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Science and Technology Representative to Japan

Science and Technology Representative to Japan

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The mission of the South African Science and Technology Office (STO) in Japan is to facilitate partnership in science and technology between South Africa and Japan. The objective of the STO is to increase flows of scientific knowledge and resources to South Africa through participation in joint programmes with Japan, as well as facilitating the participation of South Africa as a significant player in the international science and technology arena.
The mission of the South African Science and Technology Office (STO) in Japan is to facilitate partnership in science and technology between South Africa and Japan. The objective of the STO is to increase flows of scientific knowledge and resources to South Africa through participation in joint programmes with Japan, as well as facilitating the participation of South Africa as a significant player in the international science and technology arena.

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Activity Report

September 2004 – March 2007

Science and Technology Office, South African Embassy in Japan

Contents
Contact Information .......................................................................................................3 THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OFFICE .........................................................4 1. Mission and Objectives ........................................................................................5 2. Management .........................................................................................................5 3. Responsibilities ....................................................................................................6 ACTIVITIES..................................................................................................................7 1. Supporting international cooperation programmes and building partnerships in the development of high technologies, science-intensive products and services. ...............................................................................................................7 2. Supporting the alignment of South African science and technology policies and programmes through active participation in international science. ............10 3. Supporting through international cooperation programmes South Africa’s skills and human resource development imperatives. .......................................16 4. Attracting foreign investment to support the national and regional science and technology and innovation systems. ...........................................................21 5. Promoting a strong South African input into the international science and technology for sustainable development discourse as well as NEPAD and international science and technology policy formulation..................................28 CONCLUSION............................................................................................................30

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Contact Information Vuyani Lingela Department of Science and Technology Private Bag X 894, Pretoria 0001, South Africa Email: Vuyani.Lingela@dst.gov.za http://www.dst.gov.za (Department of Science and Technology in South Africa) http://www.rsatk.com (South African Embassy in Japan)

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THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OFFICE The South African and Japanese government concluded the first ever agreement on science and technology cooperation between Japan and an African country on 28 August 2003 based on the principle of equality and mutual benefit. This agreement constitutes a framework for scientific and technological collaboration between Japanese and South African institutions. The two governments share the view that the conclusion of the first ever agreement on science and technology cooperation between Japan and an African country is of great significance. The South African Government appointed Mr. Vuyani Lingela as the Counsellor for Science and Technology at the South African Embassy in Japan with effect from 1 September 2004. As the first South African Science and Technology Representative to Japan, his role included establishing the Science and Technology Office at the South African Embassy to promote, facilitate and manage cooperation in all areas of science and technology between Japanese and South African universities, research institutes, companies and government.

Vuyani Lingela, Former Prime Minister Koizumi, Ambassador Ben Ngubane

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1. Mission and Objectives The mission of the Science and Technology Office (STO) is to facilitate partnership in science and technology between South Africa and Japan. The objective of the STO is to increase flows of scientific knowledge and resources to South Africa through participation in joint programmes with Japan, as well as facilitating the participation of South Africa as a significant player in the international science and technology arena. 2. Management Mr. Lingela, Counsellor: Science and Technology reports to Dr. Ben Ngubane, Ambassador of South Africa to Japan and has been reporting to Mr. Dhesigen Naidoo, Deputy Director-General, Dr. Chris Scheffer, Chief Director, Dr. Neville Arendse, Chief Director and Dr. Mogege Mosimege, Director in the Department of Science and Technology as his supervisors on the activities of the STO. The STO continuously alerts supervisors of any emerging factors that could preclude the achievement of any key responsibility areas, including the contingency measures that he or they propose to take to ensure the impact of such deviation from the original agreement is minimised.

Vuyani Lingela and Dr. Chris Scheffer

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The STO establishes and maintains appropriate internal controls and reporting systems in order to meet the performance expectations. The STO discusses with supervisors any revision of targets as well as progress made towards the achievements of the performance agreement measures.

