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Teacher Work Sample

Sring 2015 Student Teaching Internship


Krista Popkin Florida State University

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Table of Contents

TITLE
SITE DESCRIPTION
DESCRIPTION OF TEACHING

PAGE NUMBERS
3-7
8-11

CONTEXT OF PLACEMENT

12-14

UNIT RATIONALE

15-18

UNIT STANDARDS

19-22

UNIT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

23

PRE-ASSESSMENT

24

POST-ASSESSMENT

25

PRE AND POST-ASSESSMENT GRADING RUBRIC

26

WEEK ONE LESSON PLANS

27

APPENDIX A
WEEK TWO LESSON PLANS
APPENDIX B
WEEK THREE LESSON PLANS
APPENDIX C
WEEK FOUR LESSON PLANS
APPENDIX D

28-34
35
36-38
39
40-44
45
46-50

WEEK FIVE LESSON PLAN

51

GAINS CHART

52

ANALYSIS OF ASSESSMENT SCORES

53-55

INTERPRETIVE ESSAY

56-60

REFERENCES

61-62

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Site Description

During the Spring 2015 semester I will be completing my full-time student-teaching


internship at Godby High School, which is located in the city of Tallahassee in North Florida. As
state capital and home to two major universities, it is not hard to imagine how busy and crowded
Tallahassee is. According to the United State Census Bureau, the Tallahassee population in 2013
amounted to 186,411 people (2015b). In 2010, the Bureau reported that 53.3% of the population
was White non-Hispanic, 35.0% were Black or African American, 0.2% were American Indian
and Alaskan Native, 3.7% were Asian, 0.1% were Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander,
2.3% were two or more races, and 6.3% were Hispanic or Latino (2015b). There was only a
2.8% change in the population between April 2010 and July 2014, which means that the statistics
listed above from 2010 are relatively accurate for the current population with only slight
variations (United State Census Bureau, 2015b).
Tallahassees school district is the Leon County School District, in which there are
twenty-five elementary schools, nine middle schools, and seven high schools. The District
Superintendent is Mr. Jackie Pons and the Deputy Superintendent is Mr. Marvin Henderson
(Leon County School District, 2015). The Leon County School District spreads much further
than just the Tallahassee city limits. The United State Census Bureau reported that the population
in Leon County during 2013 was 281,845 (2015a). Also in 2013, 58.0% of that reported
population was White non-Hispanic, 31.4% was Black or African American, 0.3% were
American Indian and Alaskan Native, 3.1% were Asian, 0.1% were Native Hawaiian and other
Pacific Islander, 2.1% were of two or more races, and 6.0% were Hispanic or Latino (United
States Census Bureau, 2015a). These statistics exemplify the diversity in both Tallahassee and
Leon County.

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Godby High School is located about ten minutes from Florida State University and about
fifteen minutes from the state capitol, giving its surrounding environment an urban feel. There
are several college apartment complexes in the surrounding area as well as some older houses
and subdivisions. Like almost anywhere in Tallahassee, the roads, stores, and houses that
surround Godby are all very old looking. Godby itself appears to have older-looking building
structures. The school was first built in 1966 but the administration, faculty, staff, and students
have done a great job at preserving it through the years (Amos P. Godby High School, 2015a).
While the structure itself may appear out-of-date, Godby is certainly up-to-date on their
technology and resources. The classrooms at Godby are equipped with interactive Promethean
Boards in addition to white boards and bulletin boards. In my building, the teachers share a cart
of laptops that they can reserve as needed for their students to use in the classroom. If a class
does not have access to a set of laptops then they can reserve the computers in the media center.
The media center is able to accommodate big groups of students with its massive structure. The
media center specialist, Kathleen Malloy, is also available to provide both teachers and students
with any assistance, resources, or supplies they might need. There is a wide range of books,
videos, and supplies at teachers disposal in the media center along with two different staff
lounges.
The campus appears to be clean and well kept. The hallways, cafeteria, media center, and
main office are filled with posters and flyers containing inspirational quotes, information about
sporting events, information about different clubs, school rules, and other events that are taking
place on campus. This creates a school community in which students respect one another and are
encouraged to be involved on campus alongside their fellow peers and teachers. The faculty and
staff appear to be close with one another, almost as if they were all one big family. Teacher and

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administrative collaboration is also of the utmost importance to the faculty members at Godby.
This helps Godby feel more like a warm, welcoming, and supportive environment to be in.
There are five administrators at Godby High School: Shelly Bell is the Principal, Jenny
Blair is the Assistant Principal of Curriculum, Kelvin Norton is the Assistant Principal of Student
Services, Marcus Scott is the Assistant Principal of Attendance, and Todd Lanter is the Dean.
There are a little over one hundred faculty and staff members and as of September 2014 there are
one thousand two hundred eighty students enrolled at Godby (Amos P. Godby High School,
2015a). According to the schools website, 74% of the student body is African-American, 17%
are Caucasian, 7% are Hispanic, and 3% are Asian/Native American/Mixed (Amos P. Godby
High School, 2015a). The average class sizes I have seen around campus are about twenty-five.
According to the Florida Department of Education, 47% of Godbys student body is considered
economically disadvantaged, compared to the 40% of all students in the district and 58% of all
students in the state (2015). Godby High School qualifies for Title I services. Title I programs
receive funds under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 to provide supplement instruction to
students of public schools, neglected or delinquent sites, non-public schools, and homeless
children (Leon County Schools, 2015). In order for a high school to qualify for Title I services at
least 72% of the student body must be on a free or reduced lunch plan, of which Godby meets.
Godby is a school driven towards improvement and success. According to my
cooperating teacher, Dr. Thayer, Principal Bell came in about two years ago and revamped the
schools curriculum, expectations, and environment. Principal Bell hired almost an entirely new
staff of teachers, whom take education and teaching very seriously. According to the schools
website, Godby High Schools 2013-2014 performance grade was a C (Amos P. Godby High
School, 2015b). According to Godbys 2014-2015 School Improvement Plan, their goal for the

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2015 FSA-ELA is to be within 10% (+/-) of their previous proficiency rate as measured by the
2014 FCAT scores (Amos P. Godby High School, 2015c). Major school initiatives put in place
to help Godby reach this goal include Achieve 3000, Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt EnglishLanguage Arts Curriculum, and a college readiness system referred to as AVID (Advancement
Via Individual Determination) (Amos P. Godby High School, 2015c). Achieve 3000 is a
computer program that provides differentiated instruction in attempts to improve students
reading and writing proficiency levels (Amos P. Godby High School, 2015c). The HoughtonMifflin-Harcourt English-Language Arts Curriculum provides student with high-complexity text
with supplement texts to give students opportunities to strengthen skills needed to deeply analyze
a piece of text and its contents (Amos P. Godby High School, 2015c). The AVID program is a
college readiness system that is meant to accelerate student learning through research-based
methods of instruction, create meaningful and motivational professional learning, and act as a
catalyst for systemic reform and change (Amos P. Godby, 2015c). All of these initiatives are an
attempt to steer Godby students down a more meaningful and successful path in life. The entire
campus is dedicated to this mission.
Godby High School has limited to virtually no parental support. According to Dr. Thayer,
parents are not very involved in their students school lives and the only time parents really ever
become involved is when there is a behavioral or academic issue. But even though there is not
much support from parents the community provides an immense amount of support for Godby
students. According to Dr. Thayer, there are several volunteers from Americore that visit Godby
to help tutor students who are struggling with their academics. Dr. Thayer also informed me that
City Church does a lot of work with Godby. City Church donates supplies and coats for Godby
students who are in need. If students need a new backpack, a new binder, or a coat to keep warm

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then they are able to visit the supply and coat closet for all of their needs, free of charge. City
Church also donated a Thanksgiving dinner for students who were not fortunate to have one at
home with their family.
The student body has a unique culture. Several students come from lower social and
economic households. According to Dr. Thayer, there is also a lot of gang involvement on
campus, and although administration works hard to keep it off campus it is well known that
several students are still involved in gangs and gang activity outside of school. While at times
this can create a hostile or even dangerous environment, the students are relatively calm on a
daily basis. Students joke and play around in the hallways and, for the most part, are respectful of
one another. They act as a family; everyone knows everyone and everyone has each others
backs. I also believe the students at Godby have a real respect for teachers. The teachers I have
met are genuine and respectful and I think that earns them a lot of rapport with the students.
There are of course students who are kicked out of class for misbehaving or being disrespectful,
but I do not feel Godby has any more of an issue with this than other high schools I have seen.
Dr. Thayer states that most students dont have a stable household to go home to every night, so
she tries to make the classroom feel more like a family environment, or a safe haven. She
believes, along with several other teachers, that students should be allowed to be themselves and
be comfortable in their own skin, expressing themselves however they deem fit as long as that is
school appropriate. I think this type of attitude promotes a sense of respect, comfort, and
motivation in the students.

