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GAPSS Review Template

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING - Professional learning is the means by which teachers, administrators and
other school and system employees acquire, enhance and refine the knowledge, skills, and commitment necessary to create and
support high levels of learning for all students.

Professional Learning Standard 1: The context of professional learning--the who,

when, why and wherecontributes to the development and quality of


learning communities, ensuring that they are functioning, leadership is
skillful and focused on continuous improvement, and resources have been
allocated to support adult learning and collaboration.
PL 1.1 Learning Teams
Not Addressed
Teachers do not participate in
learning teams or meet regularly to
plan for instruction.

Emergent

Operational

Some teachers in some


grade levels or subject
areas meet to plan for
instruction, but meetings
do not occur regularly and
the work is not aligned with
school improvement goals.

Most teachers meet


regularly in learning teams
to plan for instruction (e.g.,
develop lesson plans,
examine student work,
monitor student progress).
This collaborative work
would be enhanced by
clear alignment of group
expectations with the
school improvement goals.

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Fully
Operational
All teachers participate in
learning teams throughout the
year and meet regularly to
plan for instruction (e.g.,
develop lesson plans, examine
student work, monitor student
progress). The collaborative
work is aligned with the school
improvement goals.

EVIDENCE: Last spring our school got a new principal. He began by interviewing the faculty and staff one on one and
surveying the school. Out of his research came the team model for our entire school. The middle school teachers
merged their two 4 person teams into on octet. They did this so that they could offer their students three different
rotations: Regular Education, Co-Taught and Resource. The high school teachers were put on to 5 four teacher teams.
Each team consisted of one content teacher per the four core subjects. Two of the teachers were special education
certified teachers and of them were regular education certified staff members. These teams have been instructed to
meet weekly on Thursday afternoons for kid talks (How to best serve the students on our team), team updates, and to
discuss any updates from the administration. Mondays we meet with our content area teachers to discuss standardized
testing, lesson plans, AKS, to create common assessments and to discuss any updates from the administration. The first
and third of Tuesday of the month are devoted to the leadership team (department chairs, assistant principals and the
principal). At these meetings we updated everyone on the departments, the principal shares any information he needs
to with the department chairs and we are told what to take back to our team. The second and fourth Tuesday of the
month is devoted to team leads. The team leads from all of the teams meet together with the principal and the assistant
principals to discuss team related items. Lastly, Wednesdays are for faculty meetings or staff wide professional
development. Any all staff information is discussed at these meetings or guest speakers are brought in for professional
development.

Building MapTeams
14-15.pdf

GIVE East Meeting


Calendar.gif

RECOMMENDATIONS: Through these meetings we have definitely increased communication throughout the building
however we are currently re-thinking the teaming model. A handful of our special education students seem to require a
more restrictive environment and without a self-contained unit at our school we are looking at other possibilities.

PL 1.2 Learning Community


Not Addressed

Emergent

Operational

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Fully
Operational

There is little or no evidence that


the principal, administrative team or
related human resources (e.g.,
leadership team, coaches, central
office) supports or reinforces the
creation and maintenance of a
learning community.

There is some evidence


that the principal,
administrative team, or
related human resources
(e.g., leadership team,
coaches, central office)
support or reinforce the
creation and maintenance
of a learning community,
but additional support in
this area is needed.
Although administrators
have created structures for
meetings to occur, they
have failed to provide
teachers with professional
development related to the
collaboration process.

The principal,
administrative team, and
other human resources
periodically support the
creation and maintenance
of an effective learning
community to support
teacher and student
learning. In key aspects of
the school, these
individuals work
collaboratively to reinforce
collaborative forms of
professional development
and learning for staff
members. Although this
process is operational, it
would improve if greater
emphasis were given to
monitoring its impact on
school improvement goals
and student achievement.

The principal, administrative


team and other human
resources consistently support
the creation and maintenance
of an effective learning
community to support teacher
and student learning. These
individuals work
collaboratively to reinforce
teachers skillful collaboration
(e.g., facilitation skills, conflict
resolution, and group
decision-making). They also
help to create structures to
support collegial learning and
implement incentive systems
to ensure collaborative work.
They monitor the impact of
these collaborative processes
on school improvement goals
and on student learning, and
participate with other
individuals and groups in the
operations of the learning
community.

EVIDENCE: This standard is accomplished by our leadership team. We meet twice a month to check in on all
departments throughout the building and to discuss any issues. The people in these meetings are the leaders in the
building. It is their job to support the teachers in our building. After the meetings we have every other week these
teachers go on to have weekly meetings with the teachers they are over. It is during these times that they ensure
collaboration among them, they have their teachers implement initiatives and monitor their progress. This standard is
also accomplished through our team lead meetings. The team leads meet with the administration and then report back
to their teams. On their teams we collaborate, we set goals and monitor student improvement.

