sides of the slide at the bottom. Two more PSPs slide down the hand-held slide and then grasp the sides of the slide at mid-level. Direct passengers down hand-held slide, and away from aircraft. Order to Passengers to "Sit and Slide" DUTIES FOLLOWING EVACUATION: ALL Assemble passengers approximately 100m upwind of the plane. Complete headcount of the crew and passengers. Administer first aid and treat for shock. Keep passengers from returning to aircraft. Keep passengers from smoking.

4.12.7.4. UNPLANNED DITCHING In any unprepared emergency the reaction of the cabin crewmembers will depend largely on their situational awareness skills: The ability to identify an abnormal situation and react accordingly. When preparing for take-off and landing, the use of the "Silent Review" will heighten crewmembers' situational awareness skills, and prepare them for the unexpected. When departing or arriving to a destination that involves flying over water, some ditching information in to the "Silent Review" should be included. Think about the extra information that will need to be given to passengers, for example, the use of equipment. What commands should be used? What should be looked for, when assessing conditions? What would determine the exits, usable/unusable? What equipment should be used? How to use the slide? What equipment to take? How to manage passengers in the water? The impact phase As with any unplanned impact, one of the first actions crewmembers will need to take is to shout the commands BEND DOWN, STAY DOWN, HOLD YOUR FEET". This will reduce the amount of injury to the passengers, and give them a better chance of being able to evacuate the aircraft and survive. Remember, there maybe be more than one impact,

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everyone will need to remain in the "Brace" position until the aircraft finally comes to a complete stop. If the cabin is flooding, or water is visible, start evacuating the aircraft immediately. Crewmembers should immediately don their life vests, and simultaneously shout commands to passengers to "Release seatbelts", "Get life vests", "Come this way". The flight crew may give the command to evacuate with instructions of which exits may be usable or unusable. Listen for specific instructions from the flight crew. The cabin crew must communicate to establish the status of all the exits. Crewmembers must use whatever means available to communicate: Use the megaphone, or shout, whatever it takes. When assessing the conditions before exiting the aircraft, it will be necessary to determine if the aircraft is floating, sinking, and, the water level is present at exits. This information will determine the actions that the cabin crew will take. 4.12.7.5. PLANNED DITCHING GENERAL According with OPS 1.835 Survival Equipment for extended over water flights, Medallion Air will provide and carry on board sufficient life-rafts to carry all persons on board. Unless excess rafts of enough capacity are provided, the buoyancy and seating capacity beyond the rated capacity of the rafts must accommodate all occupants of the airplane in the event of a loss of one raft of the largest rated capacity. The life-rafts shall be equipped with: A survivor locator light Life saving equipment including means of sustaining life as appropriate to the flight to be undertaken; At least two survival Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELT(S) capable of transmitting on the distress frequencies pre-scribed in ICAO Annex10, Volume V, Chapter 2. For Medallion Air non extended over water flights the aircrafts will carry on board all the emergency equipment designed to enable passengers and crew to survive a water landing and evacuation as for no more than 30 minutes of flight at cruising speed or 100 nautical miles. To all Medallion Air flights, the safety demonstration of the life vests is mandatory, even if the flight does not undergo over water as written on the previous paragraph. This measure was taken in the interests of safety in case of an emergency landing at one of the alternate airports on or off route. Water landings present additional problems; the greatest is that the impact may be more violent than a land impact. Securing the passengers and their carry-on items is imperative. Avoid passenger panic by giving them information and responsibilities, especially at night when visibility is at a minimum. Once the aircraft is in the water, the transfer of passengers into the rafts or into the water is critical. Aircraft have floated 3, 5, 6, 20 minutes, others an hour or more. It is not safe to assume an arbitrary time value for escape. After immediate assessment of conditions, evacuation should proceed as rapidly and orderly as possible. Your training, preparation, and leadership abilities will minimize panic and maximize the success of the water evacuation. A planned water landing allows time to prepare for evacuation onto the water. The cockpit

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crew will alert Cabin Crew that an emergency situation exists and crew and passenger coordination will begin. The aircraft is expected to float in a manner favorable to the safe evacuation of the occupants unless major structural damage has occurred. Prepare the cabin using the aircraft-specific cabin preparation for ditching. The primary flotation device for all occupants is the life vest. Evacuation at Sea The following are suggested items for the crew to consider when preparing to evacuate the aircraft following a sea ditching: Determine the water level outside the aircraft Determine the water level inside the aircraft If water level is close to the doorsill, slide/life rafts can be detached and moved to a useable exit Some exits may be unusable due to the aircrafts attitude in the water. Emergency Equipment For Over water Operation (OPS 1.830 & 1.825) Emergency Flotation Means Non-over water equipped aircraft should include the following flotation equipment: - Crew life vests - Passenger seat cushions - Slides Partially over water equipped aircraft should include the following floatation equipment: - Crew life vests - Passenger life vests - Passenger seat cushions - Slides Over water equipped aircraft should include the following floatation equipment: - Crew life vests - Passenger life vests - Extra life vests - Child life vests - Passenger seat cushions - Slide/life raft combination - Life raft - Survival kit - Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) Captain notifies Cabin Crew The preferred emergency signal between the flight deck and the cabin is a PA "Purser to the cockpit", or three (3) bells if an announcement is not possible. SCC will go directly to the cockpit to obtain information from the Captain. CCM 2, 3 and 4 will start securing the cabin and galley, retrieve their Emergency Checklists, and be prepared for a briefing by SCC. All CCM should be ready to prepare the cabin for a planned emergency evacuation. Passengers briefing Demonstrate and supervise the fitting of passengers lifejackets. Instruct adult passengers not to inflate lifejackets while inside the aircraft. Children and infants wearing adult lifejackets should be inflated inside the aircraft. Explain that floor level exits will not be used unless absolutely necessary and, even then, not if their sills are below water level.

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If applicable, instruct passengers who may have to use floor level exits that they should not attempt to dive into the water, but, if necessary, should jump in as close as possible to the life rafts. Advise passengers that all life rafts have a lifeline attached all around, which should be held on to if entering the life raft is not immediately possible. If in conditions of darkness, explain that the light from the lifejacket will turn on automatically on contact with water.

Bracing The Captain's signal to all cabin crew to brace will be the PA announcement: "Brace! Brace! Brace!" In the event the PA is inoperative, three (3) bells will be given. This will tell the CCs to begin shouting the commands to the passengers: "Brace! Bend down! Stay down!" "Brace! Capul jos! Stati jos! The brace positions should be maintained until the aircraft comes to a complete and final stop and evacuation commands are initiated. If applicable, in a planned water evacuation passengers must remain seated for rafts to be brought to exits. Cabin Crew should shout commands: "Remain Seated!" "Remain Seated!" "Ramaneti pe locuri! Ramaneti pe locuri!" until rafts are in position at the exits if there is no danger for pax. TWELVE STEPS CABIN PREPARATION Step 1: Obtain Information from Captain T: Type of Emergency: You must be aware of the problem and how it will affect the evacuation. E: Evacuation is Necessary? Is there a possibility of reaching land? S: Special instructions? Weather, water conditions, nature of the expected landing. T: Time remaining to prepare? Gauge your actions accordingly. S: Signal to Brace and to Evacuate? Step 2: Brief other cabin crewmembers Brief other CC out of sight of passengers. Calm yourselves, get organized, and remain in control. Step 3: Turn Cabin Lights to Bright Captain will make announcement, advising passengers of emergency (unless he informs you otherwise). If possible, the cabin crew should be in full view of passengers during the advisory announcement. Step 4: Emergency Announcements Must Contain the Following: Fasten seatbelts Place seatbacks in upright position Stow carry-on baggage Review exit location Review appropriate emergency equipment and donning of life vests. Have pax put on life vest. Distribute spare life vests to pax with lap children. BRACE POSITION DEMO. CC must sit on seatbacks to increase visibility. Note: CCMs must be in demo positions in the cabin. CCMs will wear their crew life vests for the demo. (Use caution when demonstrating red tabs, so as not to inflate vest).

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SCCM should check to see that all other CCMs are coordonating their demos with the announcements. Allow enough remaining time to complete cabin checks. Step 5: Secure Cabin and Galley SCC and CCM 3: lock all lavatories. SCC and CCM 3: close and secure all overhead compartments. CCM 2, 3, 4: pull out galley circuit breakers and secure galley supplies and loose equipment. SCCM, CCM 2, CCM3, and CCM 4 secure all carry-on baggage away from aisle. Step 6: Reseat Special Passengers and PSPs Reseat PRMs and special needs pax near floor exits if possible and allowed by Captain. Each Cabin Crewmember will select 3 PSP for their primary exit. Step 7: Set up "BUDDY" System: Designate assistants, or "Buddies", for passengers who need assistance due to injury, disability, panic, or age. Keep families seated close each other. Step 8: Passengers preparation: Have passengers remove jewelry and sharp objects (glasses, pens, watches, ties, scarves, high heeled shoes, prosthesis). Place such items in an airsick bag and stow in seat back pocket. Time permitting, have passengers practice bracing positions. Step 9: Brief PSPs: Select and brief PSPs. Have them gathered near exit for briefing. If a PSP becomes confused or panics, have him sit down, then select other PSP. Step 10: Personal Preparation: Remove loose articles of clothing, nylon stockings, and jewelry. Confirm with all CC that cabin is secured. SCC adapts the lights to the outside conditions.

Step 11: Cabin Ready: Advise the Captain that the cabin is secure. Cabin Crewmembers secure themselves in their assigned jumpseats and assume brace positions when ordered by Captain. Step 12: Signal to Brace/Silent Review: Begin silent review of: Location and operation of exits. Location and operation of emergency equipment and evacuation commands.

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4.12.7.6. MAIN PROCEDURE FOR DITCHING WHEN THERE ARE NO LIFE RAFTS Door-mounted slides may be used after evacuation as flotation devices: Open door and pull red manual inflation handle to inflate slide. Pull the girt cover flap back to expose the white ditching release handle. Pull the white ditching release handle. The slide will separate from the girt bar. Flip the slide over. Tell the passengers jump into the water and hold onto the handholds. Injured adults or several children may be placed on top of the slide. All others should stay in the water, holding onto the slide's handholds.

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PRE-SELECTED PASSENGERS BRIEFING (5 persons): Door If exit is safe, you, no. 1: - With two hands, rotate handle in direction of arrow (aft to forward) slowly to observe if water comes in. - Door will come in and hinge, then push door out. - If its safe, hold onto the assist handle so you dont get pushed out. - With your other hand, keep pushing the door until it is fully opened and locked against the airplane. NO RAFT: Open door and pull red manual inflation handle to inflate slide. Pull the girt cover flap back to expose the white ditching release handle. Pull the white ditching release handle. The slide will separate from the girt bar. Flip the slide over. Tell the passengers jump into the water and hold onto the handholds. RAFT: - If applicable, wait for raft to be brought to door. - Once the raft is inflated, call pax to you. Tell them to leave everything. Tell pax to inflate their life vests and step into the raft. - When all passengers have left the aircraft, or it is no longer safe for you to stay, inflate your vest and step into the raft. - Repeat your duties to me. Briefing for PSP no. 2 and no. 3 Look at PSP. Make eye contact as you assign duties. No.2 - you will hold the passengers back while I open the door, no. 1 will open the door if I am unable to. If exit is not safe - turn around and send passengers to a safe exit. If exit is safe, you no. 2 and no. 3, NO RAFT: - help people evacuate and urge them to jump into water.

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RAFT: - you will step into the raft once it is in the water and has been inflated. No.3 - If I am injured you will have to remove me from my jumpseat in order to let No. 1 open the door (give specific instruction to open seal belt/harness). When leaving the aircraft, inflate my vest, take me with you and put me in the raft. Repeat your duties to me. Briefing for PSPs no. 4 and no. 5 RAFT - if applicable Look at PSP. Make eye contact as you assign duties. You, no. 4 and no.5, you will remove the raft from Overhead Bin (or ceiling compartment) and carry it to the exit. Remove the red flap and attach the lanyard to the door hinge. Throw the raft into the water, while pulling red inflation handle. Hold the raft close to the aircraft with the lanyard. Direct passengers to board the raft directly from the aircraft, inflating their vest when leaving. Distribute them evenly on both sides. When all passengers have left the aircraft, or it is no longer safe for you to stay, inflate your vest and step into the raft. Repeat your duties to me. OVERWING EXITS Briefing for PSP no. 1 and no.2 (each OWE) Look at PSPs. Make eye contact with each one as you assign duties. Remain seated until the aircraft comes to a relative stop. When you hear the command "Remain seated! look out the window for danger, smoke, high water level or obstruction. If exit is not safe - turn around and send passengers to a safe exit. If exit is usable: - No. 1, face the back of the aircraft and, with your hand closest to the aisle, grasp upper pull lever and pull. Place other hand in lower handhold. Lift the window slightly and throw it out. - Go out the window. There is a rope located in the window frame/overhead bin. Grab the rope/tape and attach it to the ring located on the top of the wing or just drape it on the wing. This is your handrail. - No. 2 you will hold passengers back until the exit is open. - Then, jump onto the seat at exit row to assist with passenger egress. - Call passengers to you and send them out of the window exit. Have them go out leg-body-leg, inflate their vests after they leave the aircraft, and step into the raft if applicable or jump in the water. - When all passengers have left the aircraft, or it is no longer safe for you to stay, inflate your vest and jump into water or step into the raft. - Repeat your duties to me. Briefing for RAFT PSPs no.3 and no.4 OWE (each raft) if applicable Look at PSPs. Make eye contact with each one as you assign duties. - Remove the rail from the overhead bins or ceiling compartments and carry it to the window. - Prior to putting the raft out the window exit, remove the red flap and attach the lanyard to the metal base of the seats, or to the handrail rope/tape. - Toss the raft of the forward part of the wing while pulling the lanyard to inflate the raft. - Hold the raft close to the wing with the lanyard. - Direct passengers to board the raft directly from the wing, inflating their vests

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when leaving the aircraft. - Distribute them evenly on both sides of the raft. - When all passengers have left the aircraft, or it is no longer safe for you to stay, inflate your vest and step into the raft. - Repeat your duties to me. Individual Evacuation Duties -Water Captain Emergency Evacuation Checklist. Assist SCC with evacuation of passengers and inflation/launch of all available flotation/survival equipment. "Sweep" forward half of cabin and confirm that half of cabin is clear after the other half has been cleared as well. Abandon aircraft via left wing into raft no. 3 and assume command. Activate ELTs (schedule use of ELT/Radio Transmitters, if more than one is available) Direct preparation and use of signaling devices and survival equipment. First Officer Confirm Captain has been evacuated If Captain is disabled: direct PSPs to evacuate Captain into raft no. 1 (then "sweep" forward half of cabin and confirm that half of cabin is clear. Abandon cabin aircraft right) If Captain is able: "sweep" forward half cabin. Assist mid cabin evacuation Exit cabin via right OWE and enter raft no.4 Direct survival activities right side of aircraft. SCCM Relay "Evacuate!" "Evacuati" order and direct PSPs and passengers to usable exits. If LI door is usable, lock it open. Launch no. 1 raft and direct passengers to evacuate via forward door. Once raft is launched, you may use. The slide for additional flotation, if needed. Launch door slide once the passengers have evacuated as an additional means of flotation. Check pilot survival status. If one or both are functional, report "Evacuation complete" and abandon the aircraft through raft. If both pilots are disabled, direct PSP's to evacuate the pilots to the raft. Sweep the forward half of the cabin and abandon the aircraft via the left window. Assume command of survival and rescue activities. Collect survivors and provide medical care. Activate the ELTs (located on the raft if applicable). Direct preparation and use of signal and survival equipment. If there are no rafts, take the ELT located in the cabin and activate it. CCM 2 Relay "Evacuate" "Evacuati!" order. Direct passengers to exits. Obtain portable ELT, or have PSP obtain if incapacitated. Direct PSP's to remove windows if conditions are safe to do so. Launch rafts and direct passengers to them if applicable. Assist PSP's in aft cabin sweep. Exit the aircraft via wing exit. Assist the Captain in raft command. CCM 3 Relay "Evacuate" "Evacuati" order. Direct passengers to exits. Sweep aft cabin, moving to the AFT overwing. Exit aircraft right.

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Relay "Evacuate!" "Evacuati" order and direct PSPs and passengers to exits. Move to the R1 exit. If door is usable, direct passengers to evacuate. Launch door slide once the passengers have evacuated as an additional means of flotation, if needed, If forward cabin evacuation is complete, abandon aircraft on the right side. If SCC and pilots are disabled, sweep the forward half of cabin and direct 1 remaining PSP to evacuate the disabled crew through the nearest exit. Assume command of survival and rescue activities. Collect survivors and provide medical care. Activate the ELT's (located on the raft). Direct preparation and use of signal and survival equipment. Raft Deployment and Entry if applicable. Passengers must stay in their seals until the exits are opened and the life rafts are deployed. Have the passengers inflate their vests as they leave the aircraft. Have the passengers step into the raft and move to the opposite side, dispersing evenly to the right and left sides for balance. Do not stand in the raft. Stay seated. When movement is required, do so on hands and knees. If passengers are boarding from the water, use the boarding stations/ladders. Immediately after the last passenger has boarded the raft, cut the lanyard. Push away from the aircraft but remain close to other rafts, in the area where the aircraft landed. 4.12.7.7. AFTER EVACUATION POST EVACUATION DUTIES: ALL 1. Take blankets, coats, throw spare life vests, if available, to evacuees from aircraft, time permitting 2. Collect and account for survivors. 3. Activate Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELTs). 4. Distribute survivors among available rafts. 5. Provide first aid care for the injured. 6. Erect canopy and center support rods, or inflate center inflatable stanchion. . 7. Prepare & use available signaling devices and other survival equipment. 8. If not in a raft: - keep as much of body as possible out of the water - use the huddle position (for group wearing life vests) - use Heat Escape Lessening Position (draw knees to chest) to keep warm 9. Assign tasks to people exhibiting negative behavior. 10. Post watches for rescue efforts. 11. Attempt to move raft away from areas of fuel spillage. 12. If rescued by helicopter, allow basket to touch water before touching basket. 13. During rescue, survivors must keep life vests on, maintain raft position and await instructions from rescue personnel. Evacuation Commands: WATER General "Remain seated! "-"Ramaneti asezati!" -This command is to allow time for rafts if applicable to be brought to exits if there is no immediate danger to everyones safety. "Emergency! Open seat belts!"-"Pericol! Desfaceti centurile!- This command CCM 4

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should be given to initiate the evacuation. "Get out of my way! Coming through! "-"La parte!Trebuie sa trec!"- This command is used for the CCMs to get access to the exit or if the exit is not usable and they need to proceed to an alternate exit. "You! Hold people back!"-"Tu! Tine pasagerii in spate!" Use this command to get the first passenger to hold other passengers back, allowing time to safely open exit. "Come this way!"-"Veniti aici!"- This command is given to indicate that the exit is safe for evacuation. "Leave everything!"-"Lasati bagajele!"- To direct passengers to leave personal belongings on the aircraft. "Step into the raft" "Move aside!"-"Urcati in barca! Stati pe margine!"- Instruct passengers to enter the raft and move to each side, clearing entry area. "Inflate your vest!"-"Umflati vesta! "- Instruct passengers to exit the aircraft. Passengers should inflate vests as they leave the aircraft. Cabin crew should don life vests and inflate only one chamber Unplanned Water "Bend down! Stay down! "-"Capul jos! Stati aplecati!"- Continue shouting this command until the aircraft has come to a complete stop. "Don life vest!"-"Luati vesta!"- To instruct passengers to get inflation devices. "Leg, body, leg!"-" Intai piciorul!"- Instructs a passenger on the best way to go through the window exit. Instruct a selected passenger to exit first and attach ropes/tapes to wing ring. Planned Water "Brace!" "Bend down!" "Stay down!"- "Brace! Capul jos! Stati jos!"-This series of commands adds "Brace" because passengers have been instructed on how to brace and will be listening to this signal to assume their bracing positions. Blocked Exit "Go that way!" "Mergeti acolo!"- Use this command to redirect passengers to a safe exit. Note: In a water landing, the aircraft will probably assume a tail low position. L2 and Tailcone will not be usable and will have to be blocked. Do not open any exit, which is beyond water level.

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EMERGENCY EVACUATION COMMANDS UNPLANNED LAND - ALL exits usable
L-1
Brace! Bend down! Stay down!

R-1
Brace! Bend down! Stay down!

L-2
Brace! Bend down! Stay down! You! Hold people back!

TAILCONE
Brace! Bend down! Stay down! You! Hold people back!

OWEs
After opening primary exit or to move down the aisle

Open seat belts! Open seat belts! Open seat belts! Open seat belts! - Emergency Light You! Hold Switch people back! - Assess door - Open Door/ Hold Assist handle/Pull red manual inflation handle If its safe: Come this way! Leave everything! If its not safe, redirect pax. You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away! - Assess door - Open Door/ Hold Assess handle/Pull red manual inflation handle If its safe: Come this way! Leave everything! If its not safe, redirect pax. Get out of my way! Coming through!

- Assess door - Open Door/ Hold Assess handle/Pull red manual inflation handle If its safe: Come this way! Leave everything! If its not safe, redirect pax. You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away!

- Assess door - Open Door/ Hold Assess handle/ Latch open against wall

You! Hold people back

Take flashlight Enter tailcone. Eject the cone and inflate the slide manually if it did not inflate automatically. If its safe: Come this way If its not safe, redirect pax.

Assess window Open window exit Throw window out of A/C. Step aside

Jump! Slide! Get You and you! away from the Stay at the plane! bottom and send people away!

If its safe: Come this way! Leave everything! If its not safe, redirect pax.

Jump! Slide! Get Jump! Slide! Get Leave away from the away from the everything! Stay plane! plane! low!

You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away!

You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away! Jump! Slide! Get away from the plane!

Leg, body, leg!

Sit and slide the wing! Get away from the plane!

PRIOR TO OPENING ANY EXIT, ALWAYS ASSESS CONDITIONS. AN EVACUATION SHOULD NOT BE INITIATED UNTIL THE AIRCRAFT HAS COME TO A COMPLETE STOP

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EMERGENCY EVACUATION COMMANDS PLANNED LAND - ALL exits usable
L-1
Brace! Bend down! Stay down!

R-1
Brace! Bend down! Stay down!

L-2
Brace! Bend down! Stay down! You! Hold people back!

TAILCONE
Brace! Bend down! Stay down!

OWEs
After opening primary exit or to move down the aisle

Open seat belts! Open seat belts! Open seat belts! Open seat belts! - ELS You! Hold - Assess door people back! - Open Door/ Hold Assist handle/Pull red inflation handle If its safe: Come this way! Veniti aici! If its not safe, redirect pax to another exit. You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away! - Assess door - Open Door/ Hold Assess handle/Pull red manual inflation handle If its safe: Come this way! Veniti aici! If its not safe, redirect pax to another exit. You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away! If its safe: Jump! Slide! Get away from the plane! If its not safe, redirect pax. You! Hold people back! Get out of my way! Coming through!

- Assess door - Open Door/ Hold Assess handle/Pull red manual inflation handle If its safe: Come this way! Veniti aici! If its not safe, redirect pax to another exit. You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away!

- Assess door - Open Door/ Hold Assess handle/Latch open against wall

You! Hold people back

Take flashlight Enter tailcone Eject the cone and inflate the slide manually if it did not inflate automatically If its safe: Come this way! Veniti aici! If its not safe, redirect pax to another exit.

Assess window Open window exit Throw window out of A/C. Step aside

If its safe: Jump! Slide! Get away from the plane! If its not safe, redirect pax.

Come this way! Leave everything!

If its safe: Leave everything! Jump! Slide! Get Stay low! away from the plane! If its not safe, redirect pax. You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away! If its safe: Jump! Slide! Get away from the plane! If its not safe, redirect pax.

You and you! Stay at the bottom and send people away!

Leg, body, leg!

Sit and slide the wing! Get away from the plane!

PRIOR TO OPENING ANY EXIT, ALWAYS ASSESS CONDITIONS. AN EVACUATION SHOULD NOT BE INITIATED UNTIL THE AIRCRAFT HAS COME TO A COMPLETE STOP.

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EMERGENCY EVACUATION COMMANDS UNPLANNED WATER Do not use L-2 and Tailcone (in some circumstances, if the A/C does not flow, these exits might be above water level and may be used, IF ITS SAFE, for evacuation. Assess conditions and make the appropriate decision under the circumstances). L-1
Brace!Head down! Stay down ! Brace! Capul jos! Stati jos!

R-1
Brace! Head down! Stay down! Brace! Capul jos! Stati jos! Don life vest! Open seat belts! Luati vesta! Desfaceti centurile! You,keep passengers back! Tu, tine pasagerii in spate!

L-2
Go that way! Mergeti acolo! Point to usable exit if opened and attended

TAILCONE
Go that way! Mergeti acolo! Point to usable exit if opened and attended

OWEs
After opening primary exit or to move down the aisle

Don life vest! Open seat belts! Luati vesta! Desfaceti centurile! - Emergency Light Switch - Assess door - Check water level - Open Door/ Hold Assist handle/Pull red manual inflation handle - Detach slide If its safe: Come this way! Veniti aici! If its not safe, redirect pax to another exit.

Don life vests! Out of my way! Coming through! Puneti-va vestele! La parte! Trebuie sa trec!

- Assess door - Check water level - Open Door/ Hold Assess handle/Pull red manual inflation handle - Detach slide If its safe: Come this way! Veniti aici! If its not safe, redirect pax to another exit. Inflate life vest! Umflati vesta! Jump! Sariti!

You,keep passengers back ! Tu, tine pasagerii in spate !

Inflate life vest! Umflati vesta!

- Assess window - Open window exit - Throw window out of aircraft if its safe. If not, redirect pax - Step aside Come here! Veniti aici! Leg, body, leg! Inflate life vest! Intai piciorul! Umflati vesta! Instruct PSP to attach rope tape to ring on wing. Jump! Sariti!

Jump! Sariti!

PRIOR TO OPENING ANY EXIT, ALWAYS ASSESS CONDITIONS. AN EVACUATION SHOULD NOT BE INITIATED UNTIL THE AIRCRAFT HAS COME TO A COMPLETE STOP.

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EMERGENCY EVACUATION COMMANDS PLANNED WATER Do not use L-2 and Tailcone (in some circumstances, if the A/C does not flow, these exits might be above water level and may be used, IF ITS SAFE, for evacuation. Assess conditions and make the appropriate decision under the circumstances).
L-1 Brace!Head down! Stay down ! Brace! Capul jos! Stati jos! R-1 Brace! Head down! Stay down! Brace! Capul jos! Stati jos! L-2 Brace! Head down! Stay down ! Brace! Capul jos! Stati jos! Open seat belts! Desfaceti centurile! Go that way! Mergeti acolo! Point to usable exit if opened and attended Open seat belts! Desfaceti centurile! - ELS - Assess door - Check water level - Open Door/ Hold Assist handle/Pull red inflation handle/ Detach the slide Come this way! Leave everything! Veniti aici! Lasati bagajele! Open seat belts! Desfaceti centurile! You, keep passengers back! Tu, tine pasagerii in spate! Out of my way! Coming through! La parte! Trebuie sa trec! TAILCONE Brace! Head down! Stay down! Brace! Capul jos! Stati jos! Open seat belts! Desfaceti centurile! Go that way! Mergeti acolo! Point to usable exit if opened and attended OWEs After opening primary exit or to move down the aisle

- Assess door - Check water level - Open Door/ Hold Assist handle/Pull red manual inflation handle - Detach the slide If its safe: Come here! Leave everything! Veniti aici! Lasati totul! If its not safe, redirect pax to another exit. Inflate life vest! Umflati vesta! Jump! Jump! Sariti! Sariti!

You, keep passengers back ! Tu, tine pasagerii in spate !

Inflate life vest! Umflati vesta!

- Assess window - Open window exit - Throw window out of aircraft if its safe. If not, redirect pax - Step aside

Jump! Jump! Sariti! Sariti!

Come here! Leave everything! Veniti aici! Lasati bagajele! Leg, body, leg! Inflate life vest! Intai piciorul! Umflati vesta! Get off the wing! Jump! Plecati de pe aripa! Sariti in apa!

PRIOR TO OPENING ANY EXIT, ALWAYS ASSESS CONDITIONS. AN EVACUATION SHOULD NOT BE INITIATED UNTIL THE AIRCRAFT HAS COME TO A COMPLETE STOP.

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4.13. SEARCH AND RESCUE, SURVIVAL- GENERAL
4.13.1 . SEARCH AND RESCUE (SAR) General SAR is a lifesaving service provided through the combined efforts of the federal agencies signatory to the National SAR Plan, and the agencies responsible for SAR within each state. Services include search for missing aircraft, survival aid, rescue, and emergency medical help for the occupants after an accident site is located. COSPAS - SARSAT System Every polar orbiting and geostationary satellite carries a Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking (SARSAT) payload that can detect and locate emergency beacons. These SARSAT payloads are provided by Canada and France while Russia operates very similar equipment on navigation satellites known as COSPAS. Both are used in an international, co-operative Search and Rescue effort entitled COSPAS - SARSAT. Polar Orbiting Satellites SARSAT polar orbiting satellites circle the Earth every 102 minutes at an altitude of 528 miles. COSPAS satellites, however, circle the Earth every 105 minutes at an altitude of 620 miles. Both of these orbiting satellites travel at a speed of 15,500 miles an hour and can view an area of over 2,500 miles in diameter as they Orbit the Earth. The satellites over fly the poles on every orbit, so coverage of emergency beacons is best in these areas and least at the Equator. In between these two areas, in the mid-latitudes, the average waiting time for a satellite pass is 30-45 minutes. Geostationary Satellites These satellites orbit the Earth at an altitude of about 22,320 miles above the Equator. They carry 406 MHz receivers and because of their high orbit, can see large areas of the earth's surface continuously. The COSPAS - SARSAT system consists of a network of satellites, ground stations, mission control centers and rescue co-ordination centers. When an emergency beacon is activated, the signal is received by a satellite and relayed to the nearest available ground station. This ground station, known as a Local User Terminal, will process the signal and calculate the position from which is originated. This position is then transmitted to a Mission Control Centre where any identification data from the system database is added to the information on that beacon. From here, the Mission Control Centre will transmit an alert message to the best placed rescue co-ordination center to respond to an emergency in that location. If the location of the beacon is in another country's service area, the alert is transmitted to the Mission Control Centre in that country.

