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A REPORT ON

ARCHITECTURAL
PROGRAMMING
Museums and related data studies
Under the guidance of Prof. Keya Mitra

Som Sunder Roy


130212016
8th sem
Dept. of Arch T, & R.P.
IIEST SHIBPUR

A report on Architecture Programming

CONTENTS
1. General about museums

2. Case Studies: Datamatics


Indira Gandi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya
Bhopal
Bharat Bhawan Bhopal
Regional Museum of National Institute Bhopal

3. Design Considerations

Submitted by: Som Sunder Roy, 8th sem IIEST-Shibpur

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GENERAL ABOUT MUSEUMS


MUSEUM HISTORY :
Museums came into being as a reflection of basic human propensity
towards inquisitiveness, acquisitiveness and a wish to communicate with
others.
The inclination toward acquisition is to be found from pre-historic
times in the grave goods accompanying palaeolithic burials. The Venetian
Republic appears to have been one of the earliest
receive

collection

bequeathed

by

public

bodies

to

Grimani family in 1523 and 1583

which formed the basis of the present archaeological museum in Venice.


Paintings, antiquites and manuscripts taken over by the municipalities in
16th Century, Switzerland contributed to leading museums like National
Swiss Museum, Zurich and historical Museum Berne. In the United States
and Canada private museums were still increasing in large number
prominent among them being the

- Royal Ontoria Museum (Toronto

1912), Metropolitan Museum of Art (N. York, 1970) American museum of


National History (N. York, 1969).

In colonial countries the European

colonisers took initiative in the opening of museums based on existing


European models.

The two decades from 1950-1970 saw a renaissance

of museums, even though the essence was still the same they were being

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adopted to the whole new set of circumstances.

UNESCO came into

being as a patron of international art and culture.


MUSEUMS IN INDIA :
In the Indian context a large number of aristocratic families
were known to have private collections. The two major pre-independence
museums

were

the

Indian

museum of

Calcutta (founded in 1984)

earliest museum in Asia and the Prince of Wales Museum of Bombay


(founded in 1905).
European lines.

These were founded under colonial influence, on

The next phase of major boost is seen in the time

immediately after independence. This was because a large

number of

aristocratic treasures were made public and also due to the formation of
the National Museum (New Delhi) in 1949.
TYPES OF MUSEUMS :
The origin of museums is found either in the royal treasures of
the middle ages or in small collections of curious. and specimens
originating between the 16th and 18th century.

In a general way art

museums may be said to have sprung from these royal treasures of


princely collections while the science museums have inherited the small
collections of curious and specimens. The classification of museums into
categories, according to the terminology of the disciplines to which
the

collections belonged, was started by scholars towards the late 18th

to early 19th century. On this basis it seems more justifiable to divide


museums into these three basic categories artistic or aesthetic, historical
and scientific.
Art Museum
Art museums are those whose collections are conceived and
displayed

essentially for their aesthetic values, even if the objects they

enclose are not all works of art in the intention of their creator. The state
of preservation of the work, the quality of restoration, the environment it

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is

given,

notably

the

background

and lighting, assume special

importance.
Historical Museums :
All museums where collections are conceived and presented in
a historical perspective are classified as historical museums, their object
being

essentially

to document

chronological

sequence

or

an

ensemble representative of a moment in an evolving pattern, the Musie


de I Historic de France created by kind Louis Phillipe at Versailles
displays with the aid of pictures the outstanding events and persons in
the country's history during more than a thousand years. Other kinds of
history museums include those at archeological sites, museums installed
in a historic monument or on a battle field and personal memorial
museums. Example Archeological Museum (Taxila).
Science Museums :
Museums of natural science, of exact or applied science, and
technical museums

(except for museums of history of science and

technology which are accepted as historical museums are classified as


science museums. The task of science museums is to communicate in
three- dimensional form a scientific spirit and mentality,
natural

inclination

for science,

progress, to give each person


development,

to

to give
a

sense

to arouse

information on research and


of

sharing

in technological

make people wish to understand, appreciate and

conserve

nature

and

natural

environment

in an ecological

and

historical

perspective,

so as

to demonstrate the evolution of nature

and man. All these museums associated the real object with model and
with demonstration in physical experiments, planetariums, exhibitions,
field trips. Science museums are probably the best attended and most
active of museums.

