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Eat to Perform

Dietary Intake

Sports Nutrition Myth


Myth: Eat fat, get fat
Truth: Excess calories of fat do convert into body
fat. But it is important to consume healthful fats in
the right amount (i.e. nuts, avocado, omega 3 )
-helps absorb vitamins A, D, E and K, fuels the
muscles, reduces inflammation

Fuel Your Body

PROPER NUTRITIONAL INTAKE CAN HELP AN ATHLETE TO BE LEANER, STRONGER,


AND ABLE TO WITHSTAND THE RIGORS OF TRAINING AND COMPETITION

In order to fuel our bodies ...

We need energy ...

Where do we get energy from ?

FOOD
NUTRIENTS
CALORIES

Nutrients:
MacroNutrients

MicroNutrients

Carbohydrates
Protein
Fat

Readily usable energy for


the body

Regulate and maintain


bodily functions

Vitamins
Minerals
Fiber
Water

CARBOHYDRATES
What are they?

Carbohydrates serve as the bodys main source of energy fuel.

Carbohydrates are chains of glucose, digested and absorbed in the


body and used for energy.

Carbohydrates are stored in the bodys liver and muscles as


glycogenfor storing and preserving energy

2 TYPES OF CARBOHYDRATES

SIMPLE:

GLUCOSE/SUGAR

COMPLEX:

STARCHES

Simple Carbohydrates
Digested fast
Energy produced
rapidly, but does not
last long
Candy, soda,fruit juice,
baked goods, fruits, milk

Complex Carbohydrates
Often rich in fiber
Usually high in vitamins
and minerals
Energy produced slower,
lasts longer
Green vegetables, whole grain,
bread, pasta, beans, lentils,
potatoes

COMPLEX CARBOHYDRATES
REFINED GRAINS
WHOLE GRAINS

WHOLE GRAINS
Contains the entire kernel:
Bran
Fiber, vitamins, minerals
Protein (small amount)

Endosperm
Carbs, protein, fiber

Germ
More vitamins and minerals, Healthy fats
Protein (small amount)

Brown rice, oats, whole wheat bread and pasta, beans,


potatoes, barley, quinoa, popcorn

REFINED GRAINS
Milled
Removes bran and germ
Removes fiber, vitamins, Iron
Done for texture and shelf life

Often enriched
Adds back in vitamins but
not fiber

Pizza, white bread and pasta, white rice, sugary processed cereals,
pastries, biscuits, baked goods

CARBOHYDRATES
How much?

We should consume 45-60% of all calories to be carbohydrates

Based on age, weight, and physical activity: 6 oz - 8 oz daily


Glycogen stores are NOT infinite, so we need to replenish our
energy in the form of glucose (carbs) daily

Recommended to make at least half of grains consumed WHOLE


GRAINS

Consuming too little CHO can lead to fatigue, and muscle depletion

Protein

Protein is important for building, maintaining and repairing muscle and


body tissues.
10 - 35% of daily calories from protein

1.2 - 1.4 g/kg muscle building & endurance

Sources of Protein:

Meat, Poultry, and Fish


Legumes (Beans and Peas)
Tofu
Eggs
Milk and Milk Products
Grains, Fruits and Vegetables

In much smaller amounts


Should be paired with other sources

Dietary Fat

Vital nutrient our bodies need for health and daily functioning. As an energy
source, it supplies essential fatty acids for growth, healthy skin, vitaminabsorption (A, D, E, K) and regulation of bodily functions
Energy is stored in fat deposits and they insulate the body, providing support
and cushioning for the organs.