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Description of Teaching

Dr. Thayers classroom has a unique arrangement. As you walk through the door there is
a Promethean Board and two whiteboards to the right. Dr. Thayers desk is in the far corner and
is placed in a way that allows her to have constant view of all students in the classroom. On the
opposite end of the room, there is a third whiteboard that is often times used during class
discussion. The desks are divided down the middle, with four columns of three on the right side
and four columns of four on the left side. Each column is faced toward the center of the room,
which allows students to view both the whiteboards at the front of the classroom and the
whiteboard in the back of the classroom. This arrangement also allows Dr. Thayer and I to easily
maneuver our way back and forth throughout the classroom and to get to each students desk
when necessary. On the left side of the room there are three other whiteboards: the first has a
picture of a school map, the second has a daily agenda with a place to display objectives, and the
third has a full calendar displayed. On the right side of the room there are two bulletin boards:
one is for seniors to write where they will attend college at and the other displays tips for juniors
about college. My desk is placed in the farthest left corner of the room near the bookshelf. The
bookshelf contains several canonical texts, young adult literature texts, and other popular novels
for students to use for leisurely reading. The windows on the right side of the room allow for
natural light to enter the room, which helps the room feel more open and breathable. The room
arrangement encourages student interaction, teacher involvement, student success, and
organization.
This semester, Dr. Thayer and I are teaching all dual enrollment classes. We have a total
of five classes, all taking ENC 1102. The program is done through Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University, which is also located in Tallahassee, Florida. The students taking this

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ENC 1102 course also completed an ENC 1101 course last semester, Fall 2014, with Dr. Thayer.
The curriculum for ENC 1102 primarily focuses on writing about and analyzing different pieces
of literature. This semester, we are starting with short stories in January, drama during February,
reading the novel Unwind in March, and then finishing up in poetry for national poetry month.
Students will be completing a series of seven writing assignments: One diagnostic essay the first
week of class, two literary analyses papers, one research paper on the novel they are reading, one
in-class essay, and two essay exams. Students will be graded against rubrics for all writing
assignments and will also engage in peer reviews for each paper. At the end of the semester,
students are to turn in a writing portfolio that contains their pre-writing, rough drafts, peer review
draft, peer review feedback, and final draft for each paper. Students will also be graded on daily
participation and daily writing journals.
Dr. Thayer manages her classes in a very calm and collected way. She says that she wants
students to feel comfortable enough to be themselves when theyre around her. She draws firm
lines between jokes and disrespect but otherwise tries to keep the mood in the classroom light
and fun. She treats her students with respect and dignity, making sure she is always reassuring
them of how much faith she has in each and every one of them. The students not only respect
her, but also trust her. She has made personal connections with her students and I truly believe it
makes a world of difference in her classroom dynamics.
As Dr. Thayer is teaching she makes an effort to constantly move throughout the
classroom. It makes the room feel more connected and it helps facilitate whole-class
participation. Since the textbook is at a college level, the content itself is somewhat too heavy for
high school juniors and seniors. When Dr. Thayer is teaching from the textbook she makes sure
to pick out the key points from the texts to review and discuss in depth with students. This is not

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a process of watering down the content but rather is a way of translating the text from wordy
and tedious to direct and focused, which helps students retain the information better.
Dr. Thayer also tries to give her classes structure. Students will always have bell-work at
the beginning of class unless there is an in-class essay. This is a way of immediately focusing
students in on the lesson. In-class activities are student-focused and encourage class and peer
discussion as opposed to silent individual work. Dr. Thayer says she believes a healthy social
environment is ideal for learning. She allows students to make small talk in class and hardly ever
hassles students about talking. If she needs to bring the class back into focus she simply begins
talking and moves on with the lesson, which more often than not causes the class to refocus.
Dr. Thayer believes in a more hands-on approach in her classroom. She has her students
take notes when it is absolutely necessary and when it will benefit them the most. Otherwise, she
has her students take a more active part in learning the content. For example, she had students
take a few notes down on theme from the text. But afterwards, students spent a whole week
reading short stories, finding themes individually, discussing themes in groups, and discussing
themes as a class to reinforce the concepts they had learned through the notes.
My observation class is Dr. Thayers 3rd period class. There are twenty-two students in
3rd period, of which five are juniors and seventeen are seniors. Even though this is an ENC 1102
class just like any other class of Dr. Thayers, students in 3rd period seem to be a little bit more
advanced than the students in the other classes. They complete work faster than students in other
class periods, they write at higher levels of complexity than students in other classes, and they
typically have more in-depth discussions than students in other classes. Students in 3rd period are
also highly self-sufficient and dont require as much scaffolding as other classes. Since they are
so advanced, they oftentimes become bored if lessons are too systematic. They constantly need

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to be challenged and they enjoy different instructional methods. For example, they enjoy
individual work for a period of time, but after a while they like to do group work to change it up
a little bit. Since they are all close to the same academic level, they work really well with one
another. Group work is always productive and the collaboration really helps them understand the
material better. The students in 3rd period also get along very well. They are all friends with each
other and if there are any issues between students it is usually an issue with socializing. But for
the most part, they are a brilliant, hardworking, and motivated group of students.

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Context of Placement

On the left side of the classroom, Brandi sits in the first front row seat. She is social and
outgoing and enjoys group work. Individual work bores her. She is always eager to read aloud or
contribute to class discussion.
Summer sits behind Brandi. Summer has high levels of anxiety when it comes to grades.
She gives her full effort for even the smallest assignments. She enjoys being the group leader.
Dennise sits behind Summer. She is social and outgoing with her peers but does not like
to contribute to class discussion. She is a strong writer and enjoys individual work.
Janiya sits in the front of the following row. She is shy and timid and has a tendency to
become discouraged very easily. She wears her emotions on her sleeve and will often seek
advice or comfort from Dr. Thayer and I.
Taren has only been present for a few days during the first week of class. She was pulled
from school due to a personal problem. She is very shy but will contribute if she is confident of
her answer.
William, also known as Searcy, sits behind Taren. He is an awesome tennis player and
will be attending University of Central Florida next fall. He is always the first eager student to
contribute to class discussion.
Adam sits in the front of the following row. He is highly intelligent and will often
become bored with his work. He is constantly reading and will often read separate texts out of
our textbook while we are reading something else. We allow this if he has already read the texts
we read in class and can complete his work efficiently. We have to consistently remind him to
stay on task because he becomes distracted very easily.

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Ileana, also know as Ile, sits behind Adam. She is very timid and will often choose to
work on her own if given the choice between that and group work. She is also a strong writer.
Wesley sits behind Ile. He is best friends with Searcy and will often choose to work with
Searcy on group assignments. He is social in one-on-one conversation but is hesitant to
contribute to whole-class discussion.
Marcus sits in the front of the following row. He works extremely well with Adam. He is
social amongst his friends in between classes but he is shy during class. He will only contribute
to class discussion if you call on him. He is one of the strongest writers in the class.
Jacqueline, also known as Jackie, sits right behind Marcus. She is always asking
questions for clarification and sometimes needs a little more scaffolding than the rest of the class.
She really enjoys reading and is constantly reading in between assignments.
Khalid sits behind Jackie. He is very outgoing and as a result really enjoys group work.
He enjoys being the group leader that organizes everything and makes sure everyone is always
on task. He is also a very strong writer and really enjoys free writing.
On the right side of the room, Brendan sits in the first front row seat. He is an excellent
athlete and will be attending University of Miami for football. He is quiet but likes to participate
in class discussion. He will shut down very quickly if he is told he is wrong.
Cheyenne S. sits behind Brendan. She has a tendency to talk a lot in class, which is why
she is placed closest to the teachers desk. She likes to have debates in class during discussion.
Breze sits behind Cheyenne. It is hard for Breze to open up to new people she does not
know. But once she does she is kind and respectful. She is also a very hard worker and always
seems to go above and beyond on all of her assignments.

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Jacoby sits at the front of the next row. He keeps to himself for the most part, however,
he and Breze work quite well together. During group work he likes to lead discussion and offer
encouragement to the rest of his group members.
Cheyenne C. sits behind Jacoby. She is very good friends with Cheyenne S., which is
why they are so talkative in class. However, they work really well together in a group setting.
She always brings a positive energy into the room.
Adayjah sits in the front of the following row. Adayjah is outspoken and sassy. At first it
comes off as rude, but once I got to know her I realized that its just her spunky personality. She
is always trying to jump into group or class discussion, which shows her eagerness to learn.
Faith sits behind Adayjah. She gets severe anxiety if she has to speak in front of the rest
of the class. She is always in a good mood and enters the classroom with a warm smile and a
positive attitude.
Jonathan sits behind Faith. He is has an outgoing personality, which works out well
because he helps the shy students around him get involved. He is an effective group leader.
Bryce sits in the front of the following row. He plays tennis with Searcy and is hoping to
go to college for mechanical engineering with a focus in technical support for theater/film. He is
highly analytical and often needs to be challenged a little more than other students as a result.
Ayesha sits right behind Bryce. She is very social and as a result has to sit far from her
friends, Brandi and Dennise. But once she is separated from her social crowd she is productive
and motivated to learn. She doesnt always contribute to class discussion; however, it is easy to
see through her work that she works hard.

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Unit Rationale

During the 2015 spring semester, Dr. Thayers students are shifting from rhetoric and
creative writing to literary analysis. Since this ENC 1102 dual-enrollment class is geared towards
college curriculum, the majority of in-class time is spent reading and discussing selected texts
while all other time is dedicated to writing literary analyses on those texts. There are a series of
seven literary analysis papers due for this class between the months of January and April. All of
these papers require students to make an assertion about the theme of a selected text and pull out
textual evidence to support their assertion. Throughout the semester, students will be building on
their knowledge of theme and will be acquiring skills they need in order to write a successful
literary analysis critique on different genres of literature.
While finding theme may seem juvenile for twelfth and eleventh grade students taking a
dual-enrollment course, most of Dr. Thayers students find it challenging to trace themes in
literature. This unit will be a continuation of analyzing and tracing theme to ensure students are
mastering the concept of theme and are able to effectively draw inferences from a piece of text.
According to Peter Smagorinsky (2007), units should prepare students for future needs, such as
college or social needs (p. 145). Eleventh grade students will need to be able to draw inferences
about a text using textual evidence to support their inferences in order to pass the new state
examinations called the Florida Standardized Assessment (FSA). By practicing inference-making
skills repeatedly and in depth, students will be able to refine these skills and use them more
effectively on the FSA. Practicing these analytical skills through tracing theme and writing
literary analyses papers also prepares twelfth grade students for college. Even if they do not take
any other English or literature courses in college they will still need to be prepared to analyze
more complex texts, produce coherent and sophisticated writing, and think on a higher level.