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RECOMMENDATIONS: The leadership team is functioning well and as a result so are the departments. The teams could
use a little work. Some teams are working very well and others are struggling. Some communicate regularly and some
fight every time them come together. Additionally some teams are struggling with getting all team members to
collaborate and work together.

PL 1.3 Instructional Leadership Development and Service


Not Addressed
There are few if any opportunities
for teachers to participate in
instructional leadership
development experiences, serve in
instructional leadership roles, or
participate in supporting schoolbased professional learning.

Emergent

Operational

There are opportunities for


teachers to participate in
preparing for and serving
in instructional leadership
roles and contributing to
the school-based
professional learning plans.
However, the opportunities
are limited to a small
number of teachers.

There are many


opportunities for teachers
to serve in instructional
leadership roles and
develop as instructional
leaders. They are highly
engaged in planning,
supporting, and
communicating
professional learning in the
school. This would be
enhanced if there were
more opportunities for
instructional leadership
roles among various
personnel.

Fully
Operational
A variety of teachers take
advantage of opportunities to
participate in instructional
leadership development
experiences and serve in
instructional leadership roles
(e.g., instructional coach,
mentor, facilitator). They plan,
advocate for support of, and
articulate the benefits and
intended results of
professional learning.

EVIDENCE: I believe this category covers the department chairs because they make up the leadership team at my
school and it is their job to engage in planning, supporting and communicating professional learning to the teachers in
their department. This years department chair meetings in language arts have been focused around the new Ga
Milestones test so that we can learn how to better prepare our students.

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RECOMMENDATIONS: I put emergent because the department chairs in our school rarely change. We have had the same
department chairs in Language Arts and Social Studies for the past several years. Additionally, we used to pair new
teachers up with a mentor but we no longer do that anymore. I think some of the departments would benefit from new
leadership and that new teachers should be paired with a mentor as I believe this helped me immensely! School budgets
are tight and several schools do not have the money to pay for instructional coaches but if they continued the mentoring
program these teachers could apply the partnership approach (Knight, 2007) to their mentees in much the same way
that an Instructional coach would do for an entire school system.

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PL 1.4 School Culture for Team Learning and Continuous Improvement


Not Addressed
There is little or no evidence of the
principal and other leaders
establishing ongoing team learning
with clearly articulated expectations
for professional learning.

Emergent

Operational

There is some evidence the


principal and other leaders
support a culture involving
ongoing team learning and
continuous improvement.
However, there is not a
clearly articulated plan for
professional learning for
teachers and
administrators.

There is general evidence


the principal and other
leaders support a culture
involving ongoing learning
and continuous
improvement through a
plan for professional
learning for teachers and
administrators. The
professional learning would
be enhanced by including a
variety of designs (e.g.,
lesson study, peer
observations, modeling,
instructional coaching,
collaborative teacher
meetings, etc.) constituting
high-quality professional
learning experiences.

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Fully
Operational
The principal and other
leaders support a school
culture that reflects ongoing
team learning and continuous
improvement. The principal
and other leaders plan for
high-quality professional
learning, articulate intended
results of school-based
professional learning, and
participate in professional
learning to become more
effective instructional leaders.

EVIDENCE: Before our new school principal took over there was absolutely no professional development occurring in the
building. We had weekly staff meetings but no training took place. If you wanted to be trained you had to go to
something in the county outside of the building. This year the leadership team is involved in a book study. We are
reading the book Building Engaged Schools by Gary Gordon. We are assigned 2 chapters every 2 weeks and we are to
post our thoughts to an online discussion board. Additionally our new principal has brought both GIVE Centers together
for professional development with MAX Teaching to equip the teachers on both campuses with instructional strategies to
improve their teaching practices.

Book Study.gif

RECOMMENDATIONS: After spending an entire teacher work day at GIVE West for our first MAX Teaching professional
development session I feel it would be more beneficial for the administration to survey the teachers to find out what
they want to learn. At this training session they spent about 4 of the 6 hours discussing the strategy of using an
Anticipation Guide. The majority of the teachers at GIVE West have already been trained on anticipation guides and so
the majority of the day was pretty much a waste of valuable teacher time. At this session the teachers were given a MAX
Teaching book. I recommend the principals ask the teachers to skim through the book and submit requests for the next
training session in the spring.