Types of Fat
Saturated
Unsaturated

Monounsaturated & Polyunsaturated

Trans

Hydrogenated oils

Types of fat
Physical State at Room
Temperature

Solid

Liquid

Type

Saturated

Unsaturated

Source

Animals

Plants

Dietary Sources

Red meat, poultry, full-fat


dairy, butter, cream, lard

Olive oil, avocados, walnuts

Unsaturated Fats = Good Fats


Name

Monounsaturated

Polyunsaturated
Omega-3/Omega-6

Effects

Heart healthy
Help reduce bad cholesterol

Essential nutrient
Needed for muscle movement,
inflammation, and blood clotting

Nuts
Vegetable oils
Canola oil
Olive oil
High oleic safflower oil
Sunflower oil
Avocado

Soybean oil
Corn oil
Safflower oil
Soybean oil
Canola oil
Walnuts
Flaxseed
Fish: trout, herring, and salmon

Omega 3/ Omega 6 Fatty Acids


ESSENTIAL Polyunsaturated fatty acids
Omega 3 anti-inflammatory
Omega 6 pro- inflammatory
Your body doesnt make these
Required for brain function, skin and hair growth
muscle growth, bone health, and metabolism regulation
Need a ratio of omega 3 to omega 6
rang of 2:1 - 4:1 respectfully

Omega 3/ Omega 6 Fatty Acids


Sources:
Omega 3

Omega 6

Fish

Poultry

Fish Oil

Nuts

Cod Liver Oil

Most Vegetable Oils

Side note
most American diets meet the requirements for
omega 6 intake

Fats for exercise


Highest concentration of energy per gram
(9cal/g) (vs carbohydrate & protein = 4cal/g)
Utilized during long, low intensity workouts
Cycling, walking

Fats & Carbohydrates Relationship


Fat is used as the primary fuel during low
intensity workouts
However, during high intensity workouts, fat
is needed to access glycogen
When glycogen stores are depleted, fat is the
next main source of energy for our bodies
(prolonged exercise)

Hydration
Adequate hydration is essential for optimal performance
Dehydration can cause
- irritability

- muscle cramping

- fatigue

- nausea

- weakness

- decreased performance

Water is always best for maintaining hydration

Hydration
Recommendations:
Drink about 15-20 oz of water 2 hours prior to exercise
For every hour of performance, drink 34-50 oz of water
Thirst is the best indicator that you need fluids

FUN FACT
Fluid loss can be determined by taking pre- and postworkout weight measurements

2% weight loss has negative effects on performance


drink 8-16 oz for every pound lost

Electrolytes

When salts dissolve in water they break down into electrolytes


Help maintain fluid and pH balance and proper nerve and muscle function
Sodium

Potassium

Helps maintain fluid balance in cells

Helps body store glucose for energy

Helps send nerve impulses to muscles

Helps with muscle contractions

Recommended: 1500 mg per day

Recommended: 4.7 g per day

Sweet potato, carrots, celery, olives

Citrus, melons, leafy greens, broccoli

Lost through sweat and urination

Lost through sweat and urination

https://www.insidetracker.com/blog/post/48753816906/hydration-sodium-potassium-and-exercise-what-you

Hydration and Electrolytes


Sports Drinks:

Best for carbohydrate and electrolyte replacement

Justifiable after an hour or more of strenuous exercise

Justifiable in hot weather

Caution: many are high in sugar


taking high levels of sugar when youre dehydrated can cause GI upset

MicroNutrients
Current research suggests these critical micronutrients
are of concern for athletes

Calcium
An adequate intake of Calcium reduces risk of
fractures.
Now is the time achieve your peak bone
density!

Occurs between ages 18 and 30


Especially in women
Calcium is lost through sweat, so athletes may
need greater amounts of calcium in their diets to
compensate.

Foods High in Calcium & Vitamin D


Snacks: greek yogurt, cheese stick, hard boiled eggs
Meals: Broccoli stir fry, spinach and cheese omelette

B Vitamins

Involved in energy metabolism.


Inadequate B Vitamins intake can hurt your performance.
Athletes require greater energy to fuel performance and training.
B Vitamins are lost by increased sweat.
Among female athletes 10% to 60% do not consume adequate amounts of
the B vitamins.