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4.13.2. BODY SIGNAL ILLUSTRATIONS - If you are forced down and are able to attract the attention of the pilot of a rescue airplane, the body signals illustrated on these pages can be used to transmit messages to the pilot circling over your location. - Stand in the open when you make the signals. - Be sure the background, as seen from the air, is not confusing. - Go through the motions slowly and repeat each signal until you are positive that the pilot understands you. 4.13.2.1. GROUND-AIR VISUAL CODE FOR USE BY SURVIVORS NO 1 2 3 4 5 MESSAGE Require assistance Require medical assistance No or Negative Yes or Affirmative Proceeding in this direction CODE SYMBOL

V X N Y

IF IN DOUBT, USE INTERNATIONAL SYMBOL SOS INSTRUCTIONS 4.13.2.2. IDENTIFICATION OF SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT Containers or packages for dropping to survivors shall, when contents are indicated by color, be marked with colored streamers as follows: Red Medical supplies and first-aid Blue Food and water Yellow Blankets and protective clothing Black Miscellaneous equipment such as stoves, axes, compasses, cooking utensils etc URGENT MEDICAL ASSISTANCE NEED MEDICAL ASSISTANCE-URGENT LONG DELAY NEED MCHANICAL HELP OR PARTS

- Used only when life is at stake - Place both arms horizontally

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ALL OK DO NOT WAIT DROP MESSAGE

- Wave one arm overhead SHORT DELAY


CAN PROCEED SHORTLY WAIT IF PRACTICABLE

- Make throwing motion RECEIVER OPERATES OUR RECEIVER IS OPERATING

- One arm horizontal DO NOT LAND HERE DO NOT ATTEMPT TO LAND HERE

- Cup hands over ears AFFIRMATIVE (GROUND)

- Both arms waved across face

- White cloth waved vertically

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LAND HERE PICK US UP - PLANE ABANDONED

- Both arms forward horizontally, and point in direction of landing - Repeat NEGATIVE (GROUND)

- Both arms vertical

- White cloth waved horizontally AFFIRMATIVE (AIRCRAFT) Affirmative reply from aircraft NEGATIVE (AIRCRAFT) Negative reply from aircraft

- Dip nose plane several times

- Fishtail plane

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MESSAGE RECEIVED AND UNDERSTOOD (AIRCRAFT) Day or moonlight Rocking wings Night Green flashed from signal lamp MESSAGE RECEIVED AND NOT UNDERSTOOD (AIRCRAFT) Day or moonlight - Making a complete right-hand circle Night - Red flashes from signal lamp.

Rescue by air If rescue is conducted by a helicopter, you will be winched into the aircraft to safety. It is important that you are ready to be winched and that you take some basic precautions in the raft. You must wait and do exactly what you are told by the crew. The helicopter will first lower a winch man into the raft with you. Do not touch the winch man as he descends; helicopters build up an enormous amount of static electricity and the winch man will earth himself through whatever touches him first. Let this be the raft otherwise you, and he, will suffer a huge electric shock. Never attach the winch line to anything in the raft. Follow the winch man's instructions. He will probably come into the raft and will send two survivors up at a time. Be ready to tell him of any serious injuries on-board the raft. It is important to re-distribute the load as the people move out of the raft. The lighter the raft, the easier is it for the downdraft to flip it over. When being winched, you will have the strop under your arms and around your back. This is all that is holding you. Make sure the strop is tight, keep still and keep your arms dawn by your sides, or at least, if you must hold on, keep your elbows firmly down. The instinct to put your arms right up to hold on increases the danger of you falling through the strop. As you near the aircraft, just hang limply and let the crew manhandle you into the aircraft. Do not try to help them - they know what they are doing and will find it much easier without hindrance from someone who does not. Once in the aircraft, life jackets should be deflated as in all aircraft, just in case of a second ditching! Rescue from a boat Drifting ashore is probably a rare form of rescue and even then, may not be rescue but merely a transition from one form of survival to another if the land which you drift onto is remote and sparsely populated. This, in many ways, is more difficult as a transfer from a raft or from the water into a boat can be tricky. If it is a lifeboat that comes to your assistance, do exactly what the crew tell you. Clear any debris away from the side of the raft, i.e. streamers or rope to enable the boat to come in close without getting entangled. You may be given a large drogue to help keep the raft steady during rescue use it, especially if this is a combined rescue and you are ultimately going to be winched to safety

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by air. Be aware of stepping from the raft into a boat in high waves; if you don't judge it just right, the vertical distance between one and the other could be huge and you will end up in the middle. Make your move just when the crew say, otherwise you could jump just as the coxswain decides to turn away and try another approach. Again, be prepared to tell the crew of any serious casualties who may need special assistance during his rescue. In all cases, it is usual for rescuers to sink the rafts; it is too complicated to retrieve them and leaving them in the water may lead to false alarms. 4.13.3. GENERAL SURVIVAL INFORMATION - Crewmembers need to assume a leadership role. Follow the Chain of Command. The most senior crewmember present must remain in control. Fair and consistent leadership will be a great comfort. Know that your calm behavior and evident selfcontrol are contagious and will reduce fear. - Good hygiene and cleanliness are important. Attempt to keep the raft clean and free of debris. - Keep as warm and dry as possible. Bundle up/cuddle up. If possible, insulate the raft floor to prevent heat loss. - Heat is the most intense in the afternoon. Rest and stay quiet during the hottest part of the day. - Drink water when you are thirsty. Do not eat. It increases water loss. - Do everything possible to conserve/maintain your body water. Tears, urine and perspiration create water loss from the body, and can cause dehydration. - Keep a positive mental outlook. You must want to survive and know you can survive. - Be prepared. Know that emergencies can happen to you. - Remain calm, and save your strength/energy. Rest or sleep as much as you can. - Govern your actions with the following thoughts: To Yourself: I will not be overly optimistic or pessimistic about being rescued. I will tell myself I do not know when we will be rescued. I will plan every action as if we were to be adrift for several days. To Passengers: I am positive we will be rescued. It will probably be a short time until assistance arrives. - Divide responsibilities. Take stock of human and environmental resources. Give each person a task. Each member must have a sense of worth and of contributing to the group effort. Assign each person duties that they are capable of accomplishing. Use teamwork and improvisation to accomplish goals. A joint effort is the most effective. 1. Establish a lookout watch and ready the various signals for immediate use. 2. Only the seriously injured or very exhausted survivor should be exempt. 3. Set lookout watches for definite hours during the day and night. 4. No matter how small the job seems, even if it has to be invented, it gives every person something to occupy his mind and helps to keep up courage and morale. - Be prepared for contingencies; stay confident in your abilities. Stay informed as to the condition of injured and mentally fragile passengers. Be alert to weather changes and to potential rescue. Survival equipment For flight over uninhabited land areas, it is wise to take and know how to use survival equipment for the type of climate and terrain, If a forced landing occurs at sea, chances for survival are governed by the degree of crew Edition 2 Chapter 4 Page 81 May 2010

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proficiency in emergency procedures and by the availability and effectiveness of water survival equipment. 4.13.4. SURVIVAL AT SEA You survived the wreckage, you were able to stay afloat and stay warm to prevent hypothermia (or even better climb in your raft and stay dry). Now you have to be ready to survive at sea for an unknown period of time. Like on land, the basic survival rules apply. You must first protect yourself from the elements, and then find water and food. In addition preparing yourself to signal for help might increase your chances to be found by potential rescuers of passing ships and crafts. PROTECTING YOURSELF FROM THE ELEMENTS After drowning, the highest danger comes from exposure (cold, wind, heat, sun, salt). The resistance to the elements is also weakened by fear, stress, and the energy spent during the wreckage. HYPOTHERMIA Hypothermia is the main cause of death resulting from exposure to the elements. The body heat loss is 25 times greater in the water than in the air. Even in tropical water, a man immersed (without protection) for an extended period of time will die from hypothermia. (In the 80s a dive boat sunk in the warm water of the Sea of Cortez. The only people who survived were the ones who were able to grab their wetsuits. Survivors still suffered from hypothermia). In cold water, dying from hypothermia might be a matter of minutes. IN THE HEAT OF THE MOMENT If you can, grab as much clothing as possible. Polypropylene will protect you even wet. Rain gear will protect you in the raft. IN THE WATER Try to get off the water as soon as possible. If you can't, save your energy. Avoid all movements that will increase your blood circulation as it will also increase your body heat loss (it is wrong to believe that moving quickly in very cold water wilt help you to warm up. It only exhausts you). The original pain you feel in the extremities will quickly disappear, frostbite in the water doesn't happen before hypothermia, so save your energy (On land in cold climates and mountains, frostbites can often happen before or even without hypothermia). IN A SURVIVAL RAFT Protect your self from the wind. Wind-chill can very quickly increase the risk of hypothermia. Use clothing, a sail or tarp made from any fabric available. Stay as dry as possible. Avoid drinking alcohol, coffee and smoking tobacco (those have a vasoconstrictor effect). Once on the raft, exercise might warm up cold extremities (and overall body). Covering yourself with grease or fat might help you preserve your body heat, especially if you need to dive back in the water. (People swimming across the Channel spray themselves with grease). For more information read our section on Land Survival. IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT RESCUING PEOPLE SUFFERING FROM HYPOTHERMIA During rescue operations, people have lost their lives after surviving the initial hypothermia. It is essential to know (both for rescuers and victims) that the internal temperature can drop 4 to 5 degrees (Centigrade) at the time of rescue. This temperature drop might last 20 minutes. When people suffer from hypothermia, the extremities are sacrificed to preserve the internal organs. The blood circulation then stops in the extremities where the blood

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becomes much colder. When rescued, the peripheral circulation (from the extremities) is reactivated. The previously stagnant cold blood goes back to the vital organs and provokes this last dramatic temperature drop, which is often fatal. So it is essential to take these phenomena into account while warming up a victim of hypothermia. WARMING UP TECHNIQUE The best way to safely warm up victims is to immerse them in a hot bath (45-50 degrees) for a period of 10 minutes (the contact with warm water might be very painful to the extremities (if the victim is conscious), but it is very important to keep the victim submerged in the bath. This technique was successfully used on victims who seemed to have died (very stiff body and no apparent pulse. If bathtubs aren't available, but hot water is. A shower (with enough water pressure) or hose spraying water at 60 degrees could be used instead. If hot water isn't available in large quantity (if it needs to be boiled), hot pads can be made. Hot pads aren't as efficient as hot baths but they represent the next best alternative. HOT PADS SHOULD BE USED AS FOLLOWS: The most important pad (the first one) should be placed under the neck. If other pads are available, they should be placed under the armpits and between the legs (groin area). MAKING HOT PADS There are some special rubber containers made for this use. They were used in the past to warm up beds during winter nights in Europe. To make a pad, you can use any thin, flexible waterproof containers that will not melt, skin gourds, inflatable life jackets, scuba diving BCs, dry suits, car tubes, or even condoms could be used to make those pads. Water can be heated (stove, fire, microwave, etc.) and placed in those pads. If hot water isn't available, use chemical warming pads (sold in sports stores). To make hot pads without any hot water, you could heat rocks (fire) and wrap them in clothing. If on sand beach and no rocks are available, you might need to make a fire in a pit (the size of the victim). When the fire is made, place the victim next to it while preparing a second fire. As soon as the fire has produced some red coils, cover it with sand and place the victim in the hot pit. Make sure there is enough sand not to cause burns. Cover the victim with hot sand from the second pit and you can add red coals from the second fire on top of the sand. While the fire is still lit, you can wet some cloth and put them very close to the flames. They won't catch on fire but will get hot quickly. You can use those as pads while waiting for your fire to produce red coals. (Note that in hospitals, hypothermia patients are treated with combination of bath and IVs (intravenous fluids) to slowly warm up the full blood system). SUN EXPOSURE The main problem is dehydration, which is reinforced by skin burns. On a raft freshwater is probably your most valuable thing. A way to reduce your necessary consumption is to reduce your body fluid loss. To do so you have to reduce exercise and sun exposure. Make a sunshade with any type of fabric available. Sails and tarps work best. If possible set them to shade the maximum surface on the raft while preserving the maximum airflow. When you get too hot, swimming (always tie yourself to the raft) or splashing your body will cool you off. Wearing wet clothing will also keep you cooler than bare skin (it will also protect you from burns). SUNSTROKE To avoid sunstroke, cover your head and neck (with wet clothing) and minimize your

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movements during the day. SKIN The salt water takes away the skin's natural moisture and sunburns accelerate dehydration. The skin can quickly dry and chap, crack and swell. Protect your skin with light clothing. Water might help you cool off, but the constant rubbing with salt might irritate your skin even more (don't apply-anymore salt to broken skin areas). Also make sure you let your clothing dry before night. Even in the tropics, nights can be cold. If you don't have any sun protective ointments, any type of grease or fat might also help protect your skin. (Fat can be found in sea birds and other various animals). EYES On the ocean the sun is reflected by the sea and can cause partial or permanent blindness. Sunglasses (100% UV protection, polarized glasses are best) are a must for all water sport activities. If you don't have any sunglasses, you should improvise some. Indigenous people from the Arctic Circle used leather bands in which they cut two narrow slits for the eyes. Those narrow slits minimize the contact with sunrays. You could use any type of fabric to make such eye protection. If your eyes are swollen or burning you can apply wet bandage with light pressure. It is better to use freshwater if you can spare it. Don't apply the bandage for too long. SALT EXPOSURE Extended salt exposure will irritate the skin and might burn, produce rashes, sores and boils. If you can, rinse with fresh (rain) water, and keep the affected area dry. Avoid any additional contact with salt (seawater). In the case of infected pus filled sores, do not break it as they might spread infections. LONG IMMERSION Castaways who have parts of their bodies immersed for a long period of time might suffer from swelling and tenderness at the tip of their fingers and toe. It is painful and is best treated with sunscreen oil (coconut oil). Other types of rashes and boils might also result. The most affected areas are ones most frequently in contact with water: hands, elbows, buttocks. These can spread over other body parts. Healing takes a long time and requires a period of time without any additional salt exposure. Protect all affected areas from further contact with seawater. WATER Prevent dehydration (body fluid loss due to perspiration) and motion sickness (also leading to dehydration. Sleep or rest as much as possible. Protect yourself from the sun (see section on "Exposure - Sun") Protect yourself against motion sickness. (Use pills before getting sick; try applying pressure on your wrist (accu-pressure point); look at the horizon; often change your head's position; avoid eating when you are sick or susceptible to be). In the first storm on a raft, even experienced sailors get motion sickness. There isn't much to do to avoid it, but it usually goes away after 3 days (or earlier if the sea conditions improve). The danger is vomiting leading to dehydration and exhaustion. H20 CONSUMPTION: HEALTHY VS. NECESSARY TO SURVIVE The minimum amount of water considered necessary to stay in good shape is 1.3/4 pts (1 liter) per day. It is possible to survive with 2 to 5 oz (55 to 220 centiliters) per day. When you will be surviving at sea for an unknown duration of time, it is necessary to ration the water to the minimum needed to survive.

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On the first day, your body still contains much water, so you don't need to drink. It is recommended to decrease your water ration progressively. The first 2 to 4 days you should drink 14oz (400cc). After, you should reduce to 2 to 8 oz daily. This will of course vary with the conditions. (No protection from the sun in a tropical area will require more water than in the shade in temperate climate. During such rationing, symptoms such as discomfort, absence of saliva, cracking of lips and weakness are normal. If delirium starts, the victim needs more water. (This rationing might not be healthy for a period of over a week, but unless you find alternative source of water you might have to follow it to survive). MAKE GOOD USE OF YOUR FRESH WATER When drinking moisten the lips tongue and throat (gurgle lightly) before swallowing. Use lightly salted water (first rain) to wash wounds, and rinse face. FOOD AND WATER NEEDS Digestion requires a lot of water. If you are low in water and rationing yourself (adrift in an area without much rain), you should avoid eating. It is possible to survive much longer without food than without water. Proteins require much more water than carbohydrates. So if you need to eat, you should first eat your carbohydrate food (sugar and starches). The main foods you will gather from the ocean (fish, sea turtles and seaweed) are rich in proteins and should be avoided if you don't have enough water. Do not eat any dehydrated (dried) food if short on water (all dried food also requires much water to be digested). Over a long period, you should eat so as not to suffer from additional weakness and health problems due to starvation. Fish and other marine animals contain a little amount of water, but only when they are eaten immediately (fresh and preferably raw - (sashimi)). REVERSE OSMOSIS HAND PUMP Some of these water desalination pumps are manually operated and can allow you to filter from 1 to 3.5 liters per hour. They are one of the most valuable pieces of equipment you could possibly store in a survival raft. We used one in our Baja leg and in spite of the time it takes to pump, we were happy to use it for island hopping in the sea of Cortez (see photo). DRINKING SEAWATER Everybody who has accidentally swallowed a bit of seawater knows that drinking a glass of it isn't possible. Drinking seawater is dangerous and will result kidney failure. This is what everybody thought until Dr. Bombard proved that people could survive on sea water (we are talking about staying alive, not healthy). Many experts still disagree with Bombards theory, but the fact that he has survived 63 days on drifting raft without any other food and water than what the ocean could provide him gives a lot of credit to his research on sea survival. Bombard doesn't disregard the danger of drinking seawater. During his testing periods he got sick when he tried to drink more than 32oz of seawater per day for more than five days. After numerous tests and various castaway experimentation (drifting at sea for weeks), he came to the conclusion that people could safely drink seawater in quantities not exceeding 32oz per day. Safely here doesn't imply healthy, it is rather the maximum amount of sea water a man could drink without experiencing major health complication or life threatening conditions. Of course all his tests were limited on himself (although many other people like the crew of La Balsa expedition and the Incas themselves were known to regularly drink sea water). If you must drink seawater, follow Dr. Bombards advice. DRINK MAXIMUM 32oz PER DAY and start as soon as possible (don't wait to be dehydrated). Of course adding fresh water would improve your physical condition.

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FINDING FRESH WATER IN THE OCEAN ICE In Polar Regions, ice is easily collected from icebergs. The surface of the ocean might also freeze and provide ice. If the ice is old enough (a year old its usually blue-gray like on glaciers), it will have lost its salt concentration. You can melt it to drink, or just suck it. Be sure to taste it first to make sure it isn't salty. You might also be able to collect ice on the surface of various equipments. It is frozen air and can be used. When very cold, you might also be able to freeze seawater in containers. The salt will freeze last and concentrate in the middle. You can then break the side and separate it from the center to get low saline water. FISH In the tropics dehydration can happen quickly. During the dry season, rains might be very sporadic (but strong so be ready!). The tropical waters are usually rich in marine life, which can be used not only as a source of food but water as well. Fish (and other marine animals) contain liquid in their flesh, but remember that if you are very low in water, digesting proteins will require more than you might be able to spare (it means eating flesh or drinking blood). Fish can also provide a source of water. You can drink the aqueous liquid found in the eyes and spine bones. Those are almost free of salt and a good source of drinking water (especially if you catch large fish or in large quantities). To extract the liquid, cut the freshly caught fish in half. Break the vertebras apart and suck them (no water in shark spines). Also suck the eyes. You can also suck on barnacles and similar shellfish, which are often found on hulls, ropes (or even whales). Taste first to make sure it isn't too salty. If it tastes too bitter you might want to discard it as well. The Incas were believed to chew on fish to obtain water. Later, members of La Balsa expedition also survived by twisting pieces of fish in clothing to extract the moisture (after removing all the blood). They also suck on the waters from the eyes and bones. SOLAR STILLS AND CONDENSATION Modern equipment has come a long way and some new survival raft come equipped with solar stills and chemical desalination tablets. If so, the solar stills should be set up as soon as possible (don't wait to be low in water, it is slow process). To make your own solar still, read our Survival Page on beach surviving. CONDENSATION In some dry places (little to no rain), nights might bring much condensation (a good example is Baja in Mexico). You can collect the drops of condensation with a canvas or plastic tarp (or sail) set as a bowl (to cover the maximum surface area, make sure the water collected gets funneled the proper way to be stored. (Don't forget to rinse the fabrics. See collecting rain water). FOOD SAVING ENERGY The more active you are the more energy you use, the more food (and water) you need. Relax as much as possible and try to lay down to save as much energy as possible. FOOD AND WATER. SHOULD YOU REALLY EAT? Before eating any food, be aware that digestion (especially of proteins and dried food) requires much water. If you are very short on water don't eat. If you have food but no

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water, wait until you can collect enough water (rain or other means) to eat. You can survive much longer without food than without water. If you really need to eat (after a long period, don't let yourself starve), you should choose the carbohydrates first (sugar and starches often contained in survival rations). Proteins (fish, turtles, birds and algae) although probably your main source of food should be eaten last are you are low on fresh water. DOES THE SEA CONTAIN ENOUGH FOOD TO REMAIN HEALTHY? Sailors in the past believed that the sea could not provide them enough vitamins. To avoid suffering from scurvy, they stored fruits and vegetables. Onions have always been a favorite among sailors. They contain the more vitamins than any other vegetables and if kept in a dry area, they can be kept for a long period of time. Dr. Bombard proved his theory. The sea can provide enough food (including the right vitamins) to men for a long period of time. Fish flesh contains proteins, vitamin A and D. Often livers from fish also contain other vitamins like B1l and B2 (be careful that some fish contains poison in their liver, others contain a very high concentration of vitamin A which can also be toxic). Vitamin C and sugar can be found in plankton. Surviving castaways have often used much ingenuity to catch food. Most of what you find around you can be converted and use to catch, attract or find food. FISH Fish are plentiful in most oceans and they might be the easiest to catch if you have a minimum of material to make some basic equipment. Don't worry about eating raw fish. In many countries raw fish is considered a delicacy. The most famous are Japan (sushi and sashimi) and Latin American countries (ceviche). (Note: cooking will kill potential parasites, but healthy fish are safe to be eaten raw). FISHING LINES, NETS, SPEARS, ETC. There are many known fishing methods used all around the world. Lines can be made from any types of ropes or strings (found from various clothing, fabrics, and other equipment), hooks can be made from metal, plastic, bones, etc. FISHING AT NIGHT Often nighttime provides the best fishing. This is why many fishermen work at night. Spear fishing (free diving) at night is also much easier than during daytime. Many fish are attracted by light. Use any possible source of light (electrical or fire) to attract fish. If not available you might even be able to reflect the light from the moon (full moon) to attract your preys. Some fish (especially small sharks because their skin is rough) can even be caught by hand once attracted close to your raft (bait or light). For more information on fishing techniques, read our website on Survival. FLYING FISH Sailors are familiar with those, they often find them lying on the deck of their boat in the morning. Flying fish are found in schools. If you cross their path, you might be able to catch many at once. They are attracted by bright light. Use anything to that order (see fishing at night). Use white canvas or tarps (even during the day). The fish will fly over your raft and hit the tarp you set. They will fall stoned in your raft. A NOTE ABOUT POISONOUS FISH The castaways are usually far enough from shore that they don't need to worry much about poisonous fish. Most fish found in Open Ocean are edible. Poisonous fish are usually found

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in coastal areas, particularly reefs. Even some poisonous fish might be edible if you carefully discard the liver and other internal organs in which the poison or toxins are usually contained. (Often the flesh contains no or much fewer toxins). When in doubt only eat fish you know. If you can't be selective, only eat flesh that has not been in contact with organs. Eat only a small quantity first, wait a few hours checking for symptoms before eating more. For more information read our homepage on "Dangerous Sea Life". Organs you don't eat can be used. Some contain oil you can squeeze and rub on dry skin. Most can be use to bait other fish. Note: cooking will not decrease the amount of poison or toxins in the fish. Note: don't forget that fish in the tropics can spoil very quickly (unless dried properly), discard any fish with you might believe unsafe. You don't want to risk fish poisoning or even vomiting (loss of energy and water). DRYING FISH (OR MEAT) If you catch more fish than you can eat (or than you should eat if you're short on water), you should start drying it right away. In the tropics, fish can spoil very quickly. Being hanged in the sun usually dries fish fillets. A quicker process (but which might not retain as much water) is to cut very thin slices of fish and spread them on any dry fabrics (canvas and plastics) exposed to the sun. (Meat (turtle) can be dried in the same way, but meat with high content of fat might spoil before being dried). Remember that dried food will require more water to digest. BIRDS Castaways rarely think about eating birds, but all sea birds are edible (some might be very chewy though). Their meat can be eaten cooked, raw, or dried. Birds might land on your raft to rest or circle you hoping for food. They can be caught by hand, knocked with an oar, speared, caught with a net, snared, or even hook like a fish (using various baits or lure in the water or thrown in the air). If you can't cook the bird, skin it and eat it raw. In cold weather you can use the feather to make some insulation under your cloth (down sleeping bags!). Feathers could even be used as fishing bait. You can use the fat to lubricate the skin. In the arctic regions, people chew on fat (seals and sea lions). In very cold situation you might want to chew on the fat of birds (and sea turtles). Bones contain marrow. If you can't chew on the bone, break it and extract the marrow with something long and thin. The best way to kill a bird by hand is to hold both wings in one hand (from the origin of insertion) and with the other hand grabs the neck and quickly pulls it down (and up if it doesn't work on first try). The neck will break. SEA TURTLES Sea turtle meat is very nutritious and still many indigenous people feed on them in Central America. Their eggs are also very good (found buried on the beach or inside female turtles). When killed, the turtle should be bled as soon as possible to preserve its meat. (Not bled, the meat will spoil faster and won't be as easy to dry). With the exception of the heart, organs might be best discarded. To remove the meat from the turtle, you will need a knife (improvised with metal or plastic if necessary (Tin cans make good blades). Start by cutting the head off to bleed the turtle. Then insert your blade in the crack between the top and lower shell from the head. Move your blade in a sawing motion to cut all around. If you can't open the shell, cut all legs and dig your hands inside to grab the meat. Don't forget the eggs if ifs a female. Don't forget that the bones contain marrow. In cold climate the fat can also be chewed on. Otherwise it can be use for skin lubrication (or to bait fish or birds).

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PLANKTON Plankton is very nutritious and is an also essential to prevent scurvy for long time castaways. It isn't found everywhere, but as whales (whale sharks and manta rays) feed on large quantities of plankton, all areas hosting those marine animals will be rich in plankton. Plankton will often be found on the surface at night (during the day it might only be found deeper). Any type of net with very small holes dragged behind a raft will work well. Mosquito nets, cotton fabrics from a tent will also work great. Any type of clothing trailed in the water will also work. Sea anchors are ready made natural plankton nets. Don't let the smell throw you off, plankton doesn't smell good but it doesn't taste bad. SEAWEED Seaweed (or algae) of various types is found on most oceans. They are used in many Japanese dishes. In addition to being very tasty, they are rich in proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Most seaweed are edible, however some green or blue algae found in freshwater pools can be highly poisonous. Most types of seaweeds are found in coastal areas either drifting or still attached to rocks. (Don't collect dried seaweed washed out on beaches). A few types of seaweed can also be found far offshore. In the Sargasso Sea and North Atlantic, the sargassum species are commonly found floating on the surface. You can drag a net (see plankton) or any type of homemade hook or rake to collect seaweed. There are many types of seaweed, but the ones usually found offshore are tough and might be hard to eat raw. You can dry them in the sun (or with fire), and then chew on them (if you have a lot of rainwater, you might want to rinse them too). Some thick seaweed will require boiling to remove some natural glue (used a lot in the paper industry). Don't forget that seaweed requires a lot of fresh water to be digested. Do not eat seaweed unless you have sufficient drinking water. SEA CUCUMBERS They might be the least appealing form of food found in the ocean, but they are edible and even prized by Chinese and Japanese. They cover the bottom of most sandy oceans and are the easiest animals to catch in shallow water. Some species secrete a mucous from their skins that can be irritating (especially avoid contact with sensitive skin areas and eyes). They must be well gutted and cleaned (the skin must be cleaned numerous times to remove the sticky mucous) before being eaten. Depending on where they are prepared, they can be smoked, cooked, or marinated raw. SIGNALING DEVICES The most useful is an EPIRB. The smallest and easiest to carry are a signaling mirror and a whistle. Those three represent first choice because of their efficiency (whistles and mirrors are so small you can always keep them attached to your life jacket and they nearly never fail even over a long period of time). The EPIRB is an emitter that emits international distress signals messages and indicates your position. Other useful signaling devices are flares, water dye, strobe lights, red and reflective fabrics, VHF radios (and GPS to give an exact position to rescuers), etc. All signaling devices are important, but the best-equipped people aren't always the better prepared. In a survival situation it is essential to think and act according to the situation. Dr. Bombard proved that castaways could survive 63 days drifting at sea with nothing. Survival is about fighting and believing in life. REACHING SHORE Some castaways are found at sea, others reach nearby or distant coasts. If you are in a situation where you intentionally or accidentally reach a coastline, you might need to be

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careful with your landing. All sailors know that the greatest danger isn't on Open Ocean, but near rocky or coral-lined shores. (You might find many stories of bad kayak landings in our journals. The book "we survived yesterday" is also full of tales of dangerous landings). If possible avoid shores with high cliffs. Look out for breaking surf and coral reefs. Choose sandy beaches over rocks and coral. If you are on the windward side of the island, try to paddle around it (to the leeward side) to find a more protected place (or look for a small bay that will shelter you from waves). A flat sloping beach might be a better choice than a steep beach (on which big surf could break violently). If you can wait, don't land at night. If you can't choose your landing and will arrive in a coral or rocky area, wear protecting clothing if available (shoes, life jacket, wetsuit, etc). Waves arrive in sets (often of 7); make sure you time your landing to deal with the smallest waves. If pushed toward rocks, swim feet first. If high swell threatens to break on you, don't surf it, dive into it (going in the opposite direction) and once it passes over you resume swimming toward the beach. If you were in a raft or canoe, the main surf landing technique would be very similar to kayaking. Paddle hard toward the beach between the waves and back paddle as hard as you can when the next breaking wave is catching you (avoid surfing, you might capsize). If you have a sea anchor, let it drag behind you. It will keep your craft oriented in the waves and will prevent you from surfing (and maybe capsizing). Don't jump in the water, stay in your raft (or dinghy) until you touch the beach. If you seem to be drifting away from shore, you most likely are in a rip current (or possibly in an out flowing river estuary). Don't fight it. Those are usually not very wide, paddle or swim parallel to shore until you come out of the rip current. Once on the beach if no human signs are evident, you are now in a coastal survival situation (much more favorable than a sea survival situation). Note: It is easier to look for landmarks when you are still on the water than after you've landed on the beach. Note: If you are wearing a life jacket, it might be easier to swim on your back. It is easier to cover distance with a partially deflated jacket. INDICATIONS TO THE PROXIMITY OF LAND - Drifting vegetation or wood might indicate proximity of land. - Birds often fly to sea in the morning and return toward the land at night (some birds can fly far out to sea). - Birds usually indicate proximity of land. - Wind generally blows toward land during the day and toward sea at night. - Shallow water is clear (in tropics). It might indicate proximity of land. - Silt or murky water probably comes from a river and indicates proximity of land (the Amazon produces murky ocean for hundreds of miles) - In the tropics coral reefs or lagoons often reflect themselves in the clouds (greenish color). Cumulus clouds are usually formed over land. - Clouds often gather themselves over corals islands and reefs. - A change of pattern in the swell might indicate a change of tide around an island. - If the swell is decreasing but the wind remains constant, it indicates an island windward (which is protecting the sea). 4.13.5. SURVIVAL IN DESERT REGIONS Most desert lands were once fertile and some of the creatures that lived there then adapted to the new conditions. Like them, the survivor must learn to make the most of any available shade, to create protection from the sun, reduce moisture loss and restrict activity to the ends of the day and the night. Learn from the peoples who live or travel through the deserts. In some deserts, especially the Sahara, the deserts of the Middle East, of Peru and northern

