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A course project for WHRE 5521: Work-based Learning Policy & Legal Issues

Created by: Mina Blyly-Strauss, Spring 2011

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Special thanks to Trish Praus, Bev Hermanstorfer, Barbara Pederson, Wayne Jensen,
Sabina Levsen, Brian Nutter, Shirley Poelstra, and Pari Beyzavi, Ph.D., for speaking and/or
emailing with me at various times throughout the semester to provide insight into existing
work-based learning programs available to students through Special Education and Career
and Technical Education programs in the Minneapolis Public Schools.
Special thanks also goes to Stephanie Fitzgerald, in the Saint Paul Public Schools, and
Barbara Starr, in the Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan School District, for speaking and
emailing with me this semester about the work-based learning programs and policies they
work with in their respective districts.

~Table of Contents~
Topic
Introduction to Work-Based Learning.
Definition......................................................................................................
Benefits........................................................................................................
Program Overview.
Rationale......................................................................................................
Desired Program Goals
Program Organization..
Teacher Qualifications and Role.
Support Staff Qualifications and Role
Eligible Students
Partnership Structure
Responsibilities of Partners.
Program Logistics.
Identifying Students..
Class Size and Composition........................................................................
Earning Credits............................................................................................
Program Sites..............................................................................................
Required Paperwork....................................................................................
Liability and Insurance..
Types of Work-Based Learning Activities..
Worksite Fieldtrip...
Informational Interviews
Job Shadowing..
Career Mentorship.
Service Learning
School-Based Entrepreneurship.
Paid Internship...
Non-Paid Internship..
Cooperative Work Experience.
Youth Apprenticeship
Youth Entrepreneurship
Curriculum....................
Course Formats.
Career Categorizations.
Career Fields..
Career Clusters..
Textbook Resources.
Themes
Who Am I?...
How Will I Present Myself?...
Who Will I Work With?...
How Will I Work With Them?
How Will I Keep Myself and Others Safe on the Worksite?...........
What About the Law?.
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What Will I Do with My Earnings?


How Will I Share What Im Learning With Others?.........................
What About After High School?......................................................
Program Evaluation.....................
Methods of Program Evaluation..
Students
Staff
Collaboration
Indicators of Program Success
The Worksite...
Site Selection..
Site Supervision..
Worker Rights in MN..
MN Child Labor Laws
Fair Labor Standards Act..
ADA Considerations..
Affirmative Action/Anti-Discrimination.
Considerations for Students on IEPs..
Collaboration with IEP Teams..
Accommodations and Adaptations..
Worksite Placement Considerations...
Sample Program Forms
Training Agreement for Paid Experiences.....
Training Agreement for Non-Paid Experiences.
Training Agreement for Students on IEPs.....
Training Plan...
Training Plan for Students on IEPs................
Statement of Assurances..
Insurance and Emergency Information..........
Verification of Safety Training..
Student Time Card for Paid Experiences......
Student Time Card for Non-Paid Experiences..
Weekly Performance Profile.
Weekly Performance Profile for Students on IEPs...
Mid-Term Progress Report...
Mid-Term Progress Report for Students on IEPs.
Summative Performance Profile..
Summative Performance Profile for Students on IEPs
Independent Student Transportation Form
Independent Student Transportation Form for Students on IEPs..
Paid Competitive Early Release Plan.
Paid Competitive Early Release Plan for Students on IEPs
Student Placement Request.
Student Placement Request for Students on IEPs...
Incident Report
Worksite Visit Report.
Potential Worksite Evaluation Form
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2

Introduction to Work-Based Learning


This first section of the manual introduces the purpose and benefits of work-based learning
programs, in general, and provides an overview of the specific program this policy manual is
designed for.
Definition
Work-based learning provides students with a variety of opportunities to increase their
awareness of career options and to explore these options in the classroom and in worksite
experience. Through work-based learning experience students develop an increased level of
personal awareness and important workplace skills such as critical thinking, problem solving,
teamwork, conflict management, and career-specific technical skills.
Quality work-based learning experiences incorporate the following characteristics*:
Designed to
o Develop workplace awareness skills
o Expose youth to all aspects of the industry
o Engage youth in their learning
o Provide opportunity for reflection
Supported by
o Defined services and clear procedures
o Trained and caring adults
o Appropriate youth preparation
o Individualized work-based learning plans
o Communication among all partners
Structured to
o Foster youth and adult relationships
o Provide experiences that are safe and legal
o Support authentic and relevant activities
o Ensure learning objectives are met
o Include assessment and continuous improvement
Connected to
o A shared community vision and values
o Formal academic and occupational learning
o An intentional sequence of experiences
o Quality documentation and evaluation
o The learners next step

*borrowed from Quality Work-Based Learning Toolkit, Kansas City, Kansas Public Schools (2002).

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Benefits
to Students:
Increased understanding of personal interests, aptitudes, and abilities**
Improve academic achievement*
Realize the relevance of their education and apply knowledge in a meaningful way*
Explore career options*
Increase self-confidence*
Increased motivation and appreciation of staying in school the importance of postsecondary education opportunities**
Acquire real workplace experience and work readiness skills*
Development of critical thinking, problem solving, and teamwork skills**
Connect with an adult role model*
Establish professional contacts for future employment**
Expand opportunities*
to Parents/Guardians:
Become partners in the education of their young person*
Collaborate with others assisting their young person to make informed career choices*
to Schools:
Meet the needs of diverse student populations**
Improve academic achievement by participating students*
Reduce overcrowding by utilizing a variety of off-campus learning sites**
Improve student motivation resulting in better attendance and graduation rates*
Promote and foster positive staff interaction with the business community**
Improve relationships with the community*
to Employers
Involvement in the curriculum development process**
Better prepared employees who understand workplace expectations*
Opportunity to provide community service**
Reduce recruitment and training costs*
Developmental opportunities for their current workforce**
Derive value from students work*
Improved employee retention**
Improve morale and management skills of current workers*
to Community
Creating an environment of collaboration and cooperation between the school, the
employers, and the community**
Encouraging respect, tolerance, and understanding between different groups**
Contributing to building a more productive local economy**
Fostering confidence in the school system as practical through observable results**
*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)
**borrowed from North Carolinas Guide to Work-Based Learning, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

Program Overview
This is a career awareness and work experience program for Native American students in
grades 6-12 who attend Minneapolis Public Schools. Across activities for all grade levels
classes are structured to involve as much group process and group support as possible. This
is consistent with the communal values that are traditional to Native cultures, while also
intentionally used in this context to create positive peer pressure for students to continue their
participation in the program and stay in school through at least high school graduation.
Although most programming takes place during the regular school day, there is also an active
effort to involve families and community members through a series of afterschool career
related events such as guest speakers who work in a variety of career fields, career fairs,
resume writing workshops, and college tours. Activities that take place after school hours
generally have food present and are open to students caregivers and families to participate,
to try to build further support for participation from the community youths experience beyond
school walls.
Career awareness and exploration activities are woven into a seminar-format class that
introduces students, grades 6-9 to a wide range of career fields. Students learn about
different careers through guest speakers, field trips, research projects, career videos, job
shadows, and in-school hands-on group role play experiences where they learn and practice
different job skills (e.g. scripting, storyboarding, casting, shooting, and editing a movie;
reading patterns, calculating needed fabric, cutting out pieces, sewing clothing items;
selecting recipes, preparing menus, scaling up and down recipes to meet a specified group
size, budgeting for supplies, shopping for supplies, measuring and preparing ingredients,
serving dishes, etc.). Throughout this time, students also engage in self-exploration activities
such as completing interest inventories, skills inventories, annually writing and revising posthigh school plans, journaling about their experiences in the program, etc. These components
comprise the beginnings of student work-based learning portfolios, which continue to be built
on throughout high school program participation.
Starting in grades 10 or 11, students begin to be paired with mentors in career fields of
interest to them. Effort is made to find Native American mentors, but of primary importance is
finding mentors who are likely to seem approachable to teens and who work in the fields of
interest of the students. Students start out their work-site experiences with a four-day-a-week
internship at the worksite of their mentor. That same mentor will stay in contact for at least
one school year, whenever possible. Whenever possible, at least two students are placed at
each job site to encourage maintenance of peer support for active participation. About every
ten weeks (twice a semester), students rotate to different job sites in related fields or interests
of the student. During these experiences, students participate in weekly seminar classes
where they debrief on their experiences with peers and learn additional readiness skills like
interviewing, job safety, resume writing, as well as college planning. After a year of rotating
job sites, if students find a paying job on their own they have the option of doing on-the-job
training at this site, while still attending the weekly seminars, and working towards individual
goals for their job site. Students continue to build on their career portfolios throughout their
program experience.

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Rationale
This student demographic has historically faired poorly in the Minneapolis school district.
Though relatively small in number of students, this demographic has consistently had
amongst the highest drop-out rates in the districtwith lower graduation rates than all other
demographics (including special education) since the 2005-2006 school year. Additionally,
when looking at census data, the number of Native American-owned firms in the city of
Minneapolis is significantly under-represented when compared to their percentage of the
populationmeaning that there are likely very few Native American role models in the
business world that these students may ordinarily come in contact with. By starting out with
career exploration activities in middle school, its hoped that interest in careers and motivation
to continue in the program will be fostered before students are missing high school credits so
ineligible to participate in work-based learning experiences.
Desired Program Goals
This program centers around the following six program goals:
1.) Native American students will expand their awareness of the broad range of career fields
available to those living in the twin cities metro area.
2.) Native American students will develop and maintain written post-high school plans that
account for at least career and community participation, with consideration of college or
technical school possibilities included.
3.) Native American students will develop and improve in application of career readiness
skills and resumes that showcase these skills along with their experiences on different job
sites.
4.) Families and community members will be involved in students growing awareness and
participation in work-related learning experiences.
5.) The graduation rate of Native American students attending Minneapolis Public Schools
will increase.
6.) An increased percentage of Native American students will move directly from high school
enrollment to college and/or gainful employment.

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Program Organization
This second section of the manual describes the qualifications and roles of teachers, support
staff, students, and partners involved in the program.
Teacher Qualifications and Role
At the middle school level, a teacher must hold a current Minnesota teaching license
qualifying them to work with students in grades 6-8. Prior professional development or
coursework related to work-based learning is preferred but not required. Teachers working at
these grade levels hold ultimate responsibility for classroom management and assist trained
paraprofessionals in engaging students with the program curriculum. They also hold
responsibility for consulting with the case managers of any students who are on IEPs to
ensure that all necessary accommodations and adaptations are being implemented in the
classroom. If a student does have transition goals on their IEP, the teacher should have a
copy of the transition goals and notify the case-manager ahead of time when or if material
applicable to the goals is being presented in class.
At the high school level, a teacher must hold a current Minnesota teaching license qualifying
them to work with students in grades 9-12 and a Minnesota endorsement as a Teacher
Coordinator of Work-Based Learning. Licensed coordinators designed all student curriculum
for grades 6-12 and rotate between high school buildings to lead seminar classes. They are
responsible in training support staff and participating middle school teachers in all relevant
curricular components and oversee accumulation of accurate documentation and records.
Licensed coordinators oversee worksite selection/evaluation, coordination, placements, and
ongoing motoring for all worksite-based student learning experiences. They are responsible
for supervising support staff and consulting with the case managers of any students who are
on IEPs to ensure that all necessary accommodations and adaptations are being
implemented in the classroom and are being communicated to the job coaches so
reasonable accommodations can be made on worksites.
Staff in this program are not required to hold any special education certification and dont hold
any case management or due process responsibilities. When a student is on the IEP and
participating in the program, the childs normal case manager and one of the districts special
education work-based learning coordinators will hold ultimate responsibility for all transition
assessment and planning paperwork. If time allows, though, a program staff may participate
in a students IEP meeting as a general education staff member upon request.
Support Staff Qualifications and Role
Support staff working with students in grades 6-12 must minimally hold the equivalence of a
two-year associates degree (60 semester credits) and demonstrate a history of stable
employment by having remained with prior employers for at least one calendar year.
At the middle school level paraprofessionals rotate between school buildings to co-facilitate
the career awareness activities with a licensed teacher at each site. These paraprofessionals,
along with the licensed teachers from each site, will be trained in the designated curriculum
MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

and supported on an ongoing basis by a licensed work-based learning coordinator. At casemanager request, paraprofessionals may attend and participate in IEP meetings of students
they directly work with.
At the high school level, paraprofessional job coaches have responsibilities inclusive of
scouting potential job sites and completing paperwork as assigned by the licensed
coordinator one day a week (the day of seminar), checking in with students at their job sites
to find out how things are going and completing students weekly performance reviews four
days a week, and maintaining open lines of communication with the licensed coordinator
about any concerns relating to students, worksites, and/or bussing as they arise. At casemanager request, paraprofessionals may attend and participate in IEP meetings of students
they directly work with.
Eligible Students
Students in grades 6-12 are eligible for this program if they or a direct blood relative (parent,
grandparent) are an enrolled member of a federally-recognized Native American tribe. All
students that fit this criteria, including those with special needs, are automatically eligible to
participate in all school-based opportunities. Additional parent/guardian permissions will be
required for any program activities that take place outside regular school hours or off school
property.
Partnership Structure
This program requires partnership between multiple district departments and programs
including, minimally, the department of Indian Education, the department of Career and
Technical Education, the LifeSkills program, and the Transitions Plus programs along with
special education case-managers and individual K-8 schools, middle schools, and high
schools in the district. These intra-district partnerships are necessary to ensure the best
match and continuity of services for students. With the exception of middle school teachers,
the program staff is hired through the department of Indian Education and the curriculum
takes shape within this department. At the high school level, multiple work-based learning
programs may be available to students so the program staff will collaborate with multiple
departments to ensure that each student is provided with work-based learning experiences
that will best meet any particular interests or special needs that a student may have. The
curriculum and this policy manual are made available to intra-district partners to provide
culturally-relevant ideas for instruction of Native American students.
Additional partnerships are initiated in the community with local businesses and non-profit
organizations. These partnerships provide worksite opportunities for students and act as
important resources for ongoing curriculum development to address the skills needed for a
variety of occupations and to fill any gaps in foundational skills employers may notice with
incoming students. In turn, these businesses and organizations benefit from professional
growth opportunities of their current employees and student recruitment opportunities for their
future workforce.

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Students, parents/guardians, and other members of the Native community are also important
partners to ensure program success. Students bear responsibility for taking full advantage of
the educational and career opportunities provided for them. Parents/guardians, other family
members, peers, and the community at large have an important support role to play in
encouraging students to make healthy choices in their lives.
Together, representatives from these partnership constituenciesintra-district departmental
and program partners, local businesses and organizations, parents/guardians, students, and
community leaders and/or elderscome together create an advisory committee where
program staff and department of Indian Education officials can go to get ideas for
improvement of current program activities and feedback on proposed changes. Below is a
list of Best Practices* for a program advisory committee:

Send a letter to each committee member signed by the highest possible school official.

Communicate the programs purpose and goals.

Inform committee members exactly what is expected of them. (A written position


description can be helpful.)

Familiarize committee members with the education staff and school environment. (Invite
members to visit during school hours, especially to observe and meet with students.)

Keep committee informed of what is happening in other schools and districts, and at state
and national levels.

Invite committee members to attend school functions (e.g., school board meetings)

Schedule meetings at a convenient time, preferably at the school and possibly during the
late afternoon or evening.

Plan meeting schedule well in advance and keep members informed.

Establish an agenda prior to each meeting.

Set and maintain a reasonable time limit for the meeting and stick to it. (Keep to agenda
and stay on task.)

Provide recognition of all advisory committee members through newspaper articles,


annual report, presentations, etc.

Be enthusiastic! (Enthusiasm is catchy.)

