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Lesson 1 Name_______Shelby Johnson__________ Small Group Reading Lesson Plan Background Grade Level: __K__ Number of Students: __3____

Students Linguistic Backgrounds: ___English_______________ Length of Instruction: ___15 minutes___________

Instructional Location: ______In hallway at table_____________

Standard(s) Addressed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.6 Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly. Content Objectives Language Objectives Students will ask questions about the events of the story and listen Students will utilize vocabulary from text to form predictions and to others. question the story. Students will make logical predictions based on the text and illustrations on each page. Students will justify their predictions with evidence from text and illustrations. Students will compare their original predictions to the actual events in the story. Students will use phrases like, I predict and I wonder when making predictions and question elements of the story.

Title: Wheres My Teddy? Author: Jez Alborough Publisher: Walker Books Ltd. Date: 1992 Theme(s) Strategy Focus -fear of something Prediction -loss of an object -rhyme within the text

Genre: Fiction Text Structure: Narrative Level: K-2 Vocabulary What words will be focused on: Before: Prediction Setting During: Illustrations After: Summary Assessment Record student predictions on a poster during reading and have students compare their responses to the actual events in the story. See that students completed the extension activity, drawing the same item, but in two different sizes.

Materials: book comparison chart construction paper

Modifications/Differentiation Cultural Relevance (if applicable) n/a (complete with 3 students n/a in the highest level reading group)

Before Reading (Setting the Stage, Activating Prior Knowledge/Building Background Knowledge) Before reading, show the students the picture on the book cover to activate prior knowledge. Have students take turns telling one thing they notice on the front cover. Ask them to predict what the book will be about. (Possible response: a bear and a teddy bear) This will introduce the term prediction. Make sure that you are using appropriate language for the grade level so that students understand. Next, review the word setting with the students. They should understand that a setting is where the story takes place (time of day, weather, place, etc). They can look in the background and at picture details to help them. Have students take turns telling where they think the setting is and why they think so. (Possible response: the woods because there are a lot of trees) Explain to students that they will be discussing what they think happens next in the story as you read.

During Reading (Engaging in meaning making and strategy/skill practice) Begin reading the story to the students. Remember to read with expression to engage students. Remind them that they can look at the characters emotions in the illustrations to understand the story. After the first page, pause and ask students to describe what they see happening on the page. Encourage students to give as many details as possible (characters, setting, events, etc.) On page 6, as Eddie is tiptoeing through the forest, slow down the speed of your voice. Stop and ask students questions about their predictions. What do you think Eddie sees? What does Eddies facial expression tell us? Do you think he is alone in the woods? Record some student responses on the poster sheet. On page 11, stop and ask the students to predict what the sound is that Eddie hears coming closer. (Possible responses: an animal, a person) Teach students to look for the meaning of what is going on and not just make a guess that is unreasonable. On page 18, stop to ask the students questions. How do you think Eddie feels? What do you think will happen next? As you continue the story, have students justify their predictions based on the text. Was your guess correct? If not, what happened instead? Does this make sense? After Reading (Clarifying key concepts, extending ideas) After reading, have a student summarize what happened at the end of the story. What did the boy end up doing? What happened to the bear and his teddy? The last page describes the bear and boy cuddling their teddy bears. I will ask the students to think about the things they take to bed

with them. How does this item make you feel? How would you feel if it was lost? To extend the reading, have students draw their own bedtime friend on a paper. One side will be drawn big (as if it were the big bears) and the other side will be small (to represent their own). Make sure that the students understand what side is big and what side is small. Talk about the difference between the two and why we are making two different sizes. Restate that it should be the same item on both sides, but different sizes. This represents the bears teddy bear and Eddies teddy bear.

Lesson 2 Name_______Shelby Johnson__________ Small Group Reading Lesson Plan Background Grade Level: __K__ Number of Students: __3____ Students Linguistic Backgrounds: ___English_______________ Length of Instruction: ___15 minutes___________

Instructional Location: ______In hallway at table_____________

Standard(s) Addressed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.10 Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.7 With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a Recognize and produce rhyming words.

Content Objectives Language Objectives Students will ask questions about the events of the story and listen Students will utilize vocabulary from text to form predictions and to others. question the story. Students will use illustrations and text to create images in their head to visualize the story. Students will recognize words that rhyme with each other throughout the story. Students will share what they see in their mind and the emotion the character is feeling.