Dr. Ben Ngubane, Ambassador of South Africa

Mr. Vuyani Lingela, Counsellor: Science and Technology Ms. Yumi Tominaga Secretary: Science and Technology

Ms. Tomoko Inamasu Researcher: Science and Technology Key Customers

• South African and Japanese Universities • South African and Japanese Research Institutes • South African and Japanese Companies • South African and Japanese Government

Figure 1. Management Structure of the Science and Technology Office The Supervisors create an enabling environment to facilitate effective performance of the STO. They provide access to skills development and capacity building opportunities. They also work collaboratively to solve problems and generate solutions to common problems that may be impacting on the performance of the STO. 3. Responsibilities The key responsibility areas of the STO include: Supporting international cooperation programmes and building partnerships in the development of high technologies, science-intensive products and services. Supporting the alignment of South African science and technology policies and programmes through active participation in international science. Supporting through international cooperation programmes South Africa’s skills and human resource development imperatives. Attracting foreign investment to support the national and regional science and technology and innovation systems. Promoting a strong South African input into the international science and technology for sustainable development discourse as well as NEPAD and international science and technology policy formulation.

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ACTIVITIES 1. Supporting international cooperation programmes and building partnerships in the development of high technologies, science-intensive products and services. 1.1 Initiated a meetings with the representatives of the University of Fort Hare in Bisho, South Africa in July 2006, where opportunities where identified: to promote research partnership with Japanese universities, research institutions and companies; to promote partnership with the Japanese universities, research institutions, companies or government; and to promote exchange of technicians and university students (undergraduate and postgraduate) as well as university researchers. Facilitated meetings for Prof. Njabulo Ndebele, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cape Town in April 2006 and Prof. Derrick Swartz, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Fort Hare in August 2006 to discus opportunities for research and academic exchange with representatives of the representatives of universities.

1.2

Vuyani Lingela and Prof. Njabulo Ndebele 1.3 Facilitated the establishment of the Memorandum of Understanding between the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and the National Research

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Foundation of South Africa (NRF) which made South Africa the first country in Africa to conclude a formal bilateral exchange agreement with JSPS. The NRF and JSPS are currently supporting four research projects implemented joint by South African and Japanese researchers in the areas of biotechnology, infectious diseases, ICTs and food sciences involving the following Japanese universities and research institutes: Nagoya City University, Tohoku University, Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute and Chiba University together with the following South African institutions: University of the Witwatersrand, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, University of Stellenbosch and the CSIR. 1.4 Facilitated the establishment of the Memorandum of Understanding between the African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme (ACEP) and Fukushima Marine Science Museum of Japan to promote collaboration in marine sciences. The Deputy Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Ms Rejoice Mabudafhasi, participated in the signing ceremony of the MoU.

Environmental Affairs and Tourism Deputy Minister Rejoice Mabudafhasi, Dr. Tony Ribbink, Ms. Anati Canca and Director Yoshitaka Abe 1.5 Initiated the establishment of a network of science and technology researchers including 28 South African and Japanese universities and research institutions involved in joint research collaboration. Prepared and distributed information to South African researchers on available scholarships and training opportunities in Japanese universities and research institutions.

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Science and Technology Minister Mangena and Ambassador Ben Ngubane 1.6 Initiated the establishment of the “South Africa-Japan Science and Technology.” The S&T Network consists of government representatives, researchers and research managers in South African universities, science councils and other research institutions interested in promoting partnership with Japanese institutions. The objective of the S&T Network is to disseminate relevant information timely to South African institutions on Japanese academic and research institutions to promote cooperation with relevant South African institutions and researchers as well as students. As a result of this initiative, Japanese counterparts were identified by South African researchers and subsequently exchanged visits to discuss and implement plans for research collaboration. Initiated meetings with university Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Deans of Science and Engineering faculties, Heads of International Exchange divisions and university researchers in Japan to discuss opportunities for research collaboration with South African universities and research institutions. As a result of these visits and the reports to South African researchers, Japanese researchers have invited South African researchers to their laboratories in Japan. In other cases the Japanese researchers visited relevant South African researchers. Prepared a bilingual (English and Japanese) report titled: “South Africa and Japan: 10 Years of Science and Technology Relations” for distribution to South African and Japanese Government institutions, universities, research institutions and companies in South Africa and Japan. This report describes intergovernmental, inter-institutional and inter-university relationships that

1.7

1.8

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contributed to the implementation of the co-operation agreement on science and technology between South Africa and Japan. Further, the report presents modalities for future cooperation in science and technology between South Africa and Japan. 1.9 Initiated and managed a bilingual (English and Japanese) website to meet the following objectives (http://www.science-technology.jp): to promote research collaboration in priority fields, including; biotechnology, information and communication technologies, material sciences, infectious diseases, technology for development, and science and technology policy studies; to communicate opportunities for joint commercialisation of technologies; and market South Africa’s research and development expertise and science and technology facilities.