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This particular unit will be taking place during the month of February, which is about a
month into the spring semester. Students will have already written two out of their seven papers.
They will have written an in-class diagnostic essay and a literary analysis on a selected short
story. In the month of February they are scheduled to write two literary analysis papers, one inclass essay for their midterm and one in-class/out-of-class literary critique of Arthur Millers
play Death of a Salesman. In January, students used story elements such as characterization,
values presented in the story, and conflicts to explore the themes in the short stories read in class.
During the month of February, students will not only be reading and discussing these same
elements in Death of a Salesman but they will also be learning how to use setting and
symbolism in literature to determine theme.
All unit plans should align with state standards and should mirror the desired skills within
those standards (Smagorinksy, 2007, p. 146). As with the essays students wrote before this unit,
the literary analysis essays for this unit will require students to pull textual evidence from the
novel to support their theme. Pulling textual evidence to support claims and citing original
sources aligns with several Language Arts Florida Standards (LAFS). Many of the LAFS reading
standards require students to analyze complex text, determine theme, and provide textual
support. These standards require that students use a wide range of story elements, such as setting
and symbolism, to determine a deeper meaning of the text. Students will also be undergoing an
extensive writing process in which they will outline, draft, peer review, revise, and compose a
final draft, all of which will go into a final writing portfolio at the end of the semester. This
writing process meets several LAFS writing standards that require students to write over
extended periods of time, revise and edit their own work, and provide evidence for their analysis
and reflection of the text.

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Arthur Millers play Death of a Salesman will be the focus text of this unit. Students will
start reading on February 5th and will finish by February 25th. Students will then be given till
March 4th to draft, peer review, revise, and edit their final literary analysis paper. Between
February 26th and March 4th, students will be given writing workshop days and in-class time to
work on their papers. During the month of February, students will engage in whole-class
readings/discussions, reenactment projects, extended group projects, characterization
assignments, and drawing comparisons and contrasts between reading the script in class and
watching the 1984 film version of the play. All of these activities will be geared towards finding
theme in Death of a Salesman and preparing students for their literary analysis paper.
Death of a Salesman has a Lexile score of 1320L, which is a little above the equivalent
for twelfth grade level text (MetaMetrics, 2015). Using a more complex text not only satisfies
the expectations and standards of FAMU for the dual-enrollment credit, but it also aligns with
the LAFS standards. Eleventh and twelfth grade students are expected to read grade-level and
even above grade-level texts before leaving high school. Death of a Salesman also deals with
several complex ideas and themes that are appropriate for students between the ages of sixteen
and eighteen years old. When picking materials for a unit plan, it is important to consider the
relevance a text will have to the student demographic (Smagorinsky, 2007, p. 145). This play
deals with issues within the family unit, primarily issues between parents and children. Several
of Dr. Thayers students face challenges at home with their parents or other family members.
These struggles can help students find the relevance in this text. This novel also brings up issues
of gender roles within the family unit and within society as a whole. Units that provide an
environment for students to openly discuss and explore social issues helps students understand
and make choices about the problems they face in their lives (Smagorinsky, 2007, p. 144). In

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Death of a Salesman students will be able to explore the struggle of the societal expectations
placed on each gender and how that relates to them or to people they know. Discussing these
social issues may also help students see the relevance in the novel, which may motivate students
to read and enjoy the play.
The final assessment for this unit will be the literary analysis paper students write using
literary elements as support for their assertion about a theme in Death of a Salesman. To measure
students growth of knowledge over the unit, I will be using their first literary analysis paper
(Paper One) they wrote in January as their pre-assessment and their second literary analysis
paper (Paper Two) for this unit as their post-assessment. The requirements for both papers are
exactly the same and the rubrics upon which they will be graded are specific and identical. The
only difference between the first and second paper is for the first students had to write about a
short story and now they will be writing about a play for the second. All other requirements will
be exactly the same. I will be looking at their adherence to correct grammar structures, MLA
formatting, and analysis of theme. Their grades on the second paper will reflect the progress, or
lack of progress, they have made from my further instruction on determining theme during the
month of February.

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Unit Standards

Eleventh and Twelfth Grade LA Florida Standards for Reading Literature


o Cluster One: Key Ideas and Details
o LAFS.1112.RL.1.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis
of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text,
including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
o LAFS.1112.RL.1.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and
analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact
and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective
summary of the text.
o LAFS.1112.RL.1.3: Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to
develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
o Cluster Three: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
o LAFS.1112.RL.3.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem,
evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
o Cluster Four: Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
o LAFS.1112.RL.4.10: By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature,
including stories, dramas and poems, in the grade 11-CCR text complexity band
proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. By the end of
grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at
the high end of the grade 11-CCR text complexity band independently and
proficiently.
Eleventh and Twelfth Grade Writing Standards

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o Cluster One: Text Types and Purposes


o LAFS.1112.W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey
complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the
effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information


so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a
unified whole; include formatting, graphics, and multimedia when useful
to aiding comprehension.

B. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and


relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples appropriate to the audiences knowledge of the
topic.

C. Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major
sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among
complex ideas and concepts.

E. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

F. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and


supports the information or explanation presented.

o Cluster Two: Production and Distribution of Writing


o LAFS.1112.W.2.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development,
organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

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o LAFS.1112.W.2.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,


revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing
what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
o LAFS.1112.W.2.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish,
and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback,
including new arguments or information.
o Cluster Three: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
o LAFS.1112.W.3.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and research.
o Cluster Four: Range of Writing
o LAFS.1112.W.4.10: Write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time
frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Eleventh and Twelfth Grade Speaking and Listening Standards
o Cluster One: Comprehension and Collaboration
o LAFS.1112.SL.1.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative
discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

A. Come to discussion prepared, having read and researched material


under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence
from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a
thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

22

B. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decisionmaking, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as
needed.

C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe


reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a
topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and
promote divergent and creative perspectives.

D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize claims, and


evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when
possible; and determine what additional information or research is
required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

o Cluster Two: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas


o LAFS.1112.SL.2.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence,
conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line
of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the
organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose,
audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
Eleventh and Twelfth Grade Language Standards
o Cluster One: Conventions of Standard English
o LAFS.1112.L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
o LAFS.1112.L.1.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

23
Unit Goals and Objectives

Students will be able to define and describe the setting of Death of a Salesman.
Students will be able to identify multiple symbols in Death of a Salesman.
Students will be able to interpret a theme in Death of a Salesman.
Students will be able to apply their knowledge of setting, symbolism, characterization,
conflict, and values to define a theme in Death of a Salesman.
Students will be able to design an aesthetically pleasing story-web that displays how they
traced the theme throughout Death of a Salesman.
Students will be able to reconstruct a scene from Death of a Salesman making it into a
modern adaptation of the original plot line.
Students will be able to analyze differences in film adaptations and the original play.
Students will be able to create a writing outline for their literary analysis paper.
Students will be able to develop a well-thought-out and coherent literary analysis paper
pertaining to theme in Death of a Salesman.
Students will be able to evaluate their peers writing through a peer review process.
Students will be able to critique their own writing through a revision process.
Students will be able to cite textual evidence using correct MLA format.
Students will be able to create a works cited page using correct MLA format.
Students will be able to utilize technology such as Goggle Docs and Office 365 to
develop, edit, and finalize the final draft for their literary analysis paper.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

24
Unit Pre-Assessment

Paper One: Analyzing Themes in Short Fiction


We have spent the majority of class time focusing on theme and how to find themes in texts. For
this paper, you will be asked to trace a theme throughout one short story by discussing and
analyzing how that theme is conveyed throughout the story.
Please choose ONE of the short stories below for the focus of your paper:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Story of an Hour, Kate Chopin


The Birthday Party, Katharine Brush
The Lesson, Toni Cade Bambara
Happy Endings, Margaret Atwood
A Jury of Her Peers, Susan Glaspell

Remember to re-read/review the text and deicide on what you think the main theme of the text
is. Make sure the theme is formulated into an assertionthis will become the thesis statement
for your paper. To determine where the theme is prevalent in the text, make sure you look at the
following:
v
v
v
v

Issues presented in the story


Values promoted or challenged in the text
Character descriptions, actions, and dialogue
Narrator description

Please note that you MUST have quotations from the text to support your ideas. These
quotations should be throughout your paper, and you must remember to properly CITE your
source (your source is the short story).
Length:

2 PAGES, TYPED DOUBLE SPACE

Formatting:

MLA Format: Heading, Title, In-Text Citations, Works Cited

Due Dates:
Peer Review:
Final Paper Due:

Friday, January 30th


Monday, February 2nd

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

25
Unit Post-Assessment

Paper Two: Analyzing Themes in Drama


For Paper One, we focused on tracing and analyzing themes throughout the short stories we read
in class. For Paper Two, you will be tracing and analyzing the theme again; however, this time
you will be tracing themes in drama. Over the month of February, we will be reading Arthur
Millers play Death of a Salesman. You must trace a theme within this play by discussing and
analyzing how that theme is portrayed throughout the play. Death of a Salesman is the only play
we are reading in class; therefore it is the only play you are permitted to write about for this
paper.
Remember to re-read/review the text and deicide on what you think the main theme of the text
is. Make sure the theme is formulated into an assertionthis will become the thesis statement
for your paper. To determine where the theme is prevalent in the text, make sure you look at the
following:
v
v
v
v
v
v

Issues presented in the story


Values promoted or challenged in the text
Character descriptions, actions, and dialogue
Narrator description
Setting
Symbolism

Please note that you MUST have quotations from the text to support your ideas. These quotations
should be throughout your paper, and you must remember to properly CITE your source. You
will only be inserting quotations from the play. No other outside sources may be used.
Length:

2 PAGES, TYPED, DOUBLE SPACED

Formatting:

MLA Format: Heading, Title, In-Text Citations, Works Cited

Peer Review:
Final Paper Due:

Due Dates:
Wednesday, March 4th
Friday, March 6th

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

26

Pre and Post-Assessment Grading Rubric


FORM
______/40
CONTENT

Authors name/short story title stated in introduction (5 Points)


Thesis statement clearly stated in introduction (10 Points)
Topic sentences clearly state the purpose of each body paragraph (15 Points)
The paper is free of major grammatical errors (10 Points)

Thesis statement is a specific assertion that guides the paper (10 Points)
Each body paragraph has textual evidence that effectively supports the topic of each
body paragraph (10 Points)
The writer connects the end of each body paragraph back to the thesis statement to
further explain the thesis (20 Points)
The writers explanations and analysis is well-thought and reflective (10 Points)
The paper has a correct heading and title (3 Points)
All textual evidence is correctly cited (3 Points)
Works Cited page is correct (4 Points)

______/50
FORMATTING
_____/10
TOTAL

COMMENTS:

______/100
Grading
Form:

2.5 points for authors name, 2.5 points for title.