Title: Its The Bear! Author: Jez Alborough Publisher: Walker Books Ltd. Date: 1994 Theme(s) Strategy Focus -picknicking Visualizing -animals -diversity -rhyme

Genre: Fiction Text Structure: Narrative Level: K-2 Vocabulary What words will be focused on: Before: Review Setting During: Illustrations Rhyming Visuals After: Summary Assessment As the story is read, have students focus on visualizing what is going on. Informally assess that they know the term visualizing by their responses. Student will tell words they hear that rhyme, to record on paper.

Materials book construction paper

Modifications/Differentiation Cultural Relevance (if applicable) n/a (complete with 3 students n/a in the highest level reading group)

Before Reading (Setting the Stage, Activating Prior Knowledge/Building Background Knowledge) Before reading, have students review what they read about in the first book. This is the sequel to the first book. This will set the stage for this book. Talk about the characters that were in the first book. Show the students the picture on the book cover to activate prior knowledge. What characters do you think will be in this book? Are they the same as the last book? Introduce the word visualize. Ask students if they think they know what this word means. Discuss how visualizing is making mental images (forming pictures in your head) to make it more memorable. Tell students that good readers will make these pictures in their head as they read or listen to a story. Tell students that if they really think about the pictures in their head, they can remember parts of the story better. Students will focus on this as you read.

During Reading (Engaging in meaning making and strategy/skill practice) Begin reading the story to the students. After reading about the boy and his mother going on a picnic, pause and have students visualize this. Prompt students to think about details. Close your eyes and think about if you were going on a picnic with Eddie and his mother. What would you bring to eat? Are you outside or inside during a picnic? Remember that they do not need to have every single detail. Some students might see things that are not in the story. Tell them that this is okay. Give them a chance to share after they have thought about it. Before you continue to read, have students think about the rhyming they do during Heggerty. Discuss the term rhyme, or a word that has the same sound. Give an example to the students. Tell them that as you read the next page, they should think about words that rhyme. Tell them a word on the page. Can they suggest a rhyming word? Use student responses to write down rhyming words found on the pages. Continue to discuss rhyming words, as well as visualizing different parts of the story. When the boy is hiding in the picnic basket, have students close their eyes and visualize the situation. Think about the bear hiding in the basket. What would it be like in there? Is it light, dark? How might the boy be feeling? Can you show us how you would look if you were Eddie? What would your facial expression be? Throughout the reading and discussion of rhyming words, pause to ask students to use their five senses. Example: he thinks Im dessert! Ask students what they see, hear, taste, smell, and touch, from that page of reading. What words helped create this image in your head?

After Reading (Clarifying key concepts, extending ideas) Have students take turns discussing a favorite part in the story. Reread two lines that rhyme. Poems are very descriptive and great for visualizing. Remind students that we can create unique pictures in our head and they do not all have to be the exact same. If you need an extension, have students draw a picture of what they think the boy looks like when he is inside the picnic basket. Remind students to think about his emotion.

Lesson 3 Name_______Shelby Johnson__________ Small Group Reading Lesson Plan Background Grade Level: __K__ Number of Students: __3____ Students Linguistic Backgrounds: ___English_______________ Length of Instruction: ___15 minutes___________

Instructional Location: ______In hallway at table_____________

Standard(s) Addressed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.6 Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly. Content Objectives Language Objectives Students will ask questions about the events of the story and listen Students will utilize vocabulary from text to form summaries to others. about the beginning, middle, and end of the story. Students will determine main ideas and use important details to support them. Students will focus on parts of the story that are worth remembering.

Title: My Friend Bear Author: Jez Alborough Publisher: Walker Books Ltd. Date: 1998

Genre: Fiction Text Structure: Narrative Level: K-2

Theme(s) -friendship -rhyme

Strategy Focus Summarizing

Vocabulary What words will be focused on: Before: Prediction Setting During: Details Summarizing After: Summary

Assessment Have students help to fill out the beginning, middle, and end poster. (The summary train) Student responses should show an understanding of the story. Assess understanding of comprehension throughout reading.

Materials Book Summary train poster

Modifications/Differentiation Cultural Relevance (if applicable) n/a (complete with 3 students n/a in the highest level reading group)

Before Reading (Setting the Stage, Activating Prior Knowledge/Building Background Knowledge) Before reading, show students the front cover of the book. Do you think this story will be similar to the other ones? Who are some of the characters in these books? Review the word summary with the students. They should understand that they will put together information they remember to talk about what the book was about. Have a student give their own definition of the word summary and what it means to them. Before reading, tell students they will need to think about what is happening in the beginning, middle, and end of the story. They should remember these points to summarize the story after reading. Have a quick discussion about the beginning, middle, and end of things. Use the daily schedule or days of the week as an example. (Beginning- start of the day, middle- around lunch time, end- pack-up/go home)