PL 1.5 Job-Embedded Learning and Collaboration


Not Addressed

Emergent

Operational

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Fully
Operational

Teachers spend little or no time


during the work-week learning and
collaborating with colleagues to
improve their use of curriculum,
assessment, instruction, and
technology.

Some teachers spend a


small amount of time
during the work-week
collaborating with
colleagues. However, this
time is often focused on
non-curricular topics and
typically occurs after
school.

Most teachers spend time


during a workday each
week collaborating with
colleagues about
curriculum, assessment,
instruction and technology
use in the classroom. This
professional learning would
be enhanced by allocating
more time each week for
job-embedded learning
(e.g., lesson study, peerobservations, modeling,
instructional coaching,
teacher meetings).

Teachers spend a significant


part of their work-week in jobembedded learning and
collaboration with colleagues
addressing curriculum,
assessment, instruction, and
technology. They receive
sufficient support resources
(e.g., materials, time, training)
and assist with securing
additional resources
necessary (e.g., funding, time,
technology) to sustain their
learning. (NSDC Standards
recommend that formal and
informal job-embedded
learning take place during at
least 25% of educators
professional time. Such time
can be devoted to lesson
study, peer observations and
coaching, modeling,
conferencing, teacher
meetings, mentoring.)

EVIDENCE: I would say this is accomplished through the plethora of meetings in our building each week. Leaders are
trained and then those leaders train the remainder of the staff. Recently a few of our teachers have been struggling with
co-teaching. Since we are on a 4 teacher team the co-taught environments typically involve two teachers from different
content areas. As a result the struggling teachers felt like they did not know how to co-teach in a content that they are
not certified in. The team model allows for more flexibility among the staff so the team members have been covering
classes while their team mates observe other teachers co-teaching. Additionally, on our team all of our kids go to
Electives at the same time allowing our team time to collaborate, address assessments and conference with
parents/students.

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RECOMMENDATIONS: This year our teachers are being asked to embrace our new eClass initiative and although all of the
meetings throughout the building have increased collaboration and communication there is almost no time for eClass
training. The reason I marked this standard as operational is because the teachers are given time during their work day
for collaboration and professional development I just think they would benefit from more time to specifically train them
on eClass. However, this is a challenge as there is not a whole lot of time left in the day for teachers to be trained. This
is why we have begun training the department chairs so that they can train their departments every Monday.

PL 1.6 Resources Support Job-Embedded Professional Learning


Not Addressed
Resources are not allocated for jobembedded professional learning that
is aligned with high-priority school
improvement goals. Little if any
professional development is devoted
to helping teachers use technology
to enhance student learning.

Emergent

Operational

Some resources are


allocated for professional
learning. However, much of
the professional learning is
conducted primarily after
school and is not aligned
with the high-priority
school improvement goals.
There is limited
professional development
devoted to helping
teachers use technology to
enhance student learning.

Most resources for


professional learning are
allocated for the identified
high-priority school
improvement goals.
However, providing more
job-embedded learning
opportunities and
professional development
would enhance teachers
use of technology to
support student learning.
In other cases, these forms
of professional
development need to be
more ongoing and
sustained to ensure actual
classroom implementation
of training strategies and
processes.

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Fully
Operational
Resources are allocated to
support job-embedded
professional learning that is
aligned with high-priority
school improvement goals and
technology supporting student
learning. There is sustained
commitment to ensuring that
these professional
development activities result
in successful classroom
implementation. There is also
a process in place to
determine the value-added of
key strategies and processes,
i.e., how they impact student
achievement and related
organizational short- and longrange goals.

EVIDENCE: Since our administrative staff has created a plan for professional development thru the use of MAX Teaching
and a focus on building relationships I rated our school as operational. The professional development is there, resources
are being used for it and some training is going on in the building. The teachers are also being trained during their
department chair meetings on how to incorporate eClass and how to enhance their instruction to meet the demands of
the new GA Milestones assessments.
RECOMMENDATIONS: However, our school needs to improve on sustaining these trainings to ensure that they are
actually implemented in to the daily classroom instruction. Last year our school decided to focus on implementing the 3
Color Response writing strategy. Our weekly staff meetings on Thursday afternoons were focused on training the
teachers on how to implement the 3 Color Response strategy and the language arts teachers spent the first month of
school training the students. Beginning in September the staff had been trained and they were now expected to
implement the strategy in their classrooms. Our Thursday staff meetings turned in to paired grading sessions were non
language arts teachers were paired with language arts teachers to compare their grading methods on the 3CR
assignments. Additionally gradebook checks were conducted to ensure teachers were actually implementing this
strategy in to their classrooms. After this experience I truly believe it is better to focus on one method and go about it
the way that our instructional coach guided us through implementing the 3 Color Response writing strategy. I feel that if
eClass is as important as the county seems to make it then our professional development should be focused on eClass
and not on MAX Teaching or building relationships. Then someone should be monitoring teacher eClass course pages to
ensure that they are actually implementing the use of this tool.