Vuyani Lingela, Prof. Hasuck Kim, Prof. Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan and Ms. Azeza Fredericks 2. Supporting the alignment of South African science and technology policies and programmes through active participation in international science. 2.1 Initiated and managed a workshop in Japan in June 2006 to discuss the Fundamental Concept of the Science and Technology in Society (STS) Forum and the Participation of the South African delegation in the Third Annual Meeting of the STS Forum in September 2006. In this workshop Mr. Koji Omi, now Minister of Finance, Member of the House of Representatives of Japan, Chairman of the STS Forum met with members of the South African delegation

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consisting of representatives of the CSIR; Department of Science and Technology; Innovation Fund, PlantBio Trust; Sasol Chemicals Pacific Ltd.; Sasol Ltd.; and University of Limpopo.

Ambassador Ben Ngubane, Finance Minister Koji Omi and Vuyani Lingela 2.2 Presented a paper titled: Towards Sustainable Consumption and Production: The Role of South African Actors at the Ministerial Conference on the 3R Initiative: 3Rs and Sustainable Consumption and Production in Japan, April 30, 2005. The focus on cleaner production towards sustainable industrial development and competitiveness received significant support from the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development held in South Africa. It is now widely accepted that a preventive approach would offer a long-term and sustainable solution to global environmental protection strategies. Integrating cleaner production and sustainable consumption promises to offer a clean environment and sustainable development for current and future generations. It is for these reasons that the South African government endeavours to develop and promote a clean industry with efficient use of energy and raw materials with limited generation of waste and pollution. Cleaner production is the continuous application of an integrated preventive environmental strategy to processes, products and services to increase ecoefficiency and reduce risks to humans and the environment. This concept includes the emphasis on continuous improvement of environmental

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performance, through an elaborate procedure of review and innovation built into the assessment process. Technology improvements may be accomplished through the redesigning of existing products and services; modification or upgrading of existing equipment and processes; acquisition of new equipment, processes and product lines and adoption of the best available techniques.

Vuyani Lingela and Former Environment Minister Yuriko Koike 2.3 Planned and managed the Science and Technology Month in Japan which formed part of South Africa’s participation in the Aichi World Expo 2005, under the theme, Rhythm of Life, showing the technological advances and competencies, the biodiversity, our sustainable development initiatives and related aspects of our S&T system.. The Science and Technology Month was launched by Minister Mosibudi Mangena, Minister of Science and Technology at the South African Pavillion in the Aichi World Expo 2005, June 2005. It included an event to commemorate the growing partnership in Science and technology between South Africa and Japan. The South African delegation led by the Department of Science and Technology participated in the inaugural Science and Technology (STP) Forum held at the Tokyo Institute of Technology in Japan. Science and technology policy is a key to develop these and other initiatives. In this context, the STP Forum is organised in order to increase understanding, to share the experience in the best practices and to establish a platform for future possible collaboration in this area between South Africa and Japan. Prepared a report titled: Proceedings of the Science and Technology Policy Forum, June, 2005 for distribution to

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government institutions, universities, research institutions and companies in South Africa and Japan.