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Responsibilities of Partners
Each partner and program staff holds their own responsibilities in relation to the successful
implementation of quality work-based learning experiences for all students. Some of these
expectations are outlined in the training agreement forms found in the sample forms section
of this document. Other specific partner responsibilities are outlined below:
The Minneapolis school district and the department of Indian Education will

Provide support for the program and advisory committee.*

Provide students the opportunity to participate in work-based learning experiences.*

Verify proper insurance coverage.*

Provide sufficient time for the coordinator to manage the program and observe students at
worksites.*

Provide adequate resources.*

Review state program standards in order to monitor the program.*

Ensure personnel appropriately licensed as a work-based learning coordinator is in


place.*

Maintain manageable coordinator to student ratio.*

Supports program staffs development to ensure they can maximize the opportunities at
the workplace.**

The programs licensed Work-Based Learning Coordinators will

Develop a high quality work-based learning program, including the following tasks:
o Design and deliver the school-based seminar component.*
o Secure suitable worksites for students.*
o Ensure worksite activities support the students learning objectives.*
o Assure every activity meets state and/or local standards.*
o Recruit students in a timely manner to assure a smooth transition in scheduling and
orientation.*
o Disseminate program information to all partners.*
o Oversee the recruitment and training of community/business mentors.*

Effectively manage the work-based learning program, including the following tasks:
o Develop partnerships with business/community agencies.*
o Coordinate the work-based learning advisory committee.*

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o Plan and deliver program information to students, parents/guardians, teachers, and


the business/community.*
o Prepare and process Individual Training Agreements and Training Plans.*
o Provide a network for problem solving and open communication.*

Provide adequate supervision of the work-based learning program, including the following
tasks:
o Review with the student and employer, worksite responsibilities to assure the
experience meets child labor law requirements.*
o Visit the worksite to ensure the employer and student are following the Individual
Training Plan and the student is working in a safe environment.*
o Establish a procedure for regularly scheduled meetings with employers and job
coaches or worksite supervisors to discuss the students progress in achieving the
employers and schools expectations.*
o Follow-up on any concerns or questions raised by the student, parent/guardian, job
coach or employer.*

Follow appropriate evaluation protocol, including the following tasks:


o Maintain student records for local and state reporting.*
o Coordinate the evaluation of the program on a yearly basis with the development and
implementation of a plan for program improvement.*
o Submit technical reports as required by local and state officials.*

Appropriately support students, including performance of the following tasks:


o Model positive workplace attributes such as teamwork, active listening, effective
conflict management, regular workplace attendance, and professional dress.
o Facilitate the enrollment of students into the work-based learning programs by: a.
involving parents through an informational session to discuss the importance of the
parents role and support of the program; b. preparing the student for the specific
activity; and c. scheduling interviews between businesses and students.*
o If needed, coordinate the students work-based learning program with special needs
educators.*

Raise awareness of the program, through performance of the following tasks:


o Work with school administrators and counselors to ensure the program is included in

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the class schedule.*


o Create promotional materials.*
o Promote the program to parents, students, and business/community.*
The cooperating middle school teachers will

Collaborate with the work-based learning coordinator and paraprofessionals to provide the
best possible education for a student.*

Model positive workplace attributes such as teamwork, active listening, effective conflict
management, regular workplace attendance, and professional dress.

Attend and actively participate in relevant staff development activities.

If needed, coordinate the students work-based learning program with special needs
educators.*

The programs middle school-level paraprofessionals will

In partnership with the work-based learning and coordinators and cooperating middle
school teachers, fully implement a high quality work-based learning curriculum with
students.

Model positive workplace attributes such as teamwork, active listening, effective conflict
management, regular workplace attendance, and professional dress.

Attend and actively participate in relevant staff development activities.

The programs high school job coaches will

Provide assistance in locating potential worksites.*

Communicate with the work-based learning coordinators to enhance coordination of


learning activities in the classroom with those in the workplace.

Collaborate with the work-based learning coordinator to provide the best possible
education for a student.*

Model positive workplace attributes such as teamwork, active listening, effective conflict
management, regular workplace attendance, and professional dress.

Attend and actively participate in relevant staff development activities.

The intra-district department and program partners will

Provide assistance in locating potential worksites.*

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Work with the department of Indian Education and program staff to thoroughly and
proactively address the work-based learning and related needs of Native American
students they work with.

The local school building administrators will

View work-based learning programs as an integral part of the schools curriculum.*

Support the activities of the program.*

Provide a designated space for work-based learning activities to take place.

Ensure program staff with the management of student conduct or discipline when
needed.*

The school social workers or guidance counselors will

Advise work-based learning coordinators about students who could be eligible from
participation in the program.*

Assist in scheduling.*

Provide career and educational planning assistance to the students.*

The special education case managers will

Communicate regularly with program staff to ensure that any necessary accommodations
or adaptations are being implemented.

Provide copy of Performance Profiles and mid-term progress report to parent/guardian.

Grant school credit for successful training experience and take daily attendance.

The local business and organizational partners will

Follow all federal and state child labor laws.*

Provide workers compensation for the student for all paid hours worked (for paid
experiences).*

Pay at least the state minimum wage for hours worked by the student (for paid
experiences) unless student qualifies for an exception to the minimum wage laws in which
case documentation must be completed and on file.*

Sign the Individual Training Agreement.*

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Instruct the student in the competencies identified in the curriculum provided and
document the students progress.*

Conduct progress reviews with the student (which may include parent, guardian and
school personnel) and provide copies of those reviews to the school.*

Treat the student as a regular employee.*

Do not exclude student from participation in the program on the basis of race, color,
creed, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, status in regard to public
assistance or any other protected groups under state, federal or local Equal Opportunity
Laws.*

Protect student from sexual harassment.*

Provide student with safety training, safe equipment, and a safe and healthful workplace
that conforms to all health and safety standards of federal and state law (including the Fair
Labor Standards Act, OSHA, and MN Child Labor Laws).*

Properly train student on the safe operation of any equipment prior use.*

Maintain ongoing communication with program staff.**

The students will

Actively participate in their school and workplace experiences.**

Help to develop meaningful learning objectives.**

Abide by the companys policies and procedures (i.e., attendance, confidentiality,


accountability, safety, rules of conduct, etc.)*

Maintain acceptable performance at school and on the job.*

Provide proof of accident insurance coverage if using own transportation to and from the
worksite.*

Contact the job coach and work-based learning coordinator if difficulties come up at the
worksite.*

Participate in progress reviews scheduled with mentors, school personnel and/or


parent/guardian; and share information of events or facts relevant to your progress in the
program.*

Participate in reflection activities that help them process what they have learned.**

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The parents will

Sign the Individual Training Agreement.*

Support the student in meeting the requirements of the program.*

Collaborate with the district to ensure that appropriate transportation is provided to and
from the worksite for experiences.*

Participate in any progress reviews scheduled with mentors, school personnel, and
student; and communicate information vital to the success and development of the
student.*

The program advisory committee will


Help determine student, community, industry and business interests and needs.*
Advise the program coordinator on what should be taught.*
Assist with funding issues.*
Serve as a communication link to others in the community especially business and
industry.*
Recruit businesses and other workplace partners to participate.**
*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)
**borrowed from North Carolinas Guide to Work-Based Learning, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

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Program Logistics
Many logistical considerations are to be made when implementing a work-based learning
program. In this section are guidelines for identification of eligible students, class sizes and
composition, earning of high school credit, program sites, paperwork requirements, and
liability and insurance requirements.
Identifying Students
Qualifying students are identified throughout the school year from a variety of sources: school
paperwork documenting enrollment status, social worker/guidance counselor referral, teacher
or case-manager referral, and parental inquiry. Information on the program is made available
on the internet through the districts website, sent out to district staff via email twice a year,
and promoted in print publication in the local community.
Class Size and Composition
Class sizes at any site should not exceed 15 students. This is to allow for adequate
individualization for learners needs and interests within the curriculum framework.
Depending on the scheduling constraints of different sites, students may be grouped by
grade level. In schools with low Native American student enrollment more flexibility on the
part of the school may be required and mixed grade classes may be more likely.
Earning Credits
High school students are eligible to receive high school credit for both seminar and worksite
experience and participation. The number of credits earned for these experiences will be
based on the instructional hours-to-semester credit ratio that the students home high school
uses.
Program Sites
Core career awareness and exploration activities for students in grades 6-8 take place in the
districts middle schools and K-8 schools with Native American populations. Core workbased learning activities for grades 9-12 take place in the districts high schools with Native
American populations, as well as at specific off-campus job sites as determined to best meet
the interests and needs of each student. Additional activities for students in grades 6-12 will
be offered at two central locations (north and south) during after-school hours (e.g. dinner
events focused on specific careers, family events, job fairs, award recognitions, business
panels, etc.).
Required Paperwork
At a minimum, work-based learning coordinators should maintain the following on file for
each middle school student:

Parent/guardian contact information

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List of student learning objectives

Evaluation/grade reports on student performance

A signed record of safety training (see sample form in this policy manual)

Other information as determined by individual student situation (e.g., current IEP or


emergency medical plan)

At a minimum, work-based learning coordinators should maintain the following on file for
each high school student:

A signed Individual Training Agreement (see sample form in this policy manual)

An Individual Training Plan listing progress towards educational objectives (see sample
form in this policy manual)

Completed time sheets for all hours spent on a worksite (see sample form in this policy
manual)

Weekly, midterm, and summative performance evaluation reports for each worksite (see
sample form in this policy manual)

A signed statement of assurances (see sample form in this policy manual)

A coordinator observation report of each worksite (see sample form in this policy manual)

A signed record of safety training (see sample form in this policy manual)

Other information as determined by individual student situation (e.g., current transition


IEP, emergency medical plan, early release permission, or independent student
transportation form with proof of auto insurance)

Liability and Insurance


Program components that take place on school grounds are covered by the school district
liability and insurance policies in place at the time an activity is occurring.
Students who drive themselves to off-campus job sites are responsible for providing their own
proof of insurance. Please see the independent student transportation form under sample
forms.
Worksites are responsible for keeping a generally safe environment and providing worksite
accident and liability coverage for their staff. Specific questions relating to requirements of
worksite accident and liability coverage can be directed to the school districts general
counsel, Andrea Kaufman, at Andrea.Kaufman@mpls.k12.mn.us.
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School District Policy on Self-Injury Liability*


Special School District No. 1, the Minneapolis Public Schools, is self-insured for general
liability coverage for claims incurred on or after January 1, 1990. The Superintendent is
responsible for the overall operation of the self-insured general liability program. All requests
for payment under the self-insured general liability program must be in writing and submitted
to:
Associate Superintendent of Finance and Operations
Risk Management Office
Minneapolis, MN 55413-2398
Settlements in excess of $15,000 must be approved by the Board of Education.
*see district policy #3650, http://policy.mpls.k12.mn.us/uploads/3650.pdf

School District Policy on Fieldtrip Transportation*


When groups are small in number or distances such to make it economically impractical to
use district owned vehicles or commercial transportation, the use of privately owned
passenger automobiles or station wagons will be permitted under the following conditions:\

The driver of the vehicle must be properly licensed as required by state law. A person
possessing a valid Class C driver's license but not a school bus endorsement may drive a
vehicle with a seating capacity of ten or less persons used as a school bus but not
outwardly equipped or identified as a school bus. The operator of a vehicle designed to
carry more than ten passengers is required to have a Class A or B license with school bus
endorsement.

The automobile used must be covered by liability insurance during the period of the trip
for the following amounts:
o Bodily injury limits . . . . . . . . $100/300,000
o Property damage limits . . . . . $10,000

It is the responsibility of the owner/operator to instruct his auto insurance company to


send to the building principal or program director an insurance certificate outlining the
above coverages prior to the trip.

The legal passenger capacity of a vehicle must not be exceeded. For instance, a pickup
truck or camper is designed to carry passengers only in the cab of the vehicle. A sixpassenger station wagon has a legal capacity of six passengers including the driver.

The use of the vehicle must have the approval of the building principal or program director
and be cleared through the Field Trip Office.

The conditions outlined above are not intended to apply to principals, nurses, school social
workers, or other school personnel who may find it necessary to transport students on an
unplanned or emergency basis.
*see district policy #6230, http://policy.mpls.k12.mn.us/uploads/6230b.pdf

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Types of Work-Based Learning Activities


There are eleven different kinds of work-based learning activities that students may
participate in. Some of these are activities where students are paid, and others are activities
where students are not paid but are still gaining valuable experiences with different types of
work and skills needed for success in a workplace environment.
The information that follows provides descriptions, examples, and best practices relating to
the following types of work-based learning activities: worksite fieldtrips, job shadows, career
mentorships, service learning experiences, school-based entrepreneurship, paid internships,
non-paid internships, cooperative work experiences, and youth apprenticeships, and youth
entrepreneurship.

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Worksite Fieldtrips
A worksite fieldtrip involves taking students on an organized tour of a job site. During this
kind of fieldtrip, an employee or employees of a company will lead the tour, discussing what
kinds of jobs people do at the worksite and what types of skills a person needs to have to
work in the industry. Worksite fieldtrips are appropriate for middle school and high school
students can be arranged for either a whole class or for a single student with an identified
interest in a particular career field.
Examples from Minneapolis Public Schools
Worksite field trips take place through the High Tech Girls and High Tech Boys programs
in the career and technical education department. These programs are focused on high tech,
high pay, career fields and include field trips to higher-education institutions such as MCTC,
as well as job sites.
There are also other worksite fieldtrips specific to individual career and technical programs in
the high schools. One recent example from Roosevelts Construction program was when
students went to a light rail construction site and got to walk the job site and learn about what
was going on there with the central corridor project.
Other Ideas

Contact Two Rivers Gallery or a different art gallery and arrange to have a curator give a
tour of their current exhibit and talk about the process of curating and publicizing an art
show.

Contact the Indian Health Board and arrange a tour of a clinic to have an employee give a
tour and discuss the wide variety of service jobs it takes to keep the clinic running and the
different types of skills and college degrees needed for different health occupations.

Contact a childcare center and arrange to have a center director or childcare teacher give
a tour and discuss the different jobs that need done to keep the center running and the
required skills and education needed to be hired in different positions at the center.
Best Practices*

Send a letter of understanding to the business prior to the field trip.

Have participants view a videotape of the worksite in advance of the visit.

Review examples of the business/industry marketing materials, products, or services


performed in advance of the visit.

Have students generate a list of questions, prior to the visit, to ask the
business/employees.

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Train volunteers to assist in managing the experience.

Teach students what to look for at the worksite. (For example: type of skills required to
perform different tasks and why the product or service is important.)

Ask the business/employer to build in demonstrations during the tour to explain why the
company has been successful.

Ask employers to allow time for employees to explain their roles, responsibilities, and how
they were educated, trained or qualified to be employed at the worksite.

Require students to write reflections and/or thank you letters following the worksite visit.

Evaluate field trips annually.

Recognize business partners, publicly, for their involvement (e.g., thank you letters,
awards, newspaper articles, framed certificates).

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Informational Interviews
Informational interviews are when students formally interview someone who works in a
particular career about what the career is about, what types of activities are done in the dayto-day work of the career, and what types of skills and level of education is required to work
in the career area. This awareness building activity is appropriate for both middle school and
high school students.
Some Examples

Contact the Indian Health Board to arrange an interview with a doctor or nurse for a
student who is interested in a medical career.

Contact The Circle or another local newspaper to arrange an interview with a staff writer
for a student who really likes to write.

Contact a local theater to arrange an interview with an actor for a student who is
interested in acting.
Tips to Promote a Successful Interview*

Have the student research the occupation prior to the informational interview, develop
questions and establish learning objectives and goals.

Have the student call the employer to arrange the informational interview. Ideally the
interview should take place at the worksite.

Have the employee share his or her career path and the skills necessary to do the job.

Have the student reflect on the experience.

*borrowed from Quality Work-Based Learning Toolkit, Kansas City, Kansas Public Schools (2002).

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Job Shadowing
In a job shadow experience, a student spends a day or two observing an employee at their
place of work. The goal of this type of work-based learning activity is for a student to see
first-hand the types of activities someone does on a job and they types of skills they need to
use in doing these tasks. Job shadow experiences are appropriate for middle school and
high school students to participate in. They are great awareness-building activities that are
best arranged so that one or two students are paired with a single employee.
Examples from Minneapolis Public Schools
Two job shadow programs a year are conducted through Transitions Plus for students with
special needs. These activities take place at the VA as well as the Midtown Global Market.
Each student gets connected with an employee at the job site and gets to go through the
entire day with the employee. This program is very popular among the students.
Through the Career and Technical programs, students who are considered at-risk as well as
other general education students are able to participate in job shadow programs. One
example of a job shadow program at Roosevelt high school is a partnership that the schools
Health Careers program has with Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC). In this job
shadow program, 12 kids are paired with employees at HCMC on three-week rotations.
Other Ideas

Encourage students and parents to participate in bring your child to work days when
possible; excuse school absences for participation in this event.

Contact an elder-care program and arrange to have a student follow a PCA or nursing
assistant for a day.

Contact a grocery store and arrange to have a student follow around a store manager for
a day.
Best Practices*

Develop a plan that includes a clear process for selecting prospective participants and
worksites for a job shadowing experience.

Build a congenial relationship between each job shadowing site and the local educational
agency so that scheduling changes and other student issues can be quickly addressed.

Develop a process to identify employees at a business or agency who are willing to be


shadowed and demonstrate the ability to:
o 1. Support the growth and career development efforts of the participant.
o 2. Help participant explore options, values, and career alternatives.
o 3. Unconditionally accept a participant as he or she is.
o 4. Convey a sense of caring and importance.

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o 5. Enhance the students feeling of self-worth.

Develop a process for matching students interests with related careers, business, and
industry.

Parental input is encouraged.

Provide a letter of understanding to the workplace that explains how the student will be
prepared and what is expected from the employer. Provide orientation activities for the
participant and employer prior to the beginning of the job shadowing experience.

Provide safety instruction for all job shadowing, especially where there may be a
physical risk.

Ensure participants are supervised by the local educational agency and an employee
assigned at the job-shadowing site.

Recognize employers and employees who participate in the job shadowing experience.

Contact local newspapers and other media to promote activities and to recognize
businesses and agencies that participate.

Require participants to keep job shadowing journals to record and reflect on their
shadowing experience. To monitor the success of the shadowing experience, the journals
may be copied and provided to the school for evaluation.

Accommodate students of all abilities.