Page 10 of 26

Professional Learning Standard 2: The processthe howof professional learning is

aligned with articulated goals and purposes, data-driven, research-based,


evaluated to determine its impact, aligned with adult learning theory, and
collaborative in design and implementation.
PL 2.1 Collaborative Analysis of Data
Not Addressed
Teachers and/or administrators use
personal experiences or opinions
to determine student and adult
learning needs and goals. Data is
not collected and analyzed in
monitoring school and classroom
improvement strategies,

Emergent

Operational

Teachers and/or
administrators work in
isolation or with limited
representation to review
student summative data and
determine student and adult
learning needs and goals.
Student and teacher data is
collected and analyzed at the
end of the year to monitor
the accomplishment of
classroom and school goals.

Teachers and administrators


collaboratively analyze
disaggregated student
learning, demographic,
perception, and process
data to identify student and
adult learning needs and
goals. They collect and
analyze relevant student
and teacher data at the
beginning and end of the
year to monitor and revise
school and classroom
improvement strategies.
Accomplishments are
celebrated and results are
regularly reported to family
and community.

Page 11 of 26

Fully
Operational
Teachers and administrators
collaboratively analyze
disaggregated student
learning, demographic,
perception, and process data
to identify student and adult
learning needs and goals.
They continuously (minimum
of 4 times a year) collect and
analyze relevant student and
teacher data (e.g. action
research, analyzing student
work, classroom observations,
Awareness Walks, and
surveys) to monitor and revise
school and classroom
improvement strategies.
Accomplishments are
celebrated and results are
regularly reported to family
and community.

EVIDENCE: It would appear that analysis of data has taken a back burner recently. Last year it seemed like all we talked
about was data. We actually had a data room where all of the walls were covered in data. This was primarily driven by
the implementation of the 3 Color Response Strategy. Teachers were told to average their students 3CR grades every 6,
9, 12 and 18 weeks in order to monitor the progress of the 3CR writing strategy. When the data began to show
improvement we began to look at how this method was impacting our writing scores on standardized tests like the
Gateway and the Georgia High School Graduation Test. Additionally, I believe the new assessments and a focus on
behavior has caused last years data to loose relevance.

2014-15 LSPI
Goals.docx

PBIS Lesson Plan for


Communication and
the Week of October 27, Instructional
2014- Habitual
Support
Tardiness.pptx
Framework.jpg

RECOMMENDATIONS: I understand why data analysis has died for the moment. However, I noticed teachers began
discussing their teaching practices more when we were working as a school to implement the 3CR strategy. Having
teachers come together to discuss student performance opened up a dialogue on teaching practices. I recommend that
the administration push for teachers to focus on the 3 Color Response method again as we wait for new test results to
analyze. In my interview with my assistant principal he explained that this years professional development is going to
focus in part on relationship building. He stated that the instructional teams and the relationship professional development have been
implemented in an effort to aid teachers in accomplishing our goal of increasing the percentage of students who receive one or less disciplinary
referrals to 10% in 14-15 school year (Daly, 2014) and I think data could play a huge role in aiding us towards accomplishing this goal. Last
year our PBIS team put together a PBIS lesson targeting an issue we had with students being tardy. The data was inserted in to the PowerPoint
lesson for that week and teachers discussed with students why the data was showing such an influx in tardies. I think our staff would benefit from
a review of the referrals so that as a school we can high light the number one issues with referrals. If we are implementing the team model in
order to achieve a decrease in referrals then we need to see the data and know if what we are doing is working.

Page 12 of 26

PL 2.2 Evaluating Impact of Professional Learning


Not Addressed
The principal and other leaders
develop and implement a plan for
evaluating teachers reactions to
professional development events.
Teachers contributions to the
evaluation are limited to providing
satisfaction ratings. The
evaluation identifies changes in
teacher knowledge and skills as a
result of participation, but it does
not evaluate changes in practice or
impact on student learning.

Emergent

Operational

The principal and other


leaders develop and
implement a plan for
evaluating professional
development events.
Teachers contribute to the
evaluation by collecting and
analyzing summative student
learning data. The evaluation
identifies changes in teacher
knowledge and skills as a
result of participation and
year-end student
performance, but it does not
evaluate change in teacher
practice.