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Chile and parts of the Gobi desert in Mongolia, there are great temperature differences between night and day. At night condensation of any moisture in the air can make some water available- and in the Namibian desert of southern Africa fog coming in from the sea often provides moisture for life. Elsewhere, in such deserts as those of Western Australia, northern Mexico and the Mohave of the southwestern USA, where the temperature changes are comparatively slight, there is very little condensation and consequently both plants and game are very rare. Sometimes, as in the Kalahari, there will be sparse grass and thorny bushes and, even in the most barren conditions, some kind of life seems to survive, though often invisible if you don't know where to look. Dust and sand storms may occur at certain times of the year, reducing visibility to zero and demanding maximum protection to prevent sand entering every orifice. Dust devils- desert whirlwinds like tornadoes- are quite common. When rain does come- and in some territories years may pass with none at all- it may be in torrential down pours which create flash floods, before being quickly absorbed into the parched ground. This provides for a brief blossoming of vegetation and the emergence of species such as the Spade foot Toad of Arizona for rapid reproduction. DESERT RAINFALL AND TEMPERATURE Typical of desert extremes are conditions in the Rub'al Khali, the "Empty Quarter", of southern Arabia. For most of the year there is only a trace of rain but over 30mm may fall on a single day in the winter. July temperatures may reach over 48C (120F), dropping to 15C (60F) at night, and December extremes range from 26 to 6.6C (79-20F). WATER Water needs are paramount. Finding it is VITAL. If you have it, ration it immediately. If you are stranded by mechanical failure during a planned desert crossing, you will have plotted your route with an awareness of oases, wells and waterholes. Wells can be very deep and the water level requires a container lowered on a line to reach it. Small water holes are often seasonal. They are usually covered with a stone or brushwood. Away from known waterholes, try digging at the lowest point between dunes. Do not dig in the heat of the day, the exertion will use up too much fluid and you may not be able to replace it. You must always balance fluid loss against possible gain. Exploit cactus and roots as water sources and, in deserts where the day/night temperature range is great, exploit this to produce water by condensation. LIFE EXPECTANCY Life expectancy depends upon the water available and your ability to protect the body from exposure to the sun to minimize perspiration. Allow a slight negative balance. Drink 1.5 liter for every 2-liter lost and then drink at the rate the body is sweating. Efficiency is then impaired little and no water is wasted. Less fluid will not result in less sweating. Sweating is a cooling mechanism, not a way of losing moisture. If more fluid is drunk than needed it will be excreted and used to no purpose. Without water you will last about two and a half days at 48C (120F) if you spend the whole time resting in the shade, though you could last as long as twelve days if the temperature stays below 21C (70F). If you are forced to walk to safety the distance you cover will relate directly to water available. With none, a temperature of 48C (120F), walking only at night, resting all day, you could cover 40 km (25miles). Attempting to walk by day you would be lucky to complete 8 km (5miles) before collapse. At the same temperature, with about 2 liters of water you might cover 56 km (35miles) and last three days. Your chances are not

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appreciably increased until available water reaches about 4.5 liters per person, though training and determination to survive could contradict predictions. SHELTER AND FIRE Make a shelter from the sun and rest in the shade. You'll also need protection from winds and low night temperatures. Do not stay in a metal vehicle or airplane, which may rapidly become overheated. Use it to support a shelter or make use of the shadow beneath an aircrafts wing. In sand desert you may even be able to use wreckage to make a shelter beneath the sand. Many desert creatures spend the day beneath the surface, where the day temperature is much lower and night much warmer than outside. Sand will not permit tunneling and you have to make a support structure. Having provided immediate shade, build your shelter in the cool of the evening to conserve energy and fluids. Pile rocks to make a windbreak. If using fabrics, leave the bottom edges lifted and loose by day to increase air circulation. Weight them down with rocks at night. Avoid lying directly on hot ground. If you make a raised bed air can circulate beneath you. You will need a fire for warmth at night, and for boiling water. Smoke will also be very noticeable and useful for signaling. Desert scrub is dry and burns easily. If the land is totally barren, vehicle fuel and oil mixed with sand in a container will burn well (and is an easy way to light other fires) or use a string wick. Camel, donkey and other animal droppings burn well. CLOTHING Clothing helps reduce fluid loss and gives protection from sunburn- as well as warmth at night and a barrier against insect bites and thorns. In the desert it should be light and loose fitting, with air space between the garments and the body to provide insulation. Copy the flowing, layered garments of the Arab world. Trousers give more protection from insects than shorts (and guard against serious burns on the legs if forced into daytime exposure). Cover the head and feet. KEEP COVERED Do not strip off your clothes. Apart from the risk of severe sunburn, an uncovered body will lose sweat through evaporation requiring even more to cool it- but keep the covering as loose as possible so that there is a layer of insulating air. Sweating will then cool you more efficiently. HEADGEAR Any hat with a piece of cloth attached to the back will give some protection to the head and back of the neck but it is better to copy the headgear of desert peoples. You need a piece of material about 120cm (4ft) square, a smaller piece, such as a handkerchief, and a piece of cord or cloth (a tie is ideal) to keep them in position. Make the handkerchief into a wad on top of the head. Fold the large cloth diagonally; place it over the handkerchief, the long edge forward. Tie cord or cloth around the head to secure them. Allowed to fall freely this will protect from the sun, trap pockets of air, take advantage of breezes and protect from sandstorms. At night wrap it around the face for warmth. EYE PROTECTION Sunglasses or goggles will help - though many made for use in temperate climes may offer insufficient protection. Soot from the fire smeared below the eyes will reduce glare reflected

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from the skin. Shield the eyes from glare and windborne sand with a strip of material. Cut narrow slits to see through. FOOTWEAR Do not walk barefoot on hot sand. It will burn and cause blisters. Do not wear sandals, which leave the top of the foot exposed. Improvise coverings if you have none. FOOD Heat usually produces a loss of appetite- so does not force you to eat. Protein foods increase metabolic heat and increase water loss and liquids are needed for digestion. If water is scarce, keep eating to a minimum and then try to eat only moisture- containing foods, such as fruits and vegetables. Food spoils very quickly in the desert and any stores, once opened, should be eaten straight away or kept covered and shaded. Flies appear from nowhere and settle on your uncovered food. PLANTS Vegetation, away from oases and waterholes, is likely to be little more than scrub and grasses- even in the semi desert- but grasses are edible and sometimes plentiful. The Acacia tree in the scrub provides edible beans. Beware of the Acacias thorns but try all its soft parts: flowers, fruit, seeds, bark and the young shoots. The grasses of the Sahara and the Gobi are neither nutritious nor palatable, but in the Sahara and the Asian deserts you may find the desert gourd, a member of the Squash family. Its vine can run over the ground for 4.5m (15ft). Chew its water-filled shoots and eat its flowers and orange-sized fruits, the seeds of which are edible roasted or boiled. The Mescal plant (an Agave from which tequila is made) of the Mexican desert, grows with a rosette of thick, tough, sharp-tipped, grows with a rosette of thick, tough, sharp-tipped leaves. Its central stalk, which rises like a candle to a flowering head, can be eaten. Cut the ends of the leaves to suck out water. ANIMALS Deserts often support a variety of animal life, which borrows into the sand or hides in any available shade during the day. Insects, reptiles, small rodents and specially adapted mammals have big ears to act as cooling aids. There are geckoes, lizards and snakes. Tortoises and amphibians survive from when these were once well-watered lands. The Sahara has gerbils and gerboas; the Middle East, Caracals and Hyenas. In the Kalahari there is a squirrel that uses its tail for shade. There are even Gazelles that manage to get all the moisture they need from the sap of leaves, though most large mammals are an indication that there is a water supply within daily reach of their grazing areas. Bird's feathers give them good insulation against heat and many live and breed long distances from there water supplies- such as the roadrunner of Arizona. HEALTH Most desert illnesses are caused by excessive exposure to sun and heat. Keeping head and body covered and remaining in shade until sundown can avoid them. Constipation and pain in passing urine are common and salt-deficiency can lead to cramps. Continued heavy sweating on the body coupled with rubbing by clothing can produce blockages in the sweat glands and an uncomfortable skin irritation known as prickly heat. Heat cramps, leading to heat exhaustion, heat stroke and serious sunburn are all dangers. A gradual increase in activity and daily exposure to the sun will build up a defense- provided

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that plenty of drinking water is available. Various microorganisms attack the moist areas of the body - the crevices of the armpits, groin and between the toes. Prevention and treatments are to keep these areas clean and dry. Warning: In the desert even the most trivial wound is likely to become infected if not dealt with straight away. Thorns are easily picked up and should be pulled out as soon as possible. Where the skin is broken a large and painful sore may develop which could prevent walking. Bandage all cuts with clean dressings and use what medical aids are available. 4.13.6. SURVIVAL IN POLAR REGIONS Antarctica is covered with a sheet of ice. In the Arctic the pole is capped by deep ice floating on the sea and all the land north of the timberline is frozen. There are only two seasons - a long winter and a short summer - the day varying from complete darkness in midwinter to 24 hours daylight at midsummer. Arctic summer temperatures can rise to 18C (65F), except on glaciers and frozen seas, but fall in winter to as low as - 56C (-81F) and are never above freezing point. In the northern forests summer temperatures can reach 37C (100F), but altitude pushes winter temperatures even lower than in the artic. Antarctic winds of 177kmph (11Omph) have been recorded and, in the arctic autumn, winter winds reach hurricane force and can whip snow 30m (100ft) into the air, giving the impression of a blizzard - even when its not snowing. Accompanied by low temperatures, winds have a marked chilling effect- much greater than the thermometer indicates. For instance, a 32kmph wind will bring a temperature of -14C (5F) down to -34C (-30F). TRAVEL Experience shows the best policy is to stay near an aircraft or disabled vehicle. If the spot is hazardous establish a safe shelter as close as possible. A decision to walk out will be based on nearness to civilization and probability of rescue. Decide early what to do - while you can still think clearly. Cold dulls the mind. Movement in a blizzard is out of the question and, at all times, navigation is difficult on featureless ice and tundra. Ice movement pushes up ridges, which make the going treacherous. Summer melt water makes the tundra boggy and even sea ice slushy under foot. Mosquito, black fly, deerfly and midges can all be a nuisance in the arctic summer. Their larvae live in water- avoid making shelter near it Keep sleeves down, collar up, wear a net over the head and burn green wood and leaves on the fire - smoke keeps them at bay. When it turns colder, these nuisances are less active and they disappear at night. In Alaska, north western and northeastern Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Scandinavia, and on other islands there are mountains where ice cliffs, glaciers, crevasses and avalanches are hazards. Near the Artic coastline frequent fog from May to August, sometimes carried far inland, increases navigation problems. NAVIGATION Compasses are unreliable near the poles. The constellations are better direction finders and nights light enough to travel by. By day use the shadow tip method. Traveling on sea ice, do not use icebergs or distant landmarks to fix direction. Floes are constantly moving - relative positions may change. Watch for ice breaking up and, if forced to cross from floe to floe, leap from and to a spot at least 60cm (2ft) from the edge. Survivors have been rescued from floes drifting south but sooner or later ice floating into the warmer oceans will melt -

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though that chance might be worth taking. Avoid icebergs; they have most of their mass below the water. As this melts, they can turn over without warning, particularly with your added weight. Avoid sailing close to ice-cliffs. Glaciers may "calve" huge masses of ice, often thousands of tons, which break off into the sea without warning. Bird observations can aid navigation. Migrating wildfowl fly to land in the thaw. Most sea birds fly out to sea during the day and return at night. Sky reflections help to determine distant terrain. Clouds over open water, timber or snow free ground appear black below; over sea ice and snowfields, white. New ice produces grayish reflections; mottled ones indicate pack ice or drifted snow. Warning: Ice-cold water is a killer. Falling into icy water knocks the breath out of you. The body curls up with loss of muscular control and violent shivering. Exposed parts freeze in about 4 minutes, consciousness clouds in7, death follows in 15 - 20. Resist! Take violent action on hitting the water. Get to shelter and dry kit immediately. ARCTIC FISHING On frozen artic seas fish are likely to be the most accessible food. Even in summer it is safer to fish through the ice than to fish from the edge of a flow, which may break up beneath you. The techniques involved are equally effective on any frozen lake or river where the ice is thick enough to bear your weight with ease but not so solid that it cannot be broken through. First you need to gain access to the water, which means smashing a hole in the ice. If you have an ice saw, use that to cut neat holes, which will still leave you with firm edges. If you have to smash the ice there is a risk that it may fracture back into the area where you are standing. Approach the operation carefully. HOOK AND LINE Bait the hook in the usual way. If the line is being carried back up against the underside of the ice you will have to weight it below the hook. There is no point in trying out your angling skills at only one hole - far better to set up multiple angling points. In order to cover them effectively, however, you will need an easy way of knowing when you have a bite, make a flag from a piece of cloth, paper or cardpreferably of a bright color so that you will see it easily against the snow and ice- and attach it to a light stick. Lash this firmly at right angles to another stick, which must extend beyond the maximum diameter of your hole by at least 30percent. Now attach the line to the lower end of the flagpole and rest the flag on the side of the hole with the line at its center. When a fish takes your bait the crosspiece will be pulled over the hole and the flagpole jerked upright. Keep your eye on the markers so you can pull your catch up quickly. The wriggling fish makes an easy meal for a passing seal. ANTARCTIC: Lichens and mosses, growing on dark, heat-absorbing rocks on some northern coasts, are the only plants; seas are rich in plankton and krill, which support fishes, whales, seals, and many seabirds. Most birds migrate in autumn, but flightless penguins stay. They make good eating. Most of the year they take to the water at the first sign of danger but, when incubating eggs, sit tight on their burrows or scrapes. ARCTIC: Ice provides no habitat for plants or animals, even polar bears are likely only to hunt where they can find prey - and they are difficult and dangerous to hunt. Seabirds, fish and seals, where there is water, are the potential foods. Foxes - the artic fox turns white in winter - sometimes follows polar bears on to sea ice to scavenge their kills. Northern wildlife

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is migratory and availability depends on season Tundra and forest: Plants and animals can be found in winter and summer and the northern forests offer even more wildlife. Tundra plant species are the same in Russia as in Alaska. All are small compared to warmer climate plants: ground spreading willow, birch and berry plants with high vitamin content. Lichens and mosses, found widely, form a valuable food source - especially reindeer moss. POISONOUS PLANTS The majorities of artic plants are edible, but AVOID water hemlock - the most poisonous. AVOID the fruit of the baneberry. AVOID small artic buttercups. Best avoid fungi too - make sure you can distinguish lichens from them! There are no arctic plants, which are known to produce contact poisoning. 4.13.7. SURVIVAL IN JUNGLE REGIONS Everything in the jungle thrives, including disease - germ breed at an alarming rate - and parasites. Nature provides water, food and plenty of materials for making shelters. Indigenous peoples have lived for millennia from hunting and gathering, but for the outsider it can take a long time to get used to the conditions and the non-stop activity. Native people wear little, except as ornament, but the newcomer, unaccustomed to insects, leeches and to moving through dense jungle growth, needs to keep as covered as possible. Clothing may become saturated by perspiration but it is better than being stung, scratched and bitten all over. Do not remove clothing until you halt and then, with humidity at 8090% there is no point hanging it up to dry except in the sun or by a fire. Clothes saturated regularly by perspiration will rot. Except at high altitudes, high temperatures, heavy rainfall and oppressive humidity characterize both equatorial and subtropical regions. At low altitudes, temperature variation is seldom more than 10C (50 F), and is often 37C (98 F). At altitudes over 1500m (5000ft) ice often forms at night. The rain has a slightly cooling effect but, when it stops, the temperature soars. Rainfall is heavy, often with thunder and lightning. Sudden rain beats on the tree canopy, turning trickles into raging torrents and rivers rise at an alarming rate, but - just as suddenly its gone. Violent storms may occur, usually towards the end of the "summer" months. Prevailing winds create variation between winter and summer with the dry season (rain once a day) and the monsoon (continuous rain). In south East Asia, winds from the Indian Ocean bring monsoon, but it is dry when the wind blows from the landmass of China. Tropical day and night are of equal length, darkness falls quickly and daybreak is equally sudden. FIRE: Everything is likely to be damp. Take standing dead wood and shave off the outside. Use that to start your fire. Dry bamboo makes excellent tinder (store some), so does a termites nest. FOOD: A large variety of fruits, roots and leaves are available. Banana, papaya, mango and figs are easily recognized, (papaya is one of the few plants with white sap that is edible). The large, thorny fruit of the Durian, of Southeast Asia, smells disgusting, but is good to eat. Palms provide an edible growing point and manioc produces massive tubers- though they must be cooked before eating. Taro, wild potato and some kinds of yam must also be prepared to remove poisons before they are eaten. You must also be prepared to remove poisons before they are eaten. Deer, pigs, monkeys and a wide range of animals can be hunted and trapped according to location.

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In primary jungle, birds spend most of there time in the tree canopy among the fruit and berries. Place traps in clearings and lure birds with fruit. Near river traps can be baited with fish or offal for Fish Eagles and similar species, which patrol rivers for prey. Parrots and their relatives abound in the tropics - their screeching makes their presence known from early morning, they are cunning - get them used to taking bait before setting the trap. Snakes are easier to catch - go for the non-poisonous constrictor - and very tasty. Catch them using a forked stick. Rivers support all kinds of life: fish, plants, animals and insects. If you have no fishing tackle small pools can be dammed and then emptied with a bailer - fish and turtles in surprising numbers in mud. Fish from slow moving water are more likely to be infested with parasites. If suspect, boil for 20 minutes. Cover your feet Good footwear and protection for the legs is essential- they are most exposed to leeches and centipedes. Wrap bark or cloth around the legs and tie it to make puttees. Insect attack Slashing your way through jungle you may disturb bee, wasp or hornet nests. They may attack, especially hornets, whose stings can be especially painful. Anywhere left bare, including your face, is vulnerable to attack. Run! Don't drop anything; you won't want to go back for it! Goggles would help protect the eyes. As you work up perspiration there are insects, desperate for salt that will fly to the wettest parts of the body. Unfortunately they also sting. Protect armpits and groin. BEWARE OF INVADERS Keep clothing and footwear off the ground. Then scorpions, snakes and other nasties are less likely to invade them. Always shake out clothing and check boots before putting them on and be wary when putting hands in pockets. On waking, take care. Centipedes tend to curl for warmth in some of the more private body regions. Beware caterpillars too! If mosquitoes and leeches sucking your blood, painful bites from centipedes and the risk of scorpion and snake bites are not enough, look out for hairy caterpillars. Be careful to brush them off in the direction they are traveling or small irritant hairs may stay in the skin and cause an itchy rash, which may fester in the heat. MOSQUITO PROTECTION Wear a net over your head, or tie a tee shirt or singlet over it, especially at dawn and dusk. Better, take a strip of cloth long enough to tie around your head and about 45cm (18in) deep and cut it to make a fringe of vertical strips hanging from a band that will hang around your face and over your neck. At night keep covered, including your hands. Use bamboo or a sapling to support a little tent of clothing plus large leaves, rigged over your upper half. Oil, fat or even mud spread on hands and face may help to repel mosquitoes. In camp a smoky fire will help keep insects at bay. Leeches lie on the ground or on vegetation, especially in damp places, waiting to attach themselves to an animal (or a person) to take a meal of blood. Their bite is not painful but they secrete a natural anti-coagulant that makes it messy. Left alone, they drop off when they are had their fill - but if you are covered in them you must do something! Do NOT pull

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them off. There is a risk the head will come off leaving the jaws in the bite, which could turn septic. Remove with a dab of salt, alcohol or the burning end of a cigarette, an ember or a flame. 4.13.8. SURVIVAL IN SEA SHORES Most seashores offer abundant sources of food and excellent prospects for survival. Even where they appear bleak and barren, there is food to be found. Coastal waters are the home of many life forms - seaweeds, fish, seals, birds, mollusks and the plankton that supports the marine animals. Inland lakes and waterways of all kinds will also teem with life, with the exception of the Dead Sea and other main areas of extreme salinity, and those heavily polluted by man. Coasts can range from sheer cliffs to long and gently sloping beaches. From the sea a towering cliff offers no opportunity to escape the water. Even a stretch of beach at its foot is likely to be cut off by high tide in tidal waters, though it could offer a few hours of respite before swimming off to find another landing place. All kinds of shore, however, offer resources to exploit and there are few better places to be stranded. SANDY BEACHES Sandy shores tend to be gentle and sloping. The tide goes out a long way, exposing large areas, which are the habitat of burrowing species, left below the sand when the water recedes. They include many worms and mollusks and they also attract feeding birds. Look for signs of buried mollusks. It is usually easier to spot the marks left by the siphons of buried bivalves under the shallow water at the seas edge. Where the sand is not inundated by the tide and is blown into dunes, it may be possible to find fresh water and it is here that plants will grow. Sand is easily blown by the wind and gets into everything. Dunes also tend to be full of insects - so do not choose them for making camp or building shelter, if you can move beyond. MUDDY SHORES AND ESTUARIES Where a slow moving river joins the sea it deposits sediment, rich in nutrients, forming large mud flats. These can support many species of worms and mollusks and provide a rich feeding ground for birds and animals. ROCKY SHORES Rocky shores, if their cliffs are not too sheer, trap pools of water when the tide recedes. These pools may teem with life. Rocks form strata, to which the many univalve shells can cling, an anchor for weed and sea urchins and crevices where octopus and other cephalopods can live. Soft rocks such as chalk, marl and limestone, erode quickly and their surfaces are smooth, but hard rocks fracture in chunks and provide good nesting sites for birds. PEBBLE BEACHES Stretches of pebble beach often found between sandy and rocky sections of the shore, sustain least life. The continual movement of pebbles makes a difficult habitat for most plants and animals. Seashore plants will differ according to the climate, but they will be available when weather or tide prevents you gathering food from the sea. In the water, you will find seaweeds (more correctly called algae) are very valuable as food. In many parts of the world they form a major part of the diet and many are considered a delicacy from the cuisine of Japan to the laver bread of Wales. Seaweeds can be dried and stored for months. Warning! Do not eat the blue-green algae sometimes found on fresh water pools.

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It is very poisonous. SEAFOOD The best hunting for fish and mollusks will be at low tide, when rock pools can be inspected and buried mollusks and other creatures dug from sandy shores. In tropical zones mussels are poisonous during the summer, especially when seas are reddish or highly phosphorescent. In the arctic, black mussels can be poisonous at any time of the year. Learn to recognize the cone shells, which shoot out a poisonous barb, in a few species potent enough to kill you. Only eat mollusks collected live. Bivalves such as oysters, clams and mussels, should close tightly if tapped gently. Use a knife under the edge of the shell to pries them off. If they are hard to dislodge, they are good to eat. If they come off easily, they are probably dead or sick. After high tide any limpet found still fastened is good food- the tide washes away sick or dead specimens. Cook shell foods by plunging them into boiling water and boiling for at least five minutes. If you eat shell foods raw you expose yourself to parasites and pollutants, which they may carry. FISHING Fish and sea snakes require more effort than shellfish. Some fish are dangerous and all sea snakes are venomous. Distinguish snakes from eels by their scales and their broad flattened tails. They are said not to bite swimmers. Bites usually occur, and then only rarely, when fishermen are removing fish from nets in which the snakes are also caught. On most coasts the best time to fish from the shore is about two hours after high water. If you fish when the tide is still coming in you are constantly retreating and probably getting wet. Remember that salt water will rot boots and clothing. Sea fishing requires a larger hook than fresh water fishing. A wide variety of bait can be used. Make use of the tide to help you catch fish by building large arrow-shaped fish traps from stakes or rocks. Point them away from the shore. Fish will be caught when the tide recedes. OCTOPUS AND SQUID Octopus can be hunted at night, when they are in search of their own prey. Attract them with a light, and then spear them. In daytime empty shells around a hole is an indication that an octopus may live inside. Drop in a baited hook, wait until it is taken and pull sharply up. The best way to kill an octopus is to turn it inside out: place a hand inside the fleshy hood, grab the innards and pull hard. Try it on a small octopus first! It takes practice so until you are proficient stab the octopus between the eyes or bang it against a rock. All octopuses have a hard, parrot-like beak, and a few can give a poisonous bite. The worst is the Blue-ringed octopus of eastern Australia- its venom can be lethal. AVOID IT! Octopus flesh is tough and chewy and very nourishing. Pounding it will help make it more tender. Boil the body and roast the smaller tentacles. In the open sea squid can be huge, but a few small squid may occur inshore. Look for them in rock pools attached to seaweed. Catch them at night with a bright light, by jigging. Cuttlefish do not come close inshore but can be caught at sea in the same way. Fish are a valuable food source, containing protein, vitamins and fats. All fresh water fish are edible but some tropical ones can be dangerous: keep clear of electric eels, freshwater stingrays and the piranha of South American rivers. Unless very still, water higher than your thighs will be too murky to see through. You'll risk stepping on something unpleasant and waves could sweep you on to rocks or coral. Wear

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shoes when foraging in the water- you need soles if you are improvising foot coverings. Cloth wrapping is NOT enough to protect from spines. JELLYFISH are often swept inshore after a storm. Some, especially in the tropics, sting severely, the sea wasps, or box jellies, of northern Australian beaches, are the most dangerous. The bell shaped body of the largest reaches only 25 cm but it tentacles can reach 9m. Almost transparent, and difficult to see, each tentacle is armed with millions of stinging cells. Although their venom is one of the most deadly known and highly concentrations cause skin lesions and death, usually only a very high dose is fatal to humans. Some jellyfish are not venomous but beware - size is not an indication of potency! If stung do NOT pull the tentacles off or wipe away the slime with your hand- you will only get stung more. Use seaweed, cloth etc to wipe the sting with sand. PORTUGUESE-MAN-OF-WAR, looks like a jellyfish but are actually a colony of polyps. It too, can have tentacles 9m (30ft) long but, though its stings may cause irritation for several days, they are rarely fatal. Treat as for jellyfish. WEAVER FISH lie buried in the sand off the shores of Europe, West Africa and the Mediterranean. Their spines are venomous. Apply very hot water to sooth spine wounds. Stingrays occur inshore everywhere, but especially in warm to temperate zones. Camouflaged, some like rocky and pebbly places, they don't only hide in sand. Play it safe prod the bottom with a stick as you go. Stingray wounds can be soothed with very hot water. MORAY EELS may be found in shallow water. They have a savage bite and guard their holes tenaciously. Keep clear of any you see and do NOT put your hands into crevices! GIANT CLAMS on tropical reefs can be big enough to trap a limb if they snap shut on it. FISH WITH VENOMOUS SPINES often live in very shallow waters. Most common, and most dangerous, in the tropics, a few occur in temperate waters. Bottom-dwelling kinds are almost impossible to detect and are often superbly camouflaged. Zebra fish are easier to see, but equally dangerous to contact. Use a stick to stir up sand and rocks in front of you. SEA SNAKES often occur in some numbers close in shore in the Tropical Pacific and the Indian oceans. They are inoffensive and bites are rare - but their venom is most toxic of all snake venom. Keep clear of snakes in the water. Found on shore, pin them with a forked stick- they make a good meal. MANY CORALS are sharp and can easily cut you. Some, such as the fire corals, sting on contact. Always approach a reef with caution Exploit other sites for food first. Both the reef and its inhabitants - which may include cone shells - , can present dangers. SHARKS Although most sharks feed mainly in deep waters, some species frequent shallow waters and swim up rivers and any might come onshore looking for an easy meal. Most shark attacks on humans occur in very shallow water. Be watchful! LAGOONS Reefs are often formed around tropical islands or out from the shore, making a breakwater, which leaves still waters in a lagoon. Fish in the lagoon are often of the poisonous varieties. Barracuda and Red snapper, which are edible in the open sea, should be avoided if caught in lagoons - their eating habits cause them to become toxic.

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5.1. AIRPLANE DESCRIPTION .....................................................................................3 5.1.1. AIRCRAFT DIMENSIONS.................................................................................4 5.1.2. YR-HBA EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT LOCATION ....................................................6 5.2. DOORS, SLIDES AND OVERWING EXITS ................................................................7 5.2.1. L1 PASSENGER DOOR....................................................................................8 5.2.1.1. FORWARD PASSENGER ENTRANCE DOOR - AND THE STAIRWAY .................. 11 5.2.2. R1 - L2 SERVICE DOOR................................................................................ 15 5.2.3. EMERGENCY OPERATION OF L1, R1 AND L2 .................................................... 17 5.2.3.1. USE OF SLIDE AS A FLOTATION AID......................................................... 18 5.2.3.2. SLIDE RELOCATION PROCEDURE ............................................................. 18 5.2.4. TAILCONE EXIT (A1 DOOR) .......................................................................... 19 5.2.4.1. VENTRAL PASSENGER STAIRWAY............................................................. 20 5.2.4.2. TAILCONE DECAL (ACTIVATOR INDICATOR) .............................................. 23 4.2.4.3. SAFETY BARRIER STRAP ......................................................................... 23 5.2.4.4. TAILCONE EXIT EMERGENCY OPERATION ............................................... 25 5.2.4.5. INOPERATIVE CATWALK ......................................................................... 28 5.2.4.6. TAILCONE MANUAL JETTISON HANDLE ..................................................... 28 5.2.4.7. MANUAL INFLATION OF TAILCONE SLIDE.................................................. 30 5.2.5. OVERWING EXITS ....................................................................................... 31 5.3. THE COCKPIT................................................................................................... 33 5.3.1. WINDOWS ................................................................................................. 33 5.3.2. COCKPIT CHAIR .......................................................................................... 34 5.3.3. REINFORCED FLIGHT DECK DOOR ................................................................. 34 5.4. THE OXYGEN SYSTEM ....................................................................................... 36 5.4.1. COCKPIT STABLE OXYGEN SYSTEM ............................................................... 36 5.4.2. COCKPIT DEMAND CONSTANT FLOW OXYGEN BOTTLE ..................................... 38 5.4.3. CABIN STABLE OXYGEN SYSTEM ................................................................... 39 5.5. EMERGENCY LIGHTING SYSTEM ........................................................................ 41 5.6. CABIN CREW PANELS........................................................................................ 44 5.7. COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS ............................................................................... 45 5.7.1. PUBLIC ADDRESS ....................................................................................... 45 5.7.2. INTERPHONE SYSTEM.................................................................................. 46 5.8. CABIN LIGHTING SYSTEM.................................................................................. 48 5.9. PASSENGER SEATS........................................................................................... 48 5.10. PASSENGER SERVICE UNITS (PSU) ................................................................... 49 5.11. OVERHEAD COMPARTMENTS ............................................................................ 49 5.12. JUMPSEATS.................................................................................................... 49 5.13. LAVATORIES .................................................................................................. 50 5.14. GALLEYS ....................................................................................................... 52 5.15. SAFETY AND EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT ............................................................... 56 5.15.1. PORTABLE OXYGEN BOTTLES ..................................................................... 56 5.15.2. PROTECTIVE BREATHING EQUIPMENT (PBE) ................................................. 58 5.15.3. FIRE FIGHTING GLOVES ............................................................................. 61 5.15.4. SMOKE GOGGLES...................................................................................... 61 5.15.5. FIRE EXTINGUISHERS................................................................................ 61 5.15.5.1. WATER (H2O)...................................................................................... 61

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5.15.5.2. HALON ............................................................................................... 62 5.15.5.3. AUTOMATIC FIRE EXTINGUISHER - LAVATORY ......................................... 63 5.15.6. MEGAPHONE............................................................................................. 64 5.15.7. SMOKE DETECTORS................................................................................... 64 5.15.8. CRASH (FIRE) AXE ................................................................................... 65 5.15.9. ESCAPE LIFE-LINES .................................................................................. 65 5.15.10. EMERGENCY FLASHLIGHTS ....................................................................... 65 5.15.10.1. PORTABLE EMERGENCY FLASHLIGHT .................................................... 66 5.15.11. MEDICAL EQUIPMENT............................................................................... 66 5.15.11.1. FIRST AID KIT .................................................................................. 66 5.15.11.2. MEDICAL KIT .................................................................................... 67 5.15.11.3. BREATHING BARRIER ......................................................................... 68 5.15.12. LIFE VESTS ............................................................................................ 68 5.15.13. SEAT CUSHION ....................................................................................... 69 5.15.14. SAFETY DEMO EQUIPMENT ....................................................................... 70 5.15.15. EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER (E.L.T.) ............................................ 70

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5.1. AIRPLANE DESCRIPTION
MODEL: MANUFACTOR: ENGINES: MD 83 (MD-80 series have been produced since 1980) Douglas Aircraft Company McDonnell Douglas Corporation There are 2 Pratt & Whitney JT8D-219 High Bypass Turbine Engines. The engines are at the rear part of the aircraft. Left engine is No 1, right engine is No 2. 4,5 - 5 hours 4630 km Max. 900 km/h 37,000 feet (11.277 m)
YR- HBA 165 pax

MAX. FLIGHT TIME: RANGE (varies on conditions): CRUISE SPEED: MAX. OPERATING ALTITUDE: PASSENGER SEATING CAPACITY:

CREW:

1 Captain 1 First Officer 1 Observer up to 5 cabin crew

EXIT:

L1 - Forward Entry Door R1 - Forward Galley Door L2 - Aft Galley Door A1 - Aft Entry Door 4 over wing exit

SC/C C/C4 C/C3 C/C2

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5.1.1. AIRCRAFT DIMENSIONS

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5.1.2. YR-HBE EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT LOCATION

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5.2. DOORS, SLIDES AND OVERWING EXITS
MD 83 airplane has: 2 passenger doors 2 service doors 4 over wing exits Cockpit emergency exits (2 sliding windows) 1 cockpit door L1 and A1 doors have an internal stairway which can be controlled from inside and outside of the aircraft.