During Reading (Engaging in meaning making and strategy/skill practice) Begin reading the story to the students. Remember to read with expression to engage students. Remind them to think about the main things that happen in the story. After page 6, pause and ask for a student to summarize what has happened so far. (Possible response: The boy heard the big bear crying because he has no friends) Continue reading the story. Allow students to ask questions if they feel they need to. Pause throughout book to help identify parts of the text (beginning, middle, end). Ask the students to think about important information in the story. After page 14 (Eddie reveals himself), ask a student to summarize what just happened. (Possible response: the bear thought his teddy was talking, but it was actually Eddie) Make sure that students understand that the teddy bear was not actually the one who was talking. At the end of the reading, ask students if they think it was a happy or sad ending. Why? Did the boy and bear become friends? How do you think the characters feel at the end of the story? After Reading (Clarifying key concepts, extending ideas) After reading the book, discuss how you will record student responses on the chart. After reading the story, have a student define the term summary to review. Summaries do not include information that is not important to the story. Give an example of something that you would not need to include in a summary. (Eddie says that he teddy bear Freddie is only 2) Prompt students to come up with ideas to help you fill in the chart. What happened in the beginning of? What happened in the middle of? What happened in the end of? Be prepared for students to give an idea that fits better for a different section. Discuss how it might be better to use it in the other section.

Review the importance of telling story events in a correct order so it makes sense. Extension activity: Discuss how bear and Eddie became friends. Have students think about one of their good friends. As a group, write down qualities of a good friend.

Lesson 4 Name_______Shelby Johnson__________ Small Group Reading Lesson Plan Background Grade Level: __K__ Number of Students: __3____ Students Linguistic Backgrounds: ___English_______________ Length of Instruction: ___15 minutes___________

Instructional Location: ______In hallway at table_____________

Standard(s) Addressed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1 Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.4 Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

Content Objectives Language Objectives Students will ask questions about the events of the story and listen Students will personalize the reading by talking about their own to others. experiences that relate to the story. Students will make connections from the text to self. Students will compare the events in the text to events in real life. Students will form responses to the theme of the story that shows use of evidence from the text.

Title: Pop-Pop Author: George Glinos Publisher: Winky Adam Date: n/a

Genre: Fiction Text Structure: Narrative Level: K Book 12

Theme(s) -Family -Gift-giving

Strategy Focus -Connecting -Clarification

Vocabulary What words will be focused on: Before: Prediction Setting During: Illustrations After: Summary Pop-Pop

Assessment Review student predictions on their whiteboard after pages 2 and 4 to see if they remember what a prediction is and how to make meaningful predictions. Informally assess students on connections among the characters/plot in the story and themselves and their own family. Use assessment sheets to record notes on their reading strategies. Cultural Relevance (if applicable) A family can have different members within it. In the story, the word Pop-Pop refers to the grandpa. Some cultures may have nicknames or other terms that they use to call a relative.

Materials books whiteboards markers

Modifications/Differentiation n/a (complete with 3 students in the highest level reading group)

Before Reading (Setting the Stage, Activating Prior Knowledge/Building Background Knowledge) Hand out the Harcourt leveled book Pop-Pop to each student. Keep one for you to refer to. Before reading, have the students look at the picture on the book cover to activate prior knowledge. Have students take turns telling one thing they notice on the front cover. Ask them to predict what the book will be about. (Possible response: a grandpa, a farm house) Next, use the reading strategy pictures (from Daily 5) to review ways to figure out an unknown word when reading. Examples: -Lips the Fish: sound out the first sound in the word -Eagle eye: use the picture clues to help -Stretchy snake: stretch out the word by individual sounds Tell students that today they will be taking turns on each page to read the book to you.

During Reading (Engaging in meaning making and strategy/skill practice) Choose one student to begin reading the first page in the book. Remind students that they should be following along with their pointer finger as the other students are reading. If a student has trouble with a word, first allow them time to figure it out on their own. If they need further help, allow another student to try to say the word. After page 2, hand out whiteboards and markers to each student. Ask them to predict what gift is in the first box. After they have thought about it in their head, have students draw a picture on the whiteboard of what they think the present will be for Pop-Pop. Allow students to share their responses. Continue to have the students take turns reading each page. After page 4, there is another box for Pop-Pop. Ask students: Who do you think Pop-Pop is? (grandpa) How do you know? (gray hair, glasses, etc.) Does your picture of your prediction make sense? Remind students that they need to make purposeful predictions. Does the gift they predicted make sense for a gift they would give their grandpa? Finish reading the story. As the students read, point out sight words. Also, review sentence writing conventions that the story follows (uppercase letter at beginning of sentence, spaces between words, period at the end, etc.). After Reading (Clarifying key concepts, extending ideas) After reading, Have a student summarize what happened at the end of the story. Possible response: the grandpa made cookies for the kids as a present to them Discuss how a reader can make connections from the story to their own life experiences. One connection to make would be the idea of gift-giving. Have you ever given a gift to a relative? How did it make them feel? Has your grandparent ever made cookies or another treat for you? This story is a great way to talk about family members. Have students turn back to the front page and look at the title of the book Pop-Pop. Ask students what this means. Is that the grandpas real name?

