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Name: Kaylee Dillon

Subject: Math
Grade Level: Kindergarten
School: Dunbar Primary School
Cooperating Teacher: Mary Ellis
University Supervisor: B. Korn

Number Tested: 18
Date of Pre-Test: March 9, 2015
Date Post- Test: March 27, 2015
Average Pre-Test: 48.9%
Average Post Test: 93.9%
Overall Gain: 45%

Lesson/ Unit Description:

I determined that subtraction was a necessary unit to teach for my

Action Research project during my Kindergarten placement because it is part


of kindergartens PLCs (public learning communities). Subtraction is also on
the report cards.
Every day the students have math workstations that they work with a
partner in. They start these work stations before going to breakfast, (7:207:40) and finishing when they return for 25 more minutes. Then Mrs. Ellis,
Mrs. McClung (aide), Ms. Barbra (classroom granny), and myself each take a
math group to work with individually for 35 minutes.

We rotate the guided

math groups every day so that we each could see all four groups in a week.
During both the math workstations and the math groups, students worked on
subtraction activities as a form of independent and guided practice.

Unit Objectives:

Students will be able to:


1) Represent subtraction problems by using objects, drawings, images,
2)
3)
4)
5)

verbal expressions, and equations


Solve subtraction word problems
Subtract within ten
Fluently subtract within 5
Create drawings to represent subtraction problems

Link to Standards:

M.K.OA.1

M.K.OA.2
M.K.OA.5

Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers,


mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out
situations, verbal explanations, expressions or equations.
(CCSS Math.K.OA.1)
Solve addition and subtraction word problems and add and
subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to
represent the problem. (CCSS Math.K.OA.2
Fluently add and subtract within 5. (CCSS Math.K.OA.5)

Multiple Assessments Descriptions:

The pre-test and post-test both consist of 10 subtraction problems.

Each problem on the test was provided with objects that can be used to cross
out to help the students find the answer, as a form of take away. The pretest determined which students could compute subtraction problems and
which could not.

The scores of the pre-test were used to determine the

guided math groups. The guided math groups for subtraction are as followed
with group A being the highest and group D being the group that needed the
most intervention.

Group A

Group B

Group C

Group D

Student 5
Student 6
Student 10
Student 11
Student 13
Student 16
Student 18

Student 3
Student 7
Student 8
Student 14
Student 17

Student 4
Student 9
Student 12
Student 15

Student 1
Student 2

My formative assessments included the activities that were used


during independent math rotations and during guided math groups. While
students worked in their math rotations, I walked around and observed them.
I would stop and ask the students questions. I would also check their work
when they were finished.
my unit.

Below is a list of the activities that I used during

1) Magic Zero Whole Group Lesson: This lesson is one of the first
whole group instructions. Many students missed the equations dealing
with zero. This lesson goes over the 0 rule and offers a chance of
guided practice. (M.K.OA.5 & M.K.OA.2)
2) Cookie Jar and Cookie Manipulatives: Guided math activity where
students place cookies on the jar and take away some to find the sum.
( M.K.OA.2)
3) Pete the Cat Ten Frame: Ten frame subtraction using buttons.
(M.K.OA.2)
4) Frogs on a Log: Paper frogs to fold over a log to compute subtraction
problems. (M.K.OA.2)
5) Ten Finger Subtraction: Paper hands to fold over fingers to compute
subtraction problems. (M.K.OA.2)
6) Egg Hunt: students use a magnifying glass to find the math problems
hidden in the eggs. They write the problems that they found on a
basket and find the sum. (M.K.OA.5)
7) Who Took the Cookies from the Cookie Jar: each student was
given a paper with a jar on it. They make up a subtraction problem and
illustrate it by drawing cookies in the jar. (M.K.OA.2)
8) Five Little Birdies: Five Little Birdies is a story where students fill in
numbers and do subtraction problems. The story goes Five little
birdies flying around the door. One flew away and now there are ___.
(M.K.OA.5)
9) Basic subtraction worksheets were students were able to mark out
pictures to help them subtract. (M.K.OA.5 & M.K.OA.2)
10)
Smart Board Games: these games including activities with
manipulatives such as objects to take away and ten frames. There
were also games subtraction word problems. (M.K.OA.2 & M.K.OA.5)

Results of Multiple Assessments:

As a class whole, the students overall percentage of gain was 45%.


Students average pre-test percent was 48.9% and the average scores grew
to 93.9% on the post-test.

After giving the pre-test, it was obvious that

students needed grade-level instruction pertaining to subtraction.

I was

excited to find new ways and manipulatives to teach this subject.

I was

overly pleased with how well all of my students performed on their posttests.

I was thrilled that every student showed some gain.

Even though

some students score a 100% on both pre-test and post-test, they too showed
gain by accelerating the expectations and subtracting within 20 instead of
just 10. I found ways to make sure that they too took away from this unit.
After I had finally gathered all of my data, I disaggregated it into two
ways. First, I disaggregated the scores of my female students with my male
students.

In this are 9 females and 9 males.