Review job shadowing activities, annually.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Career Mentorship
Career mentoring provides a 1:1 ongoing relationship for a student with someone who is
experienced and skilled in a career field that the student is interested in. The mentor may
help the student to develop a plan for attaining the skills and education needed to enter a
chosen career field. Mentorship may take form either entirely face-to-face or partially through
the internet. Career mentorships may be most appropriate for high school students.
Examples from Minneapolis Public Schools
Career and Technical rograms in the district partner with a variety of community
organizations to provide career mentorship opportunities for high school students. One
example of this for students in the Construction program at Roosevelt is their partnership with
ACE Mentor Program, which brings in professionals in construction, engineering, and
architecture to mentor students. Next school year, Roosevelt students will also have the
opportunity to work with mentors through the BestPrep program, which will have both
internet-based and face-to-face mentorship components
Other Ideas

Contact the GeekSquad or another computer repair company to arrange for a career
mentorship for a student whos really interested in computers.

Contact the Indian Health Board or another social service agency to arrange for a career
mentorships for a student whos really interested in a career in a medical field or in
substance abuse prevention.

Contact MIGIZI Communications or another local media organization to arrange for a


career mentorship for a student interested in becoming a videographer or filmmaker.
Best Practices*

Develop a plan that includes a clear process for selecting prospective participants.

Provide orientation activities for the participant and mentor prior to the beginning of the
career mentorship.

Ensure participants are supervised by the local educational agency/institution.

Develop an application and interview process for prospective students to provide a means
for the instructor to meet and clarify mentorship goals.

Require mentorship training to prepare the students for the activity. The topics for training
may include: workplace rules of conduct, safety, and communication skills.

Develop a process to identify career mentors that demonstrate the ability to:
o 1. Support the growth, skill and career development efforts of the student.

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o 2. Help the student explore options, values and career alternatives.


o 3. Convey to the student a sense of caring and importance.
o 4. Contribute to the students feeling of self-worth

Review the Characteristics of a Good Mentor.


o Good listener
o Tactful
o Gives honest feedback
o Accepting of learner
o Committed to quality
o Respectful
o Communicates clearly
o Skilled in their field
o Maintains confidentiality
o Encourages vs. criticizes
o Possesses respectable character

Have a procedure in place to check backgrounds of prospective career mentors.

Develop a process for matching students and mentors with similar career interests.

Work with students in the development of a portfolio that describes career interests,
experience, goals and other background information.

Develop and provide a written career mentorship agreement that includes:


o 1. Expectations of mentor and student.
o 2. Length of the mentorship relationship.
o 3. Number and location of the mentorship meetings.
o 4. Description of the mentorship evaluation process.
o 5. Signatures of mentor, student, parent and school representative.

Require students to keep a journal to record and reflect on discussions they had with their
mentor. To monitor the quality of the mentorship, the journals may be also copied and
provided to the school advisor for evaluation purposes.

Provide time for weekly meetings with classmates and instructors to share experiences
and ensure student follow-through.

Send thank you notes to businesses and agencies for allowing their employees to
participate in the program. Also recognize individuals who volunteer as career mentors.

Contact local newspapers, TV stations and other media to promote activities and to
recognize businesses and agencies that participate.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Service Learning
Service learning projects target community needs and involve students in actively
determining a course of action to take to work towards addressing those needs. Students
should take an active role in identifying a need, planning for how to go about addressing it,
taking action to address the need, and reflecting on the process afterwards. Service learning
is a team-based activity that is appropriate for both middle school and high school students.
Example from Minneapolis Public Schools
Career and Technical programs have created service-learning opportunities for students.
One example of this from last year is when the students in Roosevelts Auto program
responded to the earthquake in Haiti by putting on an oil changes for Haiti benefit. They
secured donated oil, charged those in the community for changing the oil in their cars, and
raised $500 in funds that was donated for Haiti relief efforts.
Other Ideas

Help students generate a brainstorm list of community issues, then have groups select
through consensus or democratic process which one will be targeted first.

Multiple issues may be addressed by different groups of students simultaneously.

Essential Elements*
1. Education Goals: Establishes clear education goals that require the application of
concepts, content and skill from the academic disciplines and involves students in the
construction of their own knowledge.

2. Challenge: Students are engaged in tasks that challenge and stretch them cognitively
and developmentally.

3. Learning Assessment: Assessment is used as a way to enhance student learning as


well as to document and evaluate how well students have met content and skill standards.

4. Service Tasks: Students are engaged in service tasks that have clear goals, meet
genuine needs in the school or community and have significant outcomes for themselves
and others.

5. Service Evaluation: Employs systematic evaluation of the service effort and its
outcomes.

6. Self-Directed Learning: Creates opportunities to foster self-directed learning in


selecting, designing, implementing and evaluating the service-learning project.

7. Diversity: Values diversity through its participants, practice and outcomes and honors
individual learning styles.

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8. Community Partnerships: Promotes communication and interaction with the


community by encouraging partnerships and collaboration.

9. Preparation: Students are prepared for all aspects of their service-learning including a
clear understanding of task and role, the skills and information required by the task, an
awareness of safety precautions, and knowledge about and sensitivity to the people with
whom they will be working.

10. Reflection: Student reflection takes place before, during and after service; uses
multiple methods; encourages critical thinking; and is a central force in the design and
fulfillment of curricular activities.

11. Celebration: Designed to acknowledge, celebrate and further validate students


service work.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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School-Based Entrepreneurship
School-based entrepreneurship supports students in starting and running a business, from
initial conception to follow through of a business plan. Collaboration and teamwork is
important as students design an implement a plan that requires both an overall division and
an effective division of labor. A business started in a school setting may eventually transition
into a community-based business as students depart from the school setting. This type of
activity may be appropriate for both middle school and high school students.
Examples from Minneapolis Public Schools
Students in the Transitions Plus program, through REACH Food Service, have a daily coffee
cart that serves coffee and muffins to the staff in the building (the building houses four
additional, non-transition, district programs). Students in REACH Food Services also cater
lunch for some staff development sessions that take place in the building.
The Junior Achievement Plus program at Edison high school pairs students with employees
at Best Buys headquarters every Wednesday to learn how to set up a company, from start to
finish. Last school year, a team from Edison created and launched a cookbook to represent
the diverse tastes of students and staff of the 40+ different cultures represented at the school.
They presented their product along with 23 other student teams from North America, along
Nicollet Mall, and came out 4th in a competition that looked at business plans, marketing
plans, and product delivery. While the participating students had not previously considered
becoming entrepreneurs, after their experience with Junior Achievement Plus some now
consider going into business a definite possibility for them. To see a clip relating to this
project, click here: http://www.kare11.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=866546
Other Ideas

Students could work together to create beaded pins and barrettes and develop a
marketing plan for selling them at local powwows.

Students could write, illustrate, publish, and market storybooks for young children in
English and/or Ojibwe and/or Dakota languages.

Students who are in a drum group together could record a CD of their music in the
schools media lab and design and implement a marketing and distribution plan for it.
Best Practices*

Establishes a good working relationship between the educational institution and the local
Chamber of Commerce (or similar agency).

Involves students in every aspect such as assignments to develop formal business plans,
market the need for the business to the community, and handle the financial aspects of a
business.

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Ensures the result of the business project is a tangible service recognized as having value
to the community and may create current and future opportunities for employment.

Allows for entrepreneurial projects to evolve through a variety of ways such as existing
school course activities, interdisciplinary activities involving two or more instructional
disciplines, or extracurricular or independent study activities directed by a qualified adult.

Utilizes community resources including marketing research information, financial or


investment firms, business associations, and small business development center for
entrepreneurial activities.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Paid Internship
Paid internships provide students with an opportunity to extend learning about a career field
beyond a classroom setting and into an applicable worksite. This is a short-term, paid,
experience with no guarantee to be hired by the business or organization after the internship
ends. A paid internship may take place either after school or during school hours, as outlined
by a students training plan. This type of activity may be most appropriate for high school
students.
Examples from Minneapolis Public Schools
In the past, students at Roosevelts Construction program were able to work with Knutson
Construction. The students were trained in and paid for taking pictures of all aspects of
construction projects and then uploading these images into the companys database system.
This job was an important aspect of company operations since if something went wrong in
the building later on, once it was finished, employees were able to go back to the photo
archive to see how things were put together inside the walls.
Other Ideas

Contact MIGIZI Communication or another local media organization to get


recommendations of local videographers who may be looking to hire editors for short-term
projects for a student who has some experience with video editing.

Contact bike shops to arrange for a seasonal internship in bike repair or maintenance for
a student whos interested in bikes.

Contact the STEP-UP program (http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/cped/stepup.asp) to find


out about paid summer internship opportunities for students.
Best Practices*

Develop and provide a written Individual Work-Based Training Agreement signed by the
student, employer, supervisor, instructor/coordinator, parent/guardian and any support
service providers.

Involve parents/guardians in the process through informational meetings and regular


communication.

Articulate WBL experience with post-secondary courses whenever possible.

Provide safety instruction to all work-experience participants. Identify specific safety


training items and whether the item will be taught at the school, worksite or both.
Document all safety instruction.

Provide opportunities in the school-based instruction (seminar) for career exploration,


development of SCANS skills, reflection and instruction related to career fields.

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Use a performance review process that is discussed with the student and reflected in the
training agreement expectations.

Ensure the school has a licensed WBL coordinator, to act as the liaison between school
and worksites, in place to monitor students activities.

Require participants to keep a journal to record and reflect on their work experience. The
journals may be copied and provided to the high school and the employer.

Establish an advisory committee that includes employers, training supervisors, parents,


school faculty, school administration, and representatives from business, government,
community agencies along with others that make up the dynamics of the employment
area.

Comply with all Federal FLSA and State Child Labor Laws.

Contact local newspapers, TV stations and other media to promote activities and to
recognize businesses and agencies that participate.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Non-Paid Internship
Non-paid internships provide students with an opportunity to extend learning about a career
field beyond a classroom setting and into an applicable worksite. This is a short-term,
unpaid, experience with no guarantee to be hired by the business or organization after the
internship ends. A non-paid internship may take place either after school or during school
hours, as outlined by a students training plan. This type of activity may be most appropriate
for high school students.
Example from Minneapolis Public Schools
Students in the Transition Plus program have the opportunity to gain ServSafe certification for
the food service industry. Students are first trained on the school site in the requisite skills by
paraprofessionals who are ServSafe certified before being able to apply for certification and
spend time out in a food service internship in the community.
Students enrolled in Minneapolis Roosevelt high school medical fields program participate in
60 hours of community service/internship in a medical facility. One student who did her
experience at Childrens Hospital last fall has kept up with her volunteer work there and is
now earning additional elective credits for this continuing worksite experience.
Other Ideas

Contact Two Rivers or another local art gallery to arrange for a student who is interested
in art to participate in the production of an upcoming art show.

Contact MIGIZI Communications or a local community access station to arrange for a


student who is interested in video production or filmmaking to help out on production of a
documentary or a weekly cable show.
Best Practices*

Build a relationship between the school and business/industry that demonstrates a


commitment to the internship process.

Develop an agreement between the school and business/industry that clearly states the
purpose and outcomes of the internship including length of experience.

Ensure competent employees from the business/industry and appropriately licensed


personnel at the school supervise interns.

Develop a marketing plan that includes a clear process for selecting prospective
participants.

Document suggested and/or required coursework has or is being taken in conjunction with
the internship.

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Involve parents/guardians in the process through informational meetings and regular


communication.

Provide and document safety instruction to all interns at the internship site and/or at the
school.

Develop and provide a written Work-Based Agreement for Nonpaid Activities which
describes the objectives of the internship and is signed by the student, employer,
coordinator, and parents/guardians.

Ensure all criteria are met for internship to qualify as a non-paid experience. (If any one of
the criteria is not met establish a process in place to change experience to a paid
internship.)
o 1) The training, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the
employer, is similar to that which would be given in a vocational school. A written
training plan with a completion date is recommended;
o 2) The training is for the benefit of the trainees, interns or students;
o 3) The trainees, interns or students do not displace regular employees, but work under
their close observation;
o 4) The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the
activities of the trainees, interns or students, and on occasion his operation may
actually be impeded;
o 5) The trainees, interns or students are not necessarily entitled to a job at the
conclusion of the training period; and
o 6) The employer and the trainees, interns or students understand that the trainees,
interns or students are not entitled to wages for the time spent in training.

Comply with all State and Federal Child Labor Requirements.

Complete written evaluations or observation reports of the interns progress towards


reaching objectives for internship.

Require interns to record and reflect on their internship experience in a journal. The
journal will help to monitor the quality of the experience and to determine whether or not
objectives have been met.

Seek input from the business/employer and supervisor.

Recognize businesses/employers and supervisors for providing this experience.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Cooperative Work Experience


Cooperative work experiences offer students paid worksite experiences in a career field that
they are interested in pursuing after high school. They are beneficial since they take career
skill learning beyond the classroom and into applied practice. These experiences are most
appropriate for high school students and must receive prior approval from the Minnesota
Department of Education. Please refer to
http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/Academic_Excellence/Career_Technical_Education/Forms
_Resources/index.html for the appropriate forms and information on how to submit a proposal
for approval.
Example from Minneapolis Public Schools
The Community Based Vocational Training (CBVT) program for students with special needs
who are age 16 and up. The district partners with eight job sites to provide up to 12 students
per-site workplace experience. The students are picked up from school, along with a
paraprofessional job coach, and bussed to their site where they spend two hours working
before being bussed back to their school to continue the classes of their school day. The first
week on the jobsite is an orientation week where the job expectations, skills, safety protocol,
etc. is introduced to the students. Students spend nine weeks at each site.
Best Practices*

Develop and provide a written Individual Work-Based Training Agreement signed by the
student, employer, supervisor, instructor/coordinator, parent/guardian and any support
service providers.

Involve parents/guardians in the process through informational meetings and regular


communication.

Articulate WBL experience with post-secondary courses whenever possible.

Provide safety instruction to all work-experience participants. Identify specific safety


training items and whether the item will be taught at the school, worksite or both.
Document all safety instruction.

Provide opportunities in the school-based instruction (seminar) for career exploration,


development of SCANS skills, reflection and instruction related to career fields.

Use a performance review process that is discussed with the student and reflected in the
training agreement expectations.

Ensure the school has a licensed WBL coordinator, to act as the liaison between school
and worksites, in place to monitor students activities.

Require participants to keep a journal to record and reflect on their work experience. The
journals may be copied and provided to the high school and the employer.

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Establish an advisory committee that includes employers, training supervisors, parents,


school faculty, school administration, and representatives from business, government,
community agencies along with others that make up the dynamics of the employment
area.

Comply with all Federal FLSA and State Child Labor Laws.

Contact local newspapers, TV stations and other media to promote activities and to
recognize businesses and agencies that participate.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Youth Apprenticeship
Youth apprenticeships involve intensive partnerships between schools, employers, postsecondary institutions, and participating students. They provide for academic instruction,
formal career-specific training (usually matching post-secondary education standards), role
exploration within a career field, and paid work experience. These experiences are most
appropriate for high school students and must receive prior approval from the Minnesota
Department of Education. Please refer to
http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/Academic_Excellence/Career_Technical_Education/Forms
_Resources/index.html for the appropriate forms and information on how to submit a proposal
for approval.
Best Practices*

Determine the level of commitment business, industry, employers and the local
educational agencies have in developing a youth apprenticeship partnership.

Show how the apprenticeship-training program is based upon local/regional labor needs.

Develop a marketing plan that includes a clear process for selecting prospective
participants.

Involve parents/guardians in the process through informational meetings and regular


communication.

Have on file completed youth apprenticeship application, the Standards for Youth
Apprenticeship and the signed state approval for each individual youth apprentice.

Develop and make use of a written Individual Youth Apprenticeship Training Agreement
which is signed by the apprentice, parents/guardians, educational institution
representative and employer.

Comply with all state and federal child labor requirements. Complete the Statement of
Assurances on hazardous occupations in the Standards for Youth Apprenticeship
document.

Identify required pre-apprenticeship skills and suggested or required coursework taken in


conjunction with the apprenticeship.

Identify school-based, work-based, and related technical instruction.

Ensure youth apprentices are receiving a minimum of 50 hours of SAFETY


INSTRUCTION.

Provide worksite supervisors with mentorship training.

Articulate the apprenticeship for post-secondary course credit and/or registered

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apprenticeship programs.

Ensure the school has an appropriately licensed WBL coordinator to act as the liaison
between school and worksites and to monitor students activities.

Document the competency level of all skills and standards the apprentice has
demonstrated and attained. (Records are kept on file at the school.)

Require youth apprentice to keep journals to record and reflect on their apprenticeship
experience.

To monitor the quality of the apprenticeship experience, the journals may be copied and
provided to the high school and the employer.

Recognize business/employers and worksite supervisors for their service.

Contact local newspapers, TV stations and other media to promote activities and to
recognize businesses and agencies who participate.

Award a State of Minnesota Youth Apprenticeship Certificate of Accomplishment to each


apprentice upon successful completion of the apprenticeship. The certificate specifies the
number of hours completed and the level of occupational skills development by the
apprentice.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Youth Entrepreneurship
Youth entrepreneurship supports individual students in starting and then running their own
businesses. This includes coming up with a viable idea, developing a business plan, and
implementing the plan. The student maintains full ownership of his or her business and may
earn income from their business if it experiences success. In general, this type of activity is
recommended for high school students though in some cases may also be appropriate for
some middle school students.
Other Ideas

A student who loves to take pictures may establish a portraiture business where they
charge a fee to those dressed in regalia at a powwow for providing them with pictures of
them at the event.

