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Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank

JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph





Vermicompost Production

BUSINESS PLAN
(Working draft)

For Legazpi City, Albay









Prepared by: Carlos O. Tulali
cjtulali@gmail.com
+639124126530


August 12, 2014

1




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph



Contents Page

Introduction ... 3
Background
Summary of Financial Needs
Estimated Investment Costs

Executive Summary ... 4
Market Opportunity

Benefits to the Community ..... 5
Economic Development
Community Development
Human Development

Industry Analysis .. 8

Manufacturing and Operations Plan ... 9
Location and Space Requirements
Inventory Control

Labor Force .. 10
Labor Requirements

Marketing Plan .. 10
Target Market
Market Opportunity
Distribution Plans
Pricing

Financial Plan .. 12
Estimated Investment Costs

Financial Analysis ..... 13
Projected Sales and Income

APPENDIX 1. Vermicomposting Procedure ..... 15

2




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph


INTRODUCTION


Background

The solid waste problem and its detrimental impact on the environment and peoples health have
been the major concerns of local government units (LGUs) since the enactment of Republic Act 9003
(Ecological Solid Waste management Act of 2001. This vermicomposting project supports the
enactment of R.A. 9003 in which LGUs have the primary responsibility of implementing the law with
proper segregation, collection, storage, treatment and processing (composting, recycling, reuse,
recovery, etc.) in appropriate and environmentally-sound solid waste management facilities in
accordance with ecologically sustainable development principles. RA 9003 also strategically
envisions that all stakeholders, whether government institutions, private entities in
commercial/industrial establishments, and every household must implement the solid waste
management scheme.

There are various methods of composting municipal and farm solid wastes or biomass applied in the
Philippines. One such method that has become widely applied because of its simplicity, practicality
and cost-effectiveness is vermicomposting, the process of composting with the use of earthworms.
The increased adoption of vermicompost technology would lead to savings in farm inputs and an
increase in environmental consciousness.

Vermicomposting is a mesophilic process, utilizing microorganisms and earthworms, in which
organic waste passes through the earthworm gut, whereby the resulting earthworm castings (worm
manure) are rich in microbial activity and plant growth regulators, and fortified with pest repellence
attributes as well. Earthworms consume various organic wastes and reduce the volume by 4060%.
Vermicompost provides all nutrients in readily available form and also enhances uptake of nutrients
by plants.

Based on the increasing trend in the number of vermicompost technology adoptors, it was
popularized among local entrepreneurs for the reason that it is considerably profitable and
furthermore maximizes the flow of materials within the farm level.
1

2
The process of utilizing the
organic wastes within the farms leads to a more sustainable farming practices. The nutrients are
retained and returned back to the soil through vermicompost application. Such practice would make
the soil suitable for crop production and increases crop yield since the soil quality is improved.
3


The vermicompost contains higher percentage (nearly twofold) of both macro and micronutrients
than the garden compost. It has good sale potential over range of crops i.e. agricultural,
1
Aldridge, N. 2003. Black Gold: A guide to vermicomposting. Agriculture. Nov. pp. 24-25.
2
Felix, R.C. 2005. Vermiculture - Sugarcane producer casts his luck with earthworm castings. The Philippine
Star. May 1, 2005.
3
Aranda, E., Barois, I., Arellano, P., Irisson, S., Salazar, T., Rodriguez, J. and J.C. Patron. 1999.
Vermicomposting in the tropics. In: Earthworm Management in Tropical Agroecosystems. P. Lavelle, L.
Brussard & P. Hendrix, Eds., CABI Publishing, United Kingdom, pp. 253-287.
3





Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph

horticultural, ornamental, vegetables, etc. Agronomical studies show that earthworm-produced
fertilizer is richer in plant nutrient than the soil, containing five times more nitrogen, seven times
more phosphorus, 11 times more potassium, three times more exchangeable magnesium, and one
and a half times more calcium. It contains a high percentage of humus, which helps soil particles
form into clusters creating channels for the passage of air and water. This kind of humus is found to
be more effective compared to ordinary compost and chemical fertilizers and its use can lead to
higher crop yield over a longer period of time.