5 points for thesis statement, 5 points for clarity and strength.
5 points for each topic sentence, 5 points for clarity and strength.
10 points for grammar. Minus 1 point per every two grammar mistakes.

Content:
5 points if the thesis is expressed as an assertion, 5 points if it reoccurs throughout the
rest of the paper. Minus 5 points if the thesis is not restated in the conclusion.
5 points per body paragraph that has relevant textual evidence. Minus 2 points per
irrelevant piece of textual evidence or incorrect textual evidence.
10 points per body paragraph that has 2-3 sentences of direct connection back to the
thesis. Minus 5 points per body paragraph if the connection is loosely stated or if there is
not enough connection made.
5 points per paragraph if the student includes clear, direct, and in-depth explanation and
analysis. Minus 2.5 points per paragraph that the student doesnt include explanation.
Minus 2.5 points per paragraph that the student doesnt include analysis.
Form:
3 points for correct title and heading. Minus 1 point per error, up to three points off of
the students overall grade.
3 points for correct in-text citations. Minus 1 point per two errors.
4 points for correct Works Cited page. Minus 1 point per error, up to four points off of
the students overall grade.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

27

Week One Lesson Plans

Class: ENC 1102 DUAL ENROLLMENT


Period: 1-6
Essential Question(s): What is the setting in a story and how do we use it to predict a theme?
Unit Standards:

Date: WEEK FIVE (2/2-2/6)

LAFS.1112.RL.1.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters
uncertain.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex
account; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.3: Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
LAFS.1112.W.2.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS.1112.RL.4.10: By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas and poems, in the grade 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end
of the range. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grade 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Students will be able to:

Compose two-page literary analysis of a selected short story.


Collaboratively plan a design for their group poster project.

Activity

Mon. 2/2

Tues. 2/3

Wed. 2/4

Thurs. 2/5

Fri. 2/6

Get Started
(openers)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

Writing Workshop (Entire


Class)

Writing Workshop (Entire Class)

Students will turn in Paper One


(5 Minutes)

PowerPoint Lesson on setting.


Students will take notes while I
explain the slides. (15 Minutes)

Continue reading Death of a


Salesman (30 Minutes)

Practice whole
class, groups,
alone

Students will work on


completing their essays.
(Entire Class)

Students will work on completing


their essays. (Entire Class)

We will review the Paper Two


assignment sheet as a class.
(20 Minutes)

Begin reading Death of a


Salesman (20 Minutes)

Introduce group project. Display


directions on the overhead.
Students will get into their assigned
groups, and learn about their
assigned roles. I will discuss the
brief outline of the project. (10 Min.)

Evaluate Understanding

I will walk around and answer


any and all questions. (Entire
Class)

I will walk around and answer any


and all questions. (Entire Class)

I will walk around and check for


understanding. (Rest of the
Class Period)

Students will discuss the


significance of setting in the
beginning of the play. (7
Minutes)

I will walk around and check for


understanding.

Closing Activities
and Homework

Reminder: Paper One is due


Wednesday 2/4. (3 Minutes)

Reminder: Paper One is due


tomorrow, Wednesday 2/4. (3
Minutes)

Make sure all papers are turned


in. (2 Minutes)

Return books. (3 Minutes)

Return all materials used for the


project. Place posters in a pile at the
front of the room. (5 Minutes)

Engage, Explore,
and Explain

Accommodations

Students who need extra time or multiple days to complete assignments will be accommodated with an appropriate time extension. Students needing preferential seating will be
placed up front and away from distracting stimuli. Students who with attention disabilities will be cued to stay on task and will be encouraged to use self-advocacy skills.

References: Miller, A. (1949). Death of a salesman. In E.V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An introduction to reading and writing. (1182-1244). Boston, MA: Pearson Education.
Appendix A: Paper Two Assignment Sheet (Unit Post-Test), Grading Rubric, PowerPoint on Setting, Group Project Directions

Note: Week Five mentioned in the lesson plan reflects the specific week within the 3rd nine
weeks grading period.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

28
Appendix A

Paper Two: Analyzing Theme in Drama (UNIT POST-ASSESSMENT)


For Paper One, we focused on tracing and analyzing themes throughout the short stories we read
in class. For Paper Two, you will be tracing and analyzing the theme again; however, this time
you will be tracing themes in drama. Over the month of February, we will be reading Arthur
Millers play Death of a Salesman. You must trace a theme within this play by discussing and
analyzing how that theme is portrayed throughout the play. Death of a Salesman is the only
play we are reading in class; therefore it is the only play you are permitted to write about for
this paper.
Remember to re-read/review the text and deicide on what you think the main theme of the text
is. Make sure the theme is formulated into an assertionthis will become the thesis statement
for your paper. To determine where the theme is prevalent in the text, make sure you look at the
following:
v
v
v
v

Issues presented in the story


Values promoted or challenged in the text
Character descriptions, actions, and dialogue
Narrator description

Please note that you MUST have quotations from the text to support your ideas. These quotations
should be throughout your paper, and you must remember to properly CITE your source. You
will only be inserting quotations from the play. No other outside sources may be used.
Length:

2 PAGES, TYPED, DOUBLE SPACED

Formatting:

MLA Format: Heading, Title, In-Text Citations, Works Cited

Peer Review:
Final Paper Due:

Due Dates:
Wednesday, 3/4/15
Friday, 3/6/15

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

29
2/22/15%

PowerPoint on Setting

What is Setting?
! Setting:
! The natural, political, cultural, and historical environment,
including everything characters know and own.
! Look at how time, place, and property affect characters

! Types:

Setting
ENC 1102Spring 2015

! Public vs. Private


! Analyze how characters act in different environments.

! Outdoor places and/or conditions


! Time of day, seasons, weather. Influence mood and tone.

! Cultural and historical circumstances


! Culture and time period can explain character actions.

Literary Uses of Setting


! Analyzing an authors uses of setting can reinforce
elements of character and theme.
! Realism and Credibility
! Using places and objects from every day life make a story more
believable.

! Highlight Qualities of Characters


! The influence of place, circumstances, and time on human growth
and change
! Example: Sylvia changes once she is taken into a different
environment. The change in setting causes a change in attitude.

Literary Uses of Setting cont.


! Settings may be Symbolic
! Highlighted scenes and materials may be symbols for ideas
! Example: The bird cage in A Jury of Her Peers could
symbolize entrapment.

! Creates an Atmosphere and Mood


! Descriptions of colors, smells, sounds, and sights.

! Highlight Irony
! May establish expectations opposite of what occurs
! Example: In A Jury of Her Peers the men overlook the kitchen
as a crime scene because it is filled with little women things.
This is ironic because its where all the evidence is at.

1%

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

st

30
Group Project Directions

Group Poster 1 Period


Group One:
1. Priscilla C. Setting
2. Nija J. Symbolism
3. Tamera H. Values
4. Arlyesia T. Conflicts
5. Sharekah S. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Two:
1. Otia N. Setting
2. Elexus A. Symbolism
3. Karesha H. Values
4. Laterrica W. Conflicts
5. Quondarius W. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Three:
1. Jaiya W. Setting
2. Telisa E. Symbolism
3. Charisma J. Values
4. Nykhala M. Conflicts
5. Kenny B.: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Four:
1. James L. Setting
2. Tolu O. Symbolism
3. Marquan C. Values
4. Alexis P. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Five:
1. Michaela K. Setting
2. Savannah B. Symbolism
3. Takia B. Values
4. Jerald J. Conflicts
5. Roberto B. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Poster Assignment 2nd Period
Group One:
1. Zyrterica G. Setting
2. Chelsea F. Symbolism
3. Quandarius P. Values
4. Alexis T. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

Group Two:
1. Brittany F. Setting
2. Javanie R. Symbolism
3. Jaylon B. Values
4. Cole A. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Three:
1. Jordan G. Setting
2. Ericka B. Symbolism
3. Jamiel C. Values
4. Mathew B. Conflicts
5. Natasha W. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Four:
1. Trey Ellis Setting
2. Alesia T. Symbolism
3. Aaron C. Values
4. Serenity W. Conflicts
5. Carmen C. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Five:
1. Bryce B. Setting
2. Michah L. Symbolism
3. Aaron W. Values
4. Eddie W. Conflicts
5. Bryant K. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Poster Assignment 3rd Period
Group One:
1. Marcus L. Setting
2. Adam C. Symbolism
3. Jonathan L. Values
4. Cheyenne S. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Two:
1. Brendan L. Setting
2. Ayesha B. Symbolism
3. Adayjah A. Values
4. Taren G. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)

31

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE


Group Three:
1. Brandi B. Setting
2. Wesley W. Symbolism
3. Cheyenne C. Values
4. Dennise S. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Four:
1. Ileana V. Setting
2. Breze G. Symbolism
3. Faith E. Values
4. Janiyah P. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Five:
1. Searcy H. Setting
2. Bryce C. Symbolism
3. Khalid E. Values
4. Jacoby W. Conflicts
5. Summer H. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Poster Assignment 5th Period
Group One:
1. Kristopher C. Setting
2. Jordan L. Symbolism
3. Kyaira B. Values
4. Kristopher C. Conflicts
5. Genesis R. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Two:
1. Jennifer S. Setting
2. Justyce J. Symbolism
3. Alex R. Values
4. Rashonda M. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Three:
1. Hasani M. Setting
2. Alexis N. Symbolism
3. Jamaria K. Values
4. Alexius S. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)