The principal and other


leaders develop and
implement a comprehensive
plan for conducting ongoing
(formative and summative
for a one- to two-year
period) evaluation of the
impact of professional
development on teacher
practices and student
learning. The evaluation
also emphasizes changes in
school culture,
organizational structures,
policies, and processes.
Teachers contribute to the
evaluation by collecting and
analyzing relevant student
learning and process data.

Page 13 of 26

Fully
Operational
The principal and other
leaders develop and
implement a comprehensive
plan for conducting ongoing
(both formative and
summative over a three- to
five-year period) evaluation
of the impact of professional
development on teacher
practices and student
learning. Evaluation also
emphasizes changes in
school culture, organizational
structures, policies, and
processes. Teachers
contribute to the evaluation
by collecting and analyzing a
variety (student learning,
demographic, perception,
and process) of relevant
data. The plan specifies the
evaluation question(s), data
sources, data collection
methodology, and data
analysis processes.

EVIDENCE: I do not think this standard is being addressed at all. The administrative staff has definitely put together a
plan for professional development, they are implementing this plan but the only evaluation, outside of the teacher
evaluation system, that is occurring in the building centers around teacher opinion and not on student performance.
Additionally, things like the MAX Teaching training session very loosely aligns to the goals of our LSPI because our first
goal states, GIVE Center East will increase the percent of students scoring 95% or better (on grade level) on the local
school language arts, science, and social studies common assessments to 80% in 2014-2015 (GIVE Center East, 2014)
You can argue that providing teachers with instructional strategies should increase student performance on standardized
testing and that is how you could justify the MAX Teaching training session. However, if implementation is not really
being monitored then the likelihood of teachers to incorporate these strategies drops drastically.
RECOMMENDATIONS: I think our school is in a transitional period and in the process they have sort of lost sight of
evaluating professional development. Professional development is happening in the building but I believe it is based on
teacher opinion and not on a needs assessment. Additionally, due to lack of focus on goals there is little to no data being
collected or analyze. I think the administrative staff should consider reviewing the LSPI with the department chairs at
one of our leadership meetings and take a pulse check. In order to ensure that our teachers remain on track with our
LSPI I think its a good idea to make sure that our professional development aligns with our LSPI.

PL 2.3 Interpreting and Using Research Results


Not Addressed

Emergent

Operational

Page 14 of 26

Fully
Operational

The principal and other leaders


review professional journals that
summarize research instead of
actual research or they do not
recognize a need for reading and
interpreting research when
making instructional decisions
regarding professional
development and school
improvement approaches.

The principal and other


leaders review educational
research. They create
opportunities for a few,
select teachers to study
educational research. They
work with them to conduct
reviews of research when
making instructional
decisions regarding the
adoption of professional
development and school
improvement approaches.

The principal and other


leaders demonstrate
modest skills in interpreting
educational research
(validity and reliability,
matching populations, and
interpreting effect-size
measures). They create
opportunities for teachers to
learn to use educational
research. They work with
them to conduct extensive
reviews of research to make
informed instructional
decisions regarding the
adoption of professional
development and school
improvement approaches.

The principal and other


leaders demonstrate
advanced skills in
determining appropriate
research design, interpreting
research results, and
determining whether results
can be generalized. They
ensure that teachers and
community members learn
to use educational research.
They work with them to
conduct extensive reviews of
research to make informed
instructional decisions
regarding the adoption of
professional development
and school improvement
approaches.

EVIDENCE: This practice is fairly new due to a recent change in leadership. Our previous principal really was not doing
his job and as a result there was little to know professional development happening in the building. Now, with our new
principal, this standard has just started to emerge. I rated our school as emergent because this has just recently begun
to occur but it is also only occurring on a small scale. Our principal has just required the leadership team to read Building
Engaged Schools and brings videos to our meetings discussing hot topic items in the educational world. We have spent a
couple of our meetings discussing the flipped classroom and instructional theories on how students learn best.
RECOMMENDATIONS: For now, given all of the changes, I think our principals approach is best. He is targeting the
leadership and allowing the leadership team to then go on and infect the rest of the staff. Richard Dawkins says ideas
are shared through memes patterns of behavior, values, languages, and technologies (Knight, 2007, p. 181) and I
believe my principal has figured out that it is easier to infect a small group of educators than the entire staff at one time.
I think he is purposely focusing his attention on a core group of leaders in hopes that he can infect them with an idea
virus (Knight, 2007, p. 180) and then watch that virus spread throughout the rest of the staff.