A student who enjoys sewing may make jingle dresses for sale to family members,
friends, and community members.

A student who enjoys rapping and making beats may record a solo CD and market it in
the local community.
Best Practices*

Provides opportunities for youth to start and operate enterprises of appropriate size and
scope, in which they are personally invested in a manner that is significant to them.

Provides an opportunity for individuals to learn about and utilize community resources
o a. Marketing research information,
o b. Financial or investment firms,
o c. Business associations, and
o d. Small business development centers.

Reinforces the concept that successful entrepreneurs take calculated risks based on
demographic research and relevant information.

Requires youth to develop a plan for a business that addresses its financial, marketing
and operational aspects.

Utilizes an action-oriented curriculum that provides age-appropriate experiential learning


opportunities for which program leaders/instructors operate as coaches or facilitators.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Curriculum
Earlier sections of this policy manual addressed who this program works withdiverse
partners, target studentsand broad program goals. In this section the focus is what we
collaborate to teach students. The curriculum is like the informational roadmap that guides
progress towards our goals or destination. As anyone who has gone on a road trip knows,
however, each trip somewhere is unique and variable depending on things such as weather,
road construction, or need for pit stops. This being the case, its encouraged that you use the
following information as a guide but remain flexible to adjust as needs and interests indicate.
Course Formats
Career awareness and exploration activities will be woven into a seminar-format class that
will introduce students, in grades 6-9 (or 10, depending) to a wide range of career fields.
Students will learn about different careers through guest speakers, field trips, research
projects, career videos, and in-school hands-on group role play experiences where they learn
and practice different job skills (e.g. scripting, storyboarding, casting, shooting, and editing a
movie; reading patterns, calculating needed fabric, cutting out pieces, sewing clothing items;
selecting recipes, preparing menus, scaling up and down recipes to meet a specified group
size, budgeting for supplies, shopping for supplies, measuring and preparing ingredients,
serving dishes, etc.). Throughout this time, students will also engage in some self-exploration
activities such as completing interest inventories, skills inventories, annually writing and
revising post-high school plans, journaling about their experiences in the program, etc. These
components will comprise the beginnings of student work-based learning portfolios, which will
continue to be built on throughout high school program participation.
Starting in grades 10 or 11, students will begin being paired with mentors in career fields of
interest to them. Effort will be made to find Native American mentors, but of primary
importance will be finding mentors who are likely to seem approachable to teens and who
work in the fields of interest of the students. Students will start out their work-site experiences
with a four-day-a-week internship at the worksite of their mentor. Whenever possible, at least
two students will be placed at each job site. About every ten weeks (twice a semester),
students will rotate to different job sites in related fields or interests of the student. That same
mentor will stay in contact for at least one school year, whenever possible. During these
experiences, students will participate in weekly seminar classes where they debrief on their
experiences with peers, learn additional readiness skills like interviewing, job safety, resume
writing, as well as college planning. After a year of rotating job sites, if students find a paying
job on their own theyll have the option of doing on-the-job training at this site, while still
attending the weekly seminars, and working towards individual goals for their job site.
Students will continue to build on their career portfolios.

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Career Categorizations
There are a couple of different ways that careers have been groupedcareer fields and
career clusters. Both are briefly outlined below. When helping students to expand their
awareness of career possibilities, these groupings may be useful. For example, if you have a
student who is interested in being a nurse it may be that they are interested in helping people
who are sick and have mostly only seen nurses at clinics. You could help them look up
information on the internet about the wide variety of careers in the Health Services career
field or Health Sciences career cluster to be able to see the broad range of related jobs that
they could explore that would maintain this interest in helping people who are sick.
Career Fields
Career fields are groupings of jobs that require similar types of skill sets. Occupations in a
career field may represent more than one professional industry. There are six different
career fields*:

Agriculture and Natural Resources


o Includes programs related to animal & plant sciences, biotechnology, agricultural
mechanics, food processing, agribusiness, the environment and natural resources.
These may include agriculture, earth sciences, environmental sciences, fisheries
management, forestry, horticulture and wildlife management.
Arts, Humanities and Communication
o Includes programs related to the humanities and to the performing, visual, literary, and
media arts. These include architecture, creative writing, film and cinema studies, fine
arts, graphic design and production, journalism, foreign languages, radio and
television broadcasting, advertising and public relations.
Business Management and Administration
o Includes programs related to the business environment. They may include businesses,
sales, marketing, hospitality and tourism, computer/information systems, finance,
accounting, personnel, economics and management.
Engineering, Manufacturing and Technologies
o Includes programs related to the technologies necessary to design, develop, install or
maintain physical systems. These may include engineering and related technologies,
mechanics and repair, manufacturing technology, precision production, electronics and
construction.
Health Services
o Includes programs related to the promotion of health as well as the treatment of
injuries, conditions and disease. These may include medicine, dentistry, nursing,
therapy and rehabilitation, nutrition, fitness and hygiene.
Human Services
o Includes programs related to economic, political and social systems. These may
include education, law and legal studies, law enforcement, public administration, child
and family services, religion and social studies.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Career Clusters
Career clusters are more specialized than career fields, each representing broad industries.
There are 16 broad career clusters that are recognized by the States Career Clusters
Initiative (SCCI)*:

Agriculture and National Resources


o The production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing, and development of
agricultural commodities and resources including food, fiber, wood products, natural
resources, horticulture, and other plant and animal products/resources.
Architecture and Construction
o Careers in designing, planning, managing, building and maintaining the built
environment.
Arts, A/V Technology and Communication
o Designing, producing, exhibiting, performing, writing, and publishing multimedia
content including visual and performing arts and design, journalism, and entertainment
services.
Business and Administration
o Business Management and Administration careers encompass planning, organizing,
directing and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive
business operations. Business Management and Administration career opportunities
are available in every sector of the economy.
Education and Training
o Planning, managing and providing education and training services, and related
learning support services.
Finance
o Planning, services for financial and investment planning, banking, insurance, and
business financial management.
Health Sciences
o Planning, managing, and providing therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health
informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development.
Hospitality and Tourism
o Hospitality & Tourism encompasses the management, marketing and operations of
restaurants and other foodservices, lodging, attractions, recreation events and travel
related services.
Human Services
o Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and
human needs.
Information Technology
o Building Linkages in IT Occupations Framework: For Entry Level, Technical, and
Professional Careers Related to the Design, Development, Support and Management
of Hardware, Software, Multimedia, and Systems Integration Services.
Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security
o Planning, managing, and providing legal, public safety, protective services and
homeland security, including professional and technical support services.
Manufacturing
o Planning, managing and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

42

final products and related professional and technical support activities such as
production planning and control, maintenance and manufacturing/process
engineering.
Government and Public Administration
o Executing governmental functions to include Governance; National Security; Foreign
Service; Planning; Revenue and Taxation; Regulation; and Management and
Administration at the local, state, and federal levels.
Marketing
o Planning, managing, and performing marketing activities to reach organizational
objectives.
Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics
o Planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and technical
services (e.g., physical science, social science, engineering) including laboratory and
testing services, and research and development services.
Transportation, Distribution and Logistics
o Planning, management, and movement of people, materials, and goods by road,
pipeline, air, rail and water and related professional and technical support services
such as transportation infrastructure planning and management, logistics services,
mobile equipment and facility maintenance.

*borrowed from Pathways to College Readiness: Career Clusters, http://www.careerclusters.org/16clusters.cfm

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Textbook Resources
There are a variety of books out there about working effectively with Native American
Students as well as about addressing work-based learning curricular content. Below is a list
of texts that may be of interest to Work-Based Learning Coordinators, participating middle
school teachers, and paraprofessionals working with this program:

Widening the Circle: Culturally Relevant Pedagogy for American Indian Children. By
Beverly J. Klug & Patricia T. Whitfield. Routledge, 2002.

Working (4th edition). By Larry J. Baily. South-Western Cengage Learning, 2007.

The Career Tool Kit for High School Students: Making the transition from school to work.
By Carol Carter, Gary Isumo, Sarah Lyman Kravits, & Diane Lindsey Reeves. Prentice
Hall, 2001.

Life Centered Career Education: Modified curriculum for individuals with moderate
disabilities. By Robert J. Loyd & Donn E. Brolin. Council for Exceptional Children.

Material requests should be processed as specified by the department of Indian Education.


Themes
This curriculum facilitates students exploration of their personal skills and attributes while
building content knowledge related to specific career fields along with more general skills in
money management and professional presentation of self to others. It is centered around
nine fundamental questions that students may wonder about when considering entrance into
the workforce. These questions are as follows: Who am I? How will I present myself? Who
will I work with? How will I work with them? How will I keep myself and others safe on the
worksite? How will I share what Im learning with others? What will I do with my earnings?
What about the law? And, What about after high school?

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Who Am I?

Big ideas: how I act, what Im good at, what I like to do, and what I hope to accomplish in
the future

Content
PERSONALITY
Materials/tools/resources
Keirsey Temperament Sorter
http://www.keirsey.com/sorter/instruments2.aspx?partid=0
Jung Typology Test
http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes2.asp
Possible learning activities
Complete online personality tests
Write up summary of results with possible anecdotals
Create a personality collage, rap, or dance
SKILLS
Materials/tools/resources
iSeek Skills Assessment http://www.iseek.org/careers/skillsAssessment
Career One Stop skills assessment
http://www.careerinfonet.org/skills/default.aspx?nodeid=20
SCANS Self-Assessment
http://www.soicc.state.nc.us/soicc/planning/SCANS%20Self-assessment.pdf
Possible learning activities
Complete online skills assessments
Write up summary of results with possible anecdotals
Create a skills collage or rap

COMMUNICATION STYLES
Materials/tools/resources
Communications style inventory
http://occonline.occ.cccd.edu/online/klee/CommunicationsStyleInventory.pdf
Effective communication styles inventory
http://www.unc.edu/courses/2009fall/nurs/379/960/M5%20Nursing%20Contribut
ion%2009/whe%202005%20effective%20communication%20styles%20inventor
y.pdf
Communication
http://www.extension.org/mediawiki/files/1/16/ETC_Webinar_Communication_st
yles_assessment.pdf
Possible learning activities
Complete communication styles inventories
Write up summary of results with possible anecdotals
Create a communication style collage or rap

INTERESTS
Materials/tools/resources

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MN Careers Interest Inventory


http://www.getreadyforcollege.org/sPagesGR/interestAssessment.cfm
Multiple Intelligences Inventory http://surfaquarium.com/MI/inventory.htm
AES Learning Style Inventory
http://www.educationplanner.org/education_planner/calc_frames.asp?url=http%
3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eaessuccess%2Eorg%2Fgetting%2Flearning%5Fquiz%2F
quiz%2Ehtml&pagetype=Preparing-Learning+Styles+Quiz&sponsor=2859
AES Career Assessment
http://www.educationplanner.org/careerkey/code/processAssess1.asp?path=ug.
gs.discover&sponsor=2859
Possible learning activities
Complete online interest inventories
Write up summary of results with possible anecdotals
Create an interests collage or rap

FAMILY AND COMMUNITY CONTEXTS


Materials/tools/resources
Ecological theory http://www.des.emory.edu/mfp/302/302bron.PDF
The Native American Culture: A Historical and Cultural Reflection
http://www.nasponline.org/publications/cq/cq328native.aspx
Understanding family process
http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=EZpSZWkMw0wC&oi=fnd&pg=P
R9&dq=family+systems+theory&ots=shPLhCHekU&sig=DFYn2oNNcHacMiAU1BNGCiFHUM#v=onepage&q&f=false
Possible learning activities
Create a performance piece depicting personal influences from the
mesosystem
Write a poem or essay depicting the meaning of family and/or community
Create a family systems collage or rap

CRAFT PERSONAL GOAL STATEMENT


Materials/tools/resources
Constructing your Professional Goals Statement
http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:dHigLBt6YSgJ:academic.cengage
.com/resource_uploads/downloads/1111344337_263208.doc+professional+goa
ls+statements+early+childhood&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShm2aWw
QFq8CNED66vLbYh8fPSCyovwv4psV2OXEZAhvUJQdxyIKhi7GEBa4FBV1FfX
bVWxF0xD0-sinL0xivRVbBgu8km-b-LeY63ApqJaYh_Be8Et_oXuFl5AnW4PNvDSKHk&sig=AHIEtbQeTPWX6DotlUKZPtB0xrin6
GTe1g
Possible learning activities
Talk about components and reasons for writing goal statements
Brainstorm ideas of possible goals
Draft goal statement
Have 3 people read through, offer feedback, and sign off on the goals
statement

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How Will I Present Myself?

Big ideas: how I can dress for success and represent myself professionally both verbally
and in writing

Content
RESUME WRITING
Materials/tools/resources
My First Resume template http://www.careerkids.com/resume2.html
Teaching Kids Business resume template
http://www.teachingkidsbusiness.com/resume.htm
Developing a Resume http://www.earlychildhood.org/cdrg/prep_employ.cfm
JobWeb sample resume http://www.jobweb.com/Resume/sample.aspx?id=578
Possible learning activities
Discuss purpose of a resume
Discuss content and format of a resume
Look through samples of resumes
Pull together own experiences and create a resume
Have 3 people read through, offer feedback, and sign off on the resume

COVER LETTER WRITING


Materials/tools/resources
JobWeb Sample Cover Letter
http://www.jobweb.com/resumesample.aspx?id=790
Sample Resumes and Cover Letters for Students
http://jobsearch.about.com/od/teenstudentgrad/a/studentresume.htm
Cover letter for my first job http://www.careerfaqs.com.au/studentresumes/590/Cover-letter-for-my-first-job
Possible learning activities
Discuss purpose of a cover letter
Discuss content and format of a cover letter
Look through samples of cover letters
Identify a potential job and draft a cover letter relating to it
Have 3 people read through, offer feedback, and sign off on the cover letter

FILLING OUT JOB APPLICATIONS


Materials/tools/resources
SnagAJob http://www.snagajob.com/default.aspx?ref=gTeen&srcid=googleppc
How to help your teenager fill out a job application
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/524235/how_to_help_your_teenager_
fill_out.html
Job application lesson plan http://www.moneyinstructor.com/lesson/jobapp.asp
Job application tips for teens http://teenjobscene.com/job-application-tips-forteens/
Possible learning activities
Prepare index cards with commonly requested information, such as reference
contact information, prior work experience, and skill sets

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Fill out sample or real job applications

DRESSING FOR A JOB INTERVIEW


Materials/tools/resources
What to wear on an interview
http://jobsearch.about.com/od/interviewsnetworking/a/dressforsuccess.htm
Teen interview attire
http://jobsearch.about.com/od/teenstudentgrad/ig/Interview-Attire/
How to dress and prepare for job interviews
http://www.whatulookinat.com/?p=263
On-the-job primer http://www.teensandthejobgame.com/primer/interviews.htm
Digital camera to document students in interview attire
Possible learning activities
Talk about basic guidelines for interview dress
Look at pictures of people appropriately and inappropriately dressed for a job
interview, discussing as a group which pictures may fit in which category
Brainstorm items that would be appropriate to wear to a job interview and where
to find/get those items
Do an interview fashion show event where everyone wears their interview
clothes
Write a summary of what was learned
Take a picture of self in one or more sets of interview-appropriate attire

RESPONDING TO INTERVIEW QUESTIONS


Materials/tools/resources
Job interview strategies for teens
http://www.quintcareers.com/teen_job_strategies.html
JobWeb Interview Tips http://www.jobweb.com/Interview/help.aspx?id=636
JobWeb Art of Interviewing Well
http://www.jobweb.com/interviews.aspx?id=634
Possible learning activities
Talk about the importance of how one presents their self in a job interview
Review likely interview questions and things that interviewers may be looking
for in the different questions
Have students write out their own answers to some of the likely interview
questions
Hold moche-interviews
Write a summary of what was learned

DRESSING FOR THE WORK SITE


Materials/tools/resources
Summer job dress code http://www.kidzworld.com/article/8273-summer-jobdress-code
Teen girls and the proper way to dress for success
http://afropuffsandponytails.com/empowerment-of-african-american-young-girlsand-teen-girls/teen-girls-and-the-proper-way-to-dress-for-success-dos-anddonts/

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Digital camera to document students in worksite attire


Possible learning activities
Talk about basic guidelines for work-site dress
Look at pictures of people appropriately and inappropriately dressed for a
childcare job, discussing as a group which pictures may fit in which category
Brainstorm items that would be appropriate to wear to a childcare worksite and
where to find/get those items
Do an worksite fashion show event where everyone wears their worksite
clothes
Write a summary of what was learned
Take a picture of self in one or more sets of childcare worksite-appropriate attire

APPROPRIATE LANGUAGE FOR THE WORK SITE


Materials/tools/resources
RudeBusters http://www.rudebusters.com/eti-quiz.htm
Office etiquette http://www.a-to-z-of-manners-and-etiquette.com/officeetiquette.html
Good manners in the workplace http://ezinearticles.com/?Good-Manners-in-theWorkplace&id=2165392
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities
Talk about guidelines for appropriate language and manners in a work setting
Watch short video clips of appropriate and inappropriate language and manners
being used in work settings
Role play appropriate and inappropriate manners in a work setting
Write a summary of what was learned

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Who Will I Work With?