Revenues or earnings derived from the vermicomposting systems be it primary benefits or
secondary will be valued and treated as benefits. Primary benefits are those outputs directly
produced by the project while secondary benefits are those stemming from the direct outputs. The
Benefits that can be derived from this project are the following:
selling of earthworms and vermicompost;
utilization of vermicompost as organic supplement and soil conditioner as substitute for
inorganic
fertilizers;
production of organic crops; and
minimization of wastes through recycling into usable forms;
increase in employment and
greater economic activity in the farm level;
increased value of adjacent properties as a result of a cleaner environment;
decrease wastes movement to dump sites;
increase savings/revenues for the government;
good neighbor relations due to increase job availability;
consumption of safe organically produced crops; and,
pollution abatement.


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Vermicomposting is defined as the production of compost with the use of worms. It is a fast way to
convert farm waste and biodegradable municipal waste into organic fertilizer. It degrades waste as
vermi or earthworm (African night crawler) feed on and digest waste materials. Vermicomposting
results in a better quality product that is produced in only 4-6 weeks compared to ordinary compost
that is produced in 8-12 weeks.

Vermicomposting is a waste management technology utilizing earthworms to convert organic
wastes into high quality castings and vermicomposts of high economic values. The proposed
vermicompost production project involving the informal waste sector (IWS) is in effect, supporting
R.A. 9003 (Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000) by working in partnership with the
Legazpi City local government unit in promoting proper segregation, collection, storage, treatment
and processing (composting, recycling, reuse, recovery, etc.) in appropriate and environmentally-
sound solid waste management facilities in accordance with ecologically sustainable development
principles.
4




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph


The proposed project also aims to provide alternative livelihood for members of the proponent IWS
association and at the same time, support the National Organic Agriculture Program (NOAP) of the
Department of Agriculture (DA) in its goal to promote, propagate, develop further and implement
the practice of organic agriculture in the Philippines that will cumulatively condition and enrich the
fertility of the soil, increase farm productivity, reduce pollution and destruction of the environment,
prevent the depletion of natural resources, further protect the health of farmers, consumers, and
the general public, and save on imported farm inputs.

The total investment for a commercial scale vermicomposting facility is estimated at Php
1.803,000.00 to cover start-up capital and operating expenses of the commercial scale
vermicomposting facility. Aside from the establishment of a commercial scale vermicomposting
facility, members of the IWS association may undertake backyard vermicompost production. The
initial capitalization in starting a backyard vermicomposting business will depend on the scale (small-
small-scale/backyard: Php 6,000.00, large-scale: Php 50,000.000).

For every vermi bed with two kilograms (kg.) of African night crawler (ANC) worms, 90 kg.
vermicompost will be produced per harvest. With 12 cycles a year, a total of 1,080 kg. of
vermicompost will be produced. Assuming a farm gate selling price of P10 per kilo, a revenue of
PhP10,800.00 is earned annually. ANC worms multiply in double quantity every six months with a
corresponding doubling of the vermicompost business. One can opt to sell the worms at PhP500 a
kilogram. Thus in 12 cycles, a total of 48 kg. of ANC worms can be harvested and sold for
PhP24,000.00 or a toal annual revenue of PhP34,800.00 less annual production expenses of
PhP6,120.00. This means a yearly net return of P28,680.00 from an investment of P6,120.00 or a 21
percent annual return on investment (ROI).


BENEFITS TO THE COMMUNITY


Economic Development

Aside from the establishment of the coop-managed vermicomposting facility, members of the
cooperative, especially the waste pickers and sorters from the informal waste sector (IWS), may
undertake household vermicomposting.

After six months, 10 kilos of worms can produce 300 kilos of vermicompost. Assuming a farm gate
selling price of P10 per kilo, a monthly revenue of P3,000 is earned. Less monthly expenses of
P1,500, monthly net income reaches P1,500. Worms double every six months with a corresponding
doubling of the vermicompost business. This means a yearly net return of P28,680.00 from an
investment of P6,000 per vermi bed per year or a 368.63 percent return on investment (ROI). One
can opt to sell the worms at P500 a kilogram.