Where to find B Vitamins:


Whole grains, dried beans, milk, dark-green, leafy vegetables
meats, fish, poultry, and bran

Iron

Iron helps to supply oxygen to muscle cells.


Iron depletion can progress to iron deficiency and
anemia, conditions that impair athletic performance.
Young female athletes are at increased risk of Iron
Depletion.

Consume Iron rich foods regularly:


Red meat, dark poultry, fish, whole grains, egg yolks,
lentils, dried beans and peas, leafy greens, nuts, seeds,
iron-enriched pasta and bread.
Vitamin C enhances Iron absorption.

Pre and Post Workout Nutrition

Eat a small meal or snack at least 1-2 hours prior to exercise

Carbohydrates = energy
Good pre workout options:

Protein = muscle recovery


Good post workout options:

LIKE AN ENGINE, OUR BODIES NEED FUEL (NUTRITION) TO RUN AT PEAK PERFORMANCE

Eat Your Way Around


Campus!

STAMP
Chick-fil-a

Subway

Panda Express

Chargrilled Chicken Cool Wrap

Veggie Delight

Steamed Veggies

Chargrilled Chicken Sandwich

Turkey Breast

Brown Rice

Chargrilled Market Salad

Chicken Breast

Add a fruit cup as a side!

Top with Veggies and Light


Spreads!

SaladWorks

McDonald's

Autumn Harvest

Artisan Grilled Chicken Sandwich

Garden Deluxe

Add a fruit cup as a side!

Greek
Nuevo Nicoise
Build your own!

Moby Dick
Hummus
Kabob-E Joojeh: Boneless,
skinless chicken breast
Veggie Kabob with Brown
Rice
Falafel Sandwich

South Campus Diner


What to get:
Salad Exchange: Build your own salad (veggies & fruit)
Suggested: Choose balsamic dressing over caesar or
thousand island. Add in nuts for some texture & healthy fats!
Seasons 12: Build your own stir fry! (go easy on the sauces)
On weekends, the Umami station
offers new healthy recipes such as quinoa
bowls to try out

UMD CO-OP- LOCATED IN THE BASEMENT OF


STAMP STUDENT UNION
A natural food store that offers cheap, and vegetarian
foods options.

What to get:

Try one of their specialty sandwiches on whole wheat bread. They have your
choice of lean proteins and meat alternative and colorful veggies.
Taco Tuesday! All vegan ingredients go into their fresh taco bowls.
Looking for a snack? The co op makes delicious vegan smoothies with only
natural sugar.

North Campus Diner


Sprouts is a vegan option with
Boca Burgers, and made-toorder stir-fry, and wraps.
Build your own salad at New
Yorker, or try the daily vegan
soup on the salad bar.

UMD Farmers Market


When: Every Wednesday, 11 am-3 pm
Where: Outside Cole Field House
What to Get:

McLeafs Orchards (produce)


Valencias Produce
Country Vittles (meat)
Sweet Teensy (baked goods)
.and so much more!

Eat Smart!
1. Meal Frequency

2. Choice and Variety

Fruits and Vegetables


plate should consist of
fruits and veggies
At least 2 cups of fruit and
3 cups of veggies per day

Top Fruits for Athletes


Bananas

provide body with potassium (prevent muscles cramps and weakness) and
carbohydrates. Also high in Maganese, Vitamin B6 and C

Oranges

provide potassium, Vitamin A (reduces inflammation and increases iron


absorption)

Strawberries

Optimum source of Vitamin C (reduces bruising, controls blood sugar,


prevents infections, helps produce collagen which builds muscle and bone).
Also high in folate, potassium, fiber, antioxidants, phytochemicals

Eat the Skin!!


Important nutrients such as fiber and phytochemicals are
found in the skin of many fruits and veggies
EXAMPLE:

small apple with skin= 3.6 grams of fiber


small apple without skin= 1.7 grams of fiber