32

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE


Group Four:
1. William B. Setting
2. Shannon B. Symbolism
3. Alonzo G. Values
4. Tiara E. Conflicts
5. Casey W. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Five:
1. William R. Setting
2. Loften W. Symbolism
3. Alyson B. Values
4. Savannah C. Conflicts
5. Kristopher D. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Poster Assignment 6th Period
Group One:
1. Shaveze B. Setting
2. Shani C. Symbolism
3. Shazia B. Values
4. Yamani B. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Two:
1. Shannon M. Setting
2. Shadi E. Symbolism
3. Cole C. Values
4. Breanna B. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities: Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Three:
1. Christian D. Setting
2. Dejour G. Symbolism
3. Rayunna C. Values
4. Jyquonna W. Conflicts
5. Group Responsibilities Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)
Group Four:
1. Segundo S. Setting
2. Ruth C. Symbolism
3. Kyra J. Values
4. Devan V. Conflicts
5. Marissa G. Characterization (Dialogue and Actions)

33

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

34

Assignment Directions:
We have been discussing how to trace theme throughout a text. We have analyzed issues, values,
characterization, setting, and symbolism, in relation to theme. For this assignment you will be
analyzing the theme of Death of a Salesman by tracing these different elements throughout the
story.
1. You will all be put into groups of either four or five.
2. You will each be assigned a specific roll within your groups. You will responsible for
tracing one of the elements listed above (Groups of four will trace a fifth element
together).
3. For each element you must provide textual evidence and analysis for that textual
evidence.
4. You must use in-text citations for textual evidence.
5. Each group will create a poster, which must be in the format of a story web (example
below). You can get as creative as you want as long as it is in the general format of a
web.
6. The group with the most creative poster will receive extra credit points on Paper 2.

Symbolism
Setting

Theme

Values

Characterization

Conflicts

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

35
Week Two Lesson Plans

Class: ENC 1102: Dual Enrollment


Period: 1-6
Teacher: DR. THAYER/ MS. POPKIN
Date: WEEK SIX (2/9-2/13)
Essential Question(s): How do we identify symbolism within a text and how do we use symbolism to find theme?
Unit Standards:

LAFS.1112.RL.1.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters
uncertain.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex
account; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.3: Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
LAFS.1112.W.4.10: Write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
LAFS.1112.W.2.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Students will be able to:

Define characteristics of each main character from Death of a Salesman

Define what a symbol is in literature and the reasons why authors use them.

Rewrite a scene from the script of Death of a Salesman as a modern adaptation.

Prepare a performance for their rewritten scene.


Activity

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

Get Started
(openers)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

Recap Death of a Salesman


from last week. Review which
characters have been
presented in the story so far.
Display directions for activity
on the board. (5 Minutes)

PowerPoint lesson on symbolism.


Students will take notes while I
explain the slides. (15 Minutes)

Recap symbolism and the


storyline of Death of a
Salesman so far. (5 Minutes)

Continue reading Death of a


Salesman aloud as a class.
Explain reenactment activity
and display directions on the
board. (15 Minutes)

Continue reading Death of a


Salesman aloud as a class. (10
Minutes)

Practice whole
class, groups,
alone

Students will work together in


small groups to decide which
real-life celebrity each
character from D.O.S would
represent based on
characterization. (25 Minutes)

Continue reading Death of a


Salesman aloud as a class. (25
Minutes)

Continue reading Death of a


Salesman aloud as a class. (35
Minutes)

I will show students the scenes


they can choose from. We will
review the scenes as a class
and then they will rewrite them
in their groups. (20 Minutes)

Students will get back into their


groups from yesterday to put the
finishing touches on the
reenactment of their chosen scene.
(20 Minutes)

Evaluate Understanding

I will walk around the room to


check for understanding.
(Entire Class Period)

Stop periodically to discuss the text.


I will ask students to discuss any
possible symbolism seen so far.

Stop periodically to discuss the


text. I will evaluate students
understanding through
discussion.

I will walk around the room to


check for understanding,
answering any and all
questions.

Students will perform their


reenactment for the rest of the
class. I will evaluate performances
to check for understanding of the
scenes. (10 Minutes)

Closing Activities
and Homework

Students will share their


celebrity selections and
explain their reasoning. Turn in
papers for a grade. (15
Minutes)

Return books. (5 Minutes)

Return books. (5 Minutes)

Return books. (5 Minutes)

Finish performances, turn in written


portion of the assignment, and
return books. (5 Minutes)

Accommodations

Students who need extra time or multiple days to complete assignments will be accommodated with an appropriate time extension. Students needing preferential seating will be
placed up front and away from distracting stimuli. Students who with attention disabilities will be cued to stay on task and will be encouraged to use self-advocacy skills.

Engage, Explore,
and Explain

Citations: Miller, A. (1949). Death of a salesman. In E.V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An introduction to reading and writing. (1182-1244). Boston, MA: Pearson Education.
Appendix B: Character Celebrity Activity Directions Sheet, PowerPoint on Symbolism, Reenactment Activity Directions Sheet.

Note: Week Six mentioned in the lesson plan reflects the specific week within the 3rd nine
weeks grading period.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

36
Appendix B
Character Celebrity Activity

So far we have been introduced to four characters from Death of a Salesman.


Willy Loman
Linda Loman
Biff Loman
Happy Loman
For this activity pretend you are casting actors for either a live play or a theatrical film of Death
of a Salesman. Match these characters to celebrity actors based on their characteristics and the
characteristics of different celebrities. When defining the characteristics of the characters make
sure to identify where these characteristics can be found in the text (AKA use textual evidence).
Character
Willy Loman
Linda Loman
Biff Loman
Happy Loman

Characteristics

Celebrity Actors

Characteristics

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

37
PowerPoint on Symbols

2/22/15%

SYMBOLS

SYMBOLISM

ENC 1102
SPRING 2015

! Symbols- Create a connection between (1) an object,


scene, character, or action and (2) ideas, values, people,
or ways of life.
! Symbols signify several levels of meaning.
! Ex: Our flag symbolizes our nation "
! Our nation represents freedom, democracy, independence "
! These ideas represent the freedom of speech, freedom of
religion, etc.
! Our flag embodies all of the ideas, values, and principles of our
nation.

T YPES OF SYMBOLS
! Cultural Symbols
! Universally recognized and popular across all genres.
! Examples: Water symbolizes life. Fire symbolizes anger. Night
symbolizes darkness.

! Contextual Symbols
! Specific to an individual piece of work due to circumstances.
! Also known as private symbols
! Example: The open window in The Story of an Hour. It only
symbolizes freedom in this story due to the circumstances.

HOW TO DETERMINE SYMBOLS


!Judge the importance the authors gives an object
!Does it play a major role in the story?
!Does it constantly reappear throughout the story?
!Is there a lot of action revolving around it?
!Do the characters have a connection with it?
!Does it provoke emotion?
! Symbols represent the bigger ideas that are usually
present in the theme.

1%

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

38
Reenactment Activity Directions

Table 1

Choose one of the following scenes:


Option 1
Pg. 1194 1196
Lines: 319 - 358

Option 2
Pg. 1200 1201
Lines: 511- 557

Summary:
Willy is speaking with Linda
when he starts reminiscing
about The Woman. This is the
first time we are introduced to
The Woman.

Summary:
This scene takes place in
Willys imagination. Willy
starts trying to impress his
brother, Uncle Ben, with his
sons masculinities and his
own job.

Number of Actors:
Three: Willy, Linda, and The
Woman.

Number of Actors:
Six: Willy, Linda, Biff, Ben,
Happy, and Charley.

2. Rewrite the lines in modern language. You can use slang AS


LONG AS ITS APPROPRIATE! You can get creative with this
(Ex: Make it into a Tyler Perry Movie, you can make all of the
actors British, put a Rastafarian spin on it, make it into a musical,
etc.)
3. Perform for the class on Friday 2/13. Everyone must participate
J Best performance gets a surprise!

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

39
Week Three Lesson Plans

Class: ENC 1102 DUAL ENROLLMENT


Essential Question(s): What is a theme in Death of a Salesman?
Unit Standards:

Period: 1-6

Date: WEEK SEVEN (2/16-2/20)

LAFS.1112.RL.1.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex
account; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.RL.3.7: Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama or poem, evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
LAFS.1112. SL.1.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly
and persuasively.
LAFS.1112.SL.2.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are
addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
Students will be able to:

Design an organized and detailed group poster board.


Interpret the theme of Death of a Salesman
Compare and contrast the film adaptation of Death of a Salesman to the actual play itself.

Activity

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

Juniors will report to the media


center for FSA practice testing.
The rest of the school will be on
st rd
a block schedule. 1 -3 period.

Juniors will report to the media


center for FSA practice testing.
The rest of the school will be
th th
on a block schedule. 4 -6
period.

Recap the storyline of Death of a


Salesman so far. Continue reading
D.O.S aloud. (20 Minutes)

Finish reading Death of a


Salesman. Discuss the ending
of the play. (20 Minutes)

Show movie clips from the film


version of Death of a
Salesman. Students will follow
along in their books. (85
Minutes)

Show movie clips from the film


version of Death of a
Salesman. Students will follow
along in their books. (85
Minutes)

Students will get back into groups


and put finishing touches on group
assignment. (25 Minutes)

Practice whole
class, groups,
alone

Students will separate themselves


into groups and continue working
on the group project. They will
begin piecing their project
together. (20 Minutes)

Students will separate


themselves into groups and
continue working on the group
project. They will finish their
group posters. (20 Minutes)

Discuss how different


adaptations have different
affects on the storyline and our
interpretations of the overall
meaning. (Throughout Movie)

Discuss how different


adaptations have different
affects on the storyline and our
interpretations of the overall
meaning. (Throughout Movie)

Each group will present their group


poster. They will explain their theme
and explain the story element they
were responsible for. (15 Minutes)

Evaluate Understanding

I will walk around the room and


check for understanding,
answering any and all questions.

