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Lesson

About our Cultures: Traditions and Celebrations

Date

November 24, 2014

Subject/Grade
Level

Gr. 2 Social Studies

Time
Duration

60 minutes

Unit

Unit 2: More about our Communities: Regina,


Iqaluit, Bouctouche

Teacher

Amy

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES


General
Learning
Outcomes:
Specific
Learning
Outcomes:

Students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of how geography, culture,


language, heritage, economics and resources shape and change Canadas communities.
2.1.3 investigate the cultural and linguistic characteristics of an Inuit, an Acadian and a
prairie community in Canada by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions for
inquiry
What are the traditions and celebrations in the communities that connect the
people to the past and to each other? (CC, LPP, TCC)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Students will:
1. Define traditions as rituals celebrated by families and cultures
2. Identify family and cultural traditions

ASSESSMENTS
Observe if students are able to brainstorm their own traditions that they
celebrate
Monitor student work on quilt squares, make clarifications if necessary
Provide further instruction, one-on-one to those having trouble making
connections.
o What is the tradition in this story?
o Why do we have traditions?
o How are traditions and customs preserved?
Brainstorming sheet, Quilt square

Observations:

Key Questions:

Products/Performances:

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED

Alberta Education Social Studies POS


Our World: Canadian Communities Teaching
Resource

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

Definition posters
The Keeping Quilt written and illustrated by
Patricia Polacco
Chart paper for brain webs
Throw Your Tooth on the Roof: Tooth
Traditions from Around the World by Selby B.
Beeler and illustrated by G. Brian Karas
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rx4vIOsr
69M

PROCEDURE
Prior to lesson
Consider:
Attention Grabber
Assessment of Prior
Knowledge
Expectations for Learning
and Behaviour
Advance

Introduction
Students at the carpet
Ask for volunteers, also use stick pick to choose students
Review definition of culture
o Can you be part of more than one culture?
Introduce the concept of traditions, celebrations, and
storytelling

Time
12:30

Organizer/Agenda
Transition to Body

Consider:

Variety of Learning Styles


Questioning throughout
Differentiation for
students
Focused formative
assessment

Consider:

Consolidation of
Learning
Feedback from

Read The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco


o Explain tough words, ask about the purpose of the
illustrations
o What is the tradition in this story?
o How did the Keeping Quilt start?
o What was the purpose of a Keeping Quilt tradition?
o What do you think will happen to the Keeping
Quilt?
o What celebrations was the quilt used for?
o Is this an example of storytelling?
o Why do we have customs and traditions?
o How are traditions and customs preserved?
o If you could make a square for a quilt, which
tradition would you draw?
Introduce the words tradition, celebrations, and storytelling and
how they link to the story
o Have a chart made with cut outs of words, picture of
words, and definitions
o Students will work together to decide which picture
and definition fits with which word.
o Read words and definitions before hand, explain
pictures
o Hand out cards to students
o Have students discuss their cards
o Ask for the student with [traditions] to put their word
on the board
o Who thinks they have the picture for [traditions]?
o Is s/he correct? Why or why not?
Body
Students will return to their desks
Students will design their own quilt square
o If you could make a square for a quilt, which
tradition would you draw?
First have students brainstorm in groups about traditions they
celebrate.
Observe is students are able to brainstorm traditions
Prompt students to think about less traditional traditions such
as the tooth fairy
Demonstrate a brainstorm map on the whiteboard. Model
some traditions I celebrate.
Have students brainstorm traditions they have
o Each group will receive a piece of paper, students will
write/draw traditions they celebrate with their family
Discuss the traditions students brainstormed about
What does your tradition celebrate?
Students will then draw a picture of their tradition of choice
Observe if students are able to accurately draw a picture of
their tradition of choice
Closure
Review the definition of a tradition
Have students explain the tradition they chose to celebrate
and why it is important to them and their family

10 min

10 min

12:50

Time

12:50

10 min

25 min
1:25

Time
1:25
5 min

Students
Feedback to Students
Transition to Next
Lesson

Sponge
Activity/Activities

Inform students next class we will begin to study traditions of


Regina, Bouctouche, and Iqaluit
Thank students for their participation

1:30

Students who finish first, will explain their quilt to me, and then may create
another quilt piece, or silently read
If majority of students are done early, listen to Throw Your Tooth on the
Roof: Tooth Traditions from Around the World by Selby B. Beeler and
illustrated by G. Brian Karas