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DOORS AND THE PARTS LOCATED ON THEM Viewer Assist handle Door handle Latch open release handle Slide (the indicator is in green go) Interior assist strap (located next to each door and helps to stay in balance while opening and closing the door) 5.2.1. L1 PASSENGER DOOR Forward entry door is at the left side of the aircraft. It is a plug type door with a handle that rotates, on its own axis to open the door from the inside and the outside. Normal Operation (Inside) To open the door: - ensure girt bar is disengaged from floor brackets and stowed - position warning flag to its unarmed position - rotate the door operating handle 180 degrees in the direction of the arrow (to OPEN). The door will swing inboard - grasp the assist handle on the door with one hand and the assist handle on the inside of the airplane, located beside the door, with the other hand push the door to the full open position - ensure the mechanical latch locks the door open. To close the door: - press down on the door lock release latch - grasp the assist handle on the door with one hand and the assist handle on the inside of the airplane, located beside the door, with the other hand pull the door toward you - the door will lift off the body and enter the cabin - when the door has reached its most inboard point, grasp the door operating handle and continue to rotate 180 degrees until door is closed and locked. - as required, engage girt bar and set warning flag to the armed position. If the door is not closed or locked properly, the amber light on the related panel in the cockpit alerts. Dedicated Assist Space Near the entry door there is a dedicated assist space. The dedicated assist space is located between the cabin crew station and the door sill. During an emergency evacuation it is important that the cabin crew grasp the assist handle and place themselves in the dedicated assist space to ensure that they are not blocking the exit in any way.

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Normal operation - outside The exterior handle is pulled up and set to the open position. During this process, the slide must be in disarmed position. To close the door: press down on the door lock release latch grasp the door and pull to begin rotation the door will lift off the body and enter the cabin. when the door has reached its most inboard point, grasp the exterior handle and rotate handle until door is closed and locked. WARNING: Keep hands and fingers clear of door edges while closing the door. To open the door: check for red girt bar warning flag if flag is not visible, rotate the door handle (rotating the handle fully unlocks and unlatches the door) to allow the door to come to its full inboard position release exterior handle pull the aft edge of the door out to the full open position (this engages the door lock).

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5.2.1.1. FORWARD PASSENGER ENTRANCE DOOR - AND THE STAIRWAY The forward passenger entrance door stairway is used for passenger boarding. It is located in the stairway compartment just below the L1 door. It is operated electromechanically but if there is no electrical power it can be opened manually from the outside.

HANDRAIL RELEASE LEVER

LOCKABLE MECHANICAL DETENT LATCH

OPENING THE STAIRWAY FROM THE INSIDE The stairway can be opened and closed by the switches on the Cabin Crew Panel.

1 - Stair Down Light - illuminates after stairway completely extends and the handrails are locked 2 - Stair Door Open Light (amber) - it illuminates when the stairway compartment is opened 3 - Stair Control Switch operates the stairway

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RETRACT - Used for retracting the stairway. EXTEND - Used for extending the stairway. Forward stairway door handle It is located next to the forward cabin crew jump seats to operate the forward empty door (L1) stairway compartment. Pull the door towards you and lift it and at the same time "stair door open" light illuminates on the FAP. To close the door pull it towards you and push down and as the light turns off it is ensured that the stairway compartment is completely closed. Extending stairway Check if the slide is disarmed or not. Door is opened slightly; stairway compartment can not be opened unless the door is opened. Pull and lift the stairway door handle next to jump seat to open the stairway compartment. The amber "stair door open" light illuminates and it alerts on the panel in the cockpit. Push the "down" button on the FAP continuously to dislodge and open the stairway. The "Stair down" light illuminates when the handrails are disconnected from the stairway and are locked on the door. Dont stop at any point during extension, as it causes stair to stop and perhaps overheat. Finally the lock on the right side of the stairway door compartment must be brought to "locked" position to complete the opening of stairways. Retracting stairway 1. Release mechanical interlock. 2. Release and retract handrails. 3. Press the "retract" button and hold until the stairway is completely retracted. A "thump" will be heard, which is the small air stair door closing. 4. The GREEN stair down light will go off on the panel 5. Extend and lower the stairwell door latch handle to the down position. This locks the small air stair door. 6. The AMBER stair door open light will go out. If the AMBER light tails to go out, lift the stairwell door latch handle to the up position. Press the retract button and lower the stairwell door latch handle. 7. You must continue to hold the retract button as you lower the stairwell door latch handle to the down position. This will ensure that the stairs are full retracted and that the stairwell door is closed properly. 8. Squeeze gust lock release while holding onto inside aircraft assist handle. 9. Close the door. Ensure that the bayonet on the door is correctly positioned over the bayonet roller and rotate the operating handle to the closed position. This engages the interlock between L1 and the air stair door. OPENING THE STAIRWAY FROM THE OUTSIDE The forward passenger door must be open. There is an external Stairway control panel on the left bottom corner of the fuselage. This panel can be opened by lifting the cover from the bottom with the assistance of hand. An "UP" button to retract and close the stairway, a "DN" (down) button to extend and open the stairway, a BATT/NORM switch to supply electrical power to open the stairway and an

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OFF switch to be used when the electrical power does not exist, are located on that panel.

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5.2.2. R1 - L2 SERVICE DOOR The service doors are smaller and lower than the L1 passenger door and A1 door. These are plug type doors which can be opened both from the inside and the outside. Both handles inside and outside, which operates the door, moves the door inside first. To open the door, rotate the door handle up and set it to open position. Push the door until it comes to locked position on the fuselage. To close the door, press down on the door lock release latch, grasp the assist handle and pull the door inside. Turn the door handle up to locked position and lock the door.

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Red Warning Flag A red warning flag is installed next to the viewing window in each entry door L1, R1 and L2. In the warning position, the flag is clearly visible to anyone looking in the window from outside the airplane. This is a visual warning that the girt bar has been attached to the floor brackets and the slide will automatically deploy when the door is opened. WARNING: In a non-emergency situation, opening the door from the inside or outside with the door slide armed will deploy the slide and cause injury or death to the person(s) standing outside the door.

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Door Barrier Straps If provided, these barrier straps are used as a safety precaution for an open cabin door when a stairway or ramp is not in place. There are three door barrier straps, one each for L1, R1 and L2. When used, the straps are secured across the doorway to anchor plates mounted on the doorjamb. ARMED AND DISARMED POSITIONS OF L1, R1 AND L2 DOORS Girt bar is attached to the hooks on the slide cover when slide is in disarmed position. Girt bar is fixed on the floor by the locking mechanism when slide is in armed position. Slides cannot be checked from cockpit if they are armed or disarmed.

5.2.3. EMERGENCY OPERATION OF L1, R1 AND L2 Rotating the door handle fully aft (to OPEN) and opening the door with the girt bar fastened to the floor brackets automatically deploys the slide. In certain adverse airplane attitudes, direct two able-bodied passengers to assist in pushing the door out and forward to the open position. To open the door and deploy the slide: assess the escape route conditions observe cabin interior and airplane exterior conditions to identify usable escape exits ensure the airplane has stopped and the engines are shut down verify the girt bar is fastened to the floor brackets rotate the door handle and open the door. pull manual inflation handle. WARNING: If the slide does not inflate after manual attempt, do not use. Direct passengers to another exit. If an inflated slide deflates: it may be used as an apron slide direct two able-bodied passengers to climb down the slide using it as a rope direct the two passengers to then use the hand-holds provided on the sides of the slide to hold it taut while the remaining passengers exit one at a time. There are 4 one lane escape slides to enable rapid evacuation in an emergency. The inflatable and heat resistant evacuation slides are located at the forward passenger door (L1), at the forward and aft service doors (R1-L2) and at aft tail cone. There are no slides on the over wings, so evacuation is performed by sliding on the flaps. The slides on the L1, R1 and L2 can be inflated manually. When the door is opened on the "armed" position, only the slide's container falls down. To inflate the slide, the manual inflation handle on it must be pulled. If the band on the point of the handle breaks off, cord is wrapped around the hand and pulling process is performed. Slide inflates nearly in 5-10 seconds.

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When slide is inflated, the lights on it illuminate automatically and they light up the slide. There is a re-entry strap near the slide to get back on the aircraft again.

5.2.3.1. USE OF SLIDE AS A FLOTATION AID see chapter 4, 4.12.7.6, page 66 The slides of L1 and R1 doors are flotation devices. The slides have white detach handle and a mooring line. A detach handle below the flap cover of the girt bar separates the girt bar from the slide. After pulling the detach handle the mooring line prevents the slide drifting away from the aircraft. When the red strap above the slide is pulled then the mooring line will snap and the slide will separate from the aircraft. Rotate the door handle (Open the door by pushing it and make it locked on the fuselage) Pull the red handle to inflate the slide Lift up the cover to see the white disengage handle Pull the disengage handle ( finally the mooring line, that keeps the slide fixed on the aircraft, will be left) Pull the red disengage strap on the slide to separate the slide from the mooring line. An inflated slide helps the passengers float on water by grasping it. The back side of the slide can be used by reversing it. Even it is reversed or not, adults grasp the bands around it and the children, the sick or the handicapped passengers are set on the slide.

DISENGAGE HANDLE

USE OF SLIDE AS FLOTATION AID

5.2.3.2. SLIDE RELOCATION PROCEDURE Keep door closed. Disengage girt bar from floor brackets. Remove manual slide pack from casing by pulling down hard on girt bar. Transport slide pack to desired exit. Attach girt bar to brackets, push out of door and inflate.

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5.2.4. TAILCONE EXIT (A1 DOOR) Description The MD-80 series aircraft are equipped with an aft passenger door and ventral stairway. This is referred to as the tailcone exit. The door is an inward opening exit which, when opened, latches against the lavatory wall. The passenger door may be operated from the cabin or from the stairway area. The ventral stairway can be extended or retracted from inside and outside of the aircraft. There is a window on the door that helps to see Tailcone area and Stairway compartment when the door is close. And the cabin crew jumpseats are also located on that door. There is a moveable seat headrest on the jumpseat which is used to make the slide arm-disarm. The slide is in disarmed position when the seat headrest, which is suited in the middle, is pushed up and fixed and the door is opened normally with the door handle. The slide is in armed position when the seat headrest is pulled down and in an emergency case the red "Emergency Door Handle" appears which ensures the tail cone falling and the slide inflation. The door is equipped with a viewing window and two (2) interior door handles. The AFT cabin crew jumpseat is mounted on the door and automatically retracts when not in use. A passenger restraining strap is mounted on the AFT bulkhead and extends across the aft entryway area. This strap must be secured for taxi, takeoff and landing. The strap is used to restrain passengers in an emergency until the exit is opened.
Aft entrance door Hold-open Latch Lift up to release door from open position

Stair light switch


Head Rest Pad When raised, normal door release handle and instructions available. When lowered, emergency handle and instructions available.

VIEWING WINDOW

Exit has been designed and constructed so that it cannot be opened during flight.

Aft pax entrance door handle AFT C/C SEAT SHOWN EXTENDED FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES. SEAT BOTTOM SPRING-LOADED TO FOLD INTO RECESS TO ALLOW DOOR TO OPEN.

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Normal Operation - Tailcone Exit To open the AFT door, C/C moves the center headrest to the up position. This exposes the lower door handle to be used for normal operations. The lower handle is interconnected to the exterior door handle and may be rotated from either side of the door. Open the door inward and lock it against the lavatory wall with the latch. To close the AFT door, unlatch the door, close it, rotate handle in the opposite direction of the arrow to the closed position.

5.2.4.1. VENTRAL PASSENGER STAIRWAY The ventral entrance passenger stairway is used for passenger boarding. The ventral stairway is operated by hydraulic power and it gets power from the hydraulic system. The hydraulic pumps on the right side are set to "ON" position by the cockpit to operate the stairway. The ventral stairway can also be controlled from the inside and the outside of the aircraft. The internal stairway control panel is located just behind the entrance door and when the door is opened it is on the right side. The panel is on the passing way division and it has Indication Lights and a Service Light Switch. The external stairway control panel is located on the aft below fuselage, which is next to the stairway compartment lid, and it is cover up with a latched lid. The panel has an upside down T shape handle where an "Open-Closed" sign is written on. The stairway can be extended by its normal falling without a hydraulic power. But the hydraulic pumps in the cockpit must definitely be on the "ON" position to retract the stairway. The ventral stairway is extended by setting the external control handle to the "open" position and this position is kept until the stairway is completely extended. To retract the stairway set the handle to the "closed" position until the stairway is completely retracted. The stair switch on the Aft Cabin Crew Panel controls the stairway lights and is set to "ON" position before use. When the stairway is completely extended, the green "Stair Down" light illuminates. The amber "Stair Door Open" light indicates that the stairway is not locked and closed. Both lights must be controlled before boarding and de-boarding the passengers. The stairway alert sign on the pilot alert panel illuminates as the stairway is extended. It must be ensured that the stairway is completely retracted and the "Stair Down" and "Stair Door Open" lights are turned off before closing the ventral door. After retracting the stair and locking it to the "Closed" position, the door is closed by the "Door Control Handle" on it.

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5.2.4.2. TAILCONE DECAL (ACTIVATOR INDICATOR) It is a white indicator that is located on Al door. It must be controlled before each flight. If a hole is seen on it, it means the tail cone has the danger of falling down. If so the captain must be informed immediately.

WARNING

IF DECAL IS PUNCTURED NOTIFY CAPTAIN IMMEDIATELY

5.2.4.3. SAFETY BARRIER STRAP across aisle aft area The red barrier strap in front of the aft right lavatory is locked to the other side of the left lavatory. This must be fastened during take-off and landing. This process prevents passenger boarding and de-boarding from the rear part until the cabin crew opens the door. If the door is open during fuelling, the safety barrier strap must be fastened. This cross-aisle barrier strap is also provided to retain passengers while the A1 cabin crew makes preparations for a tailcone emergency exit.

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5.2.4.4. TAILCONE EXIT EMERGENCY OPERATION When the A1 door's slide is on armed position, (the seat headrest in the middle is locked below and the red emergency door handle is above) if an emergency evacuation will be necessary, the cover on the emergency door handle is removed and handle is turned towards the open direction. Together with this process tail cone is armed, this way the system is put into use. As the door is opened nearly 12 cm, the tail cone falls down and the slide inflates. When the door is opened, slide is reached by means of walkway which works as a passing way. The tail cone can be fallen down out of the cone from the outside by the panel that is located at the left below. When the tail cone falls, it might block the evacuation way. If so the tail cone must be pulled by a person from the outside. A tail cone is made of fiberglass material and its weight is appr. 40 kg. It falls towards the left side of the aircraft. Its height from the walkway to the ground is 2.19 meters. The tailcone is NOT to be used for ditching! To arm the door for emergency operation, C/C moves the center headrest to the lowered position to expose the upper door handle. Emergency Use: 1. Check if there is fire, smoke or structural damage, if the exit is appropriate, 2. Remove the plastic cover and rotate the upper handle clockwise in the direction of the arrow. Rotating this handle "arms'' the tailcone deployment mechanism. 2. Pulling the door will cause the tailcone to jettison. Pull the door in. Latch the door to the lavatory wall. The catwalk will be visible. 3. The falling action of the tailcone deploys and inflates the slide automatically. There are two (2) slide visual indicators with color stripes on the top left and right sides of the slide, which are visible from the door area to indicate that the slide has inflated. Indicators erect when slide is usable. 4. If tailcone is not jettisoned by opening the AFT door, shuffle down the catwalk. Pull tailcone jettison handle which is located aircraft left, waist high. 5. If the slide does not inflate automatically, pull the red release strap which is in front of the slide container, roll the slide outside, pull the manual inflation handle and inflate the slide. The slide on the tail cone inflates automatically about 5-10 seconds.

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5.2.4.5. INOPERATIVE CATWALK The catwalk is formed when the ceiling inside the tailcone is in the "down position." If the catwalk does not drop inside the tailcone, and walking is impossible, feel along the ceiling just inside aft of the Exit Door, inside the tailcone. Locate the two ceiling stops on either side of the ceiling. Pull down on both of the stops to manually override the spring and cable operating ceiling. The catwalk will lower and enable the use of the tailcone as an evacuation route.

5.2.4.6. TAILCONE MANUAL JETTISON HANDLE If the tail cone fails to fall down, the spring system back-up handle, which is on the right side at the end of the walkway, it is pulled strongly. The back-up handle must be pulled maximum twice, if the tail cone does not fall, passengers must be directed to other usable exits.

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5.2.4.7. MANUAL INFLATION OF TAILCONE SLIDE

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A platform and an assist handle are installed on the right side of the aft accessory compartment, just forward of the jettisonable tailcone, so that a cabin crew can assist passengers through the tailcone emergency exit.

5.2.5. OVERWING EXITS Description There are four plug type window exits in the passenger cabin. These exits can be opened from the inside and the outside of the aircraft. When the handle is pulled, the lock is disconnected and the window is opened towards the inside. The window that is removed must be thrown outside towards the wing and to the opposite side of the evacuation direction or they must be put on the pax seat in a way that does not block the exit. Features Escape line - A nylon emergency escape line is installed above each overwing exit door in the passenger compartment. One end of each line is secured to the aircraft structure above the doors. For emergency exit from the passenger compartment, remove emergency exit door, extend free end of line through door opening, and drape line over wing. The nylon lines are rolled in containers when stowed. Escape ropes are to be used in ditching only. Four "emergency exit locators'' that is facing the overwing exits are located under the hatracks. These plastic locations denote help to find the overwing exits in the darkness. The passenger seat armrests are taken to the upright position to enable the passing to the overwing exits. The armrest on the window side is installed on the window. There are no slides on the overwings and the passengers are evacuated by sliding on the flaps.

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Operation Assess condition. Stand facing aft. With your aisle hand, grasp upper handle and pull lever. Place other hand in lower handhold. Once window has cleared casing, lift window slightly and throw window out of exit as far out on wing as possible. Opening from Outside the Aircraft Stand on wing. Push handle release. Pull handle and at same time push in on top of window. Lift up forcibly. Window will fall inside the aircraft.

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5.3. THE COCKPIT
5.3.1. WINDOWS Description There are 2 sliding windows. The handle on the window is pulled down and is slides backwards and to close it, a contrary procedure is followed. There is an "Escape Rope" on each window. The cockpit windows can only be opened from the inside. The two sliding cockpit windows can be used as emergency escape routes. These exits can be operated from INSIDE ONLY. Operation Rotate the handle inboard. The window will move inward. Slide the window back until it locks into place. Throw rope out the window and lower yourself using hand over hand method.

Equipment Flight Compartment Escape Lines - A nylon emergency escape line is installed over each clearview window in the flight compartment. One end of each line is secured to the aircraft structure above each clearview window. For emergency exit from the flight compartment, open clearview window and extend free end of line through window opening. The nylon lines are coiled in containers when stowed. Sliding Clear view Windows Schematic

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5.3.2. COCKPIT CHAIR

UP & DOWN

5.3.3. REINFORCED FLIGHT DECK DOOR This door is used for the flight crew as an exit. If the door latch handle does not unlatch the door, the pull ring latch bolt release at the top of the door can be used to exit the flight deck. If the door is locked a ring latch bolt located at the top of the door is pulled to unlock and open the door. NOTE: THE DEAD BOLT MUST BE NORMALLY UNLOCKED. If the door is not locked then the latch is used or the ring of decompression panel is pulled to use it for exit. To exit through one of the decompression panels lift the latch release tab to the red zone and pull the latch bolt. The decompression panel will then pull forward and away from the door. Remote Access System Flight or ground emergency (rescue) Entry demand is made through the ALL KEY PAD CODE entering a pre-set 4 digit code followed by the pound (#) sign. Response from Flight Crew Select UNLK on the Flight Deck Door Control Panel to ON position immediately allow entry. Select DENY on the Flight Deck Door Control Panel to ON position deny entry and disable the keypad for five (5) minutes. No response from Flight Crew The aural alert sounds and the AUTO UNLK light illuminates continuously. At thirty (30) seconds the aural alert sounds again.

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At forty (40) seconds the aural alert sounds rapidly and the AUTO UNLK light flashes. At sixty (60) seconds the door will unlock for 5 seconds. Loss of electrical power If the Right DC Bus is lost, the Flight Deck Door Control Panel aural and visual alerts will not function. The deadbolt is to be used to secure the Flight Deck and entry must then be in accordance with operator established procedures (e.g; knocks or interphone system etc.) If the Left DC Bus is lost, the keypad will not function but the door solenoid will switch over to the Right DC and the door will remain locked. Entry can only be achieved opening the door manually and in accordance with operator established procedures by the Flight Crew. DECOMPRESSION PANEL The decompression panels are held on the door by decompression latches just above the panels. When the pressure difference between the passenger cabin and the flight deck is more than a present limit the latch will release. The decompression panels include vent shutters which may be closed during a cabin smoke event to better seal the flight deck, in a similar manner as the original door.

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5.4. THE OXYGEN SYSTEM
5.4.1. COCKPIT STABLE OXYGEN SYSTEM It is used to supply oxygen for the flight crew in an emergency case. The probable emergency cases are: rapid decompression, smoke or gas that covers the cockpit. USAGE Oxygen Regulator Panels are on the left and right side of the PIC and F/O. The oro-nasal (covers mouth and nose only) typed masks are hanged on the left and right side of both the flight crew. These masks have connection with the regulator panel. The ON-OFF switch on the panel is always on the "ON" position. Regulated oxygen pressure gage - indicates the pressure Flow - indicates if there is an oxygen flow or not 100% Oxygen - supplies 100% oxygen at all altitudes Normal oxygen -supplies oxygen mixed with the cabin air Emergency - when the safety pin is removed and is taken to that position, pure oxygen is supplied continuously Normal - the normal operation position Test mask - it is used for testing In an emergency flight crew members put on the masks on their mouth and nose which are hanged on the top at the left and right side. They pull the safety pin on the oxygen regulator panel and take the switch to the emergency position and oxygen flow starts. There is also an oxygen mask for the third-person who is sitting on the observer jumpseat.

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5.4.2. COCKPIT DEMAND CONSTANT FLOW OXYGEN BOTTLE There is an independent, pressurized gaseous oxygen system for the flight crew. The crew oxygen system provides adequate oxygen for the crew to maintain sustained flight if cabin decompression should occur. In addition, the oxygen system protects the crew from harmful effects of smoke and gases. The crew oxygen system is an automatic, pressure-breathing, diluter-demand system. One high pressure oxygen cylinder supplies oxygen through a regulator valve and low-pressure distribution lines to a quick-disconnect fitting at each flight compartment station. Description: - weight: 10 kg; - capacity: 48 cu.ft./1,36 m - 1360 l - normal pressure: 1850 PSI at 21C
Shut-off valve

Flow Outlet

Low pressure relief valve

Demand Outlet

Carrying strap

The flight crew oxygen system consists of a supply cylinder, a shutoff valve with a cylinder pressure gage, a safety discharge fitting, a supply pressure regulator, automatic pressure breathing diluter-demand regulators, oro-nasal masks, and a quick-disconnect test fitting. Toggle valves on the diluter-demand regulators permit selection of methods of supplying oxygen to the masks. The supply toggle, located on the right side of the regulator panel, is placarded ON, OFF, and can be safetied to the ON position. When the supply toggle is in the OFF position, the regulator will not supply oxygen to the mask. The diluter toggle, located in the center of the regulator panel, is placarded NORMAL OXYGEN and 100% OXYGEN. When the diluter toggle is in the 100% OXYGEN position only pure oxygen is supplied to the mask; in the NORMAL OXYGEN position, ambient air is mixed with oxygen according to cabin altitude. The emergency toggle, located on the left side of the regulator panel, is placarded EMERGENCY NORMAL, and TEST MASK. In the TEST MASK position, oxygen is supplied to the mask for test purposes. The emergency toggle is spring-loaded from the TEST MASK position to the NORMAL or center position. In the EMERGENCY position, positive pressure is supplied to the mask at all cabin altitudes.

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5.4.3. CABIN STABLE OXYGEN SYSTEM The cabin stable oxygen system is used to supply oxygen for the passengers and the cabin crew in an emergency case in the cabin. The stable oxygen system is located: On the passengers overhead panels In the lavatories On the cabin crew member stations In each row in the cabin, there is an additional mask. There are 3 masks over the double seats and 4 masks over the triplet seats. The additional masks are fitted for the infants and the cabin crew members in the cabin in a rapid decompression. Removing an oxygen mask starts the oxygen flow only on that unit. There is an oxygen mask for each cabin crew member on their stations. (2 in the front, 1 in the middle and 2 at the rear). There are 2 oxygen masks in the lavatories. When the cabin altitude reaches to 14.000 feet, the oxygen unit lids opens automatically and the masks appear. The masks must be pulled from the clip that keeps them fixed on their place. By this process oxygen flow starts. When just one mask is pulled, the generator system is put in use and oxygen flow starts. Oxygen mixed with the cabin air is supplied for 15 minutes. Only the masks at the cabin crew member stations and at the lavatories open automatically when the unit lids open. Operation Pull down on one mask to initiate the flow of oxygen to the PSU. Pull down on the mask until a pin is released by extending the plastic tubing. Place the mask over nose and mouth and adjust the elastic straps to secure the mask. The bag does not fully inflate while oxygen is flowing. Monitor passengers. Do not touch the generator. Do not attempt to return passenger oxygen masks to PSU compartment. The "NO SMOKING" and "FASTEN SEAT BELT" signs will illuminate when the ship's oxygen is activated. Should the compartment fail to open automatically, they are opened from the cockpit by electrical power or it can be released manually by inserting a sharp object into the hole located on the PSU. The oxygen system is chemically generated and requires a few seconds of significant oxygen production and flow. A burning odor, heat and light smoke are natural byproducts of the system. MANUAL OPENING OF THE OXYGEN UNIT LIDS If a unit lid can not open, the locking system is opened by inserting a thin, pointed, object in the hole on the unit panel. NOTE: Do not try to put the masks in their units after using them because it can cause melting or destruction in that unit. When the generator starts to operate, the temperature on its surface reaches to 260 degrees. It can never be touched or tried to move from its place. This can cause severe burnings. If the running generator comes out accidentally; it must be placed on a metal container to not to cause burning other materials and fabrics. If the heated generator has to be carried, it must be carried to the lavatory on a trolley or on a metal plaque. As the generator runs, a smell like burned fabric is smelt but this smell does not influence the purity of the oxygen and it won't cause a fire hazard.

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5.5. EMERGENCY LIGHTING SYSTEM ref EU-OPS 1.815
INTERIOR EMERGENCY LIGHTING The lighting system that helps passengers to find their way in case of an emergency is called interior emergency lighting system. It has 6 main groups: 1. There are 8 Exit Lights located above all doors and overwing windows. 2. There are 9 Exit Signs in total, one above L1 and R1, two on the ceiling before and after overwing - windows; one above L2 and A1 doors at the rear and one above Cockpit door. 3. The white fluorescent lights located on the left of ceiling along the aisle are called "Emergency Ceiling Light". This lighting also illuminates the tail cone area. 4. There are Exit Markers under doors and overwing windows that illuminate the exit floors which helps us in finding the exits in case of an emergency. 5. Escape Floor Path Lighting System: It is a system that is used for finding the exit by following the lights on the right hand side of the floor in case of smoke in the cabin. These lights are white along the right and side aisle and red in front of the exits. 6. The white fluorescent lights located on the right hand side ceiling along the aisle are called "Stand-By Lights". Their operation is different than the Emergency Lights. The emergency light switch is used in the event of an emergency resulting in a loss of power. There are two emergency light switches, one is located in the cockpit and one is on the forward F/A panel. C/C can switch the emergency lights (except Stand-by lights) to ON independently from the cockpit. These switches control the escape path floor lighting system on the floor of the cabin, the center ceiling lights, the side of the tailcone in some aircraft, as well as the exit indicator lights mounted at each exit, inside tailcone illuminator and outside fuselage evacuation lights close to the wings. Emergency light switch is always in arm position and is charged in this position. It operates automatically in case of an electric cut off and illuminates for 15 min. It can not be switched off when it is set to switch OFF mode even if it operates automatically in case of electric loss. Operation Lift the RED cover. Flip the switch to the arm position, holding momentarily then release the switch allowing it in move to the "on" position.

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STAND-BY LIGHTING It is charged from the batteries and it can illuminate up to 30 min. When it is fully charged, it can only be operated from the emergency power switches in the cockpit. When all electric goes off and emergency power switch is brought to ON position, stand-by lights illuminates. The aim of this lighting is to illuminate the cabin in case of electric loss in the cabin.

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EXTERIOR EMERGENCY LIGHTS There are five exterior emergency lights: Two after the overwing exits which illuminate the flaps One on the tailcone evacuation slide One on each motor.