I will walk around the room and


check for understanding,
answering any and all
questions.

I will check for understanding


during class discussion.

I will check for understanding


during class discussion.

I will check for understanding during


group presentations.

Closing Activities
and Homework

Return books and all crafting


materials from the group project.
(5 Minutes)

Return books and all crafting


materials from the group project.
(5 Minutes)

Return books. (5 Minutes)

Return books. (5 Minutes)

I will pass out the outline handout


for Paper Two. Ask students to
return it completed on 2/23 for a
grade. Pass out Midterm study
guide. (5 Minutes)

Get Started
(openers)

Engage, Explore,
and Explain

Accommodations

Students who need extra time or multiple days to complete assignments will be accommodated with an appropriate time extension. Students needing preferential seating will be
placed up front and away from distracting stimuli. Students who with attention disabilities will be cued to stay on task and will be encouraged to use self-advocacy skills.

Citations: Miller, A. (1949). Death of a salesman. In E.V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An introduction to reading and writing. (1182-1244). Boston, MA: Pearson Education.
Schlndorff, V. (1986). Death of a salesman. [Video File]. Retrieved from http://www.hulu.com/watch/355302
Appendix C: Midterm Study Guide, Paper Two Outline, Presentation Grading Rubric

Note: Week Seven mentioned in the lesson plan reflects the specific week within the 3rd nine
weeks grading period.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

40
Appendix C

Midterm Study Guide


ENC 1102







Midterm Exam: Study Guide
***You can receive up to 10 points on your midterm if you turn in this study guide on
the day of the exam with all questions answered correctly and a full outline your
essay.***

1. The theme of a story is the
________________________________________________________________________ and we express
theme as a(n) ___________________________________________________.
2. Values are____________________________________________________________________________________
and we use them to find the theme of a story.
3. When characterizing the characters of a story we look at three things:
1. ____________________________________________________________________
2. ____________________________________________________________________
3. ____________________________________________________________________
4. When analyzing the values represented in a character we look at three things:
1. ____________________________________________________________________
2. ____________________________________________________________________
3. ____________________________________________________________________
5. The setting of a story includes
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________.
6. How do authors use setting to create an impact on the overall meaning of their
story?



7. What is a symbol and how do authors use symbols build themes in their stories?

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

41


8. ESSAY: Compare and contrast similar themes found in at least two separate texts.
Introduction: Introduce both texts, introduce a main idea, and state the theme
as the thesis.
Body Paragraph One: Compare/Contrast a single story element (setting, values,
conflicts, characterization, symbolism) in each the texts. Explain how this
element in both texts contributes to the theme.
Body Paragraph Two: Compare/Contrast a second story element in each of the
texts. Explain how this element contributes to the common theme in both texts.
Conclusion: Recap main ideas and thesis. Analyze the importance/significance
of the theme.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

42
Paper Two Outline

Play Title:
Author:
Introduction
2-3 Sentence Summary of Story:

*Thesis Statement (focus on theme):

Body Paragraph One


Topic Sentence (should focus on analysis/not summary):

Quotations for support (include page numbers):

Analysis/Connection Back to Theme (this should be the majority of your paragraph):

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

43
Body Paragraph Two

Topic Sentence (should focus on analysis/not summary):

Quotations for support (include page numbers):

Analysis/Connection Back to Theme (this should be the majority of your paragraph):

Conclusion
Rephrase and restate thesis (do not copy and paste):

Discuss the overall significance of this theme. (Why does the author want the reader to better
understand this theme? What is the author saying about life/society/the world?)

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

44
Presentation Grading Rubric

Group Rubric
Group Member Names:
Period:

Completion

Organization

Presentation

Total Points

____ All six parts were included on the storyboard


____ Five parts were included on the storyboard
____ Four parts or less were included on the storyboard
____ Points/ 18 Points
____ Storyboard was legible, comprehensible, and followed example web format
____ Storyboard was legible and comprehensible but did not follow example web format
____ Storyboard was not legible, comprehensible, and did not follow example web format
____ Points/ 6 Points
____ Students spoke clearly, discussed each of the six parts, and maintained time limit
____ Students spoke clearly but failed to discuss each part or meet time limit
____ Students were difficult to understand but discussed each part and met time limit
____ Students spoke clearly, discussed each of the parts, but didnt maintain time limit
____ Points/ 6 Points
_____POINTS/ 30 POINTS TOTAL

Comments

Individual Rubric
Student Name:
Period:
Completion

Textual Evidence
Total Points
Comments

_____ Student traced assigned element in-depth and met length requirement
_____ Student traced assigned element at a surface level but met the length requirement
_____ Student traced assigned element at a surface level but meet the length requirement
_____ Points/ 10 Points
_____ Student provides textual evidence to support analysis
_____ Student does not provide textual evidence to support analysis
_____ Points/ 10 Points
_____ POINTS/ 20 POINTS TOTAL

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45
Week Four Lesson Plans

Class: ENC 1102: Dual Enrollment


Period: 1-6
Teacher: DR. THAYER/ MS. POPKIN
Date: WEEK EIGHT (2/23-2/27)
Essential Question(s): What is a theme that can be identified in Death of a Salesman?
Unit Standards:

LAFS.1112.RL.1.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex
account; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.3: Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
LAFS.1112.W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
LAFS.1112.W.2.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS.1112.W.2.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
LAFS.1112.W.3.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.1112.L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
LAFS.1112.L.1.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuations, and spelling when writing.
Students will be able to:

Create an outline for Paper Two.

Define thesis statement, topic sentences, and textual evidence in sample texts.

Compose an introduction and two body paragraphs for Paper Two.


Activity

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

BELL RINGER I will walk


around and check students
outlines. (10 Minutes)

I will hand out the exam at the bell. I


will explain the directions and give
students a chance to ask for
clarification. (5 Minutes

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER I will walk


around the room and check
students introduction and body
paragraphs. (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER I will walk


around the room and check their
second body paragraph. (10
Minutes)

Students will finish up


presenting their group projects.
We will discuss the different
themes they traced throughout
Death of a Salesman (15
Minutes)

Students will work silently and


individually on the midterm exam.
(50 Minutes)

I will review common areas of


improvement seen in Paper One
that students will need to work
on in Paper Two. (3 Minutes)

I will give students directions for


the highlighting writing workshop.
(5 Minutes)

Students will collect a laptop


computer to continue working on
their paper. (5 Minutes)

Practice whole
class, groups,
alone

We will review the study guide


as a class and then students
will work on the study guide.
(25 Minutes)

Students will have the entire class


period to finish the exam. If they
finish early they are to turn it in and
silently read.

Students will work quietly, using


their outline to begin the
introduction paragraph and first
body paragraph for Paper Two.
(40 Minutes)

Students will work in groups to


highlight the thesis statement,
textual evidence, and analysis in
two different model texts. (35
Minutes)

Students will work quietly on their


rough drafts through Office365.
(35 Minutes)

Evaluate Understanding

I will walk around the room


answering any and all
questions students have about
the midterm.

I will monitor the room to make sure


students are on task.

I will walk around the room


answering any and all
questions.

I will walk around the room,


helping students and answering
any questions. I will collect the
highlighting activity at the end.

I will walk around the room and


provide one-on-one help and
feedback to students who need it.

Closing Activities
and Homework

Remind students to study for


the midterm tomorrow. (5
Minutes)

Students will staple their study


guide to their exam and I will collect
both for a grade. Study guide will be
extra credit. (As the bell rings)

I will remind students that their


introduction paragraph and first
body paragraph are due at the
beginning of class tomorrow. (2
Minutes)

Remind students that their


second body paragraph is due
tomorrow. Put away laptops. (5
Minutes)

Remind students they will need a


full rough draft by Monday for the
peer review. Put away laptops. (5
Minutes)

Get Started
(openers)

Engage, Explore,
and Explain

Accommodations

Students who need extra time or multiple days to complete assignments/tests will be accommodated with an appropriate time extension. Students needing preferential seating will
be placed up front and away from distracting stimuli. Students who with attention disabilities will be cued to stay on task and will be encouraged to use self-advocacy skills.

Citations: Miller, A. (1949). Death of a salesman. In E.V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An introduction to reading and writing. (1182-1244). Boston, MA: Pearson Education.
Appendix D: Midterm Test, Highlighting Activity Directions Sheet, Highlighting Workshop Model Text Handout

Note: Week Eight mentioned in the lesson plan reflects the specific week within the 3rd nine
weeks grading period.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

46
Appendix D
Midterm Test

NAME:
I.

ENC 1102: Midterm Exam

Short Answer: Answer the following questions in 4-5 complete sentences.

1. Describe a symbol used in at least one of the texts read in class and explain its significance.
(10 POINTS)

2. Describe the impact of setting in at least one of the texts read in class. Why is the setting the
setting significant? (10 Points)

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

47

3. Describe the traits of at least two characters from one of the texts read in class. Explain how
these characters contribute to the theme of the story. (10 POINTS)

4. Using one of the texts read in class, explain at least two values presented in the text. Explain
whether those values were promoted and/or challenged and how they contributed to the theme of
the text. (10 POINTS)

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

48

Table 1

Essay: In a complete essay, answer the following question completely. You


must have a thesis statement, and you must use examples from the text to
support your points. You DO NOT need quotations, but you will need to
summarize parts of the text for your support.
TOTAL: 60 POINTS

Prompt:
In this class so far, we have discussed numerous themes including the role of women, the role of
men, marriage, and equality. For this essay, you need to compare/contrast similar themes found
in at least two texts read for class. You must use examples from the text to support your
points, but you do not need to quote.
List of texts read:
Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin
The Birthday Party by Katherine Brush
The Lesson by Toni Cade Bambara
Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood
A Jury of Her Peers by Susan Glaspell
Girl by Jamaica Kincaid
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

49
Highlighting Activity Directions

Highlighting Activity:
On average, most students struggled with the following on Paper One:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Creating clear thesis statements


Creating effective topic sentences
Pulling significant textual evidence
Analysis of the textual evidence that connects back to thesis.