Vuyani Lingela, Ms. Buhle Khumalo and Mr. Nhlanhla Nyide One of the distinguished South African marine biologist Dr. Tony Ribbink presented lectures on the African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme (ACEP) at the Aichi World Expo 2005. Over the years the ACEP has become a regional flagship programme that includes South Africa, Comoros Islands, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Seychelles and Tanzania. Doctor Ribbink presented lectures here in Nagoya at the South African Pavilion and at Fukushima Marine Science Museum. The distinguished South African scholar, Professor Gideon Smith, captivated people at the South African Pavilion in the Aichi World Expo with his presentation on South Africa’s rich floral heritage with special emphasis on the unique succulent flora of the southern tip of Africa. This is one of the mega diverse regions of the world, where about 10% of the world plant species are found in less than 2.5% of the global land surface. Prof. Emeritus Philip Tobias, the world authority on human evolution and the analysis of early hominid fossils. In his lectures at the University of Tokyo, Kyoto University and here in Nagoya, he explained that eighty years ago a momentous fossil discovery was made at Taung in South Africa. Prof Tobias indicated that this was the oldest hominid skeleton, with skull, ever discovered. It was because of the great wealth of hominid remains in certain individual caves, most notably Sterkfontein, and also because of the concentration of fossil-bearing cave sites within a restricted area, that the South African Government initiated the proclamation of the area as a World Heritage Site in

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the 1990s. The listing the South African paleontological sites the World Heritage site became effective from 2nd December 1999.

Deputy Minister Derek Hanekom, Prof. Gideon Smith and Vuyani Lingela

Prof. Emeritus Philip Tobias in Japan

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2.4

Facilitated the participation the Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, Mr. Derek Hanekom to the STS Forum in Kyoto, Japan in September 2005. Deputy Minister was accompanied by Dr Adi Paterson, Group Executive: Science and Technology Expert Services, Ms Nurunessa Moolla, Director: Office of the Deputy Minister, Ambassador Dr Ben Ngubane and Mr Vuyani Lingela, Counsellor: Science and Technology, South African Embassy.

Ambassador Ngubane, Science and Technology Deputy Minister Derek Hanekom, Ms Nurunessa Moolla, Dr. Adi Paterson and Vuyani Lingela Facilitated the participation of Dr. Nqaba Ngcobo, Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee for Science and Technology, Parliament of South Africa and the Minister of Science and Technology, Mr Mosibudi Mangena, as well as officials of the South African government, researchers and company representatives in the 3rd Annual Meeting of the STS Forum in September 2006. 2.5 Represented the Department of Science and Technology in the 7th South AfricaJapan Partnership Forum meeting held in Tokyo on 30 September to 1 October 2004 and presented a paper on Future Cooperation in Science and Technology between South Africa and Japan. The South African Delegation was led by Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr Aziz Pahad. Several issues were discussed in the fields of science and technology, education, agriculture, health, economy, arts and culture, safety and security as well as regional and multilateral issues. Prepared a Pogramme of Action for the 7th South AfricaJapan Partnership Forum meeting for distribution to the South African Government.

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3. Supporting through international cooperation programmes South Africa’s skills and human resource development imperatives. 3.1 Initiated the placement of South African young technicians and engineers for training in Japanese universities and companies for up to 2 years per candidate staring in June 2007. The Independent Development Trust (IDT) serves as a contracting party for the placement of candidates in Japanese universities and companies on behalf of the Joint Initiative for Priority Skills Acquisition (JIPSA), Chaired by the Deputy President Mlambo-Ngcuka of South Africa. Ms. Thembi Nwedamutswu, CEO of the Independent Development Trust led the South African delegation to Japan in Mach 2007 where she co-signed the Memorandum of Agreement Tohoku University on 23 March 2007. Following this Agreement, Tohoku University will accept 13 young South African technicians and engineers for academic and research training as well as internship in participating Japanese companies starting in June 2007. 3.2 Initiated and managed the Breakfast Meeting where Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka of South Africa and Presidents of Japanese Universities discussed opportunities for cooperation between Japanese and South African universities in April 2006 in Japan. The Breakfast Meeting included Ambassador of South Africa; Minister of Minerals and Energy; Deputy Minister of Environment and Tourism; Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs; Deputy Minister of Finance; and Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry of South Africa.