They have made the most vital progress in

muscology and techniques or presentation.

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Specialized Museums :
These museums are a part of earlier classifications but are different
in the way that they appeal to only a particular section of society like
museums for children. These museums

have

their

systems

of

preservation and collection and have programmes of activities determined


in application by the homogenity of their aduience. Thus one can have
museums of clock making, fabrics, wines, musical instruments, ceramics
and other subjects

CASE STUDY (DATAMATICS)


CASE STUDIES :
The following three case studies have been done :
1) Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya, Bhopal.
2) Bharat Bhawan (Bhopal)
3) Regional museum of Natural history, Bhopal.

Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya, Bhopal


Introduction
The Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya (IGRMS) an
autonomous organisation of the Ministry of Tourism and Culture,
Government of India, is dedicated to the depiction of the story of
humankind evolving in time and space. The headquarters is situated at
Bhopal, the capital city of Madhya Pradesh, in the central province of India
(between 7725,E longitudes, 2317 N latitudes), about 200 acres of
undulating terrain near the bank of a seven mile long upper lake by 36
painted rock shelters. While the Southern Regional Centre of the IGRMS
situated in the historical Wellington house (near bus stand) on lrwin Road,
Mysore, Karnataka.
The objectives of IGRMS are:
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(a) To present an integrated story of the evolution of man and culture with
special reference to India.
(b) To highlight the richness and diversity of cultural pattern in India and
its underlying unity.
(c) To promote national integration.
(d) To organise indoor and outdoor exhibitions on:
i. Human Evolution and Human Variation.
ii. Culture and Society in pre-and proto-historic times.
iii. Patterns of Culture.
(e) To take steps lo salvage and preserve the fast vanishing aspects of
the Indian culture.
(f)

To promote and conduct research in the related subjects and provide

funds and mate arrangements with other similar institutions for the
purpose of furtherance of the objectives of the Samiti.
(g) To act as a centre of research and training in museology of the
appropriate kind and generate, in the course of time, a new museum
movement in the different regions of India to present and preserve variety
of cultural life.
(h) To undertake all such activities as and when considered necessary for
the achievement of the said objectives.

Site Location :
The site of IGRMS is spread
over an area of 198 acres.

It is

situated just at the outskirts of


Bhopal and is easily accessible
from the city through the lake view
drive on the northern side and
Bhadbhada road on the southern

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side. The site id compromised of rocky hilly terrain with gradual slope
merging into the Bhopal lake on the northern side. The highest point rises
upto 605 mts. on the PREMPURA HILLOCK on the southern side a large
area of 650 acres has been allocated for wild life park.
There are rock shelters just west of the Regional College of
Education on the west slope and some cave paintings have been recently
discovered.

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Rainfall :
Average rainfall is 150mm. Rainfall is mostly concentrated in 3
months, namely July, August & September.

Wind Direction :
Wind direction is westerly and north westerly. Average velocity
of wind varies from 4 Km. to 9 Km. per hour. Variation in speed and
direction of winds on the lower reaches of the site and is because of
higher reaches of its east and south.

BREEZE IN
WINTER
FROM
WESTERLY
WIND

WIND IN WINTERS NORTH


WESTERLY

WIND IN SUMMER
FROM LAKE

WIND IN SUMMER AND


SPRING WESTERN WINDS

Vegetation :
Basically a scrub land with wild growth. There are few trees on the
western slope of PREMPURA HILLOCK. The ground is of hard soil mixed
with jutting boulders. The top soil is only 6".

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Services :
A powerline cuts through the site.

Water is presently pumped

from a bore well which is essentially the sub-soil lake water within the site
the water table is low. All the rain water collects in the nalla and runs into
the lake. There is a windmill generating electricity near the entrance on
the western side.
Water Drainage :
The nalla formed in the rainy season sheds its water in the upper
lake on the northern side and in a pond on the southern side.

SECTION
The museum building has
been designed with large open
halls, flowing into one another,
uncluttered by columns, under
split and sliced shell and domes,
permitting flexibility in display
and the use of natural light and
atmosphere.
lectures
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and

The

museums

programmes
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including its musical and dramatic performances on arts and craft


workshops, presented by communities, traditional groups or guids are
targeted to both specialised and general audience groups, whole lists are
updated by advertisement or direct contacts.