Big ideas: people in a work setting and what they do

Content
SUPERVISORS
Materials/tools/resources
Employee handbooks
The role and responsibilities of a supervisor http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Roleand-Responsibilities-of-a-Supervisor&id=108568
Typical responsibilities of a supervisor
http://managementhelp.org/suprvise/duties.htm
Job descriptions
Possible learning activities
Review job descriptions
Review supervisor role as presented in handbooks
Do a perspective-taking exercise to work through a scenario from the
supervisors role
Match tasks to job role
Interview a supervisor at the school, a business, or non-profit organization to
find out what they do on their job
Write a summary of information learned

COWORKERS
Materials/tools/resources
Employee handbooks
The employees role in a team http://www.opm.gov/perform/articles/084.asp
Job descriptions
Possible learning activities
Review job descriptions
Review supervisor role as presented in handbooks
Do a perspective-taking exercise to work through a scenario from an
employees role
Match tasks to job role
Interview a supervisor at the school, a business, or non-profit organization to
find out what they do on their job
Write a summary of information learned

CUSTOMERS/CONSUMERS
Materials/tools/resources
Employee handbooks
Possible learning activities
Review any information in the handbook for hints of who the customer or
consumer base may be
Review demographics information relating to the possible customer or
consumer base

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Do a perspective-taking exercise to work through a scenario from a


customer/consumer role
Interview a customer/consumer at the school, a business, or non-profit
organization to find out what services or items they get from the
school/business/non-profit
Write a summary of information learned

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How Will I Work With Them?

Big ideas: strategies and skills for success in a professional work setting

Content
OVERVIEW OF SPECIFIC CAREER FIELDS
Materials/tools/resources
Will depend on the specific career(s) under study
Guest speakermaybe a supervisor or employee from a worksite or even the
job coach in charge of that site
Mode of transportation for fieldtrip
Possible learning activities
Fieldtrip to a worksite
Talk about different types of worksites
Research local worksites in the chosen career field(s)
Guest speaker who works in specific career field or worksite
Write a summary of information learned

EFFECTIVE TEAMWORK
Materials/tools/resources
How to be an effective team member
http://www.effectivemeetings.com/teams/teamwork/effective.asp
Twelve tips for team building
http://humanresources.about.com/od/involvementteams/a/twelve_tip_team.htm
Training a team http://www.indianatransition.org/4Training%20and%20Workshops/Team%20Training/Training%20a%20Team%2
0--%20Essential%20Components%20of%20Effective%20Teamwork.pdf
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities
Talk about what makes a team effective
Watch video clips that show effective and ineffective teamwork
Role play different team problem-solving scenarios
Write up a summary of what was learned

COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Materials/tools/resources
Whats your communication style?
http://www.asme.org/Jobs/Manage/Whats_Communication_Style.cfm
10 tips for getting along with coworkers
http://www.lifescript.com/Life/Money/Work/10_Tips_for_Getting_Along_With_C
oworkers.aspx
Quiz: How do you get along with your coworkers?
http://careerplanning.about.com/library/weekly/quizzes/bl_getalong_quiz.htm
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities
Talk about reasons to approach and phrase things positively

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Talk about ways to approach situations positively and being proactive instead of
reactive
Watch short video clips of effective and ineffective communication interactions
and discuss as a class which went well and which didnt and why
Role play different guidance scenarios and responses to them
Write up a summary of what was learned

CONFLICT MANAGEMENT SKILLS


Materials/tools/resources
Conflict management strategies and styles
http://home.snu.edu/~HCULBERT/conflict.htm
Understanding conflict and conflict management
http://www.foundationcoalition.org/publications/brochures/conflict.pdf
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities
Talk about effective and ineffective ways to deal with conflict
Watch video clips that show effective and ineffective ways to handle conflict
Role play different scenarios using conflict management strategies
Write up a summary of what was learned

LEADERSHIP SKILLS
Materials/tools/resources
The three fundamentals of effective leadership
http://www.forbes.com/2009/04/29/vision-communication-judgment-leadershipmanaging-ccl.html
Nine principles for effective leadership
http://powertochange.com/discover/world/effectiveleadership/
Characteristics of effective leadership
http://thethrivingsmallbusiness.com/articles/characteristics-of-effectiveleadership/
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities
Talk about the assets of an effective leader
Watch video clips that show effective and ineffective leadership
Role play different leadership scenarios
Write up a summary of what was learned

ACCEPTING DIRECTION AND CRITICISM


Materials/tools/resources
7 guidelines for accepting constructive criticism
http://www.lifescript.com/Life/Money/Work/7_Guidelines_For_Accepting_Constr
uctive_Criticism.aspx
Teaching students to accept criticism
http://theapple.monster.com/benefits/articles/9154-teaching-students-to-acceptcriticism
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities

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Define the terms direction and constructive criticism and come up with
examples of each
Talk about positive ways to accept direction and constructive criticism
Role play scenarios giving and receiving directions
Role play scenarios giving and receiving constructive criticisms
Watch video clips showing effective and ineffective ways to handle direction
and constructive criticism; talking about why different clips demonstrate
effective or ineffective approaches
Write up a summary of what was learned

REPORTING TO SUPERVISORS
Materials/tools/resources
Employee handbooks
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities
Talk about situations when you should report to a supervisor (signing in/out of
work? First aid emergency?)
Talk about how to appropriately reportwhat info to give, forms to fill out, etc.
Demonstrate filling out any forms that may be used
Have students practice filling out any forms that may be used
Watch short video clips of scenarios
Role play scenarios
Write a summary of learning

CONFIDENTIALITY
Materials/tools/resources
Employee handbooks
Workplace confidentiality
http://www.businessmanagementdaily.com/articles/2346/1/Workplaceconfidentiality-Persuade-staff-to-think-privacy/Page1.html#
Workplace monitoring, privacy rights and confidentiality
http://www.thelaw.com/guide/employment/workplace-monitoring-privacy-rightsand-confidentiality/
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities
Talk about general guidelines for confidentiality
Talk about specific worksite guidelines on confidentiality
Watch video clips of different types of discussion and then have a class
discussion of whether the information should be confidential and/or who to
disclose it to
Role play scenarios involving confidentiality issues
Write a summary of learning

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How Will I Keep Myself and Others Safe on the Worksite?

Big ideas: preventing and effectively handling safety hazards

Content
TIPS FOR PREVENTION
Materials/tools/resources
*Specifics will vary depending on the worksite
Facts and prevention tip sheets http://www.thinkfirst.org/About/Facts.asp
Sports injury prevention tip sheet
http://www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/aprsportsinjurytips.cfm
Injury Prevention http://www.mnchildcare.org/health/injuries.php
Workplace Safety Toolkit http://www.nonprofitrisk.org/tools/workplacesafety/public-sector/foundation/selfinschk-ps.htm
Photographs of worksite settings
Possible learning activities
Talk about ways to prevent injury in different settings
Look at photographs of worksite settings and, as a group, identify possible
hazards and how you may be able to change things to make them safer
Draw out and/or describe in writing your ideal, safe, worksite setting
Write a summary of learning

BASIC FIRST AID


Materials/tools/resources
How to do basic first aid http://www.wikihow.com/Do-Basic-First-Aid
First Aid http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/FirstAidIndex/FirstAidIndex
First aid/CPR/AED http://www.redcross.org/vgn-exttemplating/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=8b6fc0e92ba0d210VgnVCM10000089f0870a
RCRD&vgnextchannel=aea70c45f663b110VgnVCM10000089f0870aRCRD
Guest speaker
First aid kits with enough supplies to go around
Possible learning activities
Go over the basics of RedCross (or similar) first aid
Model proper application of first aid techniques
Role play first aid techniques in common scenarios
Have a school nurse come in and talk to the class
Write a summary of learning

PROPER HANDLING AND DISPOSAL OF BODILY FLUIDS


Materials/tools/resources
Health Services http://health.mpls.k12.mn.us/e7a0f513-910e-45c2-a2f306bea62bff9d.html
Guest speaker
Select video clips on topic
Possible learning activities
Talk about proper procedures at the childcare center
Watch short video clips of proper procedures being followed

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Role play common scenarios of following proper procedures


Have a school nurse come in and talk to the class
Write a summary of learning

BASIC SAFETY RULES


Materials/tools/resources
Employee handbooks
Ten basic safety rules
http://www.toolboxtopics.com/Audio%20Topics/Vol%201%20disk%201/08%20T
en%20Basic%20Safety%20Rules.htm
Technology education basic safety rules
http://www.teched101.com/pdf/basic_safety_rules_01.pdf
Basic safety rules at work http://www.ehow.com/facts_5649752_basic-safetyrules-work.html
Possible learning activities
Talk about general safety rules for different settings and why theyre important
Talk about what employee manuals for specific worksites request
Role play following those rules
Write a summary of what was learned

MAINTAINING SAFE AND CLEAN WORK AREAS


Materials/tools/resources
Young Workers ProjectHealthy Communities, Healthy Jobsunit 3, Safe
Jobs for Youth http://www.losh.ucla.edu/yw/resources/healthy-unit3.html
Talk SafetyMinnesota Edition
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/talkingsafety/states/mn/entireMN.pdf
Teachers Toolbox http://www.safework.sa.gov.au/show_page.jsp?id=6424
Employee handbooks
Possible learning activities
Talk about what employee manuals for specific worksites request
Role play following those rules
Write a summary of what was learned

REPORTING ILLNESSES, INJURIES, OR UNSAFE CONDITIONS


Materials/tools/resources
Employee handbooks
Possible learning activities
Talk about what employee manuals for specific worksites request
Role play following those rules
Write a summary of what was learned

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What About the Law?

Big ideas: legal guidelines governing the worksite, workforce, and participation in workbased learning experiences

Content
CHILD-LABOR RESTRICTIONS
Materials/tools/resources
Federal Child Labor Laws
http://education.state.mn.us/mdeprod/groups/CareerTechEd/documents/LawSt
atute/006423.pdf
Possible learning activities
Talk about the existence of child labor laws to protect minors from injury or
harm
Talk about any limitations of worksite participation based on child labor laws
Write a summary of what was learned

MN Employee Worker Rights


Materials/tools/resources
Frequently asked questions worker rights
http://www.doli.state.mn.us/ls/FaqEmpRights.asp
Minnesota workers compensation employee rights and responsibilities
http://www.doli.state.mn.us/ls/pdf/8.5x11_wceeriteposter_sept08.pdf
Possible learning activities
Talk about what the state guidelines say and mean
Identify ways that the state guidelines impact what a student can and cannot do
at a childcare center
Write a summary of what was learned

Disability Rights
Materials/tools/resources
The ADA: Your employment rights as an individual with a disability
http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/ada18.html
Possible learning activities
Talk about what the ADA guidelines say and mean
Identify possible reasonable accommodations for work in a childcare center
setting
Write a summary of what was learned

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What Will I Do with My Earnings?

Big ideas: management of money

Content
CREATING WEEKLY AND MONTHLY BUDGETS
Materials/tools/resources
Money http://www.pbs.org/newshour/on2/money.html
Resources http://www.cusucceed.net/resources.php
How to create a budget
http://financialplan.about.com/od/budgetingyourmoney/ht/createbudget.htm
Secrets to creating a budget http://www.bankrate.com/finance/financialliteracy/secrets-to-creating-a-budget-1.aspx
How to create a zero-based budget
http://www.gettingfinancesdone.com/blog/archives/2006/08/how-to-create-azero-based-budget/
It all adds up http://www.italladdsup.org/
Possible learning activities
Create a list of projected monthly expenses and add to find out how much
income will be needed to meet a desired standard of living
Compare cost of living in different parts of the city, as well as different parts of
the state
Sort projected expenses into need, really want, and could live without
categories
Create an ideal monthly budget and a realistic monthly budget for right after
high school
Research and make changes to budgets as if a dependent, two dependents, a
second income, etc. were to take place

STARTING AND MANAGING A CHECKING ACCOUNT


Materials/tools/resources
Student checking accounts
http://www.moneyinstructor.com/art/checkingstudent.asp
Student checking http://www.usbank.com/checking/student.html
Checking http://www.tcfbank.com/PersonalBanking/pb_checking_home.jsp
Teen checking https://www.wellsfargo.com/jump/checking/teen
Possible learning activities
Create a points-based checking system for school rewards
Teach about balancing a checkbook
Start a student checking account
Bring in someone from a bank to talk about money management

STARTING AND MANAGING A SAVINGS ACCOUNT


Materials/tools/resources
Establish good savings habits
https://www.bankcnb.com/customer/establish.php

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How to teach your teens good financial habits http://www.womensfinance.com/kidsfinances/teachteens.shtml


Ways to save and make money http://www.fool.com/teens/teens02.htm
Types of savings accounts http://www.teensguidetomoney.com/saving/types-ofsavings-accounts/
Possible learning activities
Talk about reasons why its important to save money instead of spending it all
as soon as you get it
Brainstorm a list of big ticket items students may want and then figure out how
long theyd need to save to get them at varying rates of savings and interest
accrual
Compare different types of savings accounts
Go to the ceramics room and create banks that students can start saving in

PAYING BILLS
Materials/tools/resources
Using Google Calendar to pay bills on time
http://freefrombroke.com/2009/02/google-calendar-pay-bills-time.html
How to pay bills on time http://www.crediteducation.org/Financial-EducationResources/Default.aspx?id=244
Student credit cards: Establishing an A+ history
http://www.studentmarket.com/student-credit-card-basics.html
Possible learning activities
Brainstorm a list of bills that may need paid
Create a calendar with due dates for different bills and notations of late fees for
if bills are paid after their due date
Explore different ways can be paidin the mail with check or money order, in
person with cash, over the internet through a checking or savings account, over
the phone, etc.
Practice reading bills (such as cell phone bills) and completing a transaction to
pay them
Talk about credit ratings and how they can be impacted by late bill payments
Talk about credit cards and how theyre borrowed money that needs paid back
when the bill comes

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How Will I Share What Im Learning With Others?

Big ideas: collecting, sorting, and presenting information

Content
PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
Materials/tools/resources
o Developing a Professional Portfolio
http://www.acetonline.org/Developing%20Professional%20Portfolio.pdf
o How to Prepare a Professional Portfolio for a Preschool Teacher
http://www.ehow.com/how_7217497_prepare-professional-portfolio-preschoolteacher.html
o Preparing your Professional Portfolio
http://www.earlychildhood.org/cdrg/prep_employ.cfm#c
Possible learning activities
o Talk about the purpose and content of portfolios
o Look through sample portfolios
o Pull together existing pieces (such as resume and summaries of learning about
development)
o Have 3 people look through portfolio, give feedback, and sign of on it

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What About After High School?

Big ideas: choosing and applying to a college or trade school; paying for higher education

Content
POST-HIGH SCHOOL TRAINING OPTIONS
Materials/tools/resources
Choosing a college http://www.mnscu.edu/students/choosing/index.html
Minnesota colleges and universities http://u101.com/colleges/Minnesota/
Hubert H. Humphrey Job Corps
http://huberthhumphrey.jobcorps.gov/home.aspx
Which program is right for me
http://www.americorps.gov/for_individuals/choose/index.asp
American Indian OIC http://www.aioic.org/
Options after high school
http://www.hsd401.org/studentfamily/career/options.htm
Possible learning activities
Talk about different types of post-high school programs
Tour different programs
Bring in guest speakers who work or attend different programs

CHOOSING A PROGRAM
Materials/tools/resources
College major quiz
http://homeworktips.about.com/library/maj/bl_majors_quiz.htm
How to choose a college thats right for you
http://www.npr.org/2010/12/08/7506102/how-to-choose-a-college-that-s-rightfor-you
College MatchMaker http://collegesearch.collegeboard.com/search/index.jsp
Possible learning activities
Brainstorm things students would like to accomplish after high school
Brainstorm places students would like to live after high school
Research what programs are in the areas students might want to live and offer
training related to the career students think theyd like to have
Tour different programs
Bring in guest speakers who work or attend different programs
Do a day-long shadow of a current student attending a program of interest
Look through different programs brochures, catalogs, and/or websites

APPLYING TO YOUR CHOSEN PROGRAM


Materials/tools/resources
Apply to college
http://www.collegeboard.com/student/apply/index.html?affiliateId=rdr&bannerId
=apply
Admissions information http://www.mnscu.edu/students/admissions/index.html
Admissions http://admissions.tc.umn.edu/

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Admission procedure
http://www.fdltcc.edu/prospective/admissions/procedures.shtml
Possible learning activities
Fill out program applications
Gather letters of recommendation
Get copies of high school transcripts
Write entrance essays
Have peers read entrance essays and provide constructive feedback
Encourage individual students to meet with the school guidance counselor
Have the guidance counselor come to class as a guest speaker
Arrange for transportation to program sites to take placement tests

PAYING FOR COLLEGE


Materials/tools/resources
Pay for college http://www.collegeboard.com/student/pay/index.html
FAFSA http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/
Financial aid for Native American students
http://www.finaid.org/otheraid/natamind.phtml
Possible learning activities
Gather information for financial aid forms
Fill out FAFSA online
Write scholarship essays
Have peers read scholarship essays and provide constructive feedback

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Program Evaluation
Program evaluation is important as it allows continued growth of understanding of whats
working and not working, which is important when planning how to proceed with program
development and implementation. In this section of the policy manual you will find
information on how to assess the learning and effectiveness of stakeholders and progress
towards meeting the programs broad goals.
Methods of Program Evaluation
Program evaluation will have components that look at student outcomes, staff performance,
and partnership relationships. Each of these components are helpful when judging current
program effect and planning for ongoing improvements and developments.
Students
Students are evaluated on a regular basis through performance on classroom assignments,
weekly performance profiles on worksites, and periodic portfolio reviews. This information
should make clear to program staff what students individual strengths, weaknesses, and
misunderstandings are; this information should then be used, responsively, on an ongoing
basis to shape concept and skill instruction on both individual and classroom-wide levels.
Staff
All staff will participate in both self-evaluation reflections as well as being evaluated by
colleagues and students through semester-end surveys. On at least a weekly basis, all
program staff should reflect in writing on what they felt worked well that week and what they
felt could be changed or improved on in the future. These reflections are to be incorporated
into future program planning. At the end of each semester, program staff are to distribute
(and collect) surveys to students and at least one colleague they worked with that semester
evaluating perceived approachability and effectiveness. These surveys are to be submitted
to the department of Indian Education; summaries of survey results will be returned to
program staff for review and consideration when planning for the future. Evaluation will also
take place through review of the completeness of program files.
Collaboration
Records of contact (phone, email, face-to-face) will be kept by program staff documenting
communication with program partners (intra-district, worksite, parents, and community).
Minimally, information to be kept includes date of contact, purpose of contact, and result of
communication. Additionally, detailed minutes will be kept for all advisory committee
meetings documenting those present, topics discussed, and contributions offered by each
committee member. This information will help the program to identify whom the program is
communicating with frequently and who may benefit from working on strengthening
partnership ties.