What could the word be? (prompt students to think about a nickname) Do you call your grandma or grandpa by another name? Discuss with students how some people might use another term other than grandma or grandpa. For example, mama and papa. As a group, discuss with students a family tree, which includes the members of your family. Have students draw a picture on their whiteboards of the members in their family. (Mom, dad, brother, sister, grandma, grandpa, aunts, uncles, etc.) Review that these connections the students made can relate back to the story. Discuss the family members in the story that they read. How does this connect to their drawings of their own family members?

Lesson Plan Peer Editing Lesson planners name: _Shelby Johnson __________________________ Date: __12/2/13____________ Responder: _Stephanie De Haan_____________________________________ Lesson Planner, before you meet, first consider what you want help with: lesson plan ideas, language used, clarity, organization, themes, flow of the lesson, assessment, CCSS, objectives? Tell the responder what you want him or her to respond to:

-Language Used
Responder, in this conference your job is to help the lesson planner think and make sure the lesson plan is clear, thorough, and relevant for students. Ask what he or she needs help with. Listen as the lesson planner reads, try to understand the plan, share if you would be able to teach this lesson. Give the lesson planner the help he or she asked for. If there are parts that confuse you, that you dont understand, or that youd like to know more about. Please jot down your suggestions and parts you liked. Give this record of the conference to the lesson planner. For your modifications you could include the extension activities since the students are in the highest reading group. When you talk about prediction in the before reading section you say that you will ask the students to predict what the book is about before explaining what a prediction is, maybe just explain what prediction is right away since it is the main skill and then students wont be confused when you ask them to predict. You could also use other words that might be simpler to explain prediction at first and then introduce the big word (guess, imagine, etc). Just in general make sure the students have a firm understanding of the words you use before you use them in instructions (ex. prediction, illustration, facial expression, summarize, etc). Lesson Planner, jot down any changes you will make based on your feedback: -I will make sure students understand the words we will be using (prediction). This makes sense so that the students know exactly what is asked of them. For kindergarten, I agree that these words can be difficult. I will add in to make sure to use a language appropriate for the age level of students. I could maybe have them restate what it means in their own terms.

Shelby Johnson

Reflection

To begin the planning process for the small reading group project, I had to decide how I would guide instruction on comprehension reading strategies. I had to first think about the group of students I would work with. Because I am in Kindergarten, many of the students are beginner readers and only know some sight words. I didnt think that the reading comprehension strategies would be at the current level of learning for the lower level students. They still need more work with actually sounding out words and using picture and context clues to help them read. I chose three of the highest level readers in the classroom. This way, I could make the most out of my lessons. I had to complete the lessons during our daily 5 allotted time, and I think that choosing these students was a good opportunity for them to go above and beyond the learning they are at. Right now during Daily 5 they are reading books that I think they could be bumped up from. My lessons took reading a step further, and I believed the students I chose were ready for the task. I chose students in the same level so that the sequence was logical and progressive for each. It was challenging to come up with a starting plan of the goals for the lessons and what I wanted to teach. Because it was left open, I had a variety of paths to take. I first had to decide whether to choose books the students could read or ones I would read to them. Because of the reading level, most of my books were read-alouds. In an article we read for class, it talked about storybook reading and how it expands skills in listening and oral comprehension. I went to the library and found three storybooks to incorporate within the lessons. I chose books by the same author that were sequels of each other. These were all by Jez Alboroough with similar characters: a big bear, a teddy bear, and a little boy named Eddie. Tompkins refers to comprehension as a representation of the text. I