INDOOR MUSEUM HAVING FOLLOWING


REQUIREMENTS
1) Administration with huge
entrance lobby.
2) Library with other facility.
3) Auditorium
4) Research labs.
5) Technical labs with all
facility.
6) Seminar Hall
7) Temporary exhibition area
8) Museum galleries-

a) Human evolution
b) Evolution of material culture
c) Human variation
d) Habitation
e) Food
f) Traffic and transportation
g) Religion practice & cosmology
h) Music and dance
i) Art and crafts
j) Costume and dresses
k) Horticulture

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MATERIAL USED
1) Kota stone
2) Powder coated glazing with 6 mm glass
3) Sand stone cladding over domes
4) Acoustic plaster under domes, vaults
5) Aluminium sky light glazing

Interior showing artefacts on display

GUEST HOUSE CUM HOSTEL


The final design is in the form of two blocks, inter-connected by an
entrance lobby, which establishes the link between the two, the sitting
dimensioning and form of these blocks in determined with following
objectives in mind.
1) Comfort living areas
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2) Easy and clarity in circulation


3) Agreeable condition for social interaction
4) Desired views from areas of major activities.
5) Built form to complete the topographical characteristic of the site.
6) A simple yet distinct architectural expression.
7) A low profiled built form with a landscaped terrain
8) Desired orientation from areas of major activities.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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FRONT

ELEVATION OF
GUEST HOUSE
CUM HOSTEL

VIEW OF
BUILDING

BHARAT BHAWAN

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BHARAT BHAWAN

Looking Back :
Bhopal the city of lakes known for its natural splendor and cultural
heritage is named after Raja BHOJ. The catchment area of the lake
created at Bhojpur was so vast that it included in folklore as "Taal-Mein
Taal, Bhopal Taal, Baaki Sab Talayya".

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In Brief :
Location

Bhopal

Ownership

Department of culture, M.P.

Architect

Mr. Charles Correa

Site Area

1200 sq. metres

Work began

1980

Work completed

1982

The Requirements:
In 1974 a building was proposed to house a museum for art and
culture with requirements as follows:

Permanent museum

Art gallery

Library

Indoor & Outdoor auditoriums

Art workshop

Theatre workshop

Administrative areas.

In 1978 the concept change from a museum for art and culture to a
place of MULTI ARTS COMPLEX providing interactive proximity to the
verbal, visual and performing arts. The requirements change to as follows:

Galleries

Permanent exhibition

Temporary exhibition

Graphic/ceramic/sculpture workshop

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Music library

Indoor auditorium

Open air theatre

Green Room

Restaurant

Administration
The entrance is through an iron-gate 8 m wide and leads to a paved

approach towards the COURT OF FOUNTAIN.

Court of Fountain :
Courts form a major special element in the building. The MUGHALS
always planned their complexes around the courtyard.

From the court of

the fountain one has a visual choice due to the level difference. This court
guides the visitor to TRIBAL FOLK ART GALLERY & ADMINISTRATION,
ANTARANG, BHAIRANG, & VAGARTH towards west and south. This
is the largest court in the 3 courts.

Folk Art & Tribal Court;


This court

is also square in plan. The walls are barren and the

visitor traffic is less as compared to the other courts. Informal seating is


done on the steps like GHATS. SCULPTURE AND LOW LEVEL
LANDSCAPE

are

the

dominating

features

of

this

court.

ADMINISTRATION of the complex is housed in this court. At nights when


the INTERIORS get lighted the walls become dark and looks like a cave
architecture.

Court of Antarang :
On one enters this court either from the circulation axis from the
court of fountain.

The overbridge is the main gate for the entrance to

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this court. The court leads to GRAPHIC AREA, PERMANENT GALLERY &
ANTARANG.

The court performs as an extension and a out space,

passage, room for the visitor waiting to gain entry in the permanent
museum.

Interior of Travel art gallery

Roopankar - Tribal & Folk Art Gallery :


The gallery exhibits a
permanent museum of Tribal
& Folk Arts. There are three
levels in this museum and the
entrance and exit are in the
same level.

Continuous low

ceiling has a clear height of

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2.4 m. and makes the gallery even smaller even though the area covered
is a large one.