A higher financial and social ROI can be achieved if vermicomposting is used for organic agriculture.
Compared to inorganic fertilizers, vermicompost is less expensive, improves rather than destroys soil
fertility, increases the value of farm produce and provides healthier food for the consumers.
5




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph


In terms of economic viability, vermicomposting will be a good source of income aside from the
various benefits which can be derived from its various products. Aside from the economic gains,
savings will also be derived by using the product itself and its derivatives.

Vermicompost has the added advantages of being more convenient, practical and economical than
other similar composting systems. For one, it can be done at either the household or commercial
level with minimal labor and capital requirements. The tools and implements needed for the
operation are available locally and are sold by many commercial firms. Local agro-machinery shops
can also fabricate the necessary equipment (e.g. mechanical shredder).

It is in the marketing and utilization of vermi-based products that has the most impacts that
encompasses both socio-economic and environmental dimensions. Farmers can save on the use of
chemical fertilizers and pesticides. They have the opportunity to improve the condition of the soil,
increased yield of high quality crops resulting to more profit, help the environment by replenishing
natural resources, plus helping many people by giving them jobs in vermi farms. In addition, excess
vermicompost can be marketed commercially, while the surplus growth of earthworm biomass can
also be sold to other farmers and households who wanted to start their own vermicomposting
venture. Such practice would lead to economic development in the countryside and savings for the
government through reduction in the use of imported fertilizers. Equitable distribution of income
among the farmers would result to economic growth with equity.


Community Development

During the production stage, large volume of wastes is needed to produce large amount of
vermicompost needed to fertilize large tracts of agricultural lands. These wastes can be derived from
all possible sources: households, farms, communities, markets, and industries. In the
vermicomposting process, wastes are not dumped or transported to dumpsites. Wastes are
managed effectively by reducing waste transport and elimination of burning waste in the backyards
or farmlands. Therefore, pollution and greenhouse gas emission are reduced that would result to
improved environmental management and ecological integrity maintenance.

Through the vermicompost production project, it is expected that the cooperative will be able to
promote equal opportunities for its most vulnerable members, the waste pickers and sorters,
especially the women beneficiaries, to establish backyard vermicomposting and their household
members to benefit from project services. These benefits will include training and employment to be
provided through the coops vermicomposting project. As agribusiness opportunities in production,
processing, and marketing of the vermicompost increase, there is an incentive for the waste pickers
and sorters and women in the community to participate and benefit from income-generating
opportunities and employment through the project.

Vermicompost or the castings of the earthworms is an excellent soil enhancer and bioactive fertilizer
for organic farming. Earthworms can also be made into feed for fish or other domesticated animals.
Vermicomposting can also help reduce the amount of biodegradable wastes in the San Jose Sico
landfil. The production of vermicompost will also contribute to the promotion of organic farming and
6




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph

in restoring the fertility of acidic soils resulting from organic matter depletion and overuse of
chemical fertilizers in Batangas and nearby provinces.

Through vermiconposting, adoptors can recycle their own resources and create an effective fertilizer
in the process. The extra worms that are produced can be used as feed for poultry and fish, thus
helping other local businesses.

The advantages of this technology for the community include:
1. Recycling of organic wastes.
2. Production of energy rich resources.
3. Reduction of environmental pollution.
4. Provision of job opportunities for women and jobless members of the coop and the IWS
community.
5. Improvement of soil pH. (vermicompost acts as a buffering agent).
6. Improvement in the percolation property of clay soils (from the compost's granular nature).
7. Improvement of the water holding capacity in sandy soils.
8. Release of exchangeable and available forms of nutrients.
9. Increase of oxidizable carbon levels, improving the base exchange capacity of the soil.
10. Improvement of the nitrate and phosphate levels.
11. Encouragement of plant root system growth.
12. Improvement in the size and girth of plant stems.
13. Early and profuse plant flowering
14. Creation of a substitute protein in poultry and fish feed.

After project financing, the sources of raw materials needed in producing vermicompost will be
cheaper and always available in the project communities. With its low production cost, its selling
price can be cheaper compared to inorganic fertilizer, making it more competitive in the market. As
a result, farmers will be able to buy their farms needed fertilizer and increase their production
volume.


Human Development

The stages of technology can be divided into three stages, namely, (1) vermicomposting knowledge
dissemination through trainings, seminars and exposures; (2) production of different vermi-based
products; and, (3) vermi-based products marketing and/or utilization.