Ms. Pontsho Maruping and Prof. Naoharu Fujita

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Prof. Naoharu Fujita, Vice-President, Meiji University supported the visit of Prof. Ignatious Ncube, School of Molecular and Life Sciences, University of Limpopo and holder of the UNESCO Chair in Biotechnology to Meiji University in Japan. Prof. Ncube spent a month promoting research collaboration and exchange of students with Prof. Shigeru Kuwata, School of Agriculture, Meiji University in February 2006. Prof. Shoji, Vice-President, Tohoku University facilitated the establishment of a research fund of 10 million Yen to promote joint research programme with the University of South Africa, University of Venda and University of Pretoria. This programme will focus on “Virological and immunological activities of South African Medicinal Plants against HIV and mycobacterium tuberculosis.” 3.3 Initiated and managed the Workshop with Hokkaido Prefectural (Provincial) Government, universities, research institution and industry on Partnership for Priority Skills Development in South Africa held in Japan in June 2006. The purpose of this workshop was to investigate opportunities for cooperation between universities in Hokkaido and South African universities in research priority areas adopted by the Government of Japan and the Government of South Africa during the 1st Japan-South Africa Science and Technology Joint Committee Meeting held in South Africa in May 2004. These priority areas include biotechnology; information and communication technology; advanced and new materials; nanotechnology; infectious diseases; and S&T policy studies.

South African delegation in Hokkaido

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South Africa’s Joint Initiative on Priority Skills Acquisition (JIPSA) launched in March 2006 acknowledges that the single greatest impediment to Governments public infrastructure programmes - as well as private investment programmes is the country's shortage of professional skills such as those provided by engineers and scientists, financial, personnel and project managers and skilled technical employees such as artisans and information technology technicians are critically needed as the economy moves into higher gear. One of the fundamental pillars of the JIPSA is the contribution of the Department of Foreign Affairs and embassies in sourcing and attracting scarce skills from the international community to assist Government to train people in foreign academic institutions and for international placements where South Africa can train people through placements in foreign private companies and governments as well as government related institutions. It is expected that cooperation between South African universities and universities in Hokkaido will help facilitate partnership in education, research and training between universities in South Africa and Japan. 3.4 Initiated and managed the establishment of the South Africa-Japan University Forum (SAJU Forum) as an annual Forum between South African and Japanese universities. The Inaugural SAJU Forum will be held at Hiroshima University, Japan on 14-15 May 2007, where Vice-Presidents of Japanese universities and Deputy Vice-Chancellors of South African universities will be participating.

Prof. Njabulo Ndebele, Prof. Masuo Aizawa, Deputy President MlamboNgcuka, Ambassador Ben Ngubane and Minister Lindiwe Hendricks

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The objectives of the SAJU Forum were introduced by Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka of South Africa to Presidents of Japanese Universities in Japan in April 2006, as follows: To increase flows of scientific knowledge and resources between South Africa and Japan through participation in joint education, research and training programmes; To share the best practice in education, research and training through exchange of students, researchers and managers; and to facilitate the participation of South Africa and Japan as significant players in the international science and technology arena. 3.5 Facilitated the participation of the two students of the University of Venda in a training programme presented by Tohoku University to learn laboratory techniques for testing anti-viral effect of plant extracts starting in August to October 2006. The international travel costs were provided by the National Research Foundation of the Department of Science and Technology; Tohoku University will met all the transport and accommodation costs in Japan.

Mr. Mokgapi Maleka, Mr. Steven Ratsatsi, Ms. Girlsy Makoetjie, Ms. Nkuli Shinga, Dr. Bethuel Sehlapelo, Mr. Simon Mpele, Vuyani Lingela, Mr. Yoshinari Skeno and Mr. Cecile Masoka 3.6 Initiated and managed the Africa-Japan Essay and Speech Competition (AJESC). Theme: Making Science and Technology a Foundation for Partnership between Africa and Japan. The A-JESC was launched at the University of Tokyo, Japan to inspire a new generation of African and Japanese students to contribute in promoting partnership between Africa and Japan for mutual benefit. The A-JESC attracted 127 essays submitted by junior high school, senior high school and university students from Japan, South Africa and

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Zambia. Nine students presented their winning essays at the Science Council of Japan on 21 July 2006 proposing new areas for future cooperation in science and technology between Africa and Japan with emphasis on challenges or opportunities and solutions.