THE WAFFLE SLAB ROOF with coffers makes the otherwise heavy roof
seem light.

Large cut outs in PYRAMIDICAL SHAPES breaks the

monotony and natural light is taken from them. Wooden FLEXIBLE


PARTITIONS sub divide the space and gives the sense of direction.
Cubical are placed in between areas to define the movement pattern.
Large pieces of art are place under the skylight and look dwarf even
though they are very huge.

Urban Art Museum:


The skylight over the
shells and along the bays
and

edges

YELLOW

form
POOL

the
OF

LIGHT". To avoid the direct


sunlight on paintings wooded vertical blinds are

used as controlling

devices.
The entry is from a 6.0 meter wide gate. The artificial lighting is
done by lamps placed in the waffle slab and is directed towards the
exhibit. The images of buildings from old Bhopal are condensed in the
galleries of urban art.

The modern art section is sprea over three levels.

The lowest level is plus 88.2 and houses the TRAVELLING exhibitions.
While the upper level plus 90.2 houses the PERMANENT MUSEUM OF
MODERN ART.

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Interior of Urban art Museum

Urban Art Gallery:


The -traveling exhibition has a low ceiling. The total height of the free
space is 2.4 meter with the height increasing at the middle level and
subsequently.

This change in height was originally conceived so as to

accomodate large paintings and sculptures. The column free space which
square in plan allows for maximum permutations and combinations and a
flexible use of space. The main considerations considered are as follows:

Column free space

Change, in level framing small spaces using structural columns

Artificial lighting.

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Antarang :
Antarang

with

SHAPED flooring and seating


pattern with a capacity of 350
people is a delight in itself.
The seating is on the steps
created as a GHAT.

This is

one of the most casual and


intimate

space

wearing

theatre in the entire country.

Bahirang :
The

Bahirang

is

the multifunctional

and

multi dimensional

arena. The steps seating made out of natural slope resemble the TERRAI
farming. In the hilly tracks of the Himalayas.
The lake view to the west gives another dimension to the entire
theatre.

The minarets of the mosque in the backdrop reminds of the

traditional past of the city.

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Bahirung

Air Circulation :
Air slits - 8640 mm long have been provided for ventilation of the
galleries and exhibition theatres just below the roof slab. 16 la rge and 25
small air slits have been provided in the entire complex for better air
circulation. During the summers galleries becomes very hot and stuffy.
Due

to

non

compact

spread

horizontal,

horizontal

planning,

air

section

of

conditioning is a must and proves to be very expensive


In large galleries

like the modern

art

gallery

Roopankar. The deep spaces lacks clear ventilation.


Terrace gardens are always wet as water cannot seep through.
The flower beds are filled with black cotton soil upto 50-60 cm. above
the coba.

R.C.C. nitches of the flower bed rests over a coba finish.

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Landscaping prevents the HEAT BUILT UP inside the complex by two


ways and saves energy.
(a) Provides an isolative layer for solar heat gains.
(b) Enhances the ventilation through air slits by convection.

ANALYSIS
Plus Points :
(a) Material Economy.

Extensive use of local material like BASODA

STONE & ALANGA for masonry and external wall. These have a low
rejection factor of 33%.
(b) Space Economy.

The positioning of columns on a square grid of

9.2 x 9.2 mtr. gives a .large column free space.


(c)

Energy

Economy.

Horizontal spread receives maximum solar

gains of 80% of the roof is covered with lawn and saves


extensive use of artificial energy.

Negative Points :
(a) Maintenance.

High cost of maintenance of the terrace garden

is a lacking factor.

40% of the annual repair bill goes for this

purpose 40% is spent on water proofing of roof, skylights, on


walls, floors, stair and expansion joints.
(b) Restricted

Future

Expansion.

With

covering

entire horizontal

space available if the- need arrive for expansion there is no space left
for this purpose. Existing exhibition area cannot be expanded due to
maximum horizontal coverage.

CONCLUSION :
In the previous chapters we have tried to understand what the
institution called 'The Museum' is all about, in terms of what is and what it

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stands for.

This has been done in

various ways, depending on what

aspect is being examined, by examining what it is today and why and how
it came to be the way it is. The development of museums as we can
realise is closely, linked to our history and to the outlooks, attitudes and
priorities of the society.