5.6. CABIN CREW PANELS

Cabin crew panels are located adjacent to all cabin crew jumpseats, forward, mid and aft. They are within reach from a sitting position in each jumpseat. FORWARD C/C PANEL Emergency Light Switch PA Interphone Handset Boarding Music Controls - If installed Stair Controls Call Buttons - Pilot/C/C Reset Button Ceiling light control Sidewalls light control Entry lights Aisle lights C/C Reading Light Switch LIGHT Upper Side Wall - There is a round switch which can operate ceiling light from Off to Dim and Bright position. Lower Side Wall - There is a round switch which can operate window lights from Off to Dim and Bright position. Entry - illuminates forward entry, has two position, On-Off ATT - Cabin crew member reading lights are 3 positioned. Bright-Off-Dim Aisle - illuminates the fluorescent light on the ceiling of forward entry. 3 positions: Bright-Off-Dim Lav - illuminates frw lavatory. 2 position: Bright-Dim. In Bright position it is bright, no matter if the door is closed or opened; in dim position, it is related with the locking of the door. MUSIC - It is composed of a rotating volume switch STAIRWAYS OPERATION LIGHTS AND SWITCHES There are 2 lights: Stair door open: amber color; means that the compartment cover is open when in "ON" position. Stair down: green color; it means that the stairway is completely extended and the handrails are attached. Light goes off when the handrails are disconnected. Up button: the switch which retracts the stairway, it must be pressed until the stairways retracts completely. Down button: the switch which extend s the stairways, push the button until the stairways completely touches the ground. EMERGENCY LIGHT SWITCH It has 3 positions, Arm-On-Off. It must be in arm position to be charged. Using period is 15 min.

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MID C/C PANEL PA/interphone handset Call Buttons Pilots/C/C Reset Button Reset Button

AFT C/C

PANEL PA/interphone Handset Call Buttons - Pilot/C/C Reset Button Aisle Light Control Lavatory light control Tailcone light control Music Controls - If installed F/A Reading Light Switch

LIGHT AISLE: The switch used for illuminating the ceiling light on the way to the cabin from the aft entry; Dim-Bright-Off positioned. ATT: Illuminates work lights for cabin crew member. Dim-Bright-Off positioned. LAV: Illuminates aft lavatories. Dim -Bright positioned. STAIR: Illuminates aft entry door; On-Off positioned NOTE: Some call buttons are on the inside of the handset along with the PA activation button. In order to reset the pink/red light, you must return the handset to the bracket.

5.7. COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

5.7.1. PUBLIC ADDRESS The Public Address (PA) System provides the means for the pilots and C/C to make announcements to the passengers through speakers in the passenger compartment and lavatories. The PA handset that operates the system is located in each forward, mid, aft cabin crew panels, and the cockpit. To test the PA system, press "Announce/PA" button; speak into the handset at the beginning of each trip. The priority sequence (listed in order of priority) is as follows: Pilot's PA Announcement Cabin Crew PA Announcements PA Operation Press the announcement button located on the F/A panels. Push P/A button, make the announcement by pushing "Push to talk" button. This button must be pushed during the announcement. In order to turn off PA system, you must hang up the handset. First it is placed the lower part and then the upper part. Handset do not have a reset button

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on it, therefore it must be put back to its cradle to be reset. Make sure that PA button light is not illuminated. Inoperative PA In the event the PA becomes inoperative, an additional, designated megaphone is to be used for making all safety announcements. Demonstration and safety announcements must be made two (2) times, one FWD and one AFT. If the megaphone is used, an entry must be made in the cabin logbook. 5.7.2. INTERPHONE SYSTEM The interphone system provides for voice communications between the cockpit and C/C stations, C/C to C/C, and C/C to cockpit. A handset is located at each C/C station and in the cockpit. The interphone and passenger address systems are connected, and the same telephonetype handset is used in both systems. Operation Lift handset from cradle. Push appropriate call button on panel or handset. To reset, push reset button or replace handset in cradle. Procedures for inop interphone In the event that the mid-cabin jumpseat interphone is inop, the following ALL CALL procedures will apply: C/C3 will give a thumbs-up to verify that the door is armed or disarmed as appropriate. At this time, C/C2 will communicate over the interphone that L2 disarmed, headrest up or L2 armed, headrest down to complete the ALL CALL with SC/C. Master Call Panels The use of the colored light system on the master call panels enables C/C to respond to passengers and crew. There are (3) three master call panels located FWD, MID, AFT on the ceiling. When a call is initiated, a chime sounds and the corresponding light will illuminate either pink, blue or amber. Pink/Red: A crew call. A pink light will illuminate when the C/C call button is pushed on the C/C panel or if the cockpit calls a F/A. Blue: A blue light will illuminate when a passenger call button is activated. Amber: An amber light will illuminate when a call button is activated in the lavatory. A light will also illuminate on the exterior panel nearest to the lavatory requesting service. If the lavatory smoke detector is activated an amber light will illuminate on the Master Call Panel and a light will illuminate on the exterior panel nearest to the lavatory requiring attention. NOTE: Always reset call light by depressing the reset button or by hanging up the handset. This will extinguish the call light on the Master Call Panel. To reset the passenger call button or the lavatory button you must reset in those respective areas. Call System The call system consisting of lights, bells or chimes. Switches are installed at various locations to provide sight and sound communication among flight crew, C/C and passengers. Passenger to C/C A call button is located on the passenger service unit (PSU) in the ceiling directly above the passenger seats. Actuation of any passenger call button provides momentary operation of the electronic chime, which sounds through the public address system, turns on the

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blue light on the master call panel and illuminates call button at passenger seat for easy identification. This call button is reset by simply depressing the same button. The same type of call button can be found in all lavatories in the A/C. Actuation of a lavatory call button sounds a chime, turns on an amber light on all the Master Call Panels and illuminates a light above the individual lavatory. Depressing the call button resets calls originated at a passenger seat or a lavatory. Pilot to C/C The pilot's station has one call button, which activates the C/Cs pink Master Call Panel a chime that is audible through the public address system C/C to Pilot A pilot call button is installed at each cabin crew panel, which actuates a chime only in the cockpit, along with a small light. Press PILOT button once make one chime. C/C to C/C A cabin crew call button is installed at each cabin crew panel. Actuation of any button: Sounds a chime in the cabin A pink light illuminates on the Master Call Panels Press ATT button twice make two chimes.

ATT Master Call Lights (FWD, MID, AFT)


Lavatory call has been actuated. Chime sounds and individual light over lavatory door comes on. Blue Pax call switch in overhead stowage rack has been actuated. Chime sounds and integral light in switch also comes on. Pink ATT call button in cockpit or at another C/C station has been actuated. Chime sounds. ATT Call button light (All ATT panels) Push for ATT- to-ATT call. Actuates one chime and pink call lights. P.A. button light (All ATT panels) For description, ref to Communications. Pilot call button light (All ATT panels) Push to actuate chime and ATT CALLING lights in cockpit. Amber

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5.8. CABIN LIGHTING SYSTEM
Cabin lighting system consists of the following lights: 1. Interior cabin lights - Passenger compartment lighting consists of ceiling and sidewall lights located throughout the cabin and additional, aisle lights located in the forward and aft part of the cabin. Furthermore, two spotlights illuminates the panels on the forward cabin panel. All lights, except aft aisle lights, are controlled from F.A.P. Aft aisle lights are controlled from A.A.P. 2. Galley lights - are located in the ceiling of the galley areas and are controlled on the light assembly. 3. Entry lights - are only available at the forward entrance door. These lights are controlled from the forward F.A.P. There are no specific entry lights at the aft entrance door. Instead/the aft stairway compartment is equipped with lighting controlled from the A.A.P. 1. Work lights - are placed in the ceiling above the forward and aft C/C jumpseats and are controlled from the relevant panel. 5. Passenger Reading lights - are located above each seat row on the Passenger Service Units with one light source. These lights are controlled from these units. 6. Passenger signs - consists of the "NO SMOKING" and "FASTEN SEAT BELT" signs which are controlled from the cockpit. This lights are located in the Passenger Service Units above every seat. A chime sounds when the signs are switched ON or OFF. In the lavatories there is a "RETURN CABIN" sign illuminating together with the cabin "FASTEN SEAT BELT" signs to warn the passengers to be seated in the cabin. There are also "LAVATORY OCCUPIED" signs located outside each lavatory. These signs are controlled automatically by the door locking mechanism. 2. Lavatory lighting - consists of mirror lights and operates in two modes, Dim and Bright. Generally it is in Dim position and becomes Bright when the door is locked. In the relevant C/C panel there is a control switch for each lavatory. It can be brought to Bright position.

5.9. PASSENGER SEATS

Seats are arranged in rows of five in the main cabin. Main cabin seats are labeled A", "C" in the section of seats on aircraft left and "D "E and "F" in the section of seats on aircraft right. On aircraft designed for Business class, seats in the forward cabin will be arranged in sections of two on each side of the aisle. Seatbacks are adjustable from full forward to fully reclined positions by means of a push button control in the armrest. Seats at the overwing emergency exits are positioned to meet EU-OPS requirements for noninterference with an evacuation route. Therefore, the recline and break-over functions of some seats are restricted. All seats located in the overwing exit rows are the only designated "Exit Rows" on board the aircraft. Each seat is provided with the following: A service tray attached to the back of each passenger seat, or an integral armrest mounted tray. A stowage pocket, for emergency card(s), sick bags, etc., is located on the back of each seat, or installed on the fuselage, for seats that do not have stowage pockets. All armrests may be folded up flush with seatbacks to give additional room when adjacent seats are not occupied, except: Integral mounted armrest. Armrests adjacent to the aisle. (Some aisle armrests do fold up). Window armrest for seats located at the overwing exits (armrest is attached to exit). Edition 2 Chapter 5 Page 48 May 2010

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5.10. PASSENGER SERVICE UNITS (PSU)
It is above every passenger seat and consists of the following units: Passenger reading lights, air vents, C/C call button, a compartment (which will open automatically or may be opened manually) that contains oxygen masks for use in a decompression, speakers, Fasten Seat Belts - No Smoking signs.

5.11. OVERHEAD COMPARTMENTS

There are overhead compartments on the right and along the corridor adjacent to the ceiling. The seat numbers are also located here. (Maximum carrying capacity is 47.5 kg.)

There are five C/C jumpseats located throughout the cabin. All jumpseat seat bottoms are spring loaded to the "retracted" position. The required jumpseat positions on the aircraft are as follows: SC/C - forward jumpseat L1 C/C 2 - aft tailcone jumpseat A1 C/C 3 - mid cabin L2 C/C 4 - forward jumpseat R1 C/C 5 - aft tailcone jumpseat (aircraft right) Preflight: Check to see that seat springs back. Check that shoulder harnesses retract. Check that lap belt is there and secure. Make certain that buckle fastens and unfastens easily. Refasten seat belts/shoulder harnesses. Raise seat bottom. Operation: Lower seat bottom. Sit down. Fasten lap belt. Fasten shoulder harness. Use: C/C should be on their jumpseat, with shoulder harness and lap belt buckled, after emergency equipment demonstrations and compliance checks have been completed prior to takeoff, and after final compliance checks prior to landing. C/C are to remain in their jumpseats until reaching a safe cruising altitude, or until 10,000 feet. During those times, C/C may only leave their jumpseats for safety related purposes.

5.12. JUMPSEATS

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Location There are three lavatory compartments on each aircraft. They are located aft left and right, and one fwd left. Equipment: Flushing toilets - Electrically flushing toilet with three gallons (11 liters) of water and disinfectant. Do not put coffee, tea or paper towels in the toilet (as it may clog toilet or affect the sanitizing fluid). Potable water tank - It is located in the forward right hand side in the middle cargo compartment door and has a capacity of 47 gallons (180 l). Water service panel is located on the left lower part of the fuselage. The lights which shows the water amount is located in the part which indicates the amount of the drained water. Technical personnel are responsible of its controls. Wash basin Waste tanks used water from wash basin and toilets is stored in waste tanks. This tank is controlled by the technical personnel from the exterior service panel. Water heater - Electrically heats two quarts of water for the basin. Keeps water from freezing in flight. Available under every lavatory water basin. Supplies hot water. When overheated, it automatically gets into the "OFF" position automatically. Water Shut-Off Valve its located below the silver water heater. C/C can manually shut water off in individual lavatory.

5.13. LAVATORIES

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Passenger comfort supplies - Compartments provided for soap and paper towels, seat covers and sanitary napkins. Trash receptacle, which should be checked periodically for potential fire hazards (ex: cigarette butts, matches, etc.). Smoke detector - A smoke detector is mounted in each lavatory ceiling. When activated, a horn sounds in the smoke detector and the red Alarm Indicator Light illuminates on the smoke detector. Once the smoke clears, the red Alarm Indicator Light extinguishes, the horn stops, and the smoke detector is sensitive to smoke again. Lavatory Fire Extinguishing System - Toilet waste bin fire extinguishers are activated automatically if heat detectors in the vicinity are activated. Toilet Smoke detector activation does not trigger waste bin fire extinguishers. Oxygen masks inside compartment - Two oxygen masks are located in the compartment in case of decompression. C/C call button - This will illuminate an amber light on the master call panel and the light outside the lavatory. Reset call button in lavatory. Lighted return to cabin/seat" and "no smoking sign Speaker connected to PA system Door - lavatories can be locked and unlocked both from inside and outside. In order to lock from inside, locking mechanism is rotated to the left, and the "Occupied" sign appears. The fluorescent lamp operates by locking of the door. To open the door from outside, pull down the locking mechanism to "Vacant" position with a sharp object. Door latch - All lavatory doors can be locked and unlocked from the cabin side by using a key or ball point pen to move the locking mechanism from "Vacant to "Occupied" or "Occupied" to "Vacant." A light switch located above the lavatory is actuated when the lavatory door is closed and locked, which automatically turns the mirror lights from dim to bright. A switch in the door lock turns on the "Lavatory Occupied' sign adjacent to the occupied lavatory. Bright/Dim light switches are provided on the cabin crew panels for the lavatories. The "Bright" position overrides the automatic dimming of the lights when the lavatory door is open; and in the "Dim" position, the lights will be controlled by lavatory door position. Lights - Lavatory lighting is supplied with fluorescent lamps. When the door is opened it is in Dim position, and is in Bright position when closed. Fwd Lav lighting is controlled from FAP and Aft Lav from the AAP. If Lav switch is in Bright position, lavatory lights are always in the Bright position. Especially at night flights forward lavatory light must be in Dim position. In every lavatory there is an Auxiliary Light that is Dim and lights continuously.

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There are 2 galleys: one in forward area between the L1 and R1 doors and one in AFT area adjacent to the L2 door. Galley power must be activated from the cockpit. Water quantity gauge is outside the aircraft, and cannot be checked by C/C. Coffee Makers: Place empty coffeepot on warmer pad Place pillow of coffee into coffee holder (seam down) Turn on POWER button Press BREW button Press WARMER button Hot and cold water is available from the spigots near the coffee makers, Warming Plate - Used to keep coffee warm underneath coffee pot Galley Storage: Multiple compartments marked for use: Each compartment must be placarded for weight capacity Do not exceed posted weight placard Missing placards must be written up in Irregularity Report, bins may not be used, and Captain must be notified All galley latches must be in place for every takeoff and landing.

5.14. GALLEYS

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Trash - compartment door to trash bins must be spring loaded or fitted to opening. This is for fire containment. Beverage Cart Brakes must be used during service and storage. Carts can never be left unattended. During service C/C can be no further away than three rows form carts. Carts must be stowed immediately following service. Circuit Breakers Located above coffee makers, they are used for both warming plate and coffee makers. C/C are not permitted to reset circuit breakers unless specifically directed by the Captain. If circuit breaker has tripped, inform Captain and prepare Irregularity Report. Ovens Ovens that have been deactivated cannot be used for storage. For aircraft that may have their ovens activated, when the ovens are in use: F/As responsible for galleys, must never leave ovens unattended. Paper or plastic must never be placed in the oven cavity. Circuit breakers must be pulled and ovens shut off after use and prior to landing. Galley water Galley water is supplied from one water tank. The tank is normally pressurized from the airplane bleed air system. Water in not available when the tank is being serviced and when there is no bleed air pressure. Galley Waste System Galley sink waste water is drained overboard through heated drain masts. Do not dispose of solid waste materials (coffee grounds, tea bags, fruit pulp, and so on) in the sink. Put solid waste material in the galley waste containers. Water shut off valve If the water cannot be turned off in any of the galley fixtures, such as the sink water faucet, coffee maker, water boiler, and so on, the water system for that galley must be shut off. Located behind the waste containers in Fwd and Aft Galley, the water valve is always in "ON" position. To shut off the water put it in "OFF" position. The Drain Valve locations are shown on the placards at the galleys. Forward galley waste water is drained by the Drain Mast located at the left side of the nose of the aircraft. Aft galley waste water is drained by the Drain Mast located under the tail.

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5.15. SAFETY AND EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT
General The operation of the cabin emergency equipment is the same for all Medallion Air, unless specified otherwise. The location of emergency equipment may not be identical for each aircraft. However, emergency equipment is located in the same general vicinity for all aircraft. Pre-flight Check - Cabin Emergency Equipment The most important duty for the cabin crew members is the pre-flight check of the emergency equipments. These checks enhance the safe operation of all aircraft. If any discrepancies are noted at this time, cabin crew must inform SC/C immediately. The SC/C will notify the Captain and the technical personnel and/or write a note in CML. If any item of emergency equipment has been partially used or is found to be inoperable, the Captain will determine whether or not the flight will depart. As part of the preflight procedures, it is C/C responsibility to check cabin emergency equipment. The F/A is to ascertain: Is it there? Is it secured? (brackets work and functioning) Is it operable? (sealed) Pre-flight checks are required at the following times: When boarding an aircraft for duty. Whenever there is a crew change. When equipment is new on the aircraft or in the cabin. 5.15.1. PORTABLE OXYGEN BOTTLES (ref OPS 1.760/1.770) General description Cabin POB are designed to be used by C/C while assisting passengers following a loss of cabin pressure. In addition, the POB provides therapeutic oxygen for first aid purposes. The POB is green or gray in color and is equipped with: On/off valve Pressure gauge Pressure release plug Disposable masks (one attached to high outlet and one extra mask) Fill valve Carrying strap Two constant flow outlets. These continuous flow outlets are provided on each cylinder: - one outlet is marked LOW and delivers 2 liters/minute for walk around; - the other is marked HI and delivers 4 liters/minute for first aid. The first aid/supplemental oxygen mask comprises of: A face cone equipped with an inhale/exhaust valve A reservoir bag connected to the face cone An elastic head strap A flexible hose Pre-flight check: Pressure is in full range (green) - 1800-2000psi; Pressure minimum 1500psi; Mask is connected to the bottle. Operation: Check gauge for O2 quantity. Edition 2 Chapter 5 Page 56 May 2010

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Connect mask to a constant flow outlet. Turn valve on counter-clockwise all the way. Check the flow by squeezing the reservoir bag near mask to ensure bag begins to fill with air; Place mask on pax face (remove oil/make-up if possible). Place elastic band over head and pull to tighten. Secure bottle in or under seat. When oxygen is no longer required, reverse the procedure. Note: Hi position is used for therapeutic oxygen. Low position is used for small children, infants, asthmatic passengers and C/C after decompression. When possible, do not allow the POB gauge to fall under 500 PSI to avoid servicing problems and provide O2 for C/C in case of decompression. 1. Small POB 120 liters: - weight: 3 kg; - capacity: 4,25 cu.ft./0,12 m 120 l; - duration: - LOW 2 lt/min outlet - about 45 minutes - HIGH 4 lt/min outlet - about 25 minutes 2. Large POB 311 liters: - weight: 4,64 kg; - capacity: 11 cu.ft./0,31 m 311 l; - duration: - LOW 2 lt/min outlet about 120 minutes - HIGH 4 lt/min outlet about 66 minutes

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5.15.2. PROTECTIVE BREATHING EQUIPMENT (PBE) (ref OPS 1.780) General Description The PBE is a closed circuit breathing apparatus designed to help protect the wearer's eyes and respiratory tract in fire fighting by isolating the breathing function from the environment. Isolation is achieved by a hood system which envelopes the head of the wearer and provides a demand-based chemical air regeneration system that supplies oxygen and removes carbon dioxide and water vapor. A neck shield extends downward from the back of the hood to protect the collar and upper shoulder area of the user from direct flame contact. A speaking diaphragm is installed in the oro-nasal mask cone to enhance communications. The smoke hood is normally packaged in a two-component system consisting of an aluminized vacuum-sealed bag and installed in a tamper resistant container. The container also provides a barrier to prevent accidental damage to the vacuum bag. Once operation is initiated, oxygen (approximately 50 liters on demand) is generated for 15 to 30 minutes. It should be used in situations where smoke or gases would make breathing impossible. Preflight Correct location Seal is intact Ensure foil pouch appears to be vacuum packed (solid in appearance) in unit. 1. B/E Aerospace PBE - P/N 119003

Operation 1. Remove vacuum sealed pouch from the protective canister. 2. Tear open the pouch by pulling sharply on the red tag. 3. Don PBE Place both hands inside neck seal opening with palms facing each other and PBE visor facing downward with the K02 canister on top of hands. With head bent forward, guide the neck seal over the top of the head and down over the face, using hands to shield face and glasses from the mask cone. Remove hands and make sure clothing and hair is not trapped between seal and neck. Pull flap over canister and down to cover collar and shoulder area. Ensure hair is intact inside so it will not break the neck seal. 4. Pull the straps forward to start the oxygen flow. 5. Pull backward on straps to secure the mask cone high on the nose for a tight seal.

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Removal of Hood When fire is extinguished or when hood begins to collapse, indicating oxygen has been depleted. Move away from fire source. With both thumbs, reach for the two larger corners of the visor area and push forward on the metal tabs of the adjustment buckles to release strap tension. Place both hands under neck seal over face until PBE is clear of head. Shake hair free with fingers to remove chemical from hair. Place PBE in a safe place to cool - away from fire or exposure to water 2. Air Liquide PBE P/N 15-40F-11

15 minutes of operating time guaranteed Oxygen source specifications: Pressure: 2175 PSI (150 bar) Capacity: 39 liters NTPD Maximum temperature inside the hood: 103 F (39,5 C) Weight: Hood: 1,5 kg - 3,08 lbs Total packed weight: 2,4 kg 5,29 lbs

No chemical generator Oxygen flow starts automatically when the hood is put on the head Equipped with a speech diaphragm for communication Polycarbonate visor treated with anti-fog and anti-scratch coating for perfect visibility Exhaled CO2 absorbed

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put it on your head back to front.

3. Avox system (Scott) PBE P/N 802300-14

15 minutes of operating time guaranteed Oxygen source specifications: Low-Pressure Chemical Oxygen Generator Maximum temperature inside the hood: 103 F (39,5 C) Weight: Hood: 1,7 kg - 3.75 lbs Total packed weight: 2,3 kg 5,15 lbs

A solid-state chemical oxygen generator supply source with no oxygen loss during storage Completely disposable breathing unit, operable to 40,000 ft. Hood permits oral communication without compromising protection.

Operation: Remove vacuum sealed pouch from the protective canister. Tear open the pouch by pulling sharply on the red tag. Pull actuation ring in direction indicated to start oxygen flow. Hear the flow noise of oxygen. Shake hood to open. Don PBE With the sound of oxygen flowing, hold device with life support pack away from user. Place both hands inside neck seal. Insert chin into hole and pull hood across face and over head. While standing upright, pull hood down until headband firmly engages forehead. Fit the oro-nasal mask over mouth and nose. Clear neck seal of obstructions and check neck seal for secure fit.

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5.15.3. FIRE FIGHTING GLOVES A pair of protective gloves is located in the cockpit of each aircraft. These gloves are heat resistant. They are used to hold hot surfaces and also to remove materials (not on fire) and crumbs away from the fire source. Pre-flight check Check correct stowage. 5.15.4. SMOKE GOGGLES Their purpose is to provide protection for eyes in smoke filled environment. To be used in conjunction with oxygen system. Pre-flight check Check correct stowage. 5.15.5. FIRE EXTINGUISHERS (ref OPS 1.790) 5.15.5.1. WATER (H2O) Water fire extinguishers contain a solution of water mixed with antifreeze. The container is pressurized by a C02 cartridge when the extinguisher handle is rotated fully clockwise. General Description: Grey or grey-green in color. Used for Class A (material fires) only. Discharge duration is 30-45 seconds with a range of up to 20 feet (6 meters). Pre-Flight: Ensure the correct stowage and the extinguisher is secure. Safety wire and seal are intact. Cartridge is in the handle.

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Operation: Remove H2O from stowage brackets. Rotate handle fully clockwise, breaking the wire hasp and activating the CO2 cartridge. Hold the bottle upright. Aim to discharge to the source of the fire and press the trigger. Use a sweeping motion from the source to the surroundings CAUTION: DO NOT USE ON ELECTRICAL OR LIQUID TYPE FIRES

5.15.5.2. HALON The Halon extinguisher contains a liquefied gas agent (Halon 1211) under pressure. The extinguisher pressure indicator shows three pressure ranges: recharge acceptable overcharged Description: Red-colored cylinder. Effective for all types of fire, but primarily on B (burn) and C (current) class fires. A safety pin with a pull ring prevents accidental trigger movement. When released, the liquefied gas agent vaporizes and extinguishes the fire. Avoid discharging the halon directly on to people due to the possibility of suffocation. Discharge duration is 7-10 seconds from a distance of 10 feet (3 meters). Pre-flight: Stowed and secured properly in bracket. Gauge needle in green zone Pin is sealed with a wire or plastic hasp. Operation: Remove from stowage. Remove the ringed safety pin.

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Hold the extinguisher upright with hand under handle and thumb on top of lever. From a distance of at least 3 meters, aim the extinguisher at the base of the flames and press trigger. Use a side-to-side sweeping motion to suppress the fire and reduce spreading. When releasing the trigger the extinguishing mechanism will stop. After extinguishing the fire always keep under supervision. WARNING: If a fire extinguisher is to be discharged in the flight deck area, all flight crew members must wear oxygen masks and use 100% oxygen with emergency selected.

5.15.5.3. AUTOMATIC FIRE EXTINGUISHER - LAVATORY An automatic fire extinguishing system is located beneath the sink in each lavatory, above the rubbish container. It operates automatically when the temperature in container reaches 76-80 C. The extinguisher discharges non-toxic freon gas through one, or both of two heat-activated nozzles. Both nozzles discharge toward the waste disposal container. The color of the nozzle tip will change to an aluminum color when the extinguisher has discharged. A temperature indicator placard is located on the inside of the access door below each sink. A temperature indicator is located inside the waste compartment below each sink. White/grey dots on the indicator turn black when exposed to high temperatures. If an indicator has turned black, or a nozzle tip has changed color, it should be assumed that the fire extinguisher has discharged. Pre-flight check is done by maintenance.