As early as knowledge dissemination, the target beneficiaries receive benefits which affect their way
of thinking with regards to managing their wastes and soil fertility. The adoptors will be given
options on ways to manage their wastes efficiently and they will not be forced to adopt the
technology but through their own will. With the process, the target beneficiaries will be empowered
through the provision of various opportunities to choose from. Even without technology adoption,
target beneficiaries will gain much knowledge through the process of information technology
transfer that they can use in one way or the other with regards to waste management and farming.
Through informal education will equip the target beneficiaries with new knowledge and better
opportunities in farming system and waste management.
7




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph


Vermicomposting is safe and is not hazardous to the health of the farmers. In fact, the farmers'
health is promoted because by using vermicompost, they avoid exposure to toxins and other
harmful chemicals.

The project shall promote beneficiary participation to trigger grassroots mobilization and social
inclusion of the target beneficiaries from the informal waste sector (IWS) around specific themes like
enterprise formation, organic farming, poverty alleviation, and womens participation.


INDUSTRY ANALYSIS


Vermiculture or the science of breeding and raising earthworms was introduced in the Philippines in
the late 1970s
4
and gained popularity in the 1980s
5
. It started when Dr. Rafael D. Guerrero, the
Executive Director of the Philippine Council for Marine Research and Development (PCAMRD)
became interested with the technology because of the need for alternative high-protein feeds for
fish. In the 1980s, the dissemination of the technology was focused on boosting worm production
basically for fishmeal, however, the cost of worms was still too high and becoming too expensive as
feeds for the fishermen and hatchery owners because during that time the cost of commercial feeds
was still comparatively low.

The environment-friendly method of vermicomposting became popular again in recent years
because it provided the opportunity for worm raisers to produce a good source of protein for feeds
and at the same time convert farm and household wastes into organic fertilizers or vermicompost.

Vermicompost or vermicast is an odorless, organic material containing adequate quantities of
nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium (NPK) and several micronutrients, which are essential for
plant growth. It became popular with organic farmers because it helps plants grow faster and more
vigorous even without the application of commercial fertilizer.
6


Although, the vermiculture industry collapsed in 1984 due to the absence of an appropriate
technology,
7
producers of organic fertilizers and commercial farms are now utilizing the technology
to produce high quality bio-organic fertilizers and highly demanded organically-produced high value
crops.

Based on the guidelines issued by the Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority (FPA), organic fertilizer refers
to any product of plant and or animal origin that has undergone decomposition through biological,
chemical and or any other process as long as the original materials are no longer recognizable, free
from plant or animal pathogens, soil like in texture. It contains not less than 20% organic matter
(o.m) oven-dry basis and can supply nutrients to plants. All other materials that fall short of these
requirements shall be classified as soil conditioners or amendments whichever is applicable.
4
Guerrero, Rafael III. 1979. The Potential of Earthworm Culture. Greenfields (August 1979).
5
Tan, Narciso. 1985. Vermiculture in the Philippines.
6
http//www.jains.com
7
Tan, Narciso. 1985. Vermiculture in the Philippines.
8





Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph


According to the FPA, 6,271 metric tons of organic fertilizers were produced and 6,309 metric tons
were sold in 2006 by 48 companies, most of them in Metro Manila. Actual production and sales vary
from year to year and 1992 was a record breaking year with a production of 73,212 metric tons (MT)
but sales for the year was only 17,138 MT. The record breaking sale was in 1995 at 28,090 MT tons
with production figures of only 21,769 MT.


MANUFACTURING AND OPERATIONS PLAN


Location and Space Requirements

A 300 square-meter wide vermicomposting facility may be established at a lot that may be owned by
the LGU, the IWS association or by its members. Backyard vermicomposting may be undertaken by
members who want to become vermicompost producers and are qualified to apply for enterprise or
productivity loan from their IWS association or the LGU. The loan shall be utilized by the IWS
association member-borrower as working capital and for the construction of his/her backyard
vermicompost production unit and purchase of needed raw materials, tools and equipment.