The data shows that the

females and males had the same average pre-test score. However, females
scored 5.6% higher on their post-test and had a 5.6% higher overall gain
than males. I was very proud of my females and my males of their interest
in subtraction and the hard work that they put in.
Second, I disaggregated the scores of students who may be identified
as exceptional learners, those who are receiving additional services and
interventions. There are two students who were retained in kindergarten last
year, as a means for intervention. One of these students now has an IEP and
received special educational services. There are also two students who go to
Title I for Math Interventions and an ESL student. Their disaggregated data
shows that their pre-test average was a 26%. I was so pleased to see that
their post-test score was 88% and that they have overall gains of 62%!

Aggregated Whole Class Data


Pre-Test
Student Raw Score
(Out of 10)

Post-Test
Raw Score
(Out of 10)

Pre-Test
Percent

Post-Test
Percent

Overall
Gain

0%

90%

90%

0%

90%

90%

40%

90%

50%

10

0%

100%

100%

10

10

100%

100%

0%

10

90%

100%

10%

10

40%

100%

60%

10

30%

100%

70%

0%

90%

90%

10

10

10

100

100%

0%

11

10

90%

100%

10%

12

10

20%

100%

80%

13

10

90%

100%

10%

14

30%

60 %

30%

15

10

10%

100%

90%

16

10

10

100%

100%

0%

17

40%

70%

30%

18

10

10

100%

100%

0%

Class
Avg

4.9

9.4

48.9%

93.9%

45%

Aggregated Whole Class Data


18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
Pretest
Posttest

10
Student

9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0

10

Disaggregated Data: Female


Pre-Test
Student Raw Score
(Out of 10)

Post-Test
Raw Score
(Out of 10)

Pre-Test
Percent

Post-Test
Percent

Overall
Gain

0%

90%

90%

40%

90%

50%

10

0%

100%

100%

0%

90%

90%

10

10

10

100

100%

0%

11

10

90%

100%

10%

12

10

20%

100%

80%

13

10

90%

100%

10%

18
Class
Avg

10

10

100%

100%

0%

4.89

9.67

48.9%

96.7%

47.8%

Disaggregated Data: Male


Pre-Test
Student Raw Score
(Out of 10)

Post-Test
Raw Score
(Out of 10)

Pre-Test
Percent

Post-Test
Percent

Overall
Gain

0%

90%

90%

10

10

100%

100%

0%

10

90%

100%

10%

10

40%

100%

60%

10

30%

100%

70%

14

30%

60 %

30%

15

10

10%

100%

90%

16

10

10

100%

100%

0%

17
Class
Avg

40%

70%

30%

4.89

9.11

48.9%

91.1%

42.2%

Disaggregated Data: Female vs Male


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Female
Male

Disaggregated Data: Students receiving


Accommodations / Intervention
Student
1- Title I
math
2 - ESL
6 2nd yr K
9 IEP/ 2n
yr k
17- Title I
math

Average

Pre-Test
Raw Score
(Out of 10)

Post-Test
Raw Score
(Out of 10)

Pre-Test
Percent

Post-Test
Percent

Overall
Gain

0%

90%

90%

0
9

9
10

0%
90%

90%
100%

90%
10%

0%

90%

90%

40%

70%

30%

2.6

8.8

26%

88%

62%

Disaggreated Data: Students Recieving Accomondations


10
9
8
7
6

Pre-Test Score

Number Correct

5
4
3
2
1
0

Post-Test Score

Reflection and Data-Based Decision Making


From the results of the pre-test scores, I could tell that many of the
students did not understand the concept of subtraction or take away. Many
of the students were doing addition on the pre-test and some did not even
know what to do with the objects. I feel that my students each made an
incredible amount of progress during the time of the unit. I am extremely
satisfied and proud of their hard work and achievement.
My ultimate goal for each student was to have a good understand of
subtraction so that it could be worked in their daily routine (math rotations)
and that it would be used effectively for constant reinforcement.

From

looking at my data, I feel that 16 out of the 20 students could use


subtraction daily during the math rotations with little to no assistance from
the teacher or aide.

Below, are the students that I feel need more

assistance with subtraction in order to become fluent in the skill.

14

Pre-Test
Raw Score
(Out of 10)
3

Post-Test
Raw Score
(Out of 10)
6

17

Studen
t

Pre-Test
Percent

Post-Test
Percent

Overall
Gain

30%

60 %

30%

40%

70%

30%

Student 14 scored a 3/10 on his pre-test and only had 30% gain on his
post-test.

Although I am glad that he showed gains, I would like to

work with him more one on one in order to raise his post-test score to

the class average.


Student 17 scored a 4/10 on his pre-test and only had 40% gain on his
post-test. I am also glad that he showed gains, however I would like to
work with him one on one. I would also discuss his scores with his Title
I teach and see if he can get outside intervention in this area.

Student

Pre-Test
Raw Score

Post-Test
Raw Score

Pre-Test
Percent

Post-Test
Percent

Overall
Gain

5
10
16

(Out of 10) (Out of 10)


10
10
100%
100%
0%
10
10
100
100%
0%
10
10
100%
100%
0%
For my students who showed no growth from the pre-test to the posttest because of them receiving a perfect score, I would continue to
provide them with more challenging activities to motivate their
learning and keep them interested.

I would prepare adapted

subtraction activities for the math rotations for them to participate in. I
would give them subtraction within 20 and the option of whether or not
they want to use their manipulatives or not, since many of them just
used mental math to solve the problems on their post-test.