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Indicators of Program Success


We will know that the program is being successful if we find ongoing growth towards
attainment of the following six program goals:

Students will expand their awareness of career fields available to those living in the twin
cities metro area.
This will be evaluated through use of entrance surveys when students first enter the
program as well as at natural breaking points such as semester and year-ends, as well
as periodic student portfolio reviews. We hope to find an increase in the number and
range of careers that students are aware of and their depth of knowledge of the
requisite skills and education needed to pursue these careers.

Students will develop and maintain written post-high school plans that account for at least
career and community participation, with consideration of college or technical school
possibilities included.
This will be evaluated through semi-annual student portfolio review. We hope to find
that all students are addressing post-secondary involvement in education/training and
community living in their post-high school plans and that they are regularly updating
these plans to account for increasing knowledge and future vision at least annually.

Students will develop and improve in application of career readiness skills and resumes
that showcase these skills along with their experiences on different job sites.
This will be evaluated through ongoing participation level in seminar activities, periodic
student portfolio reviews, as well as weekly performance reviews completed by job
coaches at the different worksites. We hope to find that the longer students participate
in the program, the more likely they will be to stay in the program and take advantage
of the career readiness opportunities that it provides. We hope to find that students
resumes, which theyll keep in their portfolios, will be regularly updated and reflect their
mounting experiences on worksites and their confidence in work-related skills.

Families and community members will be involved in students growing awareness and
participation in work-related learning experiences.
This will be evaluated by tracking attendance at after school activities, tracking
community members who volunteer as guest speakers, tracking business partnerships
that make worksite learning experiences possible, tracking participation demographics
of the advisory committee, etc. We hope to find that with time, the program will
develop firm roots in the community and its value will be recognized through
increasing attendance and participation in program activities.

The graduation rate of Native American students attending Minneapolis Public Schools
will increase.
This will be evaluated by looking at the data the district collects annually on graduation
rates for AYP reporting, to see whether the rates improve over time as the program is
fully implemented across grade levels. We hope to see that as time passes, especially
when our incoming 6th and 7th grade participants are going through high school, an

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increasing percentage of Native American students will remain enrolled and actively
working towards high school graduation.

An increased percentage of Native American students will move directly from high school
enrollment to postsecondary education or training and/or gainful employment.
This will be evaluated by establishing a baseline by exit surveying seniors during the
program development phase, then re-surveying them (via phone and/or mail) 6
months later to see whether their plans worked out as they had intended. This same
procedure will be used with student participants as the program is implemented. Then
the information from the baseline phase can be compared to the different points in
program implementation to see if desired change is evident. We hope to see an
increase in the percentage of students who are actively involved in postsecondary
education or training and/or active workforce participation.

Please note that desired degrees of change in all these desired outcomes likely wont come
overnight, or even within the first year or two. Itll be an ongoing process to work to change
student perceptions of school and academic trends since the current pattern has very much
been entrenched for a long time.

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The Worksite
When considering potential worksites for students in a work-based learning program to spend
time at, its important prescreen potential sites to ensure that they are in accordance with
relevant laws and that they are places that students will likely have good role models for
professionalism. Once a worksite is selected and students are placed there its important that
program staff continue to build relationships with the employer and monitor the quality of
learning that is taking place there. This section provides of the manual provides an overview
of the worksite selection and supervision process and relevant laws.
Site Selection
Potential worksites should be selected based on the relevance of the work performed there to
students interests and then be carefully screened to ensure that the employer is in
compliance with legal codes and interested in hosting students for work-based learning
experiences. Relevant legal codes are outlined in the following pages. When considering
the likely dedication of a worksite to collaboration for student learning, the following elements
of partnership should be discussed with the employer*:

The employer provides orientation to the business/worksite and safety instruction.

The employer provides the student training on processes, procedures and use of
equipment.

A well-designed individual training plan that comprises tasks which are progressively
more complex and difficult in nature. The plan should be developed collaboratively with
the employer, educators, and WBL coordinator.

The duties and tasks which the student will learn and perform require problem solving.

A student is exposed to all aspects of an industry from planning, management, finances,


technical and production skills, technology, health and safety issues, and the variety of
occupations contained within business or industry.

Workplace skills and transferable skills are included in the training plan.

A supervisor, who is a positive role model, is assigned to the student at the worksite.

The worksite connects to the work-based seminar and other classroom instruction.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

For a checklist to be used when considering potential worksites for student work-based
learning experiences, please refer to the Potential Worksite Evaluation Form located in the
Sample Forms section of this manual.

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Site Supervision
Supervision of students on a worksite is done by job coaches, employee mentors, and WorkBased Learning Coordinators. Developing good professional relationships with students is
very important for helping supervisors to build credence, respect, and understanding with
adolescents. Below are some tips for those directly supervising students on the worksite*:

Get to know the young person.


o Ask the student about their career dreams, goals, hobbies, strengths, limits, and
needs.

Provide training and emphasize safety and health at all times.


o Young people are often not aware of the dangers in the workplace. They need initial
training and on-going reminders.

Provide the student opportunities to make some decision regarding their work-based
experience.
o Young people need to learn how to make informed decisions.

Teach the young person about workplace culture.


o Young people need to learn about an employers rules, customs, and standards.
Supervisors should encourage a students curiosity, invite questions, and allow for
exploration opportunities.

Be a positive role model.


o Young people are easily influenced by what is occurring around them. The supervisor
should use proper techniques and practices (especially safety), respectful language
and avoid all types of harassment at all times.

Be clear and straightforward with directions and instructions.


o Supervisors should give the what, why, and how of newly assigned tasks while
holding the student responsible for the outcome.

Advice youth on career directions and opportunities.


o When at a worksite, the student observes the realities of the workplace first-hand. This
is an ideal opportunity for the supervisor to share what knowledge and skills are
required in a particular career field.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

Although job coaches are on worksites with students on a daily basis and should be speaking
openly with Work-Based Learning Coordinators about any concerns that arise at the sites, its
important that WBL Coordinators also get out to the worksites in-person on a regular basis
throughout students 10-week rotations. At a minimum, there should be two formal prescheduled visits to each worksite by the WBL Coordinators and two drop-in visits to the site
at times that the students and job coaches are not informed of ahead of time. During formal
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visits, the WBL Coordinators should fill out a Worksite Visit Report such as the one included
under the Sample Forms section of this policy manual. If concerns or pleasant surprises are
evident during a drop-in visit, notes of these factors should be written up and followed up on
as needed.
Worker Rights in MN
The following are worker/employee rights in the state of Minnesota*:

The employee must receive at least the minimum wage per hour for all hours the
employer requires the employee to work, including preparation time, opening and closing
times and required meetings.

The employer may not deduct from the employees wages for breakages, cash shortages,
tools and uniforms. Some exceptions to this rule are allowed. The employee must
authorize any deductions from her or his paycheck in writing.

Each time the employee is paid, he or she must receive a statement listing all deductions,
such as taxes, from his or her earnings.

Keep accurate records of hours worked. If there is a difference between the employees
and the employers records, review records together.

Rest breaks are not required. However, the employee must be allowed time to use the
nearest restroom within reaching four consecutive hours of work.

If the employee works eight or more consecutive hours, she or he must be allowed
sufficient time to eat a meal.

The employer must pay one-and one-half times the regular rate of pay for overtime hours
worked. State Law requires overtime after 48-hours in a workweek. Employers with more
than $500,000 in annual sales or revenue are covered by federal law and require overtime
after 40 hours in a workweek.

Minors (under 18 years of age) are prohibited from working certain jobs. Hours are
restricted for high school students under 18 years of age. (Hazardous occupations can be
addressed on the training agreement. The specific hazard and hazardous order must be
identified and the training plan must demonstrate the task is incidental to the work
experience.)

The employee has a right to a safe workplace! If safety or health hazards exist, contact
the Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). (In a WBL experience the
student should contact his or her WBL coordinator.)

If the employee is injured on the job, the employer should be immediately informed! The
employer has an obligation to provide employees with workers compensation insurance.

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The employer must provide a work environment free from racial, sexual and religious
harassment. Report violations to the Human Resources Department. (In a WBL
experience the student should contact his or her WBL coordinator.)

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

MN Child Labor Laws*


WBL programs must assure that the employment of youth at worksites meet the Federal
FLSA and Minnesota Child Labor Laws. When there are differences among federal or state
laws or regulations, or municipal ordinances, the stricter standard applies.
Minimum Age for Employment
A minor under 14 years of age may not be employed, except:
As a newspaper carrier, if at least 11 years of age;
In agriculture, if at least 12 years of age and if parents or guardians consent;
As an actor/actress or model.
Proof of Age
The proof of age must be maintained as part of the payroll records. Acceptable proof is one
of the following:
Copy of birth certificate,
Copy of a drivers license,
An age certificate issued by the school, or
A United States Department of Justice Immigration and Naturalization Service
Employment Eligibility Verification Form I-9.
Overtime
The Minnesota FLSA requires employers to pay overtime for all hours worked in excess of 48
per work week; businesses with gross annual sales of more than $500,000; businesses that
were covered before 4/1/90 under the $250,000 ($362,500 retail and services dollar volume
test); and hospitals and nursing homes, private and public schools, federal, state and local
government agencies may be required to pay overtime for all hours worked in excess of 40
hours per work week. The rate is at least one and one-half times the employees regular rate
of pay.
Prohibited Occupations for Minors under 18
No minors under the age of 18 shall be employed:

In or about a place of employment where chemicals, compounds, dusts, fumes, vapors,


gases, or radioactive materials, or other substances are present at excessive
temperatures or in injurious, explosive, toxic, or flammable quantities. Minors employed in
retail stores, service stations, and automobile service garages are not covered by this

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prohibition.

In or about any place where explosives or pyrotechnics are manufactured, stored,


handled, or fired.

In or about logging or lumbering operations and paper mills.

In or about sawmills, lath mills, shingle mills, or cooperage stock manufacturing plant.

In or about mines, quarries, and sand or gravel pits.

In or about construction or building projects.

In or about ice harvesting operations.

On boats or vessels used for commercial purposes. Minors performing guide or other nonoperational services are not covered by this prohibition.

To operative or to assist in the operation of power-driven machinery, including but not


limited to: industrial trucks (forklifts); meat saws and meat grinders; milling machines;
punch presses, press brakes, and shears; and woodworking machinery such as circular
saws, radial saws, joiners, and shaping machines.

To operate any non-automatic elevator, lift, or hoisting machine.

To drive motor vehicles (Federal laws are more strict)

As a brakeman, fireman, engineer, motorman, or conductor for a railroad, street railway,


or interurban railroad or in switching or gate-tending.

As a lifeguard. Minors who have received a Red Cross lifesaving certificate or its
equivalent and who work under uninterrupted adult supervision are not covered by this
prohibition.

In oxyacetylene or oxyhydrogen welding.

In aerial acts using such equipment as flying rings, horizontal bars, or trapezes. Nor shall
a minor be employed in weight lifting, balancing, acting, or human pyramiding acts, or as
a rope walker, contortionist, or in other exhibitions dangerous or injurious to the life, limb
or health of the minor.

In the operation, erection, or dismantling of rides or machinery in an amusement park


street carnival, or traveling show, or in the loading or unloading of passengers on rides.

In any rooms constituting the place in which intoxicating liquors or non-intoxicating malt
liquors are served or consumed or in any tasks involving the serving, dispensing, or
handling of such liquors that are consumed on the premises except that:

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1. Minors who have reached the age of 17 may be employed to perform busing or

dishwashing services in those rooms or areas of a restaurant, hotel, motel, or resort


where the presence of intoxicating liquor is incidental to food service or preparation;
2. Minors who have reached the age of 17 may be employed to perform busing or
dishwashing services or to provide waiter or waitress service in rooms or areas where
the presence of non-intoxicating malt liquor is incidental to food service or preparation;
3. Minors who have reached the age of 16 may be employed to provide musical
entertainment in those rooms or areas where the presence of intoxicating liquor and
non-intoxicating malt liquor is incidental to food service or preparation; and
4. Minors are not prevented from working at tasks which are not prohibited by other parts
of these rules or the law in establishments where liquor is sold, served, dispensed, or
handled in those rooms or areas where no liquor is consumed or served.

In window-washing, wall-cleaning, painting, or other building maintenance or repair high


than 12 feet above the ground or floor level, using ladders, scaffolding, safety belts,
outside vertical conveyors, or like equipment.

In any occupation or activity, or on any site, which is hazardous or dangerous to life, limb
or health.
Prohibited Occupations for Minors under 16

In addition to the restrictions listed above, no minor under the age of 16 may be
employed:

In or about airport landing strips and taxi or maintenance aprons;

Except as stated in part 5200.0910, Item K, sub item (3), as a motor vehicle driver or an
outside helper thereon;

As loaders or launchers for skeet or trap shooting;

To lift or carry, or otherwise personally care for, patients in hospitals or nursing homes;

To do welding of any kind;

To operate or assist in the operation of machinery, including but not limited to:
1. Farm type tractors and other self-propelled vehicles, except those minors trained
under either the 4-H Federal Extension Service or the U.S. Office of Agriculture
Education Training program may work on equipment permitted by their certificate of
training;
2. Laundry, rug cleaning or dry cleaning equipment;
3. Sidewalk type snow blowers and other power-driven lawn and garden equipment;
4. Drill presses, milling machines, grinders, lathes, and such portable power-driven
machinery as drills, sanders, and polishing and scrubbing equipment for floor
maintenance;
5. Meat slicers;

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6. Textile-making machinery; and


7. Bakery machinery;

In oiling, cleaning, or maintaining any power-driven machinery, either portable or


stationary, while in motion or at rest;

In work involving the use of pits, racks, or lifting apparatus at service stations or in
mounting tires on rims;

In processing plants to do work which includes killing, plucking, singeing, drawing, brining,
smoking, slicing, grinding, chopping or cutting operations; In walk-in meat freezers or
meat coolers, except that occasional entrance to such areas which is incidental to the
occupation is not prohibited;

In any occupation in agriculture that the U.S. Secretary of Labor finds and declares to be
particularly hazardous for the employment of children below the age of 16;

In any manufacturing or commercial warehouse, to do work which includes packaging,


shelving, stock-clerking, or cleaning; or

In a car wash to attach cars to or detach them from mechanized conveyor lines or to
operate or contact the car while it is connected to the conveyor apparatus.
Common Exceptions to Common Labor Laws

A 17-year-old high school graduate;

A minor employed by a business solely owned and daily supervised by one or both
parents

A minor participating in a state-approved apprenticeship program or a program approved


by the MN Department of Children, Families & Learning;

A minor employed at tasks away from or outside of the area of hazardous operation,
equipment or materials.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

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Fair Labor Standards Act


Non-paid work-based learning experiences that meet the following four criteria are not
subject to the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act*:
1)

The young person receives ongoing instruction at the employers worksite and receives
close supervision throughout the learning experience, with the result that any productive
work that the learner would perform would be offset by the burden to the employer from
the training and supervision provided;

2)

The placement of the young person at a worksite during the learning experience does not
result in the displacement of any regular employee, i.e., the presence of the young person
at the worksite cannot result in an employee being laid off, or the employer not hiring an
employee it would otherwise hire, or an employee working fewer hours than he or she
would otherwise work;

3)

The young person is not entitled to a job at the completion of the learning experience but
this does not mean that employers are to be discouraged from offering employment to a
young person who has successfully completed the training;

4)

The employer, young person, and parent or guardian understand that the learner is not
entitled to wages or other compensation for the time spent in the learning experience
although the young person may be paid a stipend for expenses such as tuition, books, or
tools.

