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Chelsea Smaellie

ED 424- Lincoln Elementary Case


Students: Austin, Ian, and Calvin
Subject: Multiplication

Pre-Assessment Reflection: 12/3/14


The students that I have been assigned to are Ian, Austin and Calvin. Before the assessment I was able to build rapport with them by talking about
their favorite animals, their families, and how school was going. When I asked Ian if he liked math he said more or less. When I asked Calvin if he
liked math he said he loved it but had a hard time concentrating. Calvin confided in me and said that he takes medicine to help him focus. When I
asked Austin if he liked math he said it was his favorite. From these questions I concluded that they were each on a different plane with math. From
my observations as they were taking the assessment, I noticed that Austin already knew many of his multiplication facts. Calvin understood the
multiplication somewhat but his greatest struggle was staying on task to finish the test. Ian was able to stay on task but his knowledge about
multiplication was very limited. Ian would also continue to talk to me and ask what he should do. This made it very difficult for me to not help them
on the assessment. I tried to make sure that I was explaining what to do correctly and that my answers to Ians questions would not change the
validity of the assessment results. Austin was finished with his assessment first and got bored automatically. I told him to look at the book he brought
or draw a picture on the back of his page. He occasionally would try to talk to Ian and Calvin while they were finishing their assessments. I wish that
I would have set up specific rules to keep them from distracting one another. Calvin was the next to finish and then Ian was the last to finish. They
talked about how difficult the bigger numbers were and they asked questions. Even before grading their assessments I knew that they were all on a
different level and I would need to teach in a way to keep all of their attention and help them grow within the curriculum. Pre-Assessment Data
Pre-Assessment

Part of answer
Grouping
Correct
Answer
Grouping
Correct
Answer
Grouping
Correct
Answer

Total
Correct

Student
Question
Number
Ian

1
1

2
1

3
0

4
1

5
0

6
0

7
0

8
0

9
0

10
0

11
1

12
0

13
0

14
0

15
0

16
0

17
0

18
0

19
0

20
0

Ian
Calvin

1
1

1
1

0
1

1
0

0
1

1
0

0
0

0
0

0
1

0
1

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
1

1
1

1
0

0
0

1
1

1
1

1
1

11
13

Calvin
Austin

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
0

0
1

1
1

1
0

1
0

1
1

0
0

1
0

0
0

1
0

1
0

0
0

1
0

0
0

0
0

14
8

Austin

19

Instruction Plans:
After the assessment there were many things that I wanted to change and teach. First thing I wanted to do was make sure that my instruction is
specific to the needs and interests of my students. Ian, Calvin, and Austin, were active and fidgety. The next important thing that I wanted to integrate
was their individual level of understanding. As I looked at their assessments I saw that Austin had known many of the correct answers but he did not
understand the grouping principle. I noticed from testing that Ian only knew a couple of the simple multiplication problems and he tried to draw as
best as he could. Calvin was able to get some of the correct answers and some of the correct grouping principles. If he was able to concentrate for

longer I think that he would be able to do more of the problems. I would make my examples more difficult for Austin, and I would make more simple
examples for Calvin and Ian.
At the beginning of my lesson I would use paper and pencil to teach the grouping principle and after I demonstrated the principle by drawing, I
would ask each one of them to draw an example for me. I also would teach them the term product. Next I wanted to find a way to teach the boys
using a gross motor activity to teach the grouping principle. The area that I was teaching in, allowed me to let them move around with plenty of
space. I decided that I would use cups and writing utensils to show the grouping principle. I would make it into a game with flash cards with different
multiplication problems on the cards. When I gave the boys a card I would let them run from our table to the steps where the cups and pencils were.
When they got there they were to show the correct amount of groups with the correct amount of writing utensils in each cup. When they were
finished I would ask them to tell me how many groups they have and how many is in each group. I would let them do as many flash cards until the
time ran out.
Reflection of first teaching day:
Each one of the students really enjoyed the game of grouping with cups. They were all engaged for the entire instruction time. I was very pleased that
they were able to do larger number problems correctly. I want to mention that Ian is really catching on. From my observation, he partly understood
the grouping principle when I was drawing pictures on the paper, but it is when he started putting pens in cups that he got it.

Post Assessment Table:


Post-Assessment

Part of answer
Grouping
Correct
Answer
Grouping
Correct
Answer
Grouping
Correct
Answer

Total
Correct

Student
Question
Number
Ian

1
1

2
1

3
1

4
1

5
1

6
1

7
1

8
1

9
1

10
1

11
1

12
1

13
1

14
1

15
1

16
1

17
1

18
1

19
1

20
1

20

Ian
Calvin

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
0

1
1

1
1

1
0

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

20
18

Calvin
Austin

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
0

0
1

0
0

1
1

0
1

1
1

1
1

0
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

16
18

Austin