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5.15.6. MEGAPHONE (ref OPS 1.810) The megaphone is a compact, battery-powered unit, used for communication in case of a PA system failure or outside the aircraft following an emergency evacuation for communication. Amplification range is up to 50 feet with duration of approximately 30 minutes. Pre-flight check: check to see that the unit is there and secured; squeeze the push-to-talk button; say a few words into the microphone. Operation: hold the megaphone up, assure that upper lip is touching the microphone; squeeze the push-to-talk button; point the megaphone towards the passengers, then speak slowly in a strong imperative; adjust the volume if necessary on the scale from 0 to 10 if the megaphone is provided with this scale.
Rubber strip

Press-totalk

Grip handle

5.15.7. SMOKE DETECTORS All aircraft are provided with smoke detection equipment in the lavatories. It activates automatically, if there is a defined concentration of particles in the air. Should any smoke develop in a lavatory, so that a defined concentration of particles is reached, the smoke detection system shall activate an oral and visual alarm, accompanied by an illuminated amber light outside the lavatory door and master call panels. General description: - Round or square, ceiling or wall mounted fixture - Small green or red indicator lights Preflight check: Check to see that is there; On Jamco Smoke Detectors, check for a steady green indicator light On other smoke detectors check for a blinking red indicator light which would blink every 5 to 7 seconds. Operation: Smoke detectors will sound when there is smoke in the lavatory; To silence a smoke alarm when the danger is passed push the reset button and follow by fanning the detector to dissipate residual smoke to prevent reactivating

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Interrupt Switch (recessed) PRESS & HOLD - Silences alarm. Power Indicator Light (green) Illuminated - unit is operating. Alarm Indicator Light (red) Illuminated - smoke is detected. Self-Test Switch. Alarm horn

5.15.8. CRASH (FIRE) AXE (ref OPS 1.795) The fire axe is intended for use in emergency, e.g. breaking and cutting inside the aircraft or cutting through any obstruction and removing material from a fire area. General Description Consisting of a picked end used for puncturing or tearing. Blunt end used for chopping or cutting. The axe is equipped with a handle insulated against electrical shock. Pre-flight check Flight deck completes pre-flight check. Use: Tearing into burning or smoking upholstery. Piercing and prying aircraft interiors to get at base of a fire. For land survival following an evacuation. 5.15.9. ESCAPE LIFE-LINES ref to 5.2.5, page 31 There are installed above each emergency escape hatch frame. They can be used as a handhold in a ditching situation. The over wing emergency exits must be opened to expose the straps. 5.15.10. EMERGENCY FLASHLIGHTS General Description The emergency flashlight is mounted in a bracket adjacent to all C/C jumpseats and is equipped with a nylon lanyard and a red monitoring circuit. The light has duration of approximately 4-5 hours with continuous use. The emergency flashlight is for emergency use only and is never used as a work light. Pre-flight check Check to see that the unit is there. Secured with either a plastic or wire break away shield Red monitoring circuit is flashing approx. every 10 seconds. Flash time reflects strength of battery condition and duration. Operation remove from bracket flashlight shlight will illuminate automatically

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5.15.10.1. PORTABLE EMERGENCY FLASHLIGHT A portable light is installed on the forward bulkhead adjacent to the passenger entrance door. This kind of flash light is charged as long as it is fixed in its place and the emergency light switch is on armed position. This charge operation can be checked from the amber light on it. It can be used for 3 hours when fully charged. The switch must be brought to ON position when its removed from its place. Removal/Operation Lift up on tabs. Push buttons on each side of light. Remove light. Disconnect plug on back. Turn switch on front of light to "ON". 5.15.11. MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Medallion Air aircrafts are equipped with first aid kits and emergency medical kits. The contents of these kits fully comply with the requirements of EU-OPS 1.745. The medical equipment on board consists of the following kits: 5.15.11.1. FIRST AID KIT (ref to OPS 1.745) Emergency First Aid Kits are provided for first aid use in case of serious injuries during flight or in case of an emergency landing/ditching. As far as practicable, C/C shall refrain from recommending medication to passengers, rather informing about drugs available and offering them on passenger request only from First Aid Kit. These kits are sealed thus ensuring that all contents are intact. They are replenished and checked whenever necessary or the seal is broken. A list of contents presented in 2 languages (English and Romanian) is attached to the kit. Basic instructions for use of the drugs as well as information on the effects and side effects are available inside each kit. Bandages (10cmx5cm) Burns dressings with Iodine Wound dressings, large and small Adhesive tape (2m) Adhesive wound closures Splints, suitable for upper and lower limbs Safety pins and scissors Disposable gloves 2 sizes Disposable resuscitation aid Antiseptic wound cleaner - Betadyne Edition 2 Chapter 5 Page 66 May 2010

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Simple analgesic - Paracetamol Antiemetic Cinnarizine Nasal decongestant Rinofug Gastrointestinal antacid Malucol Anti-diarrhea medication Imodium First Aid Handbook Ground/Air visual signal code for use by survivors Pre-flight check Check to see that it is there Secure Sealed Operation Obtain from storage brackets Seal breaks when kit is opened Use contents in accordance with first aid procedures 5.15.11.2. MEDICAL KIT (ref to OPS 1.755) An aircraft operating with a maximum approved passenger seating configurations of more than 30 seats on a planned route of more than 60 minutes flying time from an airport where medical assistance could be expected to be available should be equipped with an emergency medical kit (EU-OPS 1.755). All aircraft are equipped with one emergency medical kit. A list of contents of the emergency medical kit in Romanian and English is available with each kit. The Commander shall ensure that only qualified doctors, nurses or similarly qualified personnel, will administer drugs (EU-OPS 1.745b). The purpose of this kit is to supply a doctor, when on board, with necessary medicines in case of a medical emergency. These kits should be taken along during an evacuation, as they may be helpful in a post-evacuation situation. Medical Kit must be replaced with a new lead sealed Medical Kit when opened. The following should be included in the emergency medical kit: Sphygmomanometer - non mercury Stethoscope Syringes and needles (5 and 10) Orophariyngeal airways (2 sizes) Tourniquet Catheter Disposable gloves 2 sizes Needle disposable box Coronary vasodilator - Nitroglycerin Anti-spasmodic No-spa Epinephrine 1:1000 - Adrenaline Adrenocortical steroid Hydrocortisone Major analgesic - Fortral Diuretic - Furosemid Antihistamine - Hydrocortisone Sedative/anticonvulsant - Diazepam Hypoglycemia medication Glucose 33% Antiemetic Metoclopramid Digoxin Uterine contractant Ergometrine

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Bronchial dilator injectable and tablets Myofilin Epilepsy medication - Diazepam

5.15.11.3. BREATHING BARRIER General Description Clear plastic two-piece oral-nasal device Encased in sealed plastic covering Used when performing CPR Provides barrier to infection from bodily fluids Pre-flight check Check to see that it is there Check to see that plastic wrap is intact Operation Remove plastic wrap Insert mouth tube into oral-nasal cover Place oral-nasal cover over both nose and mouth of victim Hold base of oral-nasal cover tightly to surrounding skin to create tight seal Place your mouth on mouth tube Breathe slowly into victim through breathing barrier Check to see that chest rises with each breath you give Follow CPR and Rescue Breathing instructions as outline in First Aid Chapter 5.15.12. LIFE VESTS (ref OPS 1.825) General Life vests are provided for passengers and crew in event of a ditching. A life vest assembly consists of two-coated nylon fabric independent cells, each equipped with a check valve subassembly and an oral tube assembly. A T handle and lanyard is provided on each inflator to allow the user to discharge the CO2 cylinders into the cells. The back panel assembly is a single piece of fabric used in conjunction with waist straps to secure the life vest to the user. A sea survivor locator lights consists of a water-activated battery, a light lead with connector plug. Each life vest is in a sealed plastic bag. Vests are located in a "sling" under each passenger seat. Fifteen (15) additional vests are provided on A/C and are located aft RHS overhead bin. Spare passenger vests are to replace missing/defective vests. Each vest is in a sealed plastic package. The package has a pull tab or zip lock type opening for rapid vest removal. Life vests are dual chambered with each chamber independent of the other. One chamber is sufficient for floatation. The vest can be inflated by pulling down on red "pull to inflate" tabs which activate the C02 cartridges, one for each chamber. The vests may also be inflated by blowing air into the manual inflation tubes, located at shoulder level, one for each chamber. Each vest is equipped with one locator light and is powered by a water-activated battery. The battery is activated by submerging the battery in water. Passenger life vests are yellow and crew life vests are orange/red. Life vests are considered the primary source of inflation in an unplanned water emergency where time and passenger evacuation takes precedence. Pre-flight check Check to see that it (they) are there, They are in a sealed or zip lock pouch,

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The pouch is free of holes. ADULT Pull the vest over your head. The vest is reversible. Pull single strap around waist and buckle. Tighten by pulling on the loose end of the strap. To inflate the vest, pull down on the red "pull to inflate" tabs at the front of the vest. To orally inflate the vest: Locate the manual inflation tubes between the chambers at shoulder level. Blow air into the tube. The rubber hose has a self-sealing feature similar to a tire valve, so when inflation pressure is removed, the unit seals. C/C should inflate only one chamber. (Inflation of one chamber will keep most people afloat, whereas two chambers might hamper mobility.) 5. Deflation of life vest: To deflate the vest, push down on valve stem built into the inside of the top of the manual inflation tubes. At the same time, press the vest to force air out. IMPORTANT: The adult life vest should be inflated only upon leaving the aircraft. SMALL CHILD Inflate one chamber by pulling the red "pull to inflate" tab. Leave the second chamber as a reserve. Put the vest over the child's head, with the chambers in front. Pull the waist strap between the child's legs, from back to front, and buckle in the front of the vest. Pull the strap to tighten, and tie the excess around the child's waist. Depending on the size of the child, release air by pushing down on the valve stem built into the manual inflation tubes to release the appropriate amount of air. INFANTS Remove the cartridges from both chambers of the vest. Partially inflate one chamber of the vest using the manual inflation tube. (5-7 breaths) Lay the infant face-up and lengthwise on the partially inflated vest. The head should be at the top of the vest. Bring the strap up around and tie the infant into the vest. Position the strap between the infant's legs and pull snug. CREW LIFE VESTS (ref OPS 1.825) Crew life vests are available on all Medallion Air aircraft (even those not overwater equipped) in a compartment below the C/C jumpseat and in the cockpit. Each vest is in a sealed plastic pouch with either a pull-tab or zip lock-type opening for easy vest removal. Crew vests are identical in operation to passenger vests except in color. Crew vests are orange for easy identification. C/C should inflate only one chamber for increased mobility. 5.15.13. SEAT CUSHION Passenger seat cushions are available for flotation on the MD-83 series aircraft. They provide the primary floatation device in an unanticipated water emergency where evacuation and time are of the essence. Crew jumpseats are not floatation devices. To use a seat cushion as flotation device: Pull the seat cushion up from the back and out. Hold the cushion against the chest, with arms wrapped around cushion and through

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straps on the underside. Grasp wrists and hold cushion close to chest. If arms do not reach to grasp opposite wrist, grasp straps. Enter the water. Rest chin on the edge of the cushion.

5.15.14. SAFETY DEMO EQUIPMENT EU-OPS regulations require that safety equipment announcements and demonstrations be made for every take-off. C/C demonstration kits are considered part of the emergency equipment for each aircraft. It in necessary to preflight check demo equipment to ensure equipment is in good condition. Demo Kit contains: One seat belt extensions One demo 02 mask One demo life vest One safety information card for that aircraft type 5.15.15. EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER (E.L.T.) ref OPS 1.820/1.830 General Description The ELT has been developed as a means of locating downed aircraft. The Artex C406-2 series transmits on all 3 emergency frequencies (121.5/243.0 and 406.025 MHz.) The ELT automatically activates during a crash and transmits the standard swept tone on 121.5 and 243.0 MHz. It also transmits a 406.025 MHz encoded digital message to the COSPAS/SARSAT satellite system, which allows for rapid identification and reduces search and rescue response time. The C406-2 series has been tested to meet the rigorous requirements including 500 G shock, 1000 pound crush, flame and vibration tests and continues to operate normally. Continued operation in a temperature range of -20C through +55C is assured. The ELT automatically activates during a crash and transmits the standard swept tone on 121.5 and 243.0 MHz. Every 50 seconds for 520 milliseconds the 406.025 MHz transmitter turns on. During that time an encoded digital message is sent to the satellite. The information contained in that message is shown below: - Serial Number Of The Transmitter or Aircraft ID

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- Country Code - I.D. Code The 406.025 MHz transmitter will operate for 24 hours and then shuts down automatically. The 121.5/243.0 MHz transmitter will continue to operate until the unit has exhausted the battery power which typically will be at least 72 hours. One advantage of the 406.025 MHz transmitter is that it will produce a much more accurate position, typically 1 to 2 kilometers as compared to 15 to 20 kilometers for 121.5/243.0 MHz transmitters. When coupled with the aircrafts navigation system the position accuracy improves to approximately 100 meters.

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6.1. DESCRIPTION ................................................................................................. 3 6.1.1. MAIN INTENTIONS AND CONTENTS OF FIRST AID IN AN AIRCRAFT .................. 4 6.1.2. BASIC RULES ............................................................................................ 4 6.1.3. FIRST AID METHODS .................................................................................. 5 6.1.4. DECISIONMAKING ..................................................................................... 5 6.1.5. THE MOST CRUCIAL AND HAZARDOUS THREE CONDITIONS ............................ 6 6.1.6. PASSENGERS THAT ARE NOT MEDICALLY ALLOWED ON THE AIRCRAFT ............. 6 6.1.7. ILLNESS ON BOARD AND REPORTING OF INCIDENTS...................................... 6 6.2. AIRSICKNESS ................................................................................................. 7 6.3. APPENDICITIS ................................................................................................ 7 6.4. ASTHMA ......................................................................................................... 7 6.5. ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION................................................................................. 8 6.6. BLEEDING ...................................................................................................... 9 6.6.1. NOSE BLEEDING ...................................................................................... 10 6.6.2. BLEEDING FROM MOUTH........................................................................... 11 6.6.3. BRAIN HEMORRHAGE ............................................................................... 11 6.7. BLOOD PRESSURE ......................................................................................... 11 6.8. BODY TEMPERATURE...................................................................................... 11 6.9. BURNS......................................................................................................... 12 6.9.1. FIRST DEGREE BURNS ............................................................................. 12 6.9.2. SECOND DEGREE BURNS .......................................................................... 12 6.9.3. THIRD DEGREE BURNS ............................................................................. 12 6.10. CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION (CPR) .................................................. 13 6.10.1. RECOVERY POSITION.............................................................................. 16 6.11. CHILDBIRTH ............................................................................................... 17 6.11.1. MISCARRIAGE ....................................................................................... 20 6.12. CONGESTION OF AIR PASSAGES HEIMLICH MANEUVER ............................... 21 6.12.1. CONGESTION OF BABY OR INFANT ........................................................... 22 6.12.2. CONGESTION OF OVERWEIGHT OR PREGNANT........................................... 22 6.13. DEATH ON BOARD ....................................................................................... 23 6.14. DIABETIC EMERGENCIES .............................................................................. 24 6.15. DIARRHEA .................................................................................................. 24 6.16. EAR DISCOMFORT ....................................................................................... 24 6.17. EPILEPSY.................................................................................................... 25 6.18. EYE INJURY................................................................................................. 26 6.19. FAINTING LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS .......................................................... 26 6.20. FRACTURES ................................................................................................ 26 6.20. FROSTBITE FREEZING OF TISSUE ............................................................... 29 6.21. HEART ATTACK............................................................................................ 29 6.22. HEAT EXHAUSTION ...................................................................................... 30 6.23. HYPERVENTILATION ..................................................................................... 30 6.24. HYPOTHERMIA ............................................................................................ 30 6.25. HYPOXIA .................................................................................................... 31 6.26. MOTIONLESS PROBLEMS .............................................................................. 31 6.27. PANIC ATTACK ............................................................................................ 32 6.28. POISONING ................................................................................................ 32

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6.29. 6.30. 6.31. 6.32. 6.33. 6.34. 6.35. 6.35. SEIZURES CONVULSIONS .......................................................................... SHOCK ....................................................................................................... STOMACHACHE ........................................................................................... STRAINS AND SPRAINS ................................................................................ STROKE ..................................................................................................... GLOSSARY OF MEDICAL TERMS ..................................................................... MEDICAL INCIDENT REPORT ......................................................................... INVESTIGATION OF POSSIBLE IN-FLIGHT FOOD POISONING REPORT ................. 33 34 35 35 35 37 43 45

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6.1. DESCRIPTION FIRST AID is an immediate care given to the injured or suddenly ill passengers on the aircraft. It is the assistance that is rendered until competent medical care, if required, arrives and takes over. First aid does not include medical appoint and injections. It doesnt matter what kind of problem you are face to face with, it is how calm you are and how calm you make the person in front of you when you make a decision. Cabin crew members must always be prepared for any problem that may occur. The first thing that the cabin crew member must go through is proper TRAINING. Medication A Flight Attendant may offer only those medications provided in the First aid Kit. No medication will be administered directly to a passenger by a Flight Attendant. If a passenger asks for help in taking his own medication or medications provided from the first aid kits, provide spoon, water, napkin, ice or any other convenience; but tactfully ask him to take the medicine himself. - Always tell the passenger the name of any medication, so that the passenger can determine if it is acceptable. - Do not assist with administering medication. - Do not administer hypodermic injections. - Do not store medication for a passenger. If a passenger advises that he is carrying medication that must be refrigerated, place ice along with medication in a clear airsick bag and leave with passenger at his seat. Biohazard Precautions The following preventive measures should be followed in any emergency First Aid situation involving possible contamination due to an infectious disease. - In an emergency First Aid situation where it is necessary to come in contact with body fluids, such as blood, urine, feces, or vomit, use latex gloves. After contacting bodily fluids, always wash your hands and forearms carefully for at least a minute to be effective. Check other exposed parts of your body, especially any area with an open cut, and wash as necessary. - If you are concerned about the possibility of contamination, due to contact with bodily fluids, check with a physician as soon as possible. - Log items such as soiled seat covers, blankets, pillows, dirty floor surfaces, and opened First Aid Kits on an Irregularity Form. Administering First Aid in Flight: If a life-threatening situation occurs during flight, a CCM may be called on to perform CPR or rescue breathing. If this is necessary, the CCM may not be able to sit in his/her jumpseat for landing and a PSP should be selected to operate a vacated exit door. The PSP would always operate the R1 door, and would be relocated to the passenger seat nearest to the R1 door and briefed on the R1 door operation. The PSP would be responsible for the operation of the R1 door in the event of an unplanned emergency landing. The Captain will determine if an unscheduled landing is necessary. In the event of a planned emergency landing, it would be necessary for CCM to occupy his/her jumpseat. Medical emergency victims would have to be secured for landing. When First Aid oxygen is needed during flight and for a routine landing, the oxygen cylinder should be padded with pillows, blankets, or coats and secured under the seat with a seat belt extension. Never consider a passenger to be deceased. Only medical authorities on the ground will make that determination. Whenever the Captain has summoned an ambulance, request that all passengers remain

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seated until the person has been deplaned. 6.1.1. MAIN INTENTIONS AND CONTENTS OF FIRST AID IN AN AIRCRAFT To save life To relief patient's condition as much as possible, and to make patient's recovery process easy. 6.1.2. BASIC RULES Initial interventions to patient passenger: - Is he/she breathing? - Is he/she conscious? Questions must be asked to patient passenger: Do you have a pain/ache? Do you feel any hassle to breathe? Do you feel nausea? Have you ever had similar complaints? Are you currently under the doctor control? Are you taking any medication? (If he/she does so, must be highly advised to taken.) If the patient is unconscious, his/her companions must be questioned to get detailed information about the patient. Take charge. Instruct someone to obtain medical help and others to assist as directed. Secure the scene. Make area safe, if necessary. Make a primary survey of the victim. Does he/she look dizzy and ill? How does he/she answer the questions? (Logical, complicated, shortly) Color of his/her skin? (pink, faded, purple, red ) How does he/she breathe? (Quiet, having troubles, immoderate) Does he/she have a fever? Pulse check (from wrist, from groin, from neck) Care for life threatening conditions. If the condition of a patient is serious, doctor must be urgently announced. If several people have been injured, decide upon priorities in carrying for each victim. Care for all injuries in order of need. Use a tourniquet only under extreme conditions as a last resort. Do not attempt to remove embedded objects. Place a bandage compress and cover bandage over an open fracture without undue pressure before applying splints. Cockpit must be kept informed. Loosen restrictive clothing when necessary. Air condition must be activated if it is necessary. Prevent air from reaching burned surfaces as quick as possible, using suitable dress. Patient must be laid down or stand upright and his/her legs must be raised if it is necessary. (Seat must be inclined) Patient must be kept warm if it is necessary. Oxygen must be given if it is needed. Keep passengers away from the victim. Cabin crew must stay calm, well-informed and benevolent in all conditions. Cockpit personnel must be informed about passenger's conditions and every first aid action.

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6.1.3. FIRST AID METHODS Cabin crew who saw the patient passenger must take action immediately and should stay with passenger. Senior Cabin Crew Member should be immediately informed about the situation. Chief of cabin must scrutinize the condition of passenger. The captain must be informed by SCCM. If it is necessary, doctor and competent medical care must be announced among the passengers. Doctor's and competent medical care's identity control must be done, incapable, unlicensed and unqualified people among the passengers must be taken away and prevented to involve the emergency situation and doctor must be assisted. If there is no one (such as doctor etc.) around to take immediate action, interference has to be carry on by the cabin crew and patient must be encouraged. Critical required first aid equipment has to be present. Cockpit has to keep informed about the patient's condition and the situation. Other passengers must be sent away from the patient. If there is no significant improvement in patient situation, captain and SCCM have to coordinate the preparation for an emergency landing operation. Report has to drawn up about the patient's condition. 6.1.4. DECISIONMAKING The problem must be identified in order to determine the prior and suitable treatment. If the patient is not unconscious, it is an advantage in determining the problem and the treatment. If the patient is sick, the treatment type varies. If the patient is injured; the treatment types are followed step by step. If the patient must be moved in order to be relieved, this may injure him/her more. Therefore, when moving him/her, the probability of going worse must be taken into consideration. The control of bleeding. Application of shock treatment. It must be determined that if there is an injury on the head part. In this case, take away the necklace and alike because they may be dangerous. Patient is kept under supervision. The most effective treatment method in unconscious patients is: Keeping airway open (Airway) Control the breathing (Breathing) Circulation (Circulation) BREATHE IN - BREATHE OUT (INHALE EXHALE) While breathing in expands the lungs, breathing out narrow them. The intensity of respiration can be faster or slower depending on the sickness. During 1 minute the air breathed out must be counted. (Breath in - Breath out 1, Breath in - Breath out 2...) You can see, hear and feel while the patient inhale and exhale. Number of a breath : 14 -18 per a min for Adults 16 - 20 per a min for Juvenile 20 - 30 per a min for Children 30 - 40 per a min for Babies Intensity of respiration depends on fear, excitement, happiness, tiredness, fever, shock, lost consciousness, poison or various illnesses: Asthma, Hypertension,

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Epilepsy Number of breaths can decrease in situations when a person is: asleep, frozen, or has various kinds of poisoning or loss of consciousness. The person who breathes normally will also look normal: color of his/her face, lips, cheeks, ears and the edge of nails will be normal.

PULSE Determination of pulse failure The most suitable way to do a pulse check is through patient's wrists and arteries. If its not possible to feel the pulse by touching the wrists, it must be checked by gently pressing the jugular vein. Run your index and middle fingers softly until you reach the patient's jugular vein on his/her neck side. Try to feel the pulse. Pulse failure must be determined at least in 5-10 seconds. Ask for assistance. Pulse check through the aorta could be hazardous: Blood, which pumped to the brain tissues, may slow down. Heartbeat can be weakened. Heartbeats A normal pulse rate is between: 60-80 beats per minute for Adults 80-100 beats per minute for Children 100-120 beats per minute for Babies Pulse can be checked: through wrists along the thumb line through touching the jugular vein through groin 6.1.5. THE MOST CRUCIAL AND HAZARDOUS THREE CONDITIONS RESPIRATION AND HEART FAILURE If heart failure exceeds four minutes, severe brain damage can occur. Even if the heart and airway start working, the patient will still be in vegetative state. SERIOUS/SEVERE BLEEDING If an adult loses approximately 1 Lt of blood, it can be dangerous for health. The level of danger is higher for kids. SHOCK In general bleeding, fear and pain which caused by serious wounding incidents, can result in shock. Symptoms sometimes may not be visible for if the right actions are not taken this could cause death. 6.1.6. PASSENGERS THAT ARE NOT MEDICALLY ALLOWED ON THE AIRCRAFT Patients with small pocks, chicken pocks and meningitis People that have chest pains People that have had a recent heart attack The last 4 weeks of pregnancy 7 days after birth Babies that are younger than 7 days 6.1.7. ILLNESS ON BOARD AND REPORTING OF INCIDENTS In the event of illness or injury of a passenger in flight, it is the duty of the SCC to report to the commander and to coordinate first aid procedures. In the event of any medical incident SCC must fill-in in the Medical Incident Report the following information: Name, address, telephone number of the ill/injured person; Description of illness/injury;

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Description of first aid given; Description of the situation that led to illness/injury. Name address of assisting doctors/nurses, witnesses; Statements from witnesses shall be appended to the report.

Usually caused by rapid rising or dropping of aircraft, warm cabin, irregular or insufficient food and rest, over indulgence in food or drink and/or emotional disturbances such as fear of flying. Symptoms: - Pale and sweating skin - Feeling of vomiting (even on a empty stomach) - Uneasiness and restlessness Action: Keep cabin cool during rough air Calm the passenger Open individual air vent and instruct passenger to breathe deeply Recline seat, and close window shades. Make them look at a fixed point. Make them sit comfortably Tell them to put there head back and not to move too much Give him/her a sickness bag Apply cold, damp towels to victim's forehead and back of neck Keep him/her under supervision Treatment after vomiting has ceased Offer cold, damp towel. Offer crushed ice or carbonated beverages to rinse mouth (Toss carbonated beverage from glass to glass to reduce carbonation). Do not allow victim to drink large amounts of liquid, as this will induce further vomiting. If known to be a diabetic, offer mildly sweetened (not saccharin) drink after vomiting ceases to get sugar back in their system Try to keep victim seated and quiet Help victim to lie down if there is room

6.2. AIRSICKNESS

Symptoms: - Fever above 38 C / Rapid pulse - Nausea and vomiting - Pain on right abdomen or groin area - Constipation Action: Lie the patient on his/her back Cold compress on the groin area Do not give food or drink

6.3. APPENDICITIS

6.4. ASTHMA

Asthma is an illness that can be seen at any age. Usually the crisis on the aircraft is not the first one. Illness is known; therefore pax should have medication with him. In case of crisis there is danger of suffocation and loss of consciousness. Causes: - Allergy resulting from flying substances in the air (Some people have allergy to some

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substances by birth.) EX: Pollens, egg, cats, dogs etc. Excitement The spasm of muscles causes the trachea to get narrow, actually obstructs its opening and closing regularly. Symptoms: - Shortness of breath (The air breathed in comes out very difficult) - Wheezy breathing, severe coughing - Purple face (results from breathlessness), spasms at the upper part of the body Action: Place person in most comfortable position. (This is usually in a semi-reclining position). Reassure and help him relax. Many asthmatics carry inhalers or aerosols. Help him take his medication. Loosen tight clothing; Administer oxygen on a LOW setting. Person may not be able to tolerate an oxygen mask directly over the nose and mouth. Have them hold it to the side of mouth. -

The most crucial emergency situation is when natural breathing ceases. If the patient is unconscious there is a big risk of him/her chocking because of the tongue falling back or the airway getting blocked. It should never be forgotten that seconds are very important. Before starting the treatment you must make sure that the patients airway is open. To do this, put one of your hands under the patients neck and lift up, the other hand is put on his/her forehead and pressed back. This is a basic move and could be enough to open the airway. To control the patients breathing, keep the patients head in the right position and put you ear towards the mouth of the patient. Keep an eye on the patients chest. Try to hear the sound of the patient breathing. Also you can place a little mirror near the mouth or nose; if the mirror steams up, this is a sign showing that the patient is breathing. During the respiration procedure, try to feel the warm air coming out from the chest. If the patient stops breathing you must immediately start the procedure to revive the patients. By putting the patients head back this will open the airway. Close the nostrils of the patient by squeezing them. Keep the other hand out the back side in the same condition.

6.5. ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION

The reviver takes a deep breath and blows into the patients mouth; Keep an eye on the patients chest if it rises or not.

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If there is no exchange of air, the reviver checks the position of the head and resettles the chin. If there is still no exchange, there is a possibility that it has been blocked by foreign objects. Place your fingers in the patients mouth and try to take out the foreign object. If the airway does not open, lay the patient on his/her side hit the blade bone 3 to 4 times strongly. Lay the victim on his back again and put one of your hands on his/her abdomen, put one hand on top of the other and make a powerful blows and push upwards hard. Make 5 swift moves. If there is any foreign matter in the mouth coming from the lungs, then clean it with your finger. Put the head back and try to help them breath periodically.

If conscious person suddenly stops breathing, it is highly possible that some foreign material closed his/her air passages or the person is having a heart attack. If some foreign material closes his/her air passages, the person can not speak, they will nod their heads and hold their throats. The person who is having a heart attack can hardly speak.

6.6. BLEEDING

Serious bleeding can be defined as the second most important emergency medical incident. In severe bleeding, the blood pumps or spurts from the wound with each heart beat. If the amount of the loss of blood is excessive, patient can die in a few minutes. It can be dangerous if an adult looses 1 pint of blood. Even less amount of (less than 1 pint) blood loss can be dangerous and hazardous for children. Ideally sterile dressing should be used, if it is necessary you can use bandage. If there is no broken bones lift the bleeding part up to heart level. If the bleeding doesnt stop, make sure that your hands apply pressure on the artery close to the heart to stop the bleeding. Put pressure above the wound (5-6 cm); this can be done with a piece of cloth, tie or bandage. Wrap this item above the wound and tie a knot, place a piece of wood or pen on the knot, tie 2 knots on top, then twist the wood slowly to stop the bleeding. The tourniquet must be applied without removing the clothes and the bandage. Write down the time of the tourniquet and pin it to the patient! The tourniquet must never be left for a long time (2 hours) and must be loosened every 15 minutes. If it is an artery wound place the tourniquet upstream the bleeding area;

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If it is a vein wound place the tourniquet downstream the bleeding area. The tourniquet must be removed by the medical staff called for. If the landing is not possible within 2 hours, the tourniquet must be loosened for 5-10 min after 30-60 min, the dressing must be unfastened and the artery must be compressed. Direct pressure is the most effective method to control any bleeding wound. If severe bleeding continues or cannot be controlled an emergency landing is necessary. To avoid contamination from bodily fluids, put on latex gloves. Action Direct pressure by hand over a dressing is the preferred method for the control of severe bleeding, since it prevents loss of blood from the body, without interference with normal blood circulation. Apply direct pressure by placing the palm of the gloved hand over a dressing that covers the entire area of an open wound, or as close to wound as possible. A cold compress will help stop bleeding. Do not disturb the clotting of the blood by moving the dressing. If blood soaks through the entire pad without clotting, add additional thick layers of cloth over the original dressing. Continue to apply direct pressure. Elevate the wound above the level of the victim's heart. Do not apply antiseptic and make sure that injured person is remaining still. Do not give aspirin, because it interferes with the blood clotting. Pressure Points Apply pressure to pressure points if severe bleeding from an open wound of the arm or leg does not stop after the application of direct pressure to the wound area (usually in the case of a compound fracture). Shock may accompany severe bleeding. Brachial Artery - for the control of severe bleeding from an open arm wound. - Grasp the middle of the person's upper arm, your thumb on the outside of his arm and your other lingers on the inside. Use the flat, inside surface of your fingers - not finger tips. Press in, creating an inward force from opposite sides. - Compress brachial artery against bone of upper arm to control bleeding from wound of lower arm. Femoral Artery - for the control of severe bleeding from an open leg wound. - Position the person flat on his back if possible and place the heel of your hand directly over the pressure point. Lean forward over your straightened arm to apply the amount of pressure needed to close the artery. - Bleeding from the leg can be controlled by deep pressure on the femoral artery high up in the groin. 6.6.1. NOSE BLEEDING Causes: - High blood pressure, sneezing and blowing - Infection, head injury Symptoms: - Dripping or oozing Action: Place person in a sitting position with head tilted slightly forward Have the seat upright. Have the passenger breath through his mouth Place a wet towel or ice on the back on his neck. Apply bandage to his/her nose. If bleeding continues, you can put strips of gauze up his/her nose to stop the bleeding. (Make sure that a piece of the gauze is hanging out of the nose.) Pinch the nostrils together. Advise person not to blow his nose for several hours.

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Do not put anything in nostrils.

6.6.2. BLEEDING FROM THE MOUTH Action: Attempt to determine the source of bleeding by making an inquiry and close observation. If bleeding from mouth, gums, tongue or recent oral surgery direct pressure should be applied. Do not give anything to eat or drink. If unable to determine source of bleeding, internal bleeding may be present. Do not give anything to eat or drink. Anticipate vomiting. Place person in reclined position. Elevate feet and administer oxygen. 6.6.3. BRAIN HEMORRHAGE Symptoms: - Sudden and deep unconsciousness - One of the eye pupils is bigger than the other - Difficulty in inhaling and exhaling - Body temperature below normal - Deformation to the mouth. Action: Make sure air passage is clear and always stays open Do not give any food or drink Give oxygen

An average person has 120/80 mg blood pressure, but it may differ from person to person. High blood pressure symptoms: - Back of the neck and head ache - Exhaustion - Nausea Action: High blood pressure is a chronic illness. The passenger must carry own medicine. Low blood pressure symptoms: - Dizziness - Pins and needles in the eyes - Fainting Action: Relax the passenger. Give him/her coffee/coca-cola.