South African and Zambian winners - Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, Japan

Japanese winners – CSIR, South Africa

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In July, the three Japanese winners were awarded an eight-day travel package to South Africa and Zambia and the six South Africa and Zambian winners were awarded an eight-day travel package to Japan. The A-JESC was supported by Japanese and South African organizations, including the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Science Council of Japan; South African Ministry of Science and Technology; South African Embassy in Japan; South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement (SAASTA); Zambian Embassy in Japan; and Canon Inc. 4. Attracting foreign investment to support the national and regional science and technology and innovation systems. 4.1 Initiated and managed the SASTeC and Africa Workshop with the Japanese Government, Industry and Universities on Partnership for Energy Security in Africa in June 2006. As a result of this workshop, Tohoku University faciliated the establishment of a research fund of 10 million Yen to promote joint research programme with South Africa’s Human Sciences Research Council for two years. This programme will focus on “Energy access improvement and its socioeconomic impacts in rural areas of South Africa and India.” This workshop was sponsored by Mitsubishi Corporation; Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.; and Mitsubishi Electric Corporation.

Ambassador Ben Ngubane and Ambassador Atsushi Hatakenaka There are many energy producing countries and many energy-rich countries in Africa. At the same time there are many countries in Africa, like in Japan, that do not have energy resources such as oil. Given this situation, energy security is crucial to active sustainable development in view of the very high oil prices that

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we are witnessing today. Unfortunately, this trend is not expected to reverse in the near future. The Government of Japan intends to propose several energy efficiency and saving initiatives at the July 15-17 2006 G8 Summit in St. Petersburg. A wide range of issues pertaining to global energy security have been put at the top of the summit agenda at Russia’s initiative. The G8 Summit website indicates that Japan is the absolute leader in the G8 in terms of energy saving and efficiency. It is nearly ten times more energy efficient than China and India, and almost 20 times more efficient than Russia.

Ms. Anati Canca, Ambassador Ben Ngubane, Vuyani Lingela, Mr. Senzo Ncube, Dr. Olive Chisane, Mr. Marjo Louw and Prof. Tetsuo Shoji Many countries are heavily dependent on import of energy resources including oil. Facing this situation, the improvement of energy efficiency as well as introduction and the development of the energy saving and alternative energy resources should be promoted. Science and technology has a vital role to play In this regard. Regarding environmental policy, there are various aspects of environment policy including the policy to tackle global warming and forest protection. But in general, environmental policy should be carried out in a very harmonious manner with overall policy objectives of government which would include economic policy and energy policy. In other words, we should see to it that economic growth, energy security, and environment protection should be designed and implemented in a compatible manner. It is difficult to obtain these three objectives at once as they sometimes hinder each other, especially the attainment of economic growth and environment protection. Japan adopted the "The Three E's" (Energy Security, Environmental Protection and Economic Growth) as guiding principles to find a breakthrough for the achievement of these three objectives. It is in this context that this workshop on

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Partnership for Energy Security in Africa was held with African and Japanese stakeholders. Following the workshop above, Prof. Prof. Tetsuo Shoji, Vice-President, Tohoku University facilitated the establishment of 10 million yen research fund to initiate and support research collaboration on “energy access improvement and its socio-economic impacts in rural areas of South Africa and India” between the Human Sciences Research Council of South Africa and Tohoku University in 2007-2009. 4.2 Initiated and developed a proposal for the Research and Training Programme for Agricultural Biosecurity on behalf of Ms. Njabulo Nduli, Deputy DirectorGeneral: Biosecurity & Disaster Management, Department of Agriculture. Dr. Shadrack Moephuli, CEO of the Agricultural Research Council of South Africa will lead a South Africa delegation to Japan in April 2007 to conclude the cooperation agreement with Japanese universities, research institutions and industry for the implementation of this Programme.