Read through the two example texts with your groups and highlight the following in the
corresponding colors:
THESIS STATEMENT:

YELLOW/ORANGE

TOPIC SENTENCES:

GREEN/BLUE

TEXTUAL EVIDENCE:

PINK/PURPLE

CONNECTION TO THESIS:

YELLOW/ORANGE

Use the colors to determine the areas in which each text needs improvement.
Once you highlight your quotes, then go through and make sure that you have signal phrases
before your quotations. These signal phrases must introduce who is being quoted. Also, for
each source, you must cite it. This means that at the end of that quotation, you will put the
authors last name and the page or paragraph number in the parenthesis).
EX: Bob Smith, professor at Rutgers University who studies the effects of drinking and
driving, believes, one of the primary reasons drinking and driving has remained such an
issue is because the law is too forgiving of drunk drivers (Smith par. 12).

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

50

Highlighting Activity Model Text Handout


EXAMPLE 1:
For women, the 19th century was a time of inequality, oppression, and inferiority
to their male counterparts. A womans social standing depended solely on her marital
status. For these reasons many women were forced to lead a life of solitude and
emotional inadequacy, often causing depression. In Kate Chopins short story The
Story of an Hour, setting plays a significant role in illustrating the bittersweet triumph of
Mrs. Mallards escape from oppression at the ironic cost of her life. Chopin is trying to
show that there was ultimately no way for women to escape the suppression they were
under from men.
Chopin sets the story in the springtime to represent a time of new life and rebirth,
which mirrors Louises discovery of her freedom. Louise immediately takes herself to a
room where, facing the window [sat] a comfortable, roomy armchair (Chopin 470). The
news of her husbands death leaves her feeling lost and confused, seeking answers
about her future. In her husbands lifetime, she was pressed down by a physical
exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach to her soul, but once left alone
to gaze out of the open window and to observe the patches of blue sky showing here
and there through the clouds, she recognizes freedom for the first time (Chopin 470).
Getting a glimpse of her life with an absolute and fresh freedom gives her the strength
to abandon a life of solitude. Just as springtime is a fresh beginning to a new year,
Louises discovery of sovereignty is a hopeful promise to a new life. While the
springtime represents a new beginning in Mrs. Mallards life it also highlights an irony
within the story because ultimately she dies at the end of the story. Her immediate
death upon her seemingly new found freedom is Chopins way of showing her readers
that women could not escape oppression felt by men.
EXAMPLE 2:
The Story of an Hour is a short story written by Kate Chopin in 1896. This story
depicts a single hour in Mrs. Mallard life, in which the lady who has a weak heart
experiences the momentary joy of freedom after hearing that her husband has been
killed in a railroad accident. She discovers her husband was not involved in any
accident and is still alive and as a result she dies of a broken heart. Kate Chopin is
attempting to convey the way marriages made women feel entrapped underneath the
control of their husbands in the late 1800s.
Mrs. Mallard initial reaction, upon hearing of her husband death, is not far from
what readers expect: she is deeply grieved, weeps and wants to be left alone. However,
during the hour she spends alone in her room, her state of mind changes dramatically.
Sitting in the armchair motionlessly, she sees spring trees from the open window, smells
pure air after the gentle rain, hears a faint but pleasant song, even the patched clouds
outside seem to be dispersing decently in the warm and powerful sunshine eventually.
Initially, she fails to fully comprehend the mysterious yet promising beginning to her new
life, but soon welcomes it as, she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open
window (Chopin 471). All these features imply that a subconscious wish in her heart is
quietly but quickly expanding.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

51
Week Five Lesson Plans

Class: ENC 1102 DUAL ENROLLMENT


Teacher: DR. THAYER/ MS. POPKIN

Period: 1-6
Date: WEEK 9 (3/2-3/6)

Essential Question(s): How can we trace a theme throughout Death of a Salesman using setting and symbolism?
Unit Standards:

LAFS.1112.RL.1.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.2: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact on one another to produce a complex account;
provide and objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.3: Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama.
LAFS.1112.W.2.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS. 1112.W.2.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
Students will be able to:

Evaluate each others essays.

Revise their personal work after the peer review process.

Prepare final draft of Paper Two on the computer to turn in.


Activity

Mon. 3/2

Tues. 3/3

Wed. 3/4

Thurs. 3/5

Fri. 3/6

Get Started
(openers)

BELL RINGER I will walk


around and check that
students have their second
body paragraph for their rough
draft (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

BELL RINGER. I will hand


back peer reviewed draft. (10
Minutes)

BELL RINGER (10 Minutes)

Writing workshop (40 Minutes).

Students will turn in Paper Two (5


Minutes).

Engage, Explore,
and Explain

Writing workshop (40 Minutes).

Writing workshop (40 Minutes).

I will hand out the peer review


rubrics and explain to students
that they are to get with a
partner and review each others
essays based on the rubric (5
Minutes).

Practice whole
class, groups,
alone

Students will work on


completing their essays (whole
class period).

Students will work on completing


their essays (whole class period).

Students will peer review each


others essays, making
comments throughout their
partners paper (35 Minutes).

Students will work on making


the corrections from peer
review and finishing up the
final draft of Paper Two (whole
class period).

We will review Paper Three


assignment sheet as a class (20
Minutes.

Evaluate Understanding

I will walk around answering


any and all questions.

I will walk around answering any


and all questions.

I will walk around answering any


and all questions. I will review
peer reviewed drafts to estimate
where students are in the writing
process.

I will walk around the room and


answer any and all questions.

I will walk around the room and


check for understanding (Rest of the
class period).

Closing Activities
and Homework

Reminder: Peer Review is


Wednesday and Paper Two is
due Friday 3/6 (5 Minutes)

I will remind students that full rough


draft is due for Peer Review
tomorrow (5 Minutes).

Students will put away laptops


and I will remind them that their
final writing day is tomorrow.
Collect peer reviewed drafts.(5
Minutes).

Reminder: Paper Two is due at


the beginning of class
tomorrow (5 Minutes).

Make sure all papers are turned in


(2 Minutes).

Accommodations

Students who need extra time or multiple days to complete assignments/tests will be accommodated with an appropriate time extension. Students needing preferential seating will
be placed up front and away from distracting stimuli. Students who with attention disabilities will be cued to stay on task and will be encouraged to use self-advocacy skills.

Citations: None
Appendix E: None

Note: Week Nine mentioned in the lesson plan reflects the specific week within the 3rd nine
weeks grading period.

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

52
Gains Chart

Student Name
Jackie
Adayjah
Ayesha
Brandi
Adam
Bryce
Cheyenne C.
Faith
Khalid
Breze
Taren
Summer
William
Jonathan
Marcus
Janiyah
Cheyenne S.
Illeana
Wesley
Jacoby
Brendan
Dennise

Pre-Assessment (Out of 100


Points)
47
54
86
83
90
71
83
63
83
85
73
89
75
64
91
82
80
80
94
74
70
82

Post-Assessment (Out of 100


Points)
78
80
89
78
78
66
84
73
77
94
58
92
92
60
85
56
44
85
94
78
70
78

Gains/Losses
31+
26+
3+
51251+
10+
69+
153+
17+
4628365+
0
4+
0
4-

Table 1 shows the number of points each student received on the pre and post-assessment out of
a total of 100 points on each paper. The final right column shows the gain or loss each student
made in his or her raw score between the pre-assessment and the post-assessment.
Pre-Assessment Paper One Statistics:
Average: 77.22/100 (77%)
Median: 81
Mode: 83
Range: 47
Post-Assessment Paper Two Statistics:
Average: 76.77/24 (77%)
Median: 78
Mode: 78
Range: 50
Gains and Losses:
Highest Gain: 31 Points
Lowest Gain: 1 Point
Highest Loss: 36 Points
Lowest Loss: 4 Points
Average Gain: 10.9 Points Average Loss: 12.1 Points
Number of Students Who Gained: 10
Number of Students Who Lost: 10
Number of Students Who Remained the Same: 2

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

53
Analysis of Assessment Scores

There were ten students out of twenty-two in the focus class that showed improvements
from the pre-assessment to the post-assessment, which calculates to roughly 45% of the class.
There were also ten students whose scores decreased and two students whose scores stayed
exactly the same. Jackie made the highest gain, going from a 47% on the pre-assessment, Paper
One, to a 78% on the post-assessment, Paper Two. Cheyenne S. had the highest loss, dropping
36 points from Paper One to Paper Two. Wesley and Brendans scores stayed exactly the same
from Paper One to Paper Two. See Table 1 above for all student scores in the focus class.
Major areas of problems seen in Paper One were in form and formatting (see rubric). For
Paper One, many students struggled with thesis statements, topic sentences, grammatical errors,
and MLA formatting. For Paper One, the thesis statement was supposed to be the theme of the
short story they picked, which would then drive the analysis for the rest of their paper. Students
were expressing themes as one-word phrases and as clichs. For example, Faith wrote, The
theme of The Lesson was education. As another example, Jackie wrote, In Brushs The
Birthday Party the author was trying to convey the theme of dont judge a book by its cover.
Topic sentences were often unrelated to the overall ideas expressed in the body paragraphs.
Students would use summary or creative quotes to introduce their paragraphs instead of
introducing the reader to the main idea of the paragraph. Students struggled with grammar and
usage, which I believe was mainly due to the fact that they did not proofread their work. The
majority of the errors were minor capitalization errors, spelling errors, and spacing errors.
Students really struggled with MLA formatting. Every student in the class lost points due to
incorrect formatting of the title, header, in-text citations, and/or the Works Cited Page. Even
though students were provided a sample MLA paper and a Works Cited reference sheet at the