PL 2. 4 Long-Term, In-Depth Professional Learning


Page 15 of 26

Not Addressed
Teachers experience single, standalone professional development
events that are typically large
group, workshop designs. There
is little if any evidence of
implementation or change in
practice in classrooms. No
emphasis is given to enhancing
teachers content knowledge or
understanding.

Emergent

Operational

Teachers attend multiple


workshops on the same topic
throughout the year to gain
information about new
programs or practices. They
experiment with the new
practices alone and
infrequently with limited
school-based support for
implementation. No
emphasis is given to
enhancing teachers content
knowledge or understanding.

Teachers participate in longterm (two- to three-year


period), in-depth
professional learning that
includes a variety of
appropriate professional
development designs
including the use of
technology. The various
designs are aligned with the
intended improvement
outcomes. They include but
are not limited to follow-up
support for implementing
new classroom practices
(e.g., collaborative lesson
design, professional
networks, analyzing student
work, problem solving
sessions, curriculum
development, coursework,
action research, and
classroom observations).
Some evidence is present of
attention to enhancing
teachers content
knowledge.

Page 16 of 26

Fully
Operational
Teachers participate in long-term
(two- to three-year period), indepth professional learning that
engages learning teams in a
variety of appropriate
professional development
designs including the use of
technology. The various designs
are aligned with the intended
improvement outcomes. They
include but are not limited to
extensive, follow-up support for
implementing new classroom
practices (e.g., collaborative
lesson design, professional
networks, analyzing student
work, problem solving sessions,
curriculum development,
coursework, action research, and
coaching with feedback). A major
focus of ongoing professional
development is a commitment to
maintaining and updating all
teachers knowledge and
understanding of the content
they are teaching and changes
occurring in their field(s).

EVIDENCE: I feel that our school automatically falls in to emergent simply because we have not carried any in-depth
professional learning over time. The closest thing we have come to this is our 3 Color Response Strategy. This is the first
time in the 4 years that I have been at GIVE East that we have ever come together as a school to implement a school
wide program. At this point we are a semester in to our second year of implementation.

3 Color
Instruction.pptx

RECOMMENDATIONS: With all of the new changes to our school recently I believe the 3 Color Response Strategy has
been forgotten. Last year when we first implemented this program we made sure to plan our staff development around
this program. As a result writing scores on all standardized tests improved. This year with so many changes there has
not been time to make the 3Color Response Strategy as big of a priority as we did last year. I have been working on
creating a digital version of our 3 Color Response Training in order to provide the teachers on campus with a tool to use
as new students arrive.

GIVE East GHSWT


Scores.gif

Page 17 of 26

PL 2.5 Alignment of Professional Learning with Expected Outcomes


Not Addressed
The principal and other leaders
provide single, stand-alone
professional development events
that are typically large group,
workshops with no expectations
for implementation of new
classroom practices. Generally,
activities are not aligned with the
school improvement plan or
related priorities.

Emergent

Operational

The principal and other


leaders provide multiple
workshops on the same topic
throughout the year. They
articulate the learning goal,
but do not discuss
expectations for
implementation. Teachers
receive limited school-based
support for implementing the
new classroom practices.
Activities are only generally
aligned with the school
improvement plan or related
priorities.

The principal and other leaders


align a variety of professional
development designs with
expected adult learning
outcomes (e.g., collaborative
lesson design, professional
networks, analyzing student
work, problem solving sessions,
curriculum development,
coursework, action research,
and coaching with feedback).
The professional learning is
long-term (two-to-three year
period) and in-depth with
extensive school-based support
for the implementation of new
practices. They clearly
communicate the expectations
for implementation by providing
rubrics that describe the desired
classroom practices and
communicate how those
practices connect to the school
improvement goals. Generally,
activities are aligned with major
priorities within the school
improvement plan.

Fully
Operational
The principal and other leaders
align a variety of professional
development designs with
expected adult learning
outcomes (e.g., collaborative
lesson design, professional
networks, analyzing student
work, problem solving sessions,
curriculum development,
coursework, action research, and
coaching with feedback). They
ensure that teams of teachers
are engaged in long-term (twoto-three year period), in-depth
professional learning with
extensive school-based support
for the implementation of new
practices. They clearly
communicate the expectations
for implementation with
collaboratively developed rubrics
describing desired classroom
practices and communicate how
those practices connect to the
school improvement goals.