Prof. Ben-Erik van Wyk, Dr. Mareshige Kojoma, Dr. Toshiya Muranaka, Dr. Blessed Okole, Dr. Shigeo Yoshida and Vuyani Lingela The objective of this Programme is to create opportunities for joint research and training between South African and Japanese universities, research institutions, industry and government in the following areas: Training of entomologists in integrated pest management for food production; Training of veterinary or animal scientist in animal health for livestock production; Management of plant

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and animal health for biosecure international trade; Training of young scientists and engineers for the JIPSA Programme. 4.3 Initiated and managed the proposal for the establishment of the Institute for Intellectual Property Management in Africa (IIPMA) in South Africa based on financial and technical support from various institutions in Japan and South Africa. Following this proposal, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) initiated a new training programme on Intellectual Property Rights for African Countries in Japan in November-December 2006. JICA invited three government officials from the South African Department of Science and Technology and the Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office (CIPRO) to participate in the training programme. The objective of the IIPMA is to implement the “Third Country Training” on IPR management in Africa. This means, IPR management training supported by the Japanese institution (e.g. Japan International Cooperation Agency, Japan Patent Office, etc.) aimed at enabling the South African based IIPMA to transfer the skills it has acquired with the support of the Japanese institution to other countries in Africa. If Japan is considered as the “first country”, then South Africa the host country of the IIPMA is the “second country” and the African country receiving training from the IIPMA is the “third country” as detailed in section 7.1 of the IIPMA proposal.

Ambassador Yoichi Otabe and Mr. Dhesigen Naidoo Following the strategy adopted by the Government of Japan when implementing IPR measures, the IIPMA will not only approach IPR management training in Africa from a legal perspective but also from various other perspectives

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including the promotion of science and technology as well as culture and art, economic growth, and the impact on corporate activities, so as to implement comprehensive measures. This proposal has already been discussed with the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA); South African Department of Science and Technology (DST); Japan Patent Office (JPO); Japanese Intellectual Property Policy Headquarters; South African Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office (CIPRO) as well as representatives of the South African research institutions and industry. 4.4 Initiated and managed the Southern African Science and Technology Community (SASTeC) and Africa Workshop with Japanese Government and Industry on Partnership in Intellectual Property Management in Africa in June 2006. This workshop was sponsored by Sasol Ltd. (Japan). The purpose of this workshop was to explore mechanisms for the establishment of the Institute for Intellectual Property Management in Africa (IIPMA) in South Africa based on financial and technical support from various institutions in Japan and South Africa.

Vuyani Lingela and Dr. Kiyoshi Kurokawa The IIPMA can focus on African governments, universities, research institutes and companies to provide training on intellectual property rights (IPR) management and standardization. It is envisaged that the establishment of a robust IPR management regime in Africa, following international standards, can

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promote international investor confidence to consider Africa as a destination for investment in new technologies thus promoting technology transfer. New investment in Africa can create new markets for international companies to accelerate and share global economic growth. In Africa this can generate tremendous job opportunities to bridge the growing economic divide to help Africa achieve the Millennium Development Goals and play a significant role in the global knowledge economy. South Africa on the other hand can host the IIPMA using the available physical and institutional infrastructure within South African companies, universities, research institutes and government. Examples of this infrastructure include the Intellectual Property Management Office (IPMO) of the Innovation Fund, Ministry of Science and Technology; Intellectual Property and Commercialization Office (IPCO) of the CSIR, Department of Science and Technology; Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office (CIPRO) of the Ministry of Trade and Industry; and the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) of the Ministry of Trade and Industry. 4.5 Supported the South African Embassy in Thailand in the Conference of Interested Parties in Modernizing Thailand where HE Dr. Thaksin Shinawatra, Prime Minister of Thailand presented the Kingdom of Thailand Modernization Framework to seek the participation of the private and public sector world-wide to accelerate the development of Thailand into a modern, competitive and knowledge-based economy.

Mr. Maurice Bromley, Vuyani. Lingela, Ms. Feziwe Madikizela, Mr. Mono Mashaba, and Col. Hilton Smith