came up with different reading strategies to ensure this representation. I chose summarizing, visualizations, and predictions. I think that these three areas are easier for beginner readers to understand. After students had some practice with reading comprehension strategies, I chose a leveled book for the students to read to me for the last lesson. Tompkins talked about basal reading and how the grade level series is specially designed to teach skills to improve reading. While practicing their reading ability, I focused the lesson on making connections. I wanted to make connections to the characters in the book to make it more meaningful and engaging to the students. In my Kindergarten classroom, the students rarely have opportunities to work in small groups. During Daily 5 is when I called out the three students to complete my mini lessons. They seemed to really enjoy being a part of a group with their peers. As Kindergarteners, they are open to asking many questions and commenting throughout reading, making it a more positive learning experience. This makes it easier to see what they are thinking throughout a story. Unlike other grades, the Kindergarten students I chose were not afraid to volunteer and participate in the discussions we had. I also could tell that the students liked the books that were chosen. They were fun story plots and the rhyming pattern made them engaging and more meaningful. When actually writing the lesson plans, the templates helped me to really think about the before, during, and after activities, which was important to create the most effective lessons. In Chapter 2 of Literacy for the 21st Century, Tompkins mentions pre-reading as a stage of reading. By introducing students to predicting in the before stage, I am simultaneously teaching them these skills of making predictions and setting a purpose for their own independent reading. In the during phase of the lessons, it was important to think about vocabulary and comprehension. Tompkins also mentions these as two of the components to be a successful reader.

When conducting the four mini lessons, I found it helpful to be out in the hallway. At first we were at the back table, but the students were distracted by our group, as well as our small group distracted by others. When we were in the hallway the students were focusing only on the book I was reading or they were reading with me. I also think it helped to review vocabulary words or things to focus on before reading. The students were then able to have a better idea in their mind about what they were to be looking for. One thing I didnt take into consideration was how long the books would take to read and how much time we would have for the activities. This was only a problem one of the days, where it ended early and I had to come up with more questions on spot. It is helpful to be very familiar with the book you are reading. The more you know about the story and how students might respond can help you to understand it. I also realized the importance of reading with emotion and making connections to the students personal lives. We have talked about these ideas with our book talks to help make reading appeal to students. When planning a lesson before, I never really took into consideration vocabulary words to focus on or cultural relevance. I thought it was important for these reading lessons to look at the vocabulary to remind teachers what key topics would be the focus. I thought that it was interesting and a good idea to include cultural relevance as well. In our diverse classrooms it is important to take advantage of every opportunity to think about multicultural aspects and incorporating them into our lessons. In the Dudley-Marling and Lucus article, we learned about this importance of bringing diverse cultural experiences into the classroom. To assess the students, I was able to fill our reading assessment sheets for them during the story Pop-Pop. Since students were reading the book to me one at a time, I could see who knew sight words and strategies to figure out unknown words. The students were ready to help each other if they were unsure of something. I filled in evidence of good reading on one side of the assessment. This included things the student did well as they read their page. On the other half of the sheet I wrote down things that the student could continue to work on. These books were an appropriate reading level for the students. In chapter 3, Tompkins

discusses the importance of determining instructional reading level for students and literacy assessment tools. For the other three bear books that I read to the students, I used formative assessment throughout the lesson with listening to student discussion and responses. I was able to learn if the students comprehended the text or understood the objective we were focusing on. It was beneficial to review at the end what reading strategy we were focusing on. At the end of the lesson, I completed an activity with the students to deepen understanding of a topic. The individual assignments I collected and reviewed to see who understood the task and the vocabulary words. This way, I could see whether I needed to change my lesson plans the following days. The feedback from the students helped me to revise my lesson plans, as well as feedback from my peer. I had to think about the order of my lesson and what would make the content easy to understand for the students. If the lesson does not scaffold learning, then it will not be implemented in the most effective way. I decided that having the final lesson be the one where the students read to me was most beneficial. This way, students had already practiced some of the reading strategies and would be better able to focus on both strategies and the actual reading of the text. When completing our inquiry project, I read an article on feedback loops. Not only does this relate to student-teacher conversations, but between colleagues as well. It is important to get feedback from our peers to help remind us of strategies or ideas we may have overlooked. Because the stories are in rhyming format, I wanted to address this in one of my lessons. The students loved coming up with words that rhyme during Heggerty so I thought this activity would be good. While still teaching reading strategies like visualizing, I was able to add in phonemic awareness as concepts of oral language as well. As I taught, I realized that the students understood summaries, predictions, and visualizations pretty well. The especially enjoyed sharing their ideas of what they would do if they were in the same situation as one of the characters. The most difficult reading strategy for them was connections. In the future, I would implement more lessons and activities on making connections from themselves to the text, or text to text.

References Tompkins, G. E. (2014). Literacy for the 21st century (6th edition). NJ: Merrill, Prentice Hall.