6.7. BLOOD PRESSURE

Normal body temperature is 36.5 C when measured from the armpit and 37 C from the mouth and anus. Temperature for adults is measured from the mouth and armpit for babies and from anus for 5 min. Reasons of temperature decrease - Poisoning, unconsciousness, freezing, deep shocks Reasons of temperature increase - Insect bites, wearing too much in hot/moist weather Edition 2 Chapter 6 Page 11 May 2010

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- Dehydration, hot weather, sunstroke, fever illnesses Symptoms: With the increase of body temperature patient starts to shiver and feels cold. When the body temperature decreases, the patient starts to sweat. When body temperature increases children start to shiver, foamy secretion comes out of the mouth, spasms occur. In further phases it can result in unconsciousness. Action: Give frequently plenty of liquid Aspirin can be administered Put wet piece of cloth on the forehead (Cold water or ice are never to be used)

6.9. BURNS

The degree must be identified correctly and must be treated according to this identification. Burns are caused by fire, steam, hot liquid, sun burns, electrical burns etc. 6.9.1. FIRST DEGREE BURNS First degree burns are not serious and results from touch of a hot or boiled object. Most of the sun burns are first degree burns. Symptoms: - Redness or discoloration, mild swelling and pain Action: Submerge the burned area in cold, salty water up to 20 min or use cold compress. 6.9.2. SECOND DEGREE BURNS Second degree burns are deeper. They have red, mottled appearance and causes blisters. Result of hot liquid or burning of flammable substances. Pain is severe. Treat for shock if present. Action: Immerse in cold water up to 10-15 min. Apply sterile wet gauze Do not burst the blisters, do not apply oil or pomade, do not lift the skin. Wrap with sterile bandage 6.9.3. THIRD DEGREE BURNS Deep tissue destruction. Chemical burns are third degree burns. Burned area may get black or whiter. Tissue nerves would be destroyed therefore there will be no pain. Deeper burns covering more than 15% of the body can lead to death. Burns are more dangerous for children and old people. Some burns can lead to shock. Action: Wash the area with cold and clean water Use dry, sterile gauze, give aspirin
First Degree Reddened skin Second Reddened or blistered skin Degree Third Degree Deep destruction of skin tissue Extensive 1st or 2nd degree burns Cool immediately with tap water Bandage with dry, sterile dressings Treat for shock Cool immediately with tap water Bandage with dry, sterile dressings Do not use cotton, tissues, any medication or ointment. If unconscious, monitor signs of circulation. Treat for shock

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6.10. CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION (CPR)
Knowing how to perform resuscitation could save somebody's life. The ABCs of Care: Airway - Breath - Circulation A respiratory emergency is one in which normal breathing stops or in which breathing is so reduced that oxygen intake is insufficient to support life. If breathing is labored, administer first aid oxygen. If breathing stops, Rescue Breathing should begin as quickly as possible. The person's chance for survival is greatly diminished when deprived of oxygen for more than 4 to 6 minutes. If assistance is not administered promptly, the heart will stop within minutes. Call for a doctor or qualified medical assistance. A CPR pocket facemask or breathing barrier can be placed over the person's mouth to avoid direct contact with the victim. A piece of cloth will not prevent contact with bodily fluids. A= Airway Open the airway using the head-tilt/chin lift B= C= Breathing Look, listen, and feel for breathing (5 seconds) Circulation Check for pulse-adult/child-carotid artery Check an infant, using the brachial artery

1. Opening airway - Head Super-extension If a casualty loses consciousness, the tongue may fall back into the throat and block the passage of air from the mouth and nose into the lungs. Ensuring the airway is open is vital to the casualty's survival.

Actions

Place one hand on casualty's forehead and gently tilt back their head and lift the chin Keeping the airway open, check for breathing - look, listen and feel for breathing Look for chest movement listen for sound and feel for breath on your cheek Do this for no more than ten seconds

If the casualty is breathing Bring the casualty's far arm across their chest Hold back of casualty's hand against opposite cheek With your other hand, pull up the far leg just above the knee, keeping the foot on the ground Keeping the casualty's hand pressed against their cheek, pull on the far leg and roll the casualty towards you and on to their side Adjust upper leg so both hip and knee are bent at right angles

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If the casualty isn't breathing Start resuscitation until casualty breathes again or expert medical help arrives. 2. Rescue breaths 'Rescue breaths' is the new term for mouth-to-mouth-resuscitation, if a casualty isn't breathing on their own, you may have to give rescue breaths.

By breathing air into a casualty's lungs you introduce vital oxygen into their system. This may be enough to get the casualty breathing again independently, but if it isn't you'll need to combine rescue breaths with chest compressions - cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Actions Place a hand on casualty's forehead and gently back tilt their head Look in their mouth and remove any obvious obstructions Place fingertips of your other hand under casualty's chin and lift gently Taking your hand from their forehead, pinch soft part of their nose Open their mouth and take a deep breath, filling your lungs with air Place your lips around casualty's mouth, ensuring a good seal Blow steadily, watching to see casualty's chest rise Keeping casualty's head tilted, remove your mouth and watch their chest fall Further action Repeat this once, to give two rescue breaths in total, and then check for signs of circulation by looking, listening and feeling for movement, breath or improved color.

If there's no circulation, start resuscitation. 3. Resuscitation - adult Actions Check for response - gently shake casualty's shoulder and ask if they're all right If there's no response, shout for help and open casualty's airway Check for breathing - look for chest movement, listen for sounds of breathing and feel for casualty's breath on your cheek Do this for ten seconds Give chest compressions

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Giving chest compressions Place your hands on centre of casualty's chest and, with the heel of your hands (which should be linked one over the other), press down 30 times Depress chest to a third of its depth (4-5cm) Do this at a rate of 100 times a minute After performing 30 chest compressions, tilt casualty's head and lift their chin Give two rescue breaths Continue this sequence until emergency help arrives or the casualty starts to show some response.

4. Resuscitation - child If child doesn't respond to gentle shaking, shout for help and proceed to open the airway Check for breathing, look for chest movement, listen for breathing and feel for the child's breath on your cheek Do this for ten seconds If the child isn't breathing, carefully remove any visible obstruction from their mouth and nose Give 5 initial rescue breaths and 30 chest compressions, Continue with cycles of 2 rescue breaths and 30 chest compressions Giving chest compressions Place your hands on the centre of the child's chest and, with the heel of your hand, press down 30 times (use one or two hands depending on the size of the child in relation to you) Depress the chest to a third of its depth Do this at a rate of 100 times a minute Continue the sequence until emergency help arrives, or the child starts to show some response 5. Resuscitation baby Actions If baby fails to respond to a tap or gentle flick on the sole of foot, shout for help and open the baby's airway Check for breathing, look for chest movement, listen for breathing, and feel for the baby's breath on your cheek Do this for ten seconds If the baby isn't breathing, carefully remove any visible obstruction from the baby's mouth and nose Cover babys mouth and nose with your mouth to give rescue breaths. Give 5 initial rescue breaths and 30 chest compressions Continue with cycles of 2 rescue breaths and 30 chest compressions Edition 2 Chapter 6 Page 15 May 2010

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Giving chest compressions Place two fingertips on the baby's lower breastbone - one finger's width below nipple line Press downwards sharply no more than a third of the depth of the chest Do this at a rate of 100 times a minute Continue the sequence until emergency help arrives, or the baby starts to show some response.

6.10.1. RECOVERY POSITION If a casualty is unconscious but breathing, it's often a good idea to put them in the recovery position. This position: It prevents the casualty's tongue from blocking their airway It promotes drainage of fluids, such as blood or vomit, from their mouth It keeps lie casualty in a safe position if they have to be left alone Action - step one Kneel beside casualty Remove any fragile objects, such as their glasses Place the arm nearest you at right angles to casualty's body, with palm facing upwards Action - step two Bring casualty's far arm across their chest Hold back of casualty's hand against opposite cheek With your other hand, pull up the far leg just above the knee, keeping the foot on the ground Action - step three Pull the knee towards you, rolling the casualty towards you and on to their side Keep the casualty's hand pressed against their cheek, as this helps to keep their airway open Tilt back their head and adjust hand under cheek to ensure head remains tilted Check for breathing Adjust upper leg so both hip and knee are bent at right angles

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Monitor the casualty's condition until help arrives

Recovery position for babies If an infant is unconscious but breathing, hold them on their side, head tilted, as if you were giving them a cuddle, with their head lower than their tummy.

6.11. CHILDBIRTH

Do not attempt to rush or delay childbirth. Childbirth occurs in three stages: 1st Stage - the onset of labor 2nd Stage - the birth of the baby 3rd Stage - the delivery of the afterbirth (placenta) Preparation - Immediately inform the cockpit - Make a doctor or nurse announcement - Ask the mother if she has had any previous deliveries, and how many? (This may determine the length of time that she will be in labor. Multiple deliveries will usually mean a shorter delivery time). - Ask mother if a normal delivery was expected? Is she expecting multiple births-? Does she want her husband or family with her during the birth? - Collect the following equipment: Oxygen First Aid Kit Pillows Blankets Newspapers Plastic Bags Plastic Gloves, disinfectants, alcohol, if there is no umbilical cord clamp then

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prepare a piece of string. Select an area of the aircraft most suitable for the delivery. Across aisle, opposite passenger door, etc. Keep passengers away from selected area as much as possible. If the mother's water has broken, do not allow her to walk around. Keep her lying down. Wash the lower abdomen, outer vagina, thighs and anal area thoroughly with soap and water.

1. First stage of birth - Labor Its the longest stage of birth. It could take up to 8-10 hours. - It begins with cramp-like contractions in the lower abdomen and waist. Bloodstained mucus comes from the womb. - This stage begins with the onset of regular contractions that cause the cervix to start slowly opening. Contractions may be felt by placing your hand on the womans abdomen. - Contractions will gradually become stronger and frequent and last longer. If contractions start to come in less than two minutes and bag of water breaks, it means that the birth has started. The water sac surrounding the baby ruptures and is expelled from the vagina in a gush of fluid or by slow discharge. 2. Second stage of birth Dilatation period This is the gradual opening as the womb stretches until there is enough room for the baby to pass through. This can take between 30 minutes to 2 hours. In this period the strong contractions can shorten the time. If the contractions technique must be appropriate or it could tire the mother. (Before helping the birth wash your hands and make sure they are sterile). - Gradual opening as the womb stretches until there is enough room for the baby to pass through. - As labor progresses, pain occurs more often and is more intense. - Encourage the mother to relax. - Keep moist, cool towels on the mother's forehead. - Maintain a calm and reassuring manner.

3. Third stage of birth Actual birth - Place newspapers under the expectant mother. - Once the baby's head is visible, place several pillows under the woman's back and buttocks to elevate her hips. Instruct her to breathe through her mouth and to bear down with the pain. If the woman has not emptied her bowels and bladder, you can expect this to happen at this time. As the baby's head comes through, hold one hand

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above and one hand below it. Once the head is completely out, check to see if the umbilical cord is wrapped around his neck. If so, check for a pulse in the cord. As long as there is a pulse, the baby is receiving oxygen through it. If the cord is wrapped several times, or tightly around his neck, reach up and place a finger under the cord and loosen it as you would any tight garment around the neck. Do not attempt to unwind it at this time. - The baby's head will turn to one side to allow the shoulders to pass through. There may be several minutes between each movement so don't become over anxious or attempt to pull on the baby. - The baby will be slippery, so as the body, legs and feet come out, take a firm grip on the baby. Immediately wrap a triangular bandage (pillowcase) around the baby, and then a blanket to prevent a drop in body temperature. Lay baby face down on the mother's stomach and drain fluids from his mouth. If necessary, use a sterile compress and wipe out his mouth. Be careful not to touch his nose before his mouth is clear as this may cause him to inhale quickly and suck fluid into his lungs. - Breathing may start automatically, but if it doesn't - snap your finger against the bottom of his feet. - If the baby fails to respond, check his/her mouth and be certain all mucus has been removed. If necessary, start artificial respiration (Rescue Breathing). Continue until baby is breathing on his own. Wrap the baby round with a hot and soft towel. - The umbilical cord supplies the baby with oxygen; it is not necessary to cut the cord and separate the baby from the placenta (afterbirth). You can leave them intact until the flight reaches its destination. Although the umbilical cord is not cut, it must be tied off. - Do not cut or tie the umbilical cord before the pulse has stopped and the baby is breathing on his own. Note: Do not hesitate to administer 02 to the mother if she requests it during the course of delivery. -

4. Cutting off the umbilical cord It is appropriate to cut the umbilical cord after 10 minutes after the placenta comes out. - The cord is tied with two pieces of clothes which must be 15 cm and 20 cm away from the navel. - If the first cloth (nearest to the navel) is not tied up very strongly, the cord that is cut can cause bleeding. (This may result in death) - The cord is cut between these two ties. Put sterile gauze on it. - Check if there is bleeding on the baby's navel or not. NOTE: The placenta must be put in a plastic bag for an examination. It is not advised to cut the umbilical cord during the flight (only if there isnt a doctor on board). The cord should be wrapped with to knots and tied. The placentas should be put in a clean bag and placed next to the baby.

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The Placenta (Afterbirth) This is the final stage of childbirth and usually takes about 15 minutes... Stomach-ache increases during the separation. She must hold her breath and try to push out the placenta or the cord. This will be much easier when she lies down with her knees up. If severe vaginal bleeding occurs after the placenta is expelled, place your hand on the mother's abdomen and push firmly down on the uterus. Keep rubbing until the uterus feels firm and hard. Place the placenta in a plastic bag, cover it with pillow slip, and keep it for laboratory examination later. If delivery is uncomplicated and destination is less than 2 hours away continue with flight. Do not give mother or infant anything to eat or drink. Keep mother and infant warm, quiet and comfortable. Wash your hands and arms with lots of soap and water. 6.11.1. MISCARRIAGE Miscarriages carry the danger of severe bleeding and of shock. A woman who suspects that she is miscarrying may be reluctant to confide in a stranger, particularly if that person is a man. Recognition - Cramp-like pains in the lower abdomen or pelvic area; - Signs of shock; - Vaginal bleeding, possibly sudden and profuse; - Passage of the fetus and other products of conception. Action: Remember that the woman may be frightened and very distressed at this time; Offer your help even if you seem to be intrusive; reassure the woman and help her into the most comfortable position; elevate feet; Inform the commander; Remove passengers from the area; Ask for medical assistance; Find a sanitary pad or clean towel for the woman to use; Monitor and record breathing and pulse every ten minutes; Keep any expelled material and pass it to the medical services. Keep it out of the woman's sight, if possible; Treat woman for shock.

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6.12. CONGESTION OF AIR PASSAGES HEIMLICH MANEUVER
If somebody's air passage completely or partially plugged by a foreign material and if he/she has a severe cough, let him/her spit out the foreign material by coughing.

If the cough gets weak and if he/she starts to have a respiratory problem and if the airway is partially blocked, this must be considered as a full blockage. You must hit the patients back continuously for 4 times and you should carry out a pressure on his/her abdomen for 4 times.

If she/he is unconscious or fell down, you have to hit his/her back continuously 4 times and do hand movements for 4 times and then apply an artificial respiration mouth to mouth. After emergency passes, the patient should get examined by competent medical care or doctor for an appropriate solutions and medical complications.

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6.12.1. CONGESTION OF BABY OR INFANT If the patient is a baby or a child; put his/her head upside down over your arm and make his/her face looks down and hit his/her back by short strokes. If the patient has a respiratory problem and natural breathing is inadequate or ceases because of something the child ate, the most efficient way and method to take out the foreign object is shown below; Hit his/her back for few times. If the patient is a baby; lay him/her on your arm and hit his/her back for few times by your other hand. Grasp the patient from the back by putting your arms under his/her armpits then put your first on the middle of the chest.

6.12.2. CONGESTION OF OVERWEIGHT OR PREGNANT If the patient is overweight or pregnant; Grasp him/her from the back of the patient by undergo from his/her armpits and put your fist hand under his/her middle chest. Grasp your fist by your other hand. Press the patient's chest with sudden movements. Carry out a pressure on his/her chest for 4 times.

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The difficult aspect about in-flight death is that although the person is deemed to have died, in the opinion of the crew, the person will rarely be certified dead until arrival, when the body has been removed and taken to a medical institution. The term, then, is "apparent inflight death". Medallion Air personnel are not qualified to officially state the condition of passenger's health. Pronouncement of death on board of the aircraft can occur only if a licensed authority is present. If a pronouncement of death is not made, the passenger should be considered unconscious and appropriate first aid continued. If a physician on board declares death, the aircraft may continue to destination with the consensus of the physician and the OCC. When entering the destination country with an apparent death on board the aircraft, local public health authorities must be notified as soon as possible. Symptoms: - Respiration stops (does not breathe) - Pulse has stopped - No reflex - Eye pupils expand. Does not become smaller when exposed to light. The following information should be reported: Full name of the deceased passenger; Nationality; Date of birth; Home address; Station of embarkation; Destination; Whether accompanied by relatives or friends. Death in-flight is traumatic for both passengers and crew. The following guidelines will assist cabin crew members in handling of death on board: Inform the captain. Make a doctors announcement. The deceased should be secured in a seat with a seat belt and covered with a blanket. It is preferable that as few passengers as possible be made aware of the situation. If possible, passengers should be relocated away from the area. On arrival, do not move the body until given permission by local authorities. Personal property of the deceased passenger should be secured and handled-over to the station manager, or his designee upon arrival. Persons accompanying the apparent death passenger (relatives or friends), if any, should be helped by the cabin crew to overcome the emotional shock of the event and not to induce panic to other passengers.

6.13. DEATH ON BOARD

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Abnormal fluctuations in blood sugar can lead to someone with diabetes to become unwell and, if untreated, to lose consciousness. A person suffering from diabetes should wear this mark. HYPERGYLCEMIA DIABETIC COMA Symptoms: - Thirst, nausea, vomiting - Fruity/sweet, acetone-like breath - Rapid, weak pulse, difficulty in breathing - Frequent need to urinate, loss of consciousness Action: Give plenty of water If he is not conscious, put him in the recovery position. Check the pulse and breathing regularly. Administer oxygen if needed and keep under surveillance. Make an announcement for a doctor Report to the captain HYPOGLYCEMIA INSULIN SHOCK Symptoms: - Hunger - Feeling weak and confused, dizziness - Sweating, pale skin - Shallow breathing, faint Action: Give the passenger plenty of sugary liquid and if needed give some food - bread If he is not conscious, get him in recovery position Administer oxygen and keep under surveillance Report to the captain

6.14. DIABETIC EMERGENCIES

Results of unclean food and drinks, within 2-12 hours. Symptoms: - Severe stomachache - Frequent painful toilet need diarrhea - Sweating and faint - No fever, feeling cold and sweating - Loss of water and salt could be dangerous. This illness is more dangerous for children, babies and old people. Action: During the flight nothing should be eaten. (Maybe a salty cracker). Make sure the patient gets enough liquid drink (water, tea without sugar). If possible the patient is laid down so that they can rest. Cola drinks are particularly helpful for children (warm and nonacid) or some tea, apple juice and salty cracker etc. can be given.

6.15. DIARRHEA

6.16. EAR DISCOMFORT

Ear discomfort occurs because of middle ear inflammation. Because of the changing altitude the airplanes cabin pressure increases and decreases. The ear will get affected from this

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situation Action: and pressure will start in the middle of the ear.

Gulp and yawn Chew gum Nose medicine dropper can be used. (Attention must be paid to the dosage for the children.) Squeeze the nose and swallow. Blow out with the nose and mouth closed in order to equalize pressure. Due to the pressure, pain is greater for babies. In this case do not prevent the baby from crying. If possible give some drink. Ear drops are unnecessary for the babies.

6.17. EPILEPSY

Epilepsy is a brain illness. It may result from an illness or by birth and it affects persons of all ages. The person who wears this mark has epilepsy. They also have in their possession a special medical certificate. Petit Mal: A slight lapse of awareness. - Sudden blankness, twitching limbs, smacking of lips Grand Mal: A major seizure in which victim loses consciousness and experiences convulsive movements of the body. - Victim may have a premonition or give a warning cry. - If sitting, victim will slump; if standing, victim will fall. - The face and lips will be discolored (blue or ashen gray). - The eyes will roll upward. Victim may make some unintelligible sounds. - Violent involuntary muscle contractions over part or all of body. Arms, legs, and head may jerk violently. There may be frothing at the mouth. - Victim will lose consciousness. Involuntary action of bowels and bladder. Action: Make no effort to restrain the convulsion movements, but keep the victim's airway open. Prevent injury to the victim by surrounding with padding (e.g. pillows, blankets, etc.). If attack occurs at seat, stand beside seat to insure that victim does not fall on the floor. In order to prevent him from biting his lips/tongue and cheeks put something between his teeth. Do not force. When the convulsion is over, loosen any tight clothing and turn victim's head to one side so that secretions may drool from the side of the mouth. Victim may be disoriented when coming out of the seizure. Place the victim in a comfortable position and allow sleeping. Cover with a blanket. Give NO stimulants (especially alcohol). Try in all ways to guard victim against embarrassment. Watch victim carefully, as additional seizures are a possibility. Remind victim to take his medication. NOTE: Usually after about 3 minutes, the discoloration and convulsive seizure will pass. There may be a gradual return of consciousness, but victim will not remember anything about the seizure.

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Causes: - Inflammation: infection on the membrane, etc. - Foreign object: eyelash, dust, small flies etc. - Injury: splinter, glass etc. Symptoms: - Redness in the eye, feeling a foreign object, feeling of stinging Precaution: - Before starting first aid, wash your hands and take a clean tissue. The patient must not rub their eyes. Action: Do now allow person to rub eye. Instruct person to blink eye; tears should wash particle from eye. If this fails, use cup of warm water to flush eye. Remove loose particles gently with sterile gauze. Never attempt to remove embedded particles or object(s) from eye. If particle is small, cover both eyes with a pad to prevent eye movement. If object is large, cover both eyes with a pad to prevent eye movement. If object is large, cover eye with a cup. Do not apply pressure.

6.18. EYE INJURY

Temporary loss of consciousness caused by an inadequate supply of blood to the brain. A person that has lost all consciousness will be in a coma, if the person is in a coma he/she can not move and he/she can not respond to any questions. As a result of this process the persons tongue can block the airway, causing choking and even death. Causes: - Starvation, tiredness, pain, standing for a long time - Very hot environment, excitement, fear Symptoms: - Dizziness - Skin is pale and the forehead softly starts to sweat - Weak and slow pulse, slow breathing Action: Lay the passenger flat and lift the legs up, so that blood can circulate. Open the air vents. Loosen restrictive clothing (tie, belt, button) Give something strong to smell and sprinkle some water over his face. If the passenger is consciousness you can give him a cup of tea or coffee. DANGER: If the patient is still unconscious, put him in recovery position and give him oxygen.

6.19. FAINTING LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS

6.20. FRACTURES

During the flight crashing, falling (turbulence, sudden fainting) can lead to fractures. There are usually 2 kinds of fractures. In fractures the main aim is to keep the joints still and cease the pain. 1. Closed fractures - Pain, swelling, restriction of movement, color change, a clicking noise between the broken bones. Action: Apply cold compress

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Immobilize fracture joint above and below break Do not attempt to reset Treat for shock

2. Open fractures - Deformity, loss of ability to move, pain, swelling, color change. Bleeding will be present. Attention!! Patient may go into shock. Action: Gently apply pressure as close to wound as possible with a large sterile bandage Cover entire wound including protruding bone with a bandage Immobilize fracture joint above and below the break Do not attempt to reset Treat for shock The jaw of the unconscious patient is opened and the tongue is pulled out. If there is saliva or broken teeth, clear them first. Treat bleeding and shock. Fracture immobilization is made with two hard substances (splints, wood) by binding at two sides. For hand, ankle and forearm fracture, the casualty's hand should be higher than his elbow, and the sling should be applied so that the supporting pressure is on the uninjured side. NOTE: To immobilize the fracture, the person's body (i.e. other limb) is the best splint. Magazines, blankets, newspapers, spare life vests and metal splints from the first aid kit can be used as well.

Ankle fractures - carefully take off the shoes. Ankle is wrapped with a thick piece of blanket or a towel. The leg is pulled towards the abdomen. If there is a pain increase, loss of touch, weak pulse, skin paleness, loosen the ties. If there is no recovery of the situation this may be a dislocation not a fracture.

Arm fractures - Upper arm, collarbone, shoulder and elbow fractures must be put in a triangular sling and tied under the neck.

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Knee bone fractures - slightly pull the leg towards the abdomen and tie the knee with a hard piece of substance from up and down.

Leg fractures Use any available materials for immobilization. Stability is the most important factor. Immobilize the leg from hip to the toes with splint.

Pelvis fractures - Do not move the patient with a pelvis fracture. Both legs are tied together for immobilization.

3. Dislocation of joints The displacement of a bone end from the joint with some injury to surrounding ligaments and other soft tissues. Symptoms - Pain is often intense. - Deformity of the joint. - Swelling of the joint. - Movement of the part is usually lost. - Shock is usually severe. Action: Apply a cold compress to the joint. Move part as little as possible. A dislocated shoulder or elbow may be supported by an arm sling. If dislocation of lower extremity, splint and then elevate. Treat for shock.

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CAUTION: Do not attempt to reposition a dislocation or a fracture. Attempting to reduce a fracture is very dangerous, sometimes resulting in serious paralysis of a part or of grave damage to the large blood vessels in the area. 4. Neck and spine injuries ALWAYS IMMOBILIZE THE NECK AND HEAD Symptoms: - Pain, swelling, resists movement of neck or back. - May have some paralysis in the extremities. Action: Immobilize person with blankets. Do not attempt to move person. Keep person lying flat. No pillows under head or back. Keep airway open. Use jaw thrust method to open airway if necessary. Keep head from moving. Use blanket or sweater to make a neck brace. Administer oxygen. Keep warm. Do not overheat. Monitor ABC's.

6.20. FROSTBITE FREEZING OF TISSUE

The affected area turns white and sense of feeling is lost. Get out of cold, if possible. Place the body part in warm water 105F (40C) and warm until part is red and warm. If thermometer is not available, consider water too warm if uncomfortable to touch; Place dressings between fingers and toes prior to bandaging; Cover affected area with dry sterile dressings; Do not break blisters.

The first 1-2 hours after the symptoms begin are the most dangerous for the person. Immediate action is necessary. Symptoms: - Denial Person will usually deny that it is a serious problem - Severe, dull chest pain. Pain in the middle of the chest that continues and the pain increases for more than 10 minutes - Pain may radiate to arms (usually left), neck, back, or jaw. - Agitated, fearful - Difficulty breathing - Skin-cold and clammy - Sweating - Nausea, sickness and difficulty of breath. Action: Make a doctor announcement Encourage person to remain seated in a comfortable position. Keep all activity to a minimum, if necessary loosen clothing. If person is carrying medication and conscious, assist with its administration. It will usually be nitroglycerines pills. Administer oxygen Keep Captain informed, since a flag stop will be necessary. NOTE: If breathing stops but the heart continues to beat, give rescue breathing. If the heart Edition 2 Chapter 6 Page 29 May 2010

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and breathing stops (cardiac arrest), administer CPR.

6.22. HEAT EXHAUSTION

Symptoms: Heat Exhaustion Heat Stroke Heavy sweating No perspiration Skin clammy, usually pale Dry hot skin, usually red Pupils dilated Pupils constricted Normal temperature Very high body temperature Weak, dizzy, faint May become unconscious Headache Rapid, strong pulse Nausea Action: Lie casualty down. Reassure and calm him. Sponge repeatedly with cool water and fan until temperature falls. Treat for shock. Give salt - 1/2 teaspoon in 1 glass of water. Salt or salt water produces nausea, and therefore, should be given slowly. Monitor casualty carefully. If exhaustion does not pass, inform the captain.

Person is usually nervous and slightly excited. The problem is over oxidation of lungs and the body needs carbon dioxide. Symptoms: - Rapid breathing, panting - Nervous, excited - Weak, dizzy - Rapid pulse - Complains of numbness in lingers - Complexion red in color - Stabbing chest pains Action: Calm passenger and encourage him to breathe slowly. Question the person; talking will force the breathing rate to decrease. If this does not work, have person breathe into an airsickness bag. This way CO2 and O2 rate is balanced. Oxygen must definitely not be given. If person insists upon receiving oxygen, apply facemask, but do not turn on. NOTE: If person should faint, the body systems will take over and correct the breathing pattern. However, keep airway open. If you are not sure if the person is suffering from hyperventilation or hypoxia (decreased levels of oxygen in the body), treat for hypoxia.

6.23. HYPERVENTILATION

6.24. HYPOTHERMIA

This condition occurs when body temperature drops below 35C. If allowed to continue, death may occur in a few hours. Symptoms: - Uncontrollable, violent shivering - Difficulty speaking - Weakness

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- Apathy - stupor - Muscle rigidity - In the final stages: the heart and respiration will stop Action: Warm casualty gradually by wrapping blankets. If not available, huddle around person to share body heat. Offer warming drinks. If pulse and breathing have stopped, administer CPR. While Exposed To Cold: Keep shoes on Bring legs up lo tucked position to protect groin area, keep arms close in, and restrict movements. Warm victim by using your own body heat. Keep as much of head and torso (in ditching situation) out of water.

It is the insufficiency of oxygen. Normally 21% of air is oxygen and the lowest level for living is 13%. Insufficiency of oxygen normally starts at 1500m (5000 ft). It occurs because of loss of cabin pressure. Symptoms: - Headaches, dizziness - Fatigue, listlessness - Judgment and vision impaired - Overconfident, though poorly coordinated - Euphoria - victim is unaware he is in trouble - Personality change - Loss of control of hands - Cyanosis - victim turns blue around mouth, fingernails and ear lobes - Unconsciousness Action: Immediately administer oxygen during the flight Patient is kept under supervision NOTE: The main danger of hypoxia lies in the fact that the victim becomes euphoric and is completely unaware of his own symptoms.

6.25. HYPOXIA

6.26. MOTIONLESS PROBLEMS

Being motionless for along time, especially in the sitting position will cause swelling to the legs and cause problems with the blood circulation in the legs. The clot in the vein wall can be terminated by the body. If this cannot be done then this clot could leave the veins wall and could clot a smaller vein going to the lungs. This could cause a serious medical takeover and could cause pain to the chest, hard breathing and could even cause death. Risk groups: - Above 40 years old - Pregnant women - People that have had abdomen operations - Cancer patients - People that have genetic disorder for blood clots - Smokers - Obese people - Varicose vein illness

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Precautions: During the journey, do various small exercises. Luggage should not be put where they might prevent the movement of the arms and legs. Put comfortable clothes on during the journey. Take aspirin if your doctor confirms that you can. When getting off the aircraft do a lot of walking to help the blood circulation

A panic attack is distressing for the person experiencing it and difficult to respond to, but it isnt harmful. Its a sudden rush of overwhelming fear that often occurs without warning or any obvious reason. Symptoms - Hyperventilation and fast breathing result in lack of carbon dioxide in blood - Palpitations, nervous behavior - Difficulty swallowing or breathing, trembling Actions Take casualty to a quiet place Be reassuring but firm Remain with casualty until panic attack is over Advise casualty to see their doctor.

6.27. PANIC ATTACK

6.28. POISONING

The reasons that lead to poisoning in an airplane are: alcohol, medicines, cigarettes and tobacco. Poisoning is divided into two: 1. Medicine poisoning Symptoms: - Eye pupils get smaller - Absentmindedness, drowsiness, coma, difficulty of breathing, sweating Action: First check if the patient is conscious or not If he is conscious try to make him vomit but before give the patient liquids. Give salty water for adults, tea or fruit juice for children (salty water is harmful for children). Do not give milk. To induce vomiting, put the fingers in the throat for adults, for children lean their head forward. If he is not conscious dont ever try to make the patient vomit. (Risk of suffocation). Get him in recovery position. Keep the patient warm Administrate oxygen Keep under supervision 2. Food poisoning The canned foods, fish, meat and milk products and other foods that are out of date can cause food poisoning due to the bacteria in these products. Symptoms: - Nausea - Vomiting - Stomachache, cramps SCC has to ascertain: What has been consumed on board by those affected; Edition 2 Chapter 6 Page 32 May 2010

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Whether other passengers or crew members have eaten the same; What was consumed, and where, in the last 8 hours prior take-off. SCC shall inform the Commander; Ask whether there is a doctor on board; Make passenger comfortable. Hand out airsickness bags and blankets. If possible, reseat passenger close to the toilets. Open air vents, offer refreshing towel. If possible, obtain food sample. If necessary, administer oxygen.