Facilities Needed and Other Requirements

Site Selection:

Select a site that is shaded and well-drained with availablewater supply. Temperature requirement
is 25C-29C undershade. Worms die when direct to sunlight.
Small Scale Production - Fixed capital needed would consist of hoes and spade, bolos and
scythes and the worm bins.
Commercial Production - provision of working space for drying andbagging

Materials:

Worms African night crawlers
Worm bins or worm beds - used worm bins/worm beds which are made of any material
available whether iron bars with plastic lining, old plastic basins, bamboo slats or concrete
hollow blocks. Precautions should be taken to ensure that they are protected from direct
sunlight, too much water and natural predators.

Tools:

Gardening gloves
Strainer/Sifter
Spading fork
Shovel

9




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph

Raw Material/Packaging Material:

Vermi (Worms)
Foodwastes, fruit/vegetable trimmings and peelings, dry leaves and stems, animal manure
Vermi Bed or earthworm bed (Dimension: 2x1x0.3m)
Black plastic garbage bags
Plastic sacks (50-kg. capacity)

Equipment:

Mechanical shredder (optional)


LABOR FORCE


Labor Requirements

During the production stage, different products are derived from the vermicomposting system but
the main products are vermicompost and compost worms that can further be transformed into
other usable products such as animal feed and vermi tea. In the production process,
vermicomposting will require much labor if mechanical shredder is not available. From segregation,
chopping, bin preparation, maintenance until harvesting, vermicomposting requires at least one part
time worker for a small scale vermicomposting system.

Most members of the cooperative are waste pickers or sorters who can also work at the coop-
managed vermicompost production site while their household members can help in the production
activities of their backyard vermicompost.


MARKETING PLAN


Target Market

The existing local market for vermicompost are mainly agricultural producers and farmers who
slowly but increasingly use this as an alternative to chemical fertilizers because demand for
organically produced food crops is also increasing. Organic fertilizer has likewise increased in use as
result of steep increases in the price of commercial fertilizer. These developments work in favor of
vermicomposting. Aside from the fact that no imported inputs are required in vermicomposting,
producing their own fertilizer makes the farmers less vulnerable to changes and fluctuations in the
prices of other commodities particularly chemical farm inputs. There is practically no risk at all in
producing vermicompost whether for one's use or surplus production.

The following are the other potential markets for vermicompost:
10




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph

Direct sale to end users. This includes farmers groups and subdivisions in nearby cities and
municipalities;
Bulk sale to producers and distributors of organic fertilizer that needs vermicast as one of its
primary components; and
High-end market in urban areas due to the popularity of organically grown farm produce
among the rich residing in posh villages and other high-end residential areas.

According to the Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority (FPA), 6,271 metric tons of organic fertilizers were
produced and 6,309 metric tons were sold in 2006 by 48 companies. Actual production and sales
vary from year to year and 1992 was a record breaking year with a production of 73,212 metric tons
(MT) but sales for the year was only 17,138 MT. The record breaking sale was in 1995 at 28,090 MT
tons with production figures of only 21,769 MT.


Market Opportunity

Vermicomposting technology has been in the country since 1978. However, only few people
adopted it and some ceased their operation. Its low adoption until now is due to the lack of market
linkages and high cost of earthworms. But once the market have been identified, then its potential
would be tremendous since the vermi products command high prices in the market. Vermicompost
can be sold from Php 10.00 to 25.00 per kilogram while earthworms are from Php 500.00 to Php
1,500.00 per kilogram. Some sellers repackage their products with starter kits and reading materials
but with higher price. Some vermicomposting adoptors, aside from producing and selling their
products, are also engaged in conducting training and producing other products (i.e. vermitea,
vermimeal) derived from the main vermi products. With such activities, they received more benefits
than selling vermicomposts and compost worms. Even during the promotion of the technology,
these people get paid for just sharing their experiences and practices in vermicomposting.

The existing local market for vermicompost are mainly agricultural producers and farmers who
slowly but increasingly use this as an alternative to chemical fertilizers because demand for
organically produced food crops is also increasing. Organic fertilizer has likewise increased in use as
result of steep increases in the price of commercial fertilizer. These developments work in favor of
vermicomposting. Aside from the fact that no imported inputs are required in vermicomposting,
producing their own fertilizer makes the farmers less vulnerable to changes and fluctuations in the
prices of other commodities particularly chemical farm inputs. There is practically no risk at all in
producing vermicompost whether for one's use or surplus production.