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4.6

Prepared and presented a paper titled: The Contribution of Innovation Actors to Economic Performance in Japanese and South African Regions: Northern Cape, Gauteng, Tokyo and Hokkaido at the Southern African Research & Innovation Management Association (SARIMA) Conference on Managing Research and Innovation for Development in South Africa, May 5-6, 2005. This paper compares the economic performance between regions in South Africa and Japan: Northern Cape, Gauteng, Tokyo and Hokkaido respectively. Tokyo and Gauteng show a similar trend in that they are both highest contributors to national economy. Although Hokkaido and Northern Cape occupy the largest areas of land, their contribution to national economy is small. Primary production is an important contributor to the economy of Hokkaido and Northern Cape. Northern Cape is marked by severe unemployment rate and Hokkaido has the highest unemployment rate of all regions in Japan. With this background, this paper introduces a concept of innovation system which calls for new development strategies with co-ordination across a wide set of policies including social policy, labour market policy, education policy, industrial policy, energy policy, environmental policy and science and technology policy. Integrating various perspectives on innovation system, the paper introduces a new framework for regional innovation system accounting for the contribution of the regional innovation actors to economic performance in their region. Following this introduction, the paper applies this framework to show relationships between innovation activities and to account for factors influencing Hokkaido regional economic performance.

Mr. Yasuhiro Koba, Vuyani Lingela and Dr. Tateo Shimozawa

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The paper describes the roles and functions of innovation actors in the Hokkaido regional innovation system while explaining measures undertaken to transform Hokkaido’s economy from its high dependency on public investment to a private sector driven economy. The role of innovation actors in the innovation system is further indicated by the contribution of Hokkaido University in CRIS, a comprehensive alliance with industry, government, research institutions and financial institution. The general lesson drawn from this paper is that regional economic performance is linked to the availability of actors in the innovation system and to the extent of their contribution to human resource development, research and development, and business development activities. 5. Promoting a strong South African input into the international science and technology for sustainable development discourse as well as NEPAD and international science and technology policy formulation. 5.1 Facilitated and managed the presentation of the Coelacanth Painting by President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa to His Imperial Majesty, Emperor Akihito of Japan in April 2006 through the Imperial Household Agency of Japan to acknowledge the bonds between Japan and South Africa.

Ms. Anati Canca, Mr. Takeshi Tanabe and Vuyani Lingela

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5.2

Initiated and managed the SASTeC Workshop on International Partnership in Science and Technology for Economic Development: Africa and Japan which was held in Tokyo, Japan on 28 February 2006. There is no question that science and technology is essential for sustainable development, for growth, and for poverty reduction. It is, therefore, imperative that SASTeC do a lot more to strengthen cooperation between Africa and Japan in the area of science and technology. This highlights the importance of the theme of this workshop: International Partnership in Science and Technology for Economic Development: Africa and Japan. Initiated and managed the establishment of the Southern African Science and Technology Community (SASTeC) and the SASTeC Secretariat. Recalling the commitment of the Government of Japan, expressed by Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi where he said, on 14 May 2003: “Now that NEPAD is in place, Japan's basic policy on cooperation with Africa will be to support NEPAD through the TICAD process, and to expand partnership for that purpose.” SASTeC is composed of representatives of the Embassies of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) member countries in Japan. The Member States include Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

5.3

Representatives of Japanese and African Governments The SADC Committee of Ambassadors in Japan established the Southern African Science and Technology Community (SASTeC) on 31 January 2006 to fulfil the following objectives: To increase flows of scientific knowledge and resources to Africa through participation in joint programmes with Japan; To facilitate the participation of Africa as a significant player in the international

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science and technology arena; and to facilitate partnership in science and technology between African countries and Japan. The Science and Technology Office, South African Embassy will serve as the SASTeC Secretariat and assume the following responsibilities in consultation with the SADC Committee of Senior Officials and the SADC Committee of Ambassadors. Organise events to enhance Africa’s S&T network in Japan. Draft and distribute papers to members and stakeholders for meetings in Japan. Conduct research and distribute results to members and stakeholders to advance the Africa’s Science and Technology Consolidated Plan of Action in Japan. CONCLUSION Following his promotion to the position of the Executive Director of the National Advisory Council on Innovation (NACI) in South Africa, Mr. Lingela will return to South Africa to assume this new position with effect on 1 April 2007. His successor will assume duties in the Science and Technology Office in May 2007. We are grateful to all the people and institutions that have supported the activities of the Science and Technology Office, South African Embassy in promoting science and technology partnership between Japan and South Africa as well as Africa. We appreciate your continued cooperation in this regard, to increase flows of scientific knowledge and resources to South Africa and Africa through participation in joint programmes with Japanese institutions, as well as facilitating the participation of Africa as a significant player in the international science and technology arena.

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