*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003

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ADA Considerations*
Employers with 15 or more employees must comply with the requirements of the Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA requirements which relate to work-based learning are
briefly outlined here. (This is a general description of the requirements and does not carry the
force of legal opinion.)
General Requirements
All government facilities, services and communications must be accessible and consistent
with the requirements of Sec. 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
Public accommodations such as restaurants, hotels, theaters, doctors offices, pharmacies,
retail stores, museums, libraries, parks, private schools, and day care centers, may not
discriminate on the basis of disability. Private clubs and religious organizations are exempt.
Reasonable changes in policies, practices, and procedures must be made to avoid
discrimination.
Physical Barriers
Physical barriers in existing facilities must be removed, if removal is readily achievable. If not,
alternative methods of providing the services must be offered, if theyre readily achievable.
All new construction in public accommodations, as well as in commercial facilities such as
office buildings, must be accessible.
Alterations must be accessible.
Auxiliary Aids
Auxiliary aids and services must be provided to individuals with vision or hearing impairments
or other individuals with disabilities, unless an undue burden would result.
Companies offering telephone service to the general public must offer telephone relay service
to individuals who use telecommunications devices for the deaf (TDDs) or similar devices.
Employment
Employers may not discriminate against an individual with a disability in hiring or promotion if
the person is otherwise qualified for the job.
Employers can ask about ones ability to perform a job, but cannot inquire if the person has a
disability, or subject a person to tests that tend to screen out people with disabilities.
Employers will need to provide reasonable accommodations to individuals with disabilities.
This includes steps such as job restructuring and modification of equipment.
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Employers do not need to provide accommodations that impose an undue hardship on


business operations.
www.ada.gov
*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003

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Affirmative Action/Anti-Discrimination

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Considerations for Students on IEPs


Because this program is open to all Native American students in grades 6-12, it is quite likely
that program staff may be working with students with special needs who receive services and
accommodations through Individual Education Programs (IEPs). An IEP is a legally-binding
contract with the school district and its therefore important for program staff to understand
the implications of this document. Additionally, by age 14 or grade 9, students on IEPs must
have a section in their IEP discussing present levels and goals towards transition from high
school to postsecondary education and training, employment, and high school living
(https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=125a.22). This transition part of the IEP is
particularly relevant to a students experiences in a work-based learning program.
This section of the policy manual addresses program staffs role in relation to collaboration
with special education staff, providing accommodations and adaptations as specified in IEPs,
as well as legal considerations relating to placement of students who are on IEPs in worksite
settings.
Collaboration with IEP Teams
Students in special education have whats called an IEP team that is in charge of writing a
students IEP, including goals, objectives, accommodations, and adaptations to meet their
academic and transition needs. The IEP team is also responsible for monitoring a students
progress towards meeting his or her IEP goals. A students IEP team is generally comprised
of the student, the students parent(s)/guardian(s), the students special education case
manager, a district representative (such as a school social worker or principal), and one or
more general education teachers. Because this work-based learning program is a general
education program (one open to students who both do and do not have disabilities), it is
possible that a program staff member may be asked to join a students IEP team and/or to
attend and contribute during an IEP meeting. Such a request should be obliged as long as it
would not adversely impact other students in the program.
Accommodations and Adaptations
Some students may have accommodations or adaptations written into their IEPs that specify
things such as periodic breaks from class-work, small-group testing environment, or shorter
class assignments. Program staff should work with students case managers to identify
needed accommodations and adaptations and implement them within school-based program
components. For worksite experiences, program staff should collaborate with case
managers and employers to identify and implement any needed accommodations or
adaptations in that setting. ADA legislation (addressed in the Worksite section of this policy
manual) may provide relevant guidance for what employers are responsible for doing to
accommodate for the needs of students with disabilities.

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Worksite Placement Considerations


Students who are on IEPs have guidelines, programs, and resources available to them that
are not applicable to other students in work-based learning programs. The students
Transition IEP may provide for additional staff support and/or assistive technology at a
worksite. Some students may have access to vocational rehabilitation services
(http://www.positivelyminnesota.com/JobSeekers/People_with_Disabilities/Counseling,_Train
ing_Job_Skills/What_Services_Are_Available.aspx) through the citys Workforce Centers,
which can provide a variety of services including counseling support for keeping a job.
For paid work-based learning experiences, some students may be able to continue receiving
Supplemental Security Income through the SSI Work Incentive Programs. Through the use
of Work Incentives a student can*:

Engage in paid employment.

Increase income without loss of cash benefits or eligibility for other benefits such as
Medicaid.

Offset expenses incurred as a result of their work.

Save for further postsecondary education and training or to start a business.

SSI Work Incentives available to students with disabilities may include: Earned Income
Exclusion, Student Earned Income Exclusion, Impairment-Related Work Expense, Plan for
Achieving Self-Support, and Blind Work Experience. Through the use of accommodations,
technology, training, and support, many work goals for youth with disabilities can be reached
that may not have been possible in the past.
Web site: www.ssa.gov
*borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003)

Students on IEPs may also qualify for an alternate minimum wage under the Fair Labor
Standards Act. Please see fact sheets on following pages for more information on this
difference in minimum wage law.

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Sample Program Forms


An important part of running a well-managed work-based learning program is maintaining
accurate records of student information, instructional information, worksite information, and
partnership information. This information, if gathered and maintained in good faith, ensures
that student needs are effectively being addressed in appropriate settings and that the school
district is not held liable for situations that are out of its direct control.
This section contains a variety of sample program forms. Some of the forms have been
borrowed, and at times modified, from other policy manuals or district programs. Where
applicable, notes on the origins of forms are made. Because the needs of different sites and
for different age groups may vary, it is encouraged that you use these forms as a basis for
your record keeping system and adjust them individually as needed to fit your sites specific
requirements.

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Training Agreement for Paid Experiences


The following training agreement form is borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based
Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children, Families,
and Learning (2003).

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Individual Training Agreement


Type of training agreement: _____ Cooperative Work Experience ______ Internship ______Other ___________________
Educational Objective:
Student:

Age:

School:

SS#:
Telephone #:

School Coordinator:
Employer/Agency:

Telephone #:

Employer/Agency Contact Person:


The work-based learning for the above named student will begin on
The hours of work will be from
to
on

and end
Days of week

Starting wages for the student will be $


per hour. The employer will determine incremental increases. A
probationary period of _____days from the date of initial employment will exist. Continued employment will be based on a
performance review.
All participating parties agree to enter into a work-based learning program authorized by the laws of Minnesota for the
purpose of providing education, career exploration, and training. They also agree to the following responsibilities in the
implementation of this agreement:
Student Agrees to:

Meet the academic and attendance requirements established by the School District and Employer.
Abide by the companys policies and procedures (e.g., attendance, confidentiality, accountability, safety, rules of conduct, etc.)
Maintain acceptable performance at school and on the job.
Participate in progress reviews scheduled with mentors, school personnel and/or parent/guardian; and share information of events
or facts relevant to your progress in this program.
The release of information (e.g., progress reports, grades, work-related evaluations, and attendance reports) between the school
and business while this agreement is in effect.

Date:

Students Signature:

Students Parent/Guardian Agrees to:

Support the student in meeting the requirements of the program.


Ensure transportation to and from the work-site is provided.
Participate in any progress reviews scheduled with mentors, school personnel, and student; and communicate information vital to
the success and development of the student.
The release of information (e.g., progress reports, grades, work-related evaluations, and attendance reports) between the school
and employer/agency while this agreement is in effect.

Date:

Parent/Guardians Signature:

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Individual Training Agreement, Cont.

School Agrees to:

Not exclude students from participation in the program on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability,
marital status, status in regard to public assistance or any other protected groups under state, federal or local Equal Opportunity
Laws.
Support the student in meeting the requirements of the program.
Participate in progress reviews scheduled with mentors, student and students guardian.
Comply with all federal, state, and local regulations.
Place students in appropriate work-based learning experience based on tested interests, aptitudes and abilities and provide
appropriate accommodations when required.
Provide pre-employment training prior to placing students at a work-site and safety training.
Follow the curriculum provided for the program for all occupationally related instruction.
Assign a work-based learning coordinator to supervise the student and to monitor the academic progress of the student to ensure
that high school graduation requirements are met (includes regularly scheduled telephone/on-site contact with the student and
employer).
Award credit for successful completion of the work-based experience.

Date:

School Coordinators Signature:

Employer/Supervisor Agrees to:

Provide a work-based learning experience and supportive supervision for the length of this agreement.
Pay at least the state minimum wage for hours worked by the student.
Provide evidence of workers compensation and general liability coverage for the student for all paid hours worked.
Instruct the student in the competencies identified in the training plan provided and document the students progress
Conduct progress reviews with the student (which may include the guardian and school personnel) and provide copies of those
reviews to the school.
Not exclude students from participation in the program on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin age, disability,
marital status, status in regard to public assistance or any other protected groups under state, federal or local Equal Opportunity
Laws.
Protect students from sexual harassment.
Provide students with safety training, safe equipment, and a safe and healthful workplace that conforms to all health and safety
standards of Federal and State Law (including the Fair Labor Standards Act, OSHA, and MN Child Labor).
Properly train students before they operate any equipment.

Date:

Employers Signature:

Date:

Worksite Supervisors Signature:

This agreement may be terminated for any reason during the probationary period by showing good cause by the
student, the school district, or the employer. Copies of this agreement should be distributed to the student, the
guardian, the employer and the original kept on file at the school.
(Attach a copy of the students Individual Training Plan to this agreement.)

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Training Agreement for Non-Paid Experiences


The following training agreement form is borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based
Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children, Families,
and Learning (2003).

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Individual Training Agreement for Non-Paid Activities


Type of training agreement:

_______ Service Learning

_______ Community-Based Special Needs

_____Non-Paid Internship _______Job Shadowing

_______ Mentorship

Educational Objective:
Student:

Age

School:

Telephone #:

Teacher Coordinator:
Work-Based Learning Site/Agency:

Telephone #:

Work-Based Learning Site/Agency Contact Person:


The work-based learning for the above named student will begin on

and end on

All participating parties agree to enter into a work-based learning program authorized by the laws of Minnesota for the purpose of
providing education, career exploration, and training. The following criteria MUST be met for a non-paid experience: 1) the employer
derives no benefit from the activities of the student; 2) the student does not displace a regular employee and is closely supervised; 3) the
student understands he or she is not entitled to receive any wages during the agreement time; and 4) the student understands he or she
is not entitled to a job at the end of the experience. A short-term activity is considered to be up to 40 hours in length. They also agree to
the following responsibilities in the implementation of this agreement:

Student Agrees to:

Meet the academic and attendance requirements established by the School District and work-based learning site.
Abide by the companys policies and procedures (e.g., attendance, confidentiality, accountability, safety, rules of conduct, etc.)
Maintain acceptable performance at school and at the work-based learning site.
Participate in progress reviews scheduled with mentors, school personnel and/or parent/guardian; and share information of events
or facts relevant to your progress in this program.

The release of information (e.g., progress reports, grades, activity-related evaluations, and attendance reports) between the school
and work-based learning site while this agreement is in effect.
Student understands he or she is not entitled to a job at the end of the activity or to receive any wages during the agreement time.
Date:

Students Signature:

Students Parent/Guardian Agrees to:

Support the student in meeting the requirements of the program.


Ensure transportation to and from the work-site is provided when required.
Participate in any progress reviews scheduled with mentors, school personnel, and student; and communicate information vital to
the success and development of the student.

The release of information (e.g., progress reports, grades, work-related evaluations, and attendance reports) between the school
and work-based learning site while this agreement is in effect.
Parent/Guardians understand their child is not entitled to a job at the end of the activity or receive wages during the agreement
time.
Date:

Parent/Guardians Signature:

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Individual Training Agreement for Non-Paid Activities, Cont.

School Agrees to:

Not exclude students from participation in the program on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability,
marital status, status in regard to public assistance or any other protected groups under state, federal or local Equal Opportunity
Laws.
Support the student in meeting the requirements of the program.
Participate in progress reviews scheduled with mentors, student and students guardian.
Comply with all federal, state, and local regulations.
Place students in appropriate work-based learning experience based on tested interests, aptitudes and abilities and provide
appropriate accommodations when required.
Provide orientation to the activity prior to placing students in a non-paid work-based learning experience.
Follow the curriculum provided for the program for all related instruction.
Assign the appropriately licensed teacher to monitor the work-based learning experience (includes regularly scheduled
telephone/on-site contact with the student and work-based learning activity site).

Date:

School Coordinators Signature:

Work-Based Learning Site/Supervisor Agrees to:


Derive no benefit from the activities of the student at their site.
Not displace a regular employee with the student.
Assure the student is closely supervised at the work-based learning site.
Provide evidence of general liability insurance coverage for visitors, volunteers, and non-paid work-based learning activities.
Instruct the student in the competencies identified in the training plan provided and document the students progress when
applicable.
Conduct progress reviews, when applicable, with the student (which may include the guardian and school personnel) and provide
copies of those reviews to the school.
Not exclude students from participation in the program on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin age, disability,
marital status, status in regard to public assistance or any other protected groups under state, federal or local Equal Opportunity
Laws.
Protect the student from sexual harassment.
Provide student with safety training, safe equipment, and a safe and healthful workplace that conforms to all health and safety
standards of Federal and State Law (including the Fair Labor Standards Act, OSHA, and MN Child Labor).
Date:

Employers Signature:

This agreement may be terminated for any reason during the probationary period by showing good
cause by the student, the school district, or the employer. Copies of this agreement should be
distributed to the student, the guardian, the employer and the original kept on file at the school.

(Attach a copy of the students Individual Training Plan to this agreement.)

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Training Agreement for Students on IEPs


The following training agreement form contains elements from Connecting Youth to WorkBased Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003) as well as the Minneapolis Public Schools Transition Plus
Services Training Agreement.

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Individual Training Agreement for Students on IEPs


Type of Work-Based Learning Experience: _______________________________________________________________
Educational Objective:
Student:

Age

School:

Telephone #: ___________________

WBL Coordinator: _________________________________________________ Telephone #: ___________________


Case Manager: __________________________________________________ Telephone #: ___________________
Worksite Contact Person: __________________________________________ Telephone #: ___________________
The work-based learning for the above named student will begin on

and end on

All participating parties agree to enter into a work-based learning program authorized by the laws of Minnesota for the purpose of
providing education, career exploration, and training. The following criteria MUST be met for a non-paid experience: 1) the employer
derives no benefit from the activities of the student; 2) the student does not displace a regular employee and is closely supervised; 3) the
student understands he or she is not entitled to receive any wages during the agreement time; and 4) the student understands he or she
is not entitled to a job at the end of the experience. A short-term activity is considered to be up to 40 hours in length. They also agree to
the following responsibilities in the implementation of this agreement:

Student Agrees to:

Meet the academic and attendance requirements established by the School District and work-based learning site.
Abide by the companys policies and procedures (e.g., attendance, confidentiality, accountability, safety, rules of conduct, etc.)
Maintain acceptable performance at school and at the work-based learning site.
Participate in progress reviews scheduled with mentors, school personnel and/or parent/guardian; and share information of events
or facts relevant to your progress in this program.

The release of information (e.g., progress reports, grades, activity-related evaluations, and attendance reports) between the school
and work-based learning site while this agreement is in effect.
Student understands he or she is not entitled to a job at the end of the activity or to receive any wages during the agreement time.
Date:

Students Signature:

Students Parent/Guardian Agrees to:

Support the student in meeting the requirements of the program.


Ensure transportation to and from the work-site is provided when required.
Participate in any progress reviews scheduled with mentors, school personnel, and student; and communicate information vital to
the success and development of the student.

The release of information (e.g., progress reports, grades, work-related evaluations, and attendance reports) between the school
and work-based learning site while this agreement is in effect.
Parent/Guardians understand their child is not entitled to a job at the end of the activity or receive wages during the agreement
time.
Date:

Parent/Guardians Signature:

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Individual Training Agreement for Special Education Programs, Cont.

Work Based Learning Coordinator Agrees to:

Not exclude students from participation in the program on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability,
marital status, status in regard to public assistance or any other protected groups under state, federal or local Equal Opportunity
Laws.
Support the student in meeting the requirements of the program.
Participate in progress reviews scheduled with mentors, student and students guardian.
Comply with all federal, state, and local regulations.
Place students in appropriate work-based learning experience based on tested interests, aptitudes and abilities and provide
appropriate accommodations when required.
Provide orientation to the activity prior to placing students in a non-paid work-based learning experience.
Follow the curriculum provided for the program for all related instruction.
Assign the appropriately licensed teacher to monitor the work-based learning experience (includes regularly scheduled
telephone/on-site contact with the student and work-based learning activity site).

Date:

School Coordinators Signature:

Case Manager Agrees to:

Communicate regularly with worksite management and the Work Based Learning Coordinator.
Provide copy of Performance Profiles and mid-term progress report to parent/guardian.
Grant school credit for successful training experience and take daily attendance.

Date:

Case Manager Signature:

Work-Based Learning Site/Supervisor Agrees to:

Derive no benefit from the activities of the student at their site.