The following are the other potential markets for vermicompost:
Direct sale to end users. This includes farmers groups and subdivisions in nearby cities and
municipalities;
Bulk sale to producers and distributors of organic fertilizer that needs vermicast as one of its
primary components; and
High-end market in urban areas due to the popularity of organically grown farm produce
among the rich residing in posh villages and other high-end residential areas.


11




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph

Distribution Plans

The vermicompost can be directly sold to farmers groups or cooperatives who are engaged in
organic farming, industrial plants and real estate developers (subdivisions and condominiums) with
landscaping and organic food production activities, and the Department of Agriculture.


Pricing

Vermicompost can be sold from Php 10.00 to 25.00 per kilogram while earthworms are from Php
500.00 to Php 1,000.00 per kilogram. Some sellers repackage their products with starter kits and
reading materials but with higher price. Some vermicomposting adoptors, aside from producing and
selling their products, are also engaged in conducting training and producing other products (i.e.
vermitea, vermimeal) derived from the main vermi products. With such activities, they received
more benefits than selling vermicomposts and compost worms. Even during the promotion of the
technology, these people get paid for just sharing their experiences and practices in
vermicomposting.


Advertising and Promotion Efforts

The cooperative will actively participate in organic agriculture promotion activities carried out by
organic food products and organic farming enthusiasts, in partnership with the DAs organic
agriculture programs at the city/municipal, provincial and national levels.


FINANCIAL PLAN


Estimated Investment Costs

The total investment for a commercial scale vermicomposting facility is estimated at Php
1.803,000.00 to cover start-up capital and operating expenses of the commercial scale
vermicomposting facility. (Table 1).





Table 1. Budgetary Requirements and Sources of Funds for the Proposed Vermicomposting Project
Component/Activity Total
EXTENSION SERVICES AND TRAINING
Salaries and travel expenses of 1 extension worker @ 5,000.00/month x 36 months Php180,000.00
Training and workshops @ P100/day x 200 pax x 3 days Php60,000.00
Subtotal A Php240,000.00
HOUSEHOLD LEVEL VERMICOMPOSTING
12




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph

Component/Activity Total
Material and biological inputs:
Hollow blocks and nets for 200 units worm beds @ Php250/unit Php50,000.00
10 kg. worms @ Php500/kg x 200 members Php1,000,000.00
Direct Costs:
Labor @ Php300 x 2 laborers x 100 days Php60,000.00
400 units shovel @ Php 300/unit Php120,000.00
Subtotal B Php1,230,000.00
VERMICOMPOST PRODUCTION FACILITY
Equipment:
1 units mechanical shredder @ Php 150,000/unit Php150,000.00
3 units weighing scale for 500 kg. @ Php 10,000.00/unit Php30,000.00
3 units weighing scale for 40 kg. @ Php 5,000/unit Php15,000.00
3 units bag closer @ Php 6,000/unit Php18,000.00
Subtotal C Php213,000.00
Land and Building:
300 sq. m. open shed warehouse @ Php20,000.00/sq. m. Php60,000.00
Land (Php20,000/year x 3 years Php60,000.00
Subtotal D Php120,000.00
GRAND TOTAL Php1,803,000.00

Typically 5,000-7,500 metric tons (MT) mix of animal manure and organic waste is required to
produce 3,000 MT vermicompost. Animal manures, biogas sludge, baggase, municipal solid waste
and range of agricultural residues serve as good raw materials for vermicomposting.

Aside from the establishment of the organization-managed vermicomposting facility, members of
the coop may undertake backyard vermicomposting. The initial capitalization in starting a backyard
vermicomposting business will depend on the scale (small-small-scale/backyard: Php 6,000.00, large-
scale: Php 50,000.000).


FINANCIAL ANALYSIS


Projected Sales and Income

Aside from the establishment of the commercial scale vermicomposting facility, members of the IWS
association may undertake backyard vermicompost production. For every vermi bed with two
kilograms (kg.) of African night crawler (ANC) worms, 90 kg. vermicompost will be produced every
harvest. With 12 cycles a year, a total of 1,080 kg. of vermicompost will be produced. Assuming a
farm gate selling price of P10 per kilo, a revenue of PhP10,800.00 is earned annually.