EVIDENCE: Again, since our school is going through so many changes we are emergent on this standard as well. Goals
have been articulated via our LSPI but specifics on how those goals are going to be met have not been laid out to the
staff yet. For example, our LSPI states that GIVE East will increase the graduation rate for all students who have
attended GIVE Center East 5% in 2014-2015 and a small group of us are working on a way to use eClass to create a
move on when ready environment for our students. Outside of that the administration has not really laid down the
specifics of how they expect us to accomplish this goal.
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RECOMMENDATIONS: I completely trust our administrative staff. This year I am a department chair and so I have had the
opportunity to watch how they work. After being a part of this team I believe our administrative staff is making changes
but slowly because they are waiting to see which teachers are committed. Although I understand the importance of
long-term professional development after experiencing our school wide initiative with the 3 Color Response right now is
a period of transition and once things settle we can go back to focusing on school wide goals that are supported by the
administration.

PL 2.6 Building Capacity to Use Research Results


Not Addressed

Emergent

Operational

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Fully
Operational

Professional development is
planned with no regard for
research about adult learning
needs and individual and
organizational change processes.
The sessions provided include
strategies that do not mirror the
instructional strategies teachers
are expected to use with students
(e.g., lecturing on inquiry method,
covering material instead of
helping participants to use and
internalize it), and sessions are the
same for all teachers regardless of
their career stage.

Professional development is
planned using research
about adult learning needs
and how individuals
experience the change
process. The professional
development sessions
demonstrate classroom
practices through videotapes
and simulations. The
experiences focus on
procedural learning -how to
do it- rather than on
developing deep
understanding of concepts
and problem solving
strategies. Some professional
development is specialized
for new and mentor
teachers.

Professional development is
planned using research
about adult learning needs
and individual and
organizational change
processes. The professional
development sessions
include modeling and
demonstrations of expected
classroom practices. The
experiences impact
teachers depth of
understanding enabling
them to use the new
strategies routinely. Some
professional development is
specialized to reflect career
stages of new teachers,
mentor teachers, and
teacher leaders.

Professional development
builds the capacity of the
staff to use research about
adult learning needs and
individual and organizational
change processes as they
implement new strategies.
Professional development
sessions consistently employ
the same instructional
strategies that are expected
to be used in their
classrooms. The experiences
impact teachers depth of
understanding enabling
them to solve problems and
adapt new strategies to
classroom circumstances.
Professional development is
differentiated to reflect
career stage needs and
interests (e.g., mentoring,
leading learning teams,
coaching, utilizing
technology, and curriculum
development).

EVIDENCE: Our past principal was absentee and so as a result the administration did not push teachers to demonstrate
specific expectations. Teachers were expected to teach, manage the student behaviors and have decent test scores. As
a result all professional development catered to How to do it sessions and skills for new teachers. This is largely due to
the turnover rate at our school and the teacher evaluation system for our older teachers.
RECOMMENDATIONS: Again, I am confident that after this year of transition, once the principal has weeded out the
teachers he wants to keep a clear mission will be delivered. From their teachers will be given targeted specific
professional development that will span 2 3 years and will that will provide teachers with an opportunity to review
data.
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PL 2.7 Knowledge about Effective Group Processes


Not Addressed
Teachers and administrators lack
knowledge about effective group
processes and/or work alone,
disregarding collective
responsibility for student learning.

Emergent

Operational

Teachers and administrators


have knowledge of stages of
group development and
effective interaction skills,
but lack skill in group process
strategies needed for
productive collaborative
work. As a result, colleagues
work in temporary groups
often encountering
unresolved conflict or
frustration. Technology (e.g.,
email, chat rooms, and
websites) is used to support
collegial interactions.

Teachers and administrators


have knowledge and skills
regarding group processes
(e.g., group decision making
strategies, stages of group
development, effective
interaction skills, and
conflict resolution) that are
necessary to accomplish
tasks and satisfy the
interpersonal expectations
of the participants. As a
result, the school culture is
characterized by trust,
collegiality, and collective
responsibility for student
learning where colleagues
work collaboratively.
Technology (e.g., subject
area networks, lesson
sharing, seminars) is used
to support collegial
interactions.

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Fully
Operational
Teachers and administrators
have knowledge and skills to
monitor and improve group
processes (e.g., group
decision-making strategies,
stages of group development,
effective interaction skills, and
conflict resolution) that are
necessary to accomplish tasks
and satisfy the interpersonal
expectations of the
participants. As a result, the
school culture is characterized
by trust, collegiality, and
collective responsibility for
student learning where
colleagues work
collaboratively in established,
ongoing learning teams.
Technology (e.g., online
discussions, web casts, and
seminars, educational blogs,
listservs, downloadable
resources) is used to support
collegial interactions and to
ensure effective and sustained
implementation.