Action

3. Alcohol Intoxication Symptoms: - The odor of alcohol on breath, warm feeling - Stupor condition, incoherent, uncoordinated. - In early stages, breathing is slow and deep, pulse is strong, and face is moist and flushed. In later stages, breathing is shallow, pulse becomes weak and rapid, and face becomes dry and pale. - Extreme cases manifested by hallucinations, delirium tremors (D.T.), partial or complete unconsciousness and may experience bleeding from the mouth. Action: Remain calm and friendly Keep firm hold on the passenger if necessary, do not leave him unsupervised Maintain open airway Administer oxygen if passenger is pale. Allow passenger to sleep, keep warm. If passenger is awake, offer orange juice. 4. Drug overdose Symptoms: - A wide variety of symptoms can occur depending on the drug type: - Violence, appearance and behavior of a drunk, runny nose, confusion - Vomiting, mood fluctuations, exhaustion, unconsciousness Action: Calm the patient; If possible identify agent-causing overdose and remove it from their person. It may be necessary to restrain those who become violent and aggressive. If convulsions occur - treat as for seizure. Keep airway open. Monitor ABC's (airways-breathing-circulation) If person is breathing on his own, administer first aid oxygen. If not breathing, ventilate twice and check for a pulse, as mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and/or CPR will be necessary. This will necessitate an emergency landing.

6.29. SEIZURES CONVULSIONS


Causes: Epilepsy Brain Tumors Drug Overdose High fevers Edition 2 Neurological diseases Complications of Pregnancy Infections of the Brain Insulin Shock Stroke Hypoxia Head Injury Chapter 6 Page 33 May 2010

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Symptoms: - Skin appears pale, eyes roll up. - Body stiffens and may bite tongue at this time. - Loud breathing noises, loses consciousness. - May lose control of bladder or bowel movements - Froths at mouth, blue in color. - Convulsive muscular movements, often involuntary action. Body may jerk about violently, or there may be slight tremors. - After convulsions cease, person lapses into a deep sleep (turn person's head to the side to drain any fluid in the mouth). Action: Sit casualty down. Try to break any fall but dont restrain. Do not attempt to place foreign object in person's mouth. Many objects can be broken and obstruct the person's airway. Clear area of passengers and any dangerous objects around them. Cushion the area with pillows or blankets to protect person from injury. If possible, loosen clothing and protect their head. When seizure passes, let person sleep, open airway, administer oxygen (if necessary), and observe for possible recurrence. Passenger will be embarrassed; be comforting. Monitor ABC's. NOTE: If the person remains in a seizure for a prolonged period of time, has more than one, is diabetic or pregnant, a flag stop is necessary.

Shock is a condition in which the circulatory system fails to deliver blood to all parts of the body. When the body's organs do not receive blood, they fail to function properly. This triggers a series of responses that produce specific signals known as shock. Even though the injuries might not look dangerous, shock could cause death. Causes: - Loss of blood, severe pain, excitement and fear - Anaphylactic shock (this is an allergic reaction that is caused by the stinging of the bugs. If its a bee sting, you must take out the needle. To prevent poisoning apply a tourniquet to the arm or leg) Symptoms - Skin pale, cool and moist - Pulse fast but weak (100 or more in a minute) - Rapid breathing - Perspiration of lips, forehead and palms - Weakness, dizziness and thirst Action: Lay him down. Elevate legs higher than the head. Loosen clothing to encourage circulation. Try to deal with the causes of shock. Treat any obvious injuries. Keep him calm and warm. Monitor breathing and level of response. If everything is normal give him a glass of water with one spoon full of salt in it. If there is bleeding on the head or face keep the head up higher than the heart. Shock treatment for every type of injury can be used even if there are shock symptoms or not (except high blood pressure and brain bleeding). If medical attention is delayed for 1 hour and if the patient does not feel sick or does not have any injury in the stomach you can give a little bit of water.

6.30. SHOCK

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NOTE: Do not give anything to drink even if they ask.

There are many reasons for the stomachache. It is not an Nines on its own but a symptom of many illnesses. These are: - Appendicitis - Gallbladder - Kidney stones - Food or chemical poisonings Symptoms: - Severe pain around stomach and abdomen - Agony - Shock symptoms (pale skin, cold, sweaty) - Starts to feel uncomfortable Action: Lie the patient on his back Put his/her head on a pillow Make him/her fold their knees towards him/her. (You can fold a blanket under the knees). This helps the stomach muscles loosen up. Keep the patient warm (In case of appendicitis suspicion put cold compress on right upper part of abdomen) Do not ever give food or drink

6.31. STOMACHACHE

Strains are injuries to the muscles moving the bones (usually sustained by overstretching). Sprains are injuries to the joints. Symptoms - Sharp pain and tenderness - Swelling and distortion of limb - Signs of bruising - Difficulty moving injured part of body Action: RICE procedure: R - rest and support affected limb I - apply ice or a cold compress to reduce swelling C - compress by applying gentle, even pressure on the limb and pad it with foam or secured with a bandage E - elevate limb to reduce blood flow to affected area

6.32. STRAINS AND SPRAINS

6.33. STROKE

When the blood vessel supply blood to the brain is obstructed, or if the vessel ruptures, a stroke has occurred. During a stroke, the brain is damaged. This damage may be so great as to cause the person to die. Symptoms: - Headache - this may be the only symptom at first - Difficulty with speech or vision. Face is red or ashen gray. - Confusion. Collapse. Pulse strong but slow. - Difficulty in breathing. Altered states of consciousness. Unequal pupils - Numbness or paralysis - usually to the extremities and/or to the face

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Alert the Captain - advanced medical teams should meet flight. Call for medically qualified personnel. Maintain an open airway, being prepared to provide artificial respiration or CPR if breathing and pulse cease. Administer oxygen. Keep person at rest. Protect all paralyzed parts. Provide emotional support. Place the person in position so that the head, neck and shoulders are slightly elevated. Be certain to allow for drainage from the person's mouth, keeping the airway open. DO NOT ALLOW THE PERSON TO BECOME OVERHEATED. DO NOT ADMINISTER ANYTHING BY MOUTH. DO NOT MOVE UNLESS NECESSARY. NOTE: Flag stop is necessary. Action:

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6.34. GLOSSARY OF MEDICAL TERMS

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6.35. MEDICAL INCIDENT REPORT
It must be completed for all medical incidents.

MEDICAL INCIDENT REPORT


DATE: FLIGHT NO: ROUTE: NAME OF COMMANDER: CREW MEMBERS SCC CCM 2 CCM 3 CCM4 1. PATIENT DETAILS (Complete as applicable) NAME: DATE OF BIRTH: HOME ADRESS: 2. DETAILS OF ILLNESS/ACCIDENT TIME OF ONSET (GMT): hrs: LOCATION: DESCRIBE EVENTS LEADING UP TO INCIDENT: 3. SYMPTOMS & SIGNS (tick, circle or complete all appropriate boxes): PAIN: YES NO SEVERE CHARACTER: PATTERN: LOCATION: SEVERITY: MILD MODERATE SEAT NO: SEX: M F

SHARP

CRAMPING

ACHING

THROBBING

CONSTANT VARIABLE LOCATION: SEVERITY: MILD MODERATE SEVERE BREATHLESS OR WHEEZY COLD FAINT DIZZY

BLEEDING: YES NO NAUSEA VOMITING PALE BLUE WEAKNESS RASH/SPOTS

DIARRHEA COUGH

FLUSHED CLAMMY/SWEATING HOT/FEVERISH

CONVULSION LOCATION:

ANXIOUS CONFUSED AGGRESSIVE INTOXICATED

OTHERS (SPECIFY):

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4. INJURY (tick appropriate box): ABRASION AMPUTATION FRACTURE BRUISING BURN CONCUSSION

CUT DISLOCATION 5. BODY PART

SPRAIN

FOREIGN BODY

HEAD/NECK EYE EAR TORSO BACK ARM/HAND FINGER LEG FOOT/TOE 6. OBSERVATIONS: PULSE: /min BLOOD PRESSURE: mm/Hg T: RESPIRATION:

/min

OTHER (SPECIFY): 7. PATIENT HISTORY: HAD THIS PROBLEM BEFORE? TAKING ANY MEDICATION? ANY ALLERGIES? YES NO YES NO YES NO

DETAILS:

ANY RECENT ILLNESS/OPERATIONS? YES NO CURRENTLY PREGNANT? YES NO

IF YES, HOW MANY MONTHS? YES NO 8. CABIN CREW ACTION (tick, circle or complete as indicated) OXYGEN GIVEN? YES NO IF YES, DID PAX CONDITION IMPROVE? YES NO MEDICATION GIVEN? YES NO IF YES, SPECIFY: WAS OWN MEDICATION OR FROM OTHER PAX USED? YES NO IF YES, SPECIFY: OTHER ON-BOARD MEDICAL EQUIPMENT USED? YES NO IF YES, SPECIFY: WAS CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION (CPR) PERFORMED? YES NO PULSE RESTORED? YES NO RESPIRATION RESTORED? YES NO CONSCIOUSNESS REGAINED? YES NO USE OF GROUND MEDICAL CONTROL? YES NO SUCCESSFUL UNSUCCESSFUL ASSISTANCE OF DOCTOR OR HEALTH PRO? YES NO SUCCESSFUL UNSUCCESSFUL ATTEMPT TO CONTACT COMPANY DOCTOR? YES NO SUCCESSFUL UNSUCCESSFUL FURTHER INFO/COMMENTS: 10. ASSISTING HEALTH PROFESSIONAL/DOCTOR: NAME: ADRESS: DIAGNOSIS: 11. CAPTAINS NAME & SIGNATURE 12. SCCS NAME & SIGNATURE Form MDP-CCM 008 TEL:

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6.35. INVESTIGATION OF POSSIBLE IN-FLIGHT FOOD POISONING REPORT
It must be completed in all cases of suspected or alleged food poisoning.

INVESTIGATION OF POSSIBLE IN-FLIGHT FOOD POISONING REPORT


DATE PASSANGER NAME NAME OF COMMANDER CREW MEMBERS SCC CCM 2 CCM 3 CCM4 1. SCHEDULED DEPARTURE TIME: 2. ACTUAL DEPARTURE TIME: 3. TURBULENCE (SEAT-BELT SIGN ILLUMINATED DURING CRUISE) 4. PAX NO: C/C Y/C 5. CASES OF ILLNESS: 6. CATERING LOADED AT STATIONS: 7. FOOD EATEN ON BOARD (PARTIALLY OR FULLY EATEN): C/C Y/C MEAL 1 TIME: C/C Y/C MEAL 2 TIME: STARTER: MAIN COURSE: DESSERT: CHEESE: STARTER: MAIN COURSE: DESSERT: CHEESE: 9. WHERE EATEN (i.e. hotel) YES NO Y/C FLIGHT No ROUTE SEAT No

C/C

8. FOOD EATEN PRIOR TO BOARDING (LAST 48 HOURS):

10. CAPTAINS NAME AND SIGNATURE: 11. SCCS NAME AND SIGNATURE: Form MDP-CCM 009

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 7. CABIN CREW CHECK-LIST HANDBOOK


7.1. PRE-FLIGHT EQUIPMENT CHECK-LIST MD-83 ...................................................... 3 7.2. SECURITY CHECK ............................................................................................ 5 7.2.1. PRE-FLIGHT SECURITY CHECK HOME BASE/OVERNIGHT STOP....................... 5 7.2.2. IN-FLIGHT SECURITY CHECK NON-NORMAL AT CDTS REQUEST.................. 6 7.2.3. POST-FLIGHT SECURITY CHECK TRANSIT WITH PAX ON BOARD/TURN-AROUND FLIGHT ............................................................................. 7 7.3. NORMAL PROCEDURES CHECK-LIST ................................................................... 8 7.4. ABNORMAL PROCEDURE CHECK-LISTS ............................................................. 11 7.5. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP LUNG L1 .............................................................................................. 17 7.6. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP LUNG R1 .............................................................................................. 19 7.7. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP LUNG L2 .............................................................................................. 21 7.8. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP LUNG TAILCONE A1 ............................................................................. 23 7.9. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP SCURT L1............................................................................................. 25 7.10. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP SCURT R1 ............................................................................................. 27 7.11. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP SCURT L2............................................................................................. 29 7.12. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP SCURT TAILCONE A1............................................................................ 31

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CABIN CREW MANUAL CABIN CREW CHECK-LIST HANDBOOK 7.1. PRE-FLIGHT EQUIPMENT CHECK-LIST MD-83
L1 Jumpseat (1) Shoulder harness (2) Crew life vest (2) Flashlight (2) Removable flash light (1) E.L.S. (1) Escape slide and door (1) Exit marker and light (1) Interphone and P.A. Cabin lights panel Cockpit door code Flight documentation CDL R1 O2 bottle and mask (2) Megaphone (1) Halon extinguisher (1) P.B.E. (2) Demo kit (1) Escape slide and door (1) Exit marker and light (1) Fwd lavatory: Smoke detector Fire extinguisher Galley lights Galley equipment Cabin: Pax seatbelts, life vests Safety cards, sickness bags L2 Jumpseat (1) Shoulder harness (1) Crew life vest (1) Flashlight (1) O2 bottle and mask (3) Megaphone (1) Halon extinguisher (2) P.B.E. (2) Demo kit (2) First aid kit (2) Medical kit (1) Adult/child spare life vests (17) Infant life vests (17) Infant seat belts (17) Extension seat belts (17) Spare seat belts (17) Escape slide and door (1) Exit marker and light (1) Aft lavatories: Smoke detector Fire extinguisher Galley lights Galley equipment Cabin: Pax seatbelts, life vests Safety cards, sickness bags

A1 Jumpseat (1) Shoulder harness (2) Crew life vest (2) Flashlight (2) Escape slide and door (1) Exit marker and light (1) Tailcone decal (1) Area lights panel Cabin: Pax seatbelts, life vests Safety cards, sickness bags

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CABIN CREW MANUAL CABIN CREW CHECK-LIST HANDBOOK 7.2. SECURITY CHECK
7.2.1. PRE-FLIGHT SECURITY CHECK HOME BASE/OVERNIGHT STOP HOME BASE/OVERNIGHT STOP PRE-FLIGHT CHECK After ground staff has completed their duties PASSENGER CABIN Overhead bins check Safety equipment stowage area check Inside panels check Side of seats check Seat pockets check Life jackets stowage area check Floor area check Wardrobe - if available check GALLEYS Lockers & contents check Ovens check Trolleys & containers check Waste bin areas check TOILETS Waste bin area check Toilet bowl area check Spare paper stowage area check CABIN CREW JUMP SEATS Safety equipment stowage area check PA system area check Door area check CC report to SCC via PA perform SCC report to Commander & Ramp Agent perform Security check form completed

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7.2.2. IN-FLIGHT SECURITY CHECK NON-NORMAL AT CDTS REQUEST NON-NORMAL PASSENGER CABIN Overhead bins Safety equipment stowage area Inside panels Side of seats Seat pockets Life jackets stowage area Floor area Wardrobe - if available UNIDENTIFIED ITEMS GALLEYS Lockers & contents Ovens Trolleys & containers Waste bin areas UNIDENTIFIED ITEMS TOILETS Waste bin area Toilet bowl area Spare paper stowage area UNIDENTIFIED ITEMS CABIN CREW JUMP SEATS Safety equipment stowage area PA system area Door area UNIDENTIFIED ITEMS CC report to SCC via interphone SCC report to Commander IN-FLIGHT CHECK at commander's request check check check check check check check check DO NOT TOUCH & REPORT check check check check DO NOT TOUCH & REPORT check check check DO NOT TOUCH & REPORT check check check DO NOT TOUCH & REPORT perform perform

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7.2.3. POST-FLIGHT SECURITY CHECK TRANSIT WITH PAX ON BOARD/TURNAROUND FLIGHT POST- FLIGHT CHECK during stop Ground staff ID check Cleaning/catering staff activities supervision perform Galley equipment - after loading check Passenger cabin - after cleaning check Toilets - after cleaning check Galley - after equipment's loading check CC report to SCC perform (fill Aircraft Security Check Form) SCC report to Commander & Ramp Agent perform TRANSIT WITH PAX ON BOARD

TURN AROUND FLIGHT Overhead bins Safety Equipment Inside panels Side of seats Seat pockets Life jackets stowage Floor Wardrobe CC report to SCC SCC report to Commander & Ramp Agent

POST- FLIGHT CHECK after landing and pax disembarkation check check check check check check check check perform perform

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BOARDING PREPARATION NO SMOKING signs ON checked Curtains secured Free access of doors & exits checked Bridge/steps on right position Emergency escape route unobstructed Catering checked & stowed Outside the aircraft free of obstacles Cabin Discrepancy Log checked Security check performed Cabin light on BRIGHT Cockpit door lock performed SCC report to flight crew by INT performed BOARDING Boarding position taken Passengers' embarkation surveyed Boarding announcements performed Free access of doors and aisles checked Emergency seats occupied by ABP Passengers count performed Flight documents on board SCC report to flight crew by INT performed DOOR LOCKING and PUSH BACK Permission from flight crew by INT received Doors closed Slides armed and cross-checked Passengers seated checked Exits and aisle unobstructed Galleys secured Baggage properly stowed checked SCC report to flight crew by INT performed PASSENGERS PREFLIGHT BRIEFING Before take-off announcements performed Passengers' safety demonstration performed BEFORE TAKE-OFF CABIN & PASSENGERS CHECK Seat belts fastened Tray tables folded Toilets checked & locked Exits and aisle unobstructed Galleys secured Extension/ infant belts provided Infant life vests if required distributed SCC report to flight crew by INT performed Commanders order by PA performed

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TAKE-OFF Cabin crew Silent review Cabin crew CLIMB CRUISE seated and harness fastened performed seated and harness fastened

FASTEN SEAT BELTS signs OFF checked Toilets unlocked Flight crew information performed In-flight services performed Toilets (during night) checked (every 15 minutes) DESCENT FASTEN SEAT BELTS signs ON checked In-flight services interrupted Landing announcements performed Compliance check performed Galleys & equipments secured Curtains secured Toilets checked & locked BEFORE LANDING SCC report to flight crew by INT performed Commander's order by PA performed Cabin crew seated & harness fastened Silent review performed AFTER LANDING Cabin crew seated & harness fastened After landing announcements performed Passengers seat belts fastened PASSENGER DISEMBARKATION FASTEN SEAT BELTS signs OFF checked CDT/SCC order to disarm performed Slides disarmed All call procedure performed Flight crew informed Bridge /stairs in right position Outside clearance received Door opened

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AFTER PASSENGERS DISEMBARKATION Security check performed Extension/infant seat belts (if required) collected Infants' life vests (if required) collected Ramp agent informed Flight documents handed over Services' staff ID checked Catering & cleaning supervision performed Catering (as required) checked & stowed Security check after catering & cleaning performed TRANSIT WITH PAX ON BOARD NO SMOKING signs ON checked FASTEN SEAT BELT signs OFF checked Announcements performed Catering loaded as required Cleaning supervision performed Safety instructions cards checked & in plain view Security check performed SCC report to flight crew by INT performed Cabin crew at stations Emergency escape route unobstructed REFUELLING WITH PAX ON BOARD NO SMOKING signs ON checked FASTEN SEAT BELT signs OFF checked L1 door/stairs opened/lowered L2 door slide armed Tailcone door/stairs opened/lowered Announcements performed Emergency escape route unobstructed Cabin & passengers checked/surveyed Cabin crew at stations

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REJECTED TAKE-OFF ALERT Cabin crew notified by PA: CABIN CREW AT STATIONS Cabin crew harness released Slides checked Outside conditions evaluated Flight crew communication established Flight crew instructions received Passengers under control EMERGENCY EVACUATION REQUIRED Flight crew order by PA: EVACUATE Emergency exits opened Passengers evacuation initiated EMERGENCY EVACUATION NOT REQUIRED Flight crew order by PA: CANCEL ALERT Passengers informed and under control
If no call from the cockpit, try to contact flight crew Cabin crew will make an independent decision to initiate an evacuation when there is severe structural damage, a life-threatening situation or abnormal aircraft attitude and there is no response from flight deck

TURBULENCE LIGHT TURBULENCE Cabin crew notified FASTEN SEAT BELT sign ON checked Announcement performed Passengers' seat belts fastened Infant/children secured Curtains secured Loose equipment secured Hand luggage stowed Toilets checked Flight crew informed MODERATE TURBULENCE Cabin crew notified FASTEN SEAT BELT sign ON checked Announcement performed Passengers' seat belts checked Infant/ children secured Curtains secured Loose equipment secured Hand luggage stowed Toilets checked Flight crew informed SEVERE TURBULENCE FASTEN SEAT BELT sign ON checked Cabin crew seated & fastened immediately Announcements/ performed shouting commands (if possible) Trolleys secured (if possible) CLEAR AIR TURBULENCE Cabin crew takes appropriate action based on intensity of turbulence

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FIRE AND SMOKE AIRCRAFT FIRE ON GROUND Be ready for an emergency evacuation Flight crew/cabin crew informed Passengers under control Outside conditions evaluated Flight crew/cabin crew evacuation order received by PA Aircraft evacuation initiated IN FLIGHT CABIN FIRE Be ready for an emergency descent! Fire identified & attacked Cabin crew informed Flight crew notified Outlets (in vicinity) closed Oxygen (in vicinity) removed Affected area (after extinction) surveyed Flight crew informed about actions IN FLIGHT TOILET FIRE Be ready for an emergency descent! Fire detected Cabin crew informed Flight crew informed Extinguisher & protective equipment provided Oxygen (in vicinity) removed Temperature of the door checked If door is not hot: Door slowly opened Fire attacked If door is hot: PBE put on Door slowly opened Fire attacked After extinction: Affected area surveyed Flight crew informed about the actions SMOKE EVACUATION PROCEDURE THE FIRE PRODUCES EXCESSIVE SMOKE AND FUMES INSIDE THE CABIN Origin of the fire detected Flight crew informed PA announcement performed Cabin lighting switched off Passengers instructed & surveyed R1 door and Tailcone door slides disarmed R1 door unlatched, Tailcone door fully performed opened R1 and Tailcone doors closed and slides performed armed Flight crew informed Repeat at CDTs request performed BE READY FOR AN EMERGENCY DESCENT

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BOMB THREAT AIRCRAFT ON GROUND CC informed Slides as required Steps/bridge provided Be ready for an emergency evacuation according to the commander's decision! Passengers' info performed Passengers & hand luggage deplaned Cabin crew & hand luggage deplaned Passengers moved to a safe location If there is a reason to believe that an explosion and/or the aircraft damage is imminent all emergency exits should be used (luggage remains on board) DURING PUSH BACK OR TAXING CC informed Aircraft parked SCC announcement, if required performed Door(s) opened Passengers & hand luggage deplaned, as required Passengers moved to a safe location If there is a reason to believe that an explosion and/or the aircraft damage is imminent all emergency exits should be used (luggage remains on board) AIRCRAFT IN FLIGHT AT TIME OF NOTIFICATION SCC and cabin crew informed Suspect object search provided Flight crew informed about your actions Emergency equipment relocated Pax close to aft door moved, if possible Pax seat belts fastened Pax brace position informed Prepare the cabin for emergency landing! AFTER LANDING An immediate evacuation appears to be the only one choice: Aircraft stopped Evacuation order received All available emergency exits opened Passengers (without hand luggage) evacuated Passengers moved to a safe location No immediate evacuation is considered: Aircraft stopped Slides disarmed Doors opened Passengers & hand luggage deplaned Passengers moved to a safe location

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DECOMPRESSION SLOW DECOMPRESSION THE MASK COMPARTMENTS FAILED TO DROP AUTOMATICALLY: SCC confirms with flight crew CC informed In-flight service interrupted Loose equipment secured Cabin crew seated & harness fastened THE MASK COMPARTMENTS DROP AUTOMATICALLY: The nearest mask reached & put on Cabin crew sit down & strap in/hold on Flight crew order by PA performed RAPID/EXPLOSIVE DECOMPRESSION The nearest mask reached & put on Cabin crew sit down & strapped in/hold on Shouting commands (if possible) performed Trolley secured (if possible) performed AS SOON AS THE AIRCRAFT IS STABILIZED Flight crew & cabin crew members' as required assistance Passenger assistance as required Flight crew kept informed

PILOT INCAPACITATION Cabin crew notified INCAPACITATED PILOT CANNOT BE REMOVED FROM HIS SEAT Harness fastened & locked Back rest in upright position Seat rear position First aid given Medical assistance asked for INCAPACITATED PILOT CAN BE REMOVED FROM HIS SEAT AND A QUALIFIED PILOT IS ON BOARD: Seat rear position Seat slide laterally Incapacitated pilot removed First aid given Medical assistance asked for NOTE: on pilot request, read the check list and be sure that you receive an answer before reading the next item.

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DANGEROUS GOODS INCIDEND DURING THE FLIGHT INITIAL ACTION Commander informed Item identified IN CASE OF FIRE Standard procedure applied Water use condition checked IN CASE OF SPILLAGE/LEAKAGE Emergency response kit or other useful collected items Rubber gloves and PBE provided & put on Passengers away from area Wet towels or clothes distributed Dangerous goods item stowed in polyethylene bags Affected seat cushion/covers removed Spillage on carpet/floors removed Items stowed away/contaminated regularly inspected furnishing AFTER LANDING Dangerous goods item identified to ground personnel CDL filled

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CABIN CREW MANUAL CABIN CREW CHECK-LIST HANDBOOK 7.5. EMERGENCY LANDING CARD MD-83 YR-HBA ATERIZARE/AMERIZARE TIMP LUNG L1
SCC poziia L1 CCM 4 poziia R1 A. ALERTARE din cockpit prin PA: PURSER TO COCKPIT. FASTEN SEAT BELTS se aprind 1. Ia ELC, merge in cockpit. ntrerupe serviciul la pax i ia ELC 2. Emergency Briefing CMD-SCC. Noteaz secvena TESTS: - decupleaz alimentarea electric bucatarie fa T = TIPUL AVARIEI / SITUAIEI E = EVACUAREA NECESAR - siguraneaz bucatarie fa S = SEMNALE I COMENZI ( BRACE / EVACUARE ) - verific i blocheaz toaleta fa - fixeaz perdea fa T = TIMPUL DISPONIBIL I DESTINAIA S = INSTRUCIUNI SPECIALE - mbrac sacoul. 3. Cupleaz luminile din cabin pe BRIGHT 4. Emergency Briefing SCC cu R1, L2 si A1. Emergency Briefing cu SCC B. PREGATIRE pax i cabin nainte de impact Emergency Briefing pentru pasageri. 1. La indicaia CMD se reaeaz pasagerii. Se poziioneaz n faa cabinei pentru: 2. ANUN: Atenie! Acesta este un anunt de urgen, Comandantul ne-a anunat c vom ateriza forat/ameriza - demonstraie - control peste .min din cauza... - asisten Attention please! This is an emergency situation. Captain has informed us that we will be making an emergency landing /ditching in...min due to.... Verific n cabin fatrape: 3. ANUN: Urmai ntocmai instruciunile noastre: scoatei - sptare fotolii cravatele, toate obiectele ascuite, ochelari, stilouri, pantofi cu toc i punei-le n buzunarul fotoliului din faa dvs. Ridicai - masue fixate spatarele fotoliilor. Fixai msuele n poziie vertical. Lasai - cotiere lsate cotierele n jos. Este foarte important s cuplai i s fixati - centuri cuplate corect strans centurile de siguran. Nu fumai. - obiecte ascuite depozitate - bagaje depozitate Follow exactly our instructions: remove ties and all sharp - hatrack-uri nchise articles, eyeglasses, pens, high heeled shoes and place - parasolare ridicate them in the seat pocket in front of you. Put the backrest of your seat in a vertical position. Secure the tables up-right. Fold armrest down. It is very important that you fasten your seat belt low and secure it across your hips. Do not smoke. n faa cabinei: 4. ANUN: Scoatei vesta de salvare de sub scaunul dvs. - demonstreaz utilizarea vestei cu vesta mbrcai vesta i legai-o strns de mijloc. ATENIE! Umflai vesta numai la prsirea avionului. Pentru a umfla proprie (roie) - indic localizarea vestei i cum se scoate. vesta tragei de cele 2 plcue roii. Dac nu se umfla - verific mbrcarea corect a vestelor suflai n cele 2 tuburi roii. Echipajul va purta veste roii. Remove life vest from under your seat. Put life vest on and fix it tightly around your waist. ATTENTION! Inflate the life vest while leaving the aircraft. To inflate it pull the 2 red tabs. If it fails to inflate, use the tubes for oral inflation. n faa cabinei indic: 5. ANUN: Ieirile de salvare sunt: 2 n fa, 4 deasupra aripilor i 2 n spate. Banda luminoas de pe podea v va - ieirile de avarie - ieirea cea mai apropiat conduce spre ieirile marcate cu inscripia roie EXIT. - banda luminoas Localizai cea mai apropiat ieire. The emergency exits are: 2 in front, 4 over the wings and 2 at the rear. The light line on the floor will illuminate the way to exits which are marked with red EXIT signs. Locate the nearest exit.

Rou - comenzi/Albastru - aciuni i anunuri specifice pentru amerizare

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May 2010

CABIN CREW MANUAL CABIN CREW CHECK-LIST HANDBOOK


SCC poziia L1 CCM 4 poziia R1 6. ANUN: La comanda BRACE FOR IMPACT aplecai-v i n faa cabinei: cuprindei genunchii cu braele sau asezai minile ncruciate - demonstreaz poziia BRACE - asist pax pentru a executa corect poziia pe sptarul scaunului din fa. Asezai capul pe brae. Rmnei n BRACE aceast poziie pn cnd avionul se va opri complet. Numai la - verific pax s fie familiarizai cu poziia comanda echipajului, desfacei centurile, lsai toate obiectele BRACE personale n avion i ieii imediat pe cea mai apropiat ieire. When you hear the command BRACE FOR IMPACT bend down, hold your knees and put forehead onto knees. Or lean forward with your wrists crossed on the seat in front and put your head on your hands. Do not move until the plane has come to a complete stop. Only when you hear crew's orders, open seat belts, leave everything behind and get out immediately through the nearest exit. n faa cabinei indic: 7. ANUN: Citii acum instruciunile de salvare! Read the safety instruction cards now! - localizarea instruciunilor de salvare 8. Selecteaz i instruiete cte 3 PSP pentru: Ua L1 Ua R1 Ui: - 1 PSP pentru deschiderea uii i evacuare: cnd acioneaz (asisent CC/ incapacitatea CC), cnd deschide ua (comanda CMD/decizia individual), evaluare condiii exterioare, proceduri ieire blocat, cum deschide ua, cum declaneaz toboganul, cum evacueaz pasagerii, cum desprinde toboganul (care va servi ca plut). - 2 PSP care ies primii din avion, asist pasagerii la evacuare. Le cere s demonstreze c au neles aciunile i s repete comenzile: OPEN SEAT BELTS/ COME THIS WAY/ JUMP AND SLIDE/RUN AWAY FROM AIRCRAFT/ JUMP INTO THE WATER 9. mbrac sacoul i v