ANC worms multiply in double quantity every six months with a corresponding doubling of the
vermicompost business. One can opt to sell the worms at PhP500 a kilogram. Thus in 12 cycles, a
total of 48 kg. of ANC worms can be harvested and sold for PhP24,000.00 or a toal annual revenue of
13




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph

PhP34,800.00 less annual production expenses of PhP6,120.00. This means a yearly net return of
P28,680.00 from an investment of P6,120.00 or a 21 percent annual return on investment (ROI).


Table 2. Projected Production Cost, Revenue and Income per Vermi Bed per Year through for
Backyard Vermicomposting
Particulars Amount in Php
A. Annual Revenue (1 Vermi bed)
90 kg. vermicompost x 12 cycles = 1,080 kg. of vermicompost @ P10 00/kg.
10,800.00
Additional Revenue from selling worms from 1 vermi bed:
4 kg. of vermi x 12 cycles = 48 kg. of vermi @ P500.00/kg.

24,000.00
TOTAL REVENUE 34,800.00
B. Annual Production Cost
African Night Crawler Worms 2 kg. @ Php 500.00/kg. 1,000.00
Labor (12 cycles @ Php 250.00/cycle) 3,000.00
Sack (2 sacks x 12 cycles @ Php 4.00/pc.) 120.00
Shovel 500.00
Spading fork 500.00
Strainer/sifter 200.00
Gardening gloves 200.00
Black plastic bags 100.00
Fixed Investment: Vermi Bed (2x1x0 3 m.) 400.00
ESTIMATED TOTAL PRODUCTION COST 6,020.00
Revenue 34,800.00
Less: Production Cost 6,120.00
ESTIMATED NET INCOME 28,680.00
Assumptions:
- 1 vermi bed = 12 harvests in a year.
- Vermi bed (Dimension: 2x1x0.3 m.)
- African Night Crawlers is sold at P500/kl.
- Harvesting is done every after 30 days.
- 150 kilos of biodegradable wastes + 2 kilos of worms = 90 kilos of vermicompost
- Compost sells at P10.00/kl.
- 2 kg. of vermi per bed would yield 4 kg. of additional vermi


14




Japan Social Development Fund The World Bank
JSDF Grant Social Inclusion and Alternative Livelihoods for the Informal Waste Sector Project
(JSDF Grant No. TF012037)
No. 7-A South J Street, Quezon City
http:/www.swapp.org.ph


APPENDIX 1. Vermicomposting Procedure

1. Collect biodegradable materials such as food wastes, fruit/vegetable trimmings, peelings, and
dry leaves and stems.
2. Shred/grind the food wastes, fruit/vegetable trimmings, peelings, and dry leaves and stems.
3. Mix old animal manure and chicken droppings (2 months old) with shredded vegetable waste.
This will improve the nutrient content of the finish product. Do not use fresh manure for the
ammonia produced will give discomfort to the worms.
4. Sun-dry these materials for at least three days and let them undergo partial fermentation.
5. Weigh the shredded grinded materials before putting in the compost bed to determine ratio of
compostables and worms.
6. Before stocking the earthworms, make sure that all materials in the vermi bed are prepared.
7. Moisten the bedding with water and cover it with black plastic garbage bag, old sacks, net, or
banana leaves to start "anaerobic process", which is completed after 1-2 weeks.
8. After the anaerobic process, remove the cover and stock the vermi bed with earthworms.
9. Maintain the vermi beds' moisture content and temperature through regular checking. Protect
the worms from predatory animals.
10. Vermicompost is harvested when most of the materials have been consumed by the worms. This
takes about 30-45 days depending on environmental and culture conditions.
11. In harvesting, separate the "vermi" from the vermicompost either manually (handpicking) or
using a strainer/sifter.
12. Properly pack vermicompost in sacks and store in a cool dry place.
13. Harvested/sifted vermi from the vermi beds may either be used for the next vermicomposting
cycle or for expansion by constructing additional vermi beds.
14. The offspring or produce of the initial vermi in the vermi bed can also be sold to would-be
vermicompost producer or to fish pond owner as fish meal.



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