In its own ways the Museum has always been

trying to understand what is expected of it and has been accordingly


redefining it aims to meet new challenges and fulfill its obligations. The
modern museum is very different from its predecessors and

its function

has changed entirely. It shares very little with the original functions of
the first public museums. Not only has the form of the museum changed
but also its content. The material exhibited has been intensively expanded
and diversified. Within the society the modern museum fulfills an active
and varied cultural role

educational departments, orientation galleries,

slide presentations, catalogues, posters and other museum publications.


The modern museum is characterised used by more flexibility in its
planning, in keeping with the dynamic nature of the modern society.

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REGIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY,


BHOPAL

View from the Entrance

INTRODUCTION
The Regional Museum of Natural History, a Regional Centre of the
National Museum of Natural History, New Delhi an institution devoted to
promote non-formal environmental education and conservation awareness
among the public through various in-house and outtreach activities located
in the Paryavaran parisar in the lake city of Bhopal was opened to the
public in 1997.
The museum provides a unique opportunity to explore the natural world,
diversity of plants and animals, bio-diversity of Central India as well as the
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intricate network of nature around us. The exhibits in its galleries provide
a judicious mix of specimens, models, translites, audiovisual aids,
presentation of natural habitats in the form of dioramas sequenced on the
theme. There are temporary exhibition hall, a Bioscience Computer Room
and a 'Discovery Centre' where learning can be fun and enjoyable.
OBJECTIVE
The broad objectives of the museum are as follows :

Develop exhibits : Depicting flora, fauna and geology of Central India.

Depict ecological relationships among plants and animals including


man and also to emphasise the importance of conservation through
exhibits and educational activities.

Provide special exhibits and activities to enrich school curriculum in


biology and geology to create environmental awareness among
masses.

Organise appropriate educational programmes for children, adults and


family groups, to create environmental awareness among masses.

Organise specialized educational activities for the disabled.

Publish

popular

educational

material

useful

for

environmental

education.

Develop appropriate intra-institutional collaborations in the Region of


Central India to promote environmental education.

Conduct statewide programmes for environmental education through


activities at district levels.

THE MUSEUM
The entry area has a Reception
counter, where the visitor will be able to
get information and orientation about the
museum. A family of wire-sculptured
models

of

Dinosaurs.

Triceratops,

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welcomes the visitors in the central courtyard of the museum.

Fossil

excavation site showing exposed fossil fragments have also been reproduced
alongside of the models of dinosaurs giving a feel to the visitors of how fossils
are found in nature. There are special facilities available with the museum
to take care of the needs of disabled. All the resources of the museum
will be equally accessible to them.

EXHIBIT GALLERIES
There are two exhibition galleries 1)Natures Network 2)Discovery Centre.
Exhibits are the primary learning resource in any museum.

The

strength and potential of the regional museums for imparting non -formal
environmental education basically emanates from its well planned and
well executed exhibits.
The museum gallery dealing with themes of 'Biodiversity, 'Flora,
Fauna Geology of Central India', 'Rivers of Madhya Pradesh', 'Inter
relationship in Nature', 'Conservation for development' and 'Man and the
Environment.'

NATURES NETWORK
The tour to Gallery begins with a Fascinating Panorama of 7
different Natural Habits- here shown some of.
1) The major ecosystems of the world.
2) Biodiversity of the central India.
3) The story of Earth.
4) Rivers of Madhya Pradesh.
5) Prakriti-Putra biogas.
6) Ecology
7) Crisis- out creation.

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FLORA, FAUNA AND GEOLOGY OF CENTRAL INDIA


The different forest types, animals and the geology of the central
region. Economic importance of plants, the variety and diveristy of plants
and animals of Madhya Pradesh are also depicted. Wetland is the next
theme emphasized mainly through lakes and three major river systems in
the wall. Exhibits on important minerals, fossils, geomorphology and other
rock forms of central region follow next.

Display of Biodiversity inside the museum

DISCOVERY CENTRE
One of the attractions of the museum is the Discovery Centre. This is an
area where efforts are made to activate the various senses of the visitors
who are allowed to choose one or several of the activities provided. The
centre consists of a discovery room and a bio-science computer room.