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

54

beginning of the semester they still struggled immensely with the format. Content was a
struggling point for many students but more point deductions came from form and formatting.
Most students understood and even enjoyed at least one of the five short stories read in class and
therefore provided in-depth and reflective analysis.
For Paper Two, content became the biggest area of problems. Twenty students in the
focus class made some sort of improvement, great or small, in form and formatting on the rubric.
For Paper Two there were not nearly as many grammar and usage errors, students expressed
themes as complete sentences, topic sentences were much more effective, and students made
huge improvements to their MLA format. For example, Khalids Paper Two thesis was Arthur
Miller is trying to convey the idea that a man must do what ever it takes to provide for his
family, even if it costs him his life. Khalids Paper One thesis was A theme that can be found
in A Jury of Her Peers is feminism. Even though Khalid did not show improvement overall,
the small improvements he made within his paper were significant. While students made great
strides of improvement to form and formatting, they struggled immensely with content. Students
were having trouble connecting their thoughts to textual evidence, explaining their thoughts,
critically analyzing the play, and providing not just textual evidence but effective and pertinent
textual evidence. Students also struggled to connect their body paragraphs back to their thesis,
which made their overall papers unorganized and discombobulated. So while students made
improvements in determining a theme, they seemed to struggle more than before with finding
support for their chosen themes.
One difference that stood out to me between Paper One and Paper Two was the style of
writing students were using. In Paper One they were using very creative and casual language as
opposed to writing in a more formal and direct way. However, in Paper Two their writing shifted

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from creative and conversational to more academic and formal. Students began using literary
present tense, they took words such as I, you, me, us, and we out of their papers, and
were more direct and specific with their language. While style was not a specification on the
rubric, I did note that almost all students in not only the focus class but in all classes made
improvements in their style of writing.

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Interpretive Essay

While I was extremely proud of all the students that gained from pre-assessment to postassessment I was concerned about the amount of students whose scores dropped. Results from
the pre-assessment made it clear that students would need a lot of scaffolding in order to improve
their scores. When I began planning this unit, I wanted to make sure that students started at
explicit instruction and then ended with application and critical thinking about theme.
There are a few different reasons that I believe so many students dropped in scores from
Paper One to Paper Two. For one, I believe students may not have understood the text as well as
the short stories they could pick from for the first paper. Students may have struggled to
understand Death of a Salesman and as a result struggled to write their paper. For example,
Marcus is known to be one of the strongest writers in the focus class and his score dropped by
six points. Marcus came and asked for help from me on a few different occasions because he was
having trouble understanding the text or he was struggling to put his thoughts into words for his
paper. I think this could have been the case for other students as well, such as Brandi and
Dennise, who are incredibly strong writers but seemed to drop in their score on Paper Two. I
believe this could have had an effect on the students who had small decreases on Paper Two but I
think students who had detrimental losses were having other issues.
Another possible explanation for why so many scores dropped between Paper One and
Paper Two was testing. During the month of February eleventh graders were pulled a total of
seven days for practice FSA testing. Those juniors that missed those days were responsible for
making up work and continuing Death of a Salesman on their own. While it should not be an
issue to assume students will do their work at home, not all students are motivated enough to
complete homework. Many of the juniors struggled to keep up and had to come before school,

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during my planning period, during lunch, and after school just to keep up with the work and
reading load. I believe that this could have played a role in the struggles some of the students
faced with Paper Two. I believe students such as Khalid, Taren, and Janiyah who are typically
strong writers were affected by how many times they were pulled from class. Janiyah also
showed a huge loss because she turned in her paper almost a week late and lost thirty points
automatically from her overall grade. Jonathan, who is a struggling writer to begin with, missed
out on a lot of help and scaffolding that he needed to improve Paper Two because he was pulled
from class too many days.
There were also several issues with illness and lateness that caused students to fall
behind. Bryce was out for a week during the month of February due to severe illness, Adam
turned in his paper two days late and lost an automatic ten points, and Wesley missed several
days due to a family trip. Godby is also notorious for horrible attendance. Several of our students
face challenges such as lack of transportation, responsibilities of getting siblings to school before
themselves, and several other hardships. One of my students was absent eight days during just
the month of February due to the fact that she was left in her parents house for three weeks by
herself without electricity and therefore could not wake up on time for the start of third period.
Several of our students face problems such as this at home that interfere with their consistent
attendance to school.
Cheyenne S. was a special case. She decreased by 36 points from pre-assessment to postassessment, which is shocking given how great of a writer she typically is. Cheyenne S. lost
points for turning in a paper that contained more quotes and ideas from the text than her own
ideas. Her own thoughts and analysis would not have met a single page much less the required
two-page requirement for the assignment. There was very little content within the paper that I

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could grade based on the rubric so her grade suffered immensely for it. Cheyenne and I had a
conference to discuss her Paper Two grade, in which she recognized her errors and assured me
that she would not be making the same mistake for Paper Three.
While only ten students of twenty-two gained from Paper One to Paper Two they were
still huge gains. Even Janiyah, who decreased by twenty-eight points, would have gained if had
simply turned in her work. Jackies thirty-one-point gain was a huge accomplishment for her.
Jackies Paper One was very low and she struggled in all three areas of the rubric. For Paper
Two her style, format, form, and content all improved tremendously. Jackie worked hard during
this unit and even though she was being pulled from class for all of the FSA testing she still
managed to complete her work. She also sat down with me after Paper One and together we went
through her feedback to make sure she understood the expectations for the next paper. Jackie,
along with several other students from not only the focus class but all classes, came to see me
after school for help on Paper Two. I tried my hardest to be as detailed and thorough with my
feedback on all papers so students could have a better understanding of what they were doing
well and what they needed to improve on. Adayjah, making a twenty-six-point gain, also came in
often after school for writing help. Adayjah was facing a lot of hardships at home during this
time period but still managed to complete all of her work and ask for extra help when she needed
it. I think staying to help students after school was extremely beneficial to those who came in. I
provided feedback and probed students to think more critically about their writing, which I think
was very valuable to them in the end.
Many students reported that the storyboard project really helped them analyze Death of a
Salesman. Other students claimed that it was not helpful because they were only focusing on one
of the story elements in the entire play. I think this project was a great way of scaffolding

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students knowledge and skills of determining theme. The groups came up with some great
themes that I really think helped students grasp the idea of what a theme was and how they could
pull a theme out of Death of a Salesman. However, I can understand why it still might be
intimidating for students to write a literary analysis paper on several different story elements
when they have only been focusing on one. So I think if I were to ever do this project or a project
like it with students in the future, I would ask each student to trace each element of the story/play
providing at least two or three examples of each throughout the text. I think this would allow
students to practice tracing all of the story elements and would better prepare them to analyze
theme and write a literary analysis paper on their own. This may have potentially helped with the
content of each paper. If students had been responsible for tracing each element then they might
have been able to write a more in-depth analysis of the play.
When it comes to improving content I think I should have considered showing students
samples of effective literary analysis papers. My only concern was that they may try to copy the
format and content of the sample papers because they would have thought that was the only
right way of writing a literary analysis. I was afraid it would hinder their own unique styles of
writing if they were just mirroring sample writing. Maybe if I had held more writing workshops
geared specifically towards critical analysis then it would have helped students improve the
content of their papers.
Another thing that I also think helped students a lot was our MLA workshop. After
revisiting Paper One and looking at the areas students really struggled in I decided to modify one
of the original in-class writing days to a formatting workshop. We worked on proper in-text
citations and Works Cited where I pulled up a Microsoft Word document on the Promethean
Board and showed them exactly how to work with citations. Each student had a laptop at his or

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her desk and they were working on their own paper while I was working on examples on the
board. I also showed them how to format the title and header, which must have been a huge help
because there were very few students who had any problems with the title or header. I think
many of my students do not have access to a computer at home and therefore do not have the
technological knowledge or skills it takes to operate a computer much less operate Microsoft
Word. Walking students through step-by-step and modeling the correct format was a tremendous
help to all of them.
A majority of students also improved in the form of Paper Two. Even if they decreased in
points they typically still gained in form. I think the highlighting activity done in class worked
really well in helping students visualize what makes strong writing and what makes it weak. The
activity sparked a lot of valuable class discussion about thesis statements, topic sentences, and
connecting all information back to the thesis. While students still struggled with connecting their
body paragraphs back to their thesis they definitely made improvements to their thesis statements
and topic sentences, which I firmly believe this writing workshop took a lot of responsibility for.
Overall, I was pleased with the outcome of Paper Two. Even though not all students
gained they each made their own improvements in some small or big way. One thing that Ive
realized from this unit plan is how hard it is to measure writing. Writing is supposed to be a little
ambiguous and therefore grading it and accurately measuring it can be difficult. I have also
found out that it takes much longer to improve writing than just five weeks, especially when the
lessons for four of those weeks are not specifically geared towards writing a literary analysis
paper. I think in the end, the three to four days students were given for writing workshops and
peer reviews were the most beneficial to their writing skills.

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References

Amos P. Godby High School. (2015). Our school. Retrieved from


http://www.leonschools.net/Page/2191
Amos P. Godby High School. (2015). School grades. Retrieved from
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taid=4009&FileName=SIPshort.pdf
Florida Department of Education. (2015). Amos P. Godby High School: No child left behind
school public accountability reports. Retrieved from http://doewebprd.doe.state.fl.us/eds/nclbspar/year1314/nclb1314.cfm?dist_schl=37_161
Florida Department of Education. (2015). LAFS: Language arts Florida standards. [PDF
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Bureau. Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/12/12073.html


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Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/12/1270600.html