EVIDENCE: After being placed on teams this year our school really got an inside look at how much we lack the skills to
work collaboratively in groups. Especially since the majority of the teachers in our school are high school teachers that
are used to being isolated. This year, being paired with a teacher who is less motivated than I am has been
excruciatingly frustrating! However, we are not the only group that is having difficulties and we are nowhere near as
rocky. Recently there has been talk of splitting up one of the teams because they are not getting along, hence the
temporary groups often encountering unresolved conflict or frustration.
RECOMMENDATIONS: I believe our administration knew the obstacles the team model would face and so the beginning
of the year professional development centered around building relationships. As the school year progressed we got busy
and this portion of our professional development dropped off. I think it would be more beneficial to train the team leads
on instructional coaching and train the rest of the team on communication.
EVIDENCE: The population of students that we serve at GIVE East are the ones that typically come with a lot of
baggage. I am rating our school at operational because our students baggage is always at the fore front of everything
we do. One of the key things we do at GIVE East is called Kid Talks. During these meetings our team gets together to
discuss each student. How are they doing on attendance, how are they doing behaviorally and how are they doing
academically. These talks guide our instruction and aide us through better serving our students.

Sample Kid Talk


Form.docx

RECOMMENDATIONS: There is a fine line between considering a students baggage and allowing them to use it as an
excuse. I believe sometimes our staff has a tendency to come off too harsh and not extend the grace a student is due.
Sometimes we are quick to judge a student for their behavior before checking in to see what may actually be causing
the behaviors we are seeing.

Page 23 of 26

EVIDENCE: On our team we have decided to co-teach. As a result we have more freedom to teach across the
curriculum. For example about a month ago the science teacher and I conducted a Gateway practice session. We
selected a science prompt so the students could focus on science content while practicing writing skills. I taught the
writing portions and she supported the students with the science information.

Energy
Transformation Prompt.docx

RECOMMENDATIONS: I would recommend more teachers use the team model to their advantage. If our social studies
team mate was more on board with teaching students and being innovative with our teaching practices he and I could
be teaching together. However, he does not seem to want to put forth any extra effort towards his profession and as a
result he continues to lecture from PowerPoint slides.

EVIDENCE: I scored our school as Emergent simply because we are assigned to teams and departments where we
discuss content knowledge, research based instructional strategies and assessment strategies.
RECOMMENDATIONS: I would recommend that the school cut back on staff wide training via programs like MAX teaching
because they do not meet the needs of all teachers. It would be more beneficial to request that teacher attend training
elsewhere in the county.

PL 3.4 Partnerships to Support Student Learning


Not Addressed

Emergent

Operational

Page 24 of 26

Fully
Operational

There is no collaboration
with parents or the
community in developing
activities to support
learning. Communication
through only written
correspondence is limited to
encouraging parents to
attend school functions,
yearly conferences, and
performances.

There is a school committee


to focus on developing
community partnerships to
support student learning.
Communication through
written correspondence or
phone is about school
programs, student progress,
and encouraging
attendance at school
functions, yearly
conferences, and
performances.

There is a committee that


works with families and the
community through
partnerships that develop
programs to support student
learning. Strategies are
implemented to increase
family involvement such as
offering suggestions about
ways parents can support
student learning at home and
communicating with families
about school programs and
student progress (e.g.,
information about report
cards, grading practices,
student work, homework,
and school events) through a
website, phone, email, voice
mail, and written
correspondence.

Partnerships among
teachers, families, and the
community are maintained
to develop programs that
support learning and
enhance student skills and
talents. Strategies are
implemented to increase
family involvement such as
providing parent education
workshops with information
on child development and
supporting student learning
at home and communicating
with families about school
programs and student
progress (e.g., information
about report cards, grading
practices, (student work,
homework, and school
events) through an
interactive website, phone,
email, voice mail and written
correspondence.

EVIDENCE: This is one standard that I feel my school excels at. Our title I office does a fabulous job of reaching out to
parents and providing them with adequate support. Just recently our math teachers held a parent workshop so that they
math teachers could provide these parents with tools to help their students be successful in Math. Language Arts will be
hosting a similar meeting the week before Thanksgiving Break. Additionally our PBIS has made connections with vendors
all over the county requesting them to donate to our school so that we can reward our students for positive behavior.

Parent Math
Workshop.pub

Ice CreamSocial
Invitations.pub

Page 25 of 26

RECOMMENDATIONS: I truly feel that the parent workshops are a step in the right direction. These workshops allow us to
meet the parents on a positive note and get a feel for the needs of these students. These strategic meetings should
happen across all content areas in order to really come together as a school to support our parents.

Page 26 of 26