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DISCOVERY ROOM
The Discovery Room provides opportunities for visitors, especially
children to handle, examine and study specimens, participate in creative
activities as painting, modelling, making animal masks, animal foot prints
etc. They can discover information contained in several discovery boxes
and test their knowledge about nature in the Quiz Board.
BIOSCIENCE COMPUTER ROOM
This facility appeals to High School and College students. There
are facilities to use computer to study biology. The multimedia techniques
provide the visitors an entirely new experience of learning about nature
through interactive modules.
TEMPORARY EXHIBITION
A hall near the central courtyard provides the visitors with
exhibitions on various themes of contemporary interest. Since the exhibit
themes are temporary in nature, these will be changed in regular intervals.
MOBILE EXHIBITION
A mobile exhibition van with a intension to create environmental
awareness among the rural public with exhibitions on various themes will
be changed in regular intervals and visits the surrounding villages of
Bhopal.
EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES
A museum communicates to its visitors through exhibitions and
educational activities. The educational activities are aimed at stimulating
interest in natural history and creating an awareness among the public
about the importance of nature and the conservation of natural resources.
The proposed educational activities of the museum will include :

Guided tours to the visitors in the galleries.

Regular film shows and audio-visual presentations.

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Several programmes for school children.

Special programmes for the disabled.

Teacher Orientation Workshops.

Creative activities like nature painting and animal modeling.

Study visits to nature reserves and protected areas.

Special programs for family groups.

Popular and scientific publications.

Special lecturers & exhibitions.

Seminars, workshops & symposia.

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DESIGN CRITERIA
From the case study and observation I have arrived at points to be
considered while designing National Museum of Mankind many positive
and negative aspect come to view. After the case studies this helps to
make design better by deducting negative points.
Design Consideration
1. Planning was done at microlevel by determining the size of object or
any type of huts which are gorning to display.
2. Planning based on one main consideration and that of one human being
and his behaviour and psycology.
3. Orientation of the building in such a way that, to tackle sun movement
and natural ventilation issues.
4. Maximum use of natural light in areas, like main lobby, cafeteria, court
yards and all museum building.
5. Use of natural material wherever possible like in pathways, courtyards
etc.
Points that should be considered while designing the circulation space
are:

Widen corridors beyond the typical 8-9 feet currently in use.

Corridors should be able to easily handle two-way traffic.

Break up corridor lengths. This will reduce travel time and also
discourage kids from running through the halls.

Keep corridors a consistent width. Corridors that expand and contract


create bottlenecks.

Blind corners can be a hazard. People who walk at a fast pace or turn
corners quickly do not see the traffic in the intersecting hallway.

This can lead to congestion, bumping, collisions, and altercations.

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Consider rounding or angling corners so there is a sight line to the


intersecting corridor.

Design Programme :
As mentioned earlier the architectural organisation of a museum is
determined by the functions it is expected to perform i.e. exhibition,
collection, storage, restoration, education, research along with provision
for leisure activities also. Museums space can be broadly classified into
the following categories, according to the usage of these areas.
1.

Public

2.

Semi-Public

3.

Semi-Internal

4.

Internal.

1.

Public : The totally public areas of a museum are for the under

mentioned :
(a) Entrance and reception
(b) Exhibition areas
(c) Temporary exhibitions
(d) Creative Activities
(e) Hospitality.
2.

Semi Public: include the following

(a) Administration
(b) Education
(c) Lecture Hall
(d) Library.
3.

Semi - Internal :

Submitted by: Som Sunder Roy, 8th sem IIEST-Shibpur

33

A report on Architecture Programming

(a) Administration
(b) Store
(c) Research
4.

Internal :

(a) Workshop
(b) Storeroom
(c) Packaging
(d) Restoration
(e) Staff Entrance
The programme however, is subject to specific requirements based
on museographic and

architectural requirements.

And will be further

discussed in the light of these in the next section.

Submitted by: Som Sunder Roy, 8th sem IIEST-Shibpur

34

A report on Architecture Programming

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1.

Charles Correa by Hassan Uddin Khan

2.

Nmnh.nic.in/Bhopal

3.

Igrms.com

4.

Pictures :

google.co.in/images

Soumya Dasgupta; 10 th sem, B.Arch, IIESTS

Submitted by: Som Sunder Roy, 8th sem IIEST-Shibpur

35