Not displace a regular employee with the student.
Assure the student is closely supervised at the work-based learning site.
Provide evidence of general liability insurance coverage for visitors, volunteers, and non-paid work-based learning activities.
Instruct the student in the competencies identified in the training plan provided and document the students progress when
applicable.
Conduct progress reviews, when applicable, with the student (which may include the guardian and school personnel) and provide
copies of those reviews to the school.
Not exclude students from participation in the program on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin age, disability,
marital status, status in regard to public assistance or any other protected groups under state, federal or local Equal Opportunity
Laws.
Protect the student from sexual harassment.
Provide student with safety training, safe equipment, and a safe and healthful workplace that conforms to all health and safety
standards of Federal and State Law (including the Fair Labor Standards Act, OSHA, and MN Child Labor).

Date:

Employers Signature:

This agreement may be terminated for any reason during the probationary period by showing good cause by the student, the
school district, or the employer. Copies of this agreement should be distributed to the student, the guardian, the employer
and the original kept on file at the school.

(Attach a copy of the students Individual Training Plan to this agreement.)

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Training Plan
The following training plan form is borrowed from Connecting Youth to Work-Based Learning:
BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children, Families, and
Learning (2003).

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Individual Training Plan


(Plan to be attached to the Individual Training Agreement)

Students Name: _______________________________________

SID#: ___________________

Job Title: ________________________________________________________________________


Business/Employer: ________________________________________________________________
Assigned Supervisor: _______________________________________________________________
Work-Based Learning Coordinator: ____________________________________________________
School: __________________________________________________________________________
Beginning Date

/ 20

Area/Task Assigned

Ending Date

/ 20

Date
Level of
Classroom Worksite Completed Attainment

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

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Training Plan for Students on IEPs


The following training plan form is borrowed and modified from Connecting Youth to WorkBased Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003).

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Individual Training Plan


(Plan to be attached to the Individual Training Agreement)

Students Name: _______________________________________

SID#: ___________________

Job Title: ________________________________________________________________________


Business/Employer: ________________________________________________________________
Assigned Supervisor: _______________________________________________________________
Work-Based Learning Coordinator: ____________________________________________________
Case Manager: ____________________________________________________________________
School: __________________________________________________________________________
Beginning Date

/ 20

Area/Task Assigned

Ending Date

/ 20

Date
Level of
Classroom Worksite Completed Attainment

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

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Statement of Assurances
The following statement of assurances form is borrowed from Connecting Youth to WorkBased Learning: BLUEPRINT for a Quality Program, State of MN, Department of Children,
Families, and Learning (2003).

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Statement of Assurances
(This form declares program compliance with MN Child Labor Laws and Federal Fair Labor Standards Act covering
working restrictions and hazardous occupations and is to be kept on file with the Individual Training Agreement.)
School/District

Contact Name

Address

Phone

Employers Name

Contact Name

Address

Phone

The undersigned hereby affirm that the above named partner/s will be in compliance with the requirements of state and federal
child labor laws.

Statement of Assurances: Check "Yes" or "No" to indicate which of the following assurance statements have been addressed.
Statements a-d must be checked with a yes to be in compliance with state and federal child labor laws. Steps must be taken to correct
or eliminate any item checked no. Failure to do so by employer will result in the termination of the individual work-based training
agreement.
All participants in work-based learning programs are familiar with the state and federal child labor laws as they relate to
hazardous occupations and working restrictions. This will include information about the special exemption provisions for
students enrolled in secondary career and technical education work-based learning programs.
YES___ NO___
To meet the criteria for a special exemption, the school and employer partners will ensure that the following provisions

are in place:

a. Hazardous work will be identified and documented in the work based learning program and be performed under the
direct and close supervision of a qualified and experienced person.
YES___NO___
b. Safety instruction in the hazardous occupation will be given by either the school or the employer and be reinforced
by the employer with on the job training.
YES___NO___
c. The work process follows a schedule that reflects organized and progressive skill development.

YES___NO___

d. Hazardous work is intermittent and for short periods of time and is under the direct and close supervision of a
qualified and experienced person as a necessary part of the students work based learning experience.
YES___ NO___
Planning for the program addressed state and federal child labor laws.

YES___ NO___

All participants, including parents, guardians, employer, supervisor, student, and school, will receive a signed copy of

this statement of assurances.

YES___ NO___

I verify that this information is correct and will be documented in the student's WBL program file.

Work-Based Learning Coordinators Signature

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

Date

Employers Signature

Date

119

Insurance and Emergency Information


The following insurance and emergency information form is borrowed and modified from
North Carolinas Guide to Work-Based Learning, North Carolina Department of Public
Instruction.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

120

INSURANCE AND EMERGENCY INFORMATION


Personal Data:
Student Name: _____________________________

Birthday: ______________

Home Address: ______________________________

SID#: _______________

Home Phone #: ______________________________

___________________________________________
School Name: _______________________________

WBL Coordinator: ____________________________

School Address: ______________________________

WBL Coordinator Phone#: ______________________

___________________________________________
Insurance Coverage (indicate with an X)
Insurance Coverage

Yes/No

Family

School

Worksite

Liability and/or Bonding

_________

_________

_________

_________

Workers Compensation

_________

_________

_________

_________

Health/Accident

_________

_________

_________

_________

Name of Health/Accident Insurance Company: _______________________ Insured: _____________ Policy#: __________

Student Medical Information


Asthma?

Yes

No

If yes, is a rescue inhaler used?

Allergic to any medications?

Yes

No

Yes

No

If yes, which ones? _______________________________


_______________________________

List any allergies or other medical problems of the student: __________________________________________


_________________________________________________________________________________________
Family Information
Parent/Guardian Name: _________________________________
Workplace Name: ____________________________

Address: ____________________________________

Parent/Guardian Name: _________________________________


Workplace Name: ____________________________

Work Phone #: _____________________

Work Phone #: _____________________

Address: ____________________________________

Parent/Guardian Home Address: __________________________

Home Phone #: _____________________

Emergency Contact:

Relation to Student:

Emergency Contact Phone#:

____________________________

____________________________

____________________________

I consent for my child to receive emergency medical treatment in case of injury or illness. The information
provided is accurate to the best of my knowledge.
Parent/Guardian Signature: _____________________________________________

Date: ______________

Parent/Guardian Signature: _____________________________________________

Date: ______________

Students Signature: ___________________________________________________

Date: ______________

Note: this form should be kept on file as the school and at the worksite

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

121

Verification of Safety Training


The following insurance and emergency information form is borrowed and modified from
North Carolinas Guide to Work-Based Learning, North Carolina Department of Public
Instruction.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

122

VERIFICATION OF SAFETY TRAINING


I verify that _______________________________ successfully completed an instructional
(student name)
unit on safety in the workplace on ____________________.
(Date)
Brief description of safety instruction: ____________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

Instructor Signature: _____________________________ Title: _______________________

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

123

Student Time Card for Paid Experiences


The following student time card form was created by this policy guides author.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

124

STUDENT TIME CARD


Student Name: _______________________________

Time Period (from): ___/___/___ to ___/___/___

Worksite: ___________________________________

Supervisor: __________________________________

Date:

From:

To:

Total Hours:

Tasks Completed:

Total Hours This Time Period:


Student Signature: ____________________________

Supervisor Signature: _________________________

Date: ______________

Date: ______________

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

125

Student Time Card for Non-Paid Experiences


The following student time card form was created by this policy guides author.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

126

STUDENT TIME CARD


Student Name:
_______________________________

Time Period (from): ___/___/___ to


___/___/___

Worksite:
___________________________________

Supervisor:
__________________________________

Date:

From:

To:

Total Hours:

Wages:

Tasks Completed:

X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
X $_____=$______
Total Hours this Time Period:

Total Wages this Time Period: $

Student Signature:
____________________________

Supervisor Signature:
_________________________

Date: ______________

Date: ______________

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

127

Weekly Performance Profile


The following weekly performance profile form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

128

WEEKLY PERFORMANCE PROFILE


Student Name:

SIN:

Week Of:

School:

Job Coach:

Job Site:

WBL Coordinator:

Coordinator Phone#:

Work Related Behaviors (WRB)/Specific Learner Outcomes (SLO) Rating Scale:


0 Unable to perform skill/task or never performs skill/task
1 Performs skill/task with physical guidance or performs skill/task rarely (0-25%)
2 Performs skill/task with demonstration and verbal cue or performs skill/task occasionally (25-50%)
3 Performs skill/task with verbal cue or performs skill/task some of the time (50-80%)
4 Independently performs skill/task or performs skill/task most of the time (80-100%)
Work Related Behaviors (WRB):
1. Exhibits a desire to learn
2. Makes judgments
3. Uses appropriate language
4. Accepts constructive criticism
5. Complies with safety precautions
6. Displays appropriate habits
7. Follows instructions
8. Exhibits flexibility
9. Solves problems effectively
10. Works with out prompts
11. Displays punctuality
12. Seeks needed assistance
13. Cooperates and relates to others
14. Attends daily
Specific Learner Outcomes (SLO):

Date:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Date:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Date:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Date:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Comments:
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

129

Weekly Performance Profile for Students on IEPs


The following weekly performance profile form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

130

WEEKLY PERFORMANCE PROFILE


Student Name:

SIN:

Week Of:

School:

Job Coach:

Job Site:

WBL Coordinator:

Case Manager:

Coordinator Phone#:

Case Manager Phone#:

Work Related Behaviors (WRB)/Specific Learner Outcomes (SLO) Rating Scale:


0 Unable to perform skill/task or never performs skill/task
1 Performs skill/task with physical guidance or performs skill/task rarely (0-25%)
2 Performs skill/task with demonstration and verbal cue or performs skill/task occasionally (25-50%)
3 Performs skill/task with verbal cue or performs skill/task some of the time (50-80%)
4 Independently performs skill/task or performs skill/task most of the time (80-100%)
Work Related Behaviors (WRB):
1. Exhibits a desire to learn
2. Makes judgments
3. Uses appropriate language
4. Accepts constructive criticism
5. Complies with safety precautions
6. Displays appropriate habits
7. Follows instructions
8. Exhibits flexibility
9. Solves problems effectively
10. Works with out prompts
11. Displays punctuality
12. Seeks needed assistance
13. Cooperates and relates to others
14. Attends daily
Specific Learner Outcomes (SLO):

Date:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Date:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Date:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Date:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Comments:
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

131

Mid-Term Progress Report


The following mid-term progress report form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

132

MID-TERM PROGRESS REPORT


Student Name:

SIN#:

School/Program:

Quarter:

Worksite:

Job Coach:

WBL Coordinator:

Coordinator Phone#:

Attendance:

________________________

Days Present

________________________

Days Absent Excused

________________________

Days Absent Unexcused

________________________

Total Possible Days

________________________

% Present

Progress (circle one):

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Comments:
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
(Attach students weekly performance profiles to this form)

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

133

Mid-Term Progress Report for Students on IEPs


The following mid-term progress report form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

134

MID-TERM PROGRESS REPORT


Student Name:

SIN#:

School/Program:

Quarter:

Worksite:

Job Coach:

Case Manager:

WBL Coordinator:

Coordinator Phone#:

Phone#:
Attendance:

________________________

Days Present

________________________

Days Absent Excused

________________________

Days Absent Unexcused

________________________

Total Possible Days

________________________

% Present

Progress (circle one):

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Comments:
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
(Attach students weekly performance profiles to this form)

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

135

Summative Performance Profile


The following summative performance profile form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

136

SUMMATIVE PERFORMANCE PROFILE


Student Name:

SIN#:

School/Program:

School Year:

Evaluation Date:

Quarter:

Worksite:

Job Coach:

WBL Coordinator:

Coordinator Phone#:

Work Related Behaviors (WRB)/Specific Learner Outcomes (SLO) Rating Scale:


0 Unable to perform skill/task or never performs skill/task
1 Performs skill/task with physical guidance or performs skill/task rarely (0-25%)
2 Performs skill/task with demonstration and verbal cue or performs skill/task occasionally (25-50%)
3 Performs skill/task with verbal cue or performs skill/task some of the time (50-80%)
4 Independently performs skill/task or performs skill/task most of the time (80-100%)
Work Related Behaviors (WRB):
Specific Learner Outcomes (SLO):
1. Exhibits a desire to improve
1.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
2. Displays frustration tolerance
2.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
3. Makes judgments
3.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
4. Makes decisions
4.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
5. Displays appropriate appearance
5.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
6. Accepts constructive criticism
6.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
7. Completes tasks in timely manner 0 1 2 3 4
7.
0 1 2 3 4
8. Complies with safety precautions
8.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
9. Displays appropriate manners
9.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
10. Displays appropriate habits
10.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
11. Displays initiative
0 1 2 3 4
Comments:
12. Follows instructions
___________________________________________
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
13. Exhibits flexibility
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
14. Solves problems effectively
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
15. Works unsupervised
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
16. Completes tasks accurately
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
17. Displays punctuality
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
18. Cooperates and relates to others
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
19. Seeks needed assistance
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
20. Attends daily
0 1 2 3 4
WRB Rating Scale:
Score:
SLO Rating Scale:
Score:
0 = 0.00 points
____ X
0=0
(as determined by WBL
____ X
0=0
1 = 1.25 points
____ X 1.25 = ____
teamsee attached)
____ X ____ = ____
2 = 2.5 points
____ X 2.50 = ____
____ X ____ = ____
3 = 3.75 points
____ X 3.75 = ____
____ X ____ = ____
4 = 5.00 points
____ X 5.00 = ____
____ X ____ = ____
WRB Weighted Total:
STUDENT INTEREST:

High

Medium

____
Low

STUDENT APTITUDE:

High

Medium

Low

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

SLO Weighted Total:


____
Days Absent: ___________
Days Present: ___________ Percentage
Total Days: _____________
Attended: _______%

137

Summative Performance Profile for Students on IEPs


The following summative performance profile form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

138

SUMMATIVE PERFORMANCE PROFILE


Student Name:

SIN#:

School/Program:

School Year:

Evaluation Date:

Quarter:

Worksite:

Job Coach:

Case Manager:

WBL Coordinator:

Coordinator Phone#:

Phone#:
Work Related Behaviors (WRB)/Specific Learner Outcomes (SLO) Rating Scale:
0 Unable to perform skill/task or never performs skill/task
1 Performs skill/task with physical guidance or performs skill/task rarely (0-25%)
2 Performs skill/task with demonstration and verbal cue or performs skill/task occasionally (25-50%)
3 Performs skill/task with verbal cue or performs skill/task some of the time (50-80%)
4 Independently performs skill/task or performs skill/task most of the time (80-100%)
Work Related Behaviors (WRB):
Specific Learner Outcomes (SLO):
1. Exhibits a desire to improve
1.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
2. Displays frustration tolerance
2.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
3. Makes judgments
3.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
4. Makes decisions
4.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
5. Displays appropriate appearance
5.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
6. Accepts constructive criticism
6.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
7. Completes tasks in timely manner 0 1 2 3 4
7.
0 1 2 3 4
8. Complies with safety precautions
8.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
9. Displays appropriate manners
9.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
10. Displays appropriate habits
10.
0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4
11. Displays initiative
0 1 2 3 4
Comments:
12. Follows instructions
___________________________________________
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
13. Exhibits flexibility
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
14. Solves problems effectively
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
15. Works unsupervised
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
16. Completes tasks accurately
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
17. Displays punctuality
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
18. Cooperates and relates to others
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
19. Seeks needed assistance
0 1 2 3 4
___________________________________________
20. Attends daily
0 1 2 3 4
WRB Rating Scale:
Score:
SLO Rating Scale:
Score:
0 = 0.00 points
____ X
0=0
(as determined by WBL
____ X
0=0
1 = 1.25 points
____ X 1.25 = ____
teamsee attached)
____ X ____ = ____
2 = 2.5 points
____ X 2.50 = ____
____ X ____ = ____
3 = 3.75 points
____ X 3.75 = ____
____ X ____ = ____
4 = 5.00 points
____ X 5.00 = ____
____ X ____ = ____
WRB Weighted Total:
STUDENT INTEREST:

High

Medium

____
Low

STUDENT APTITUDE:

High

Medium

Low

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

SLO Weighted Total:


____
Days Absent: ___________
Days Present: ___________ Percentage
Total Days: _____________
Attended: _______%

139

Independent Student Transportation Form


The following independent student transportation form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

140

INDEPENDENT STUDENT TRANSPORTATION


To be completed by School:
School: ____________________________________________________

SID#: _______________________

Student Name: ______________________________

Birthday: ____________________

Age: __________

Student Address: ____________________________________________

Phone: ______________________

__________________________________________________________
Travel From: _________________

To: _________________________

Time: _______________________

Travel From: _________________

To: _________________________

Time: _______________________

School Phone: _______________________________________

Date: ______________________________

If driving, license and proof of insurance required.


License #: __________________________________

Insurance provider & #: ________________________

To be completed by Parent/Guardian:

The above-named student has consent to independently transport him/her self to the worksite and
back to school.
I understand that the student will be transporting him/her self independently and will not hold those
supervising the student at the worksite or the school responsible during the time the student is in
transit.
Parent/Guardian: __________________________________________

Date: _________________

In case of Emergency: __________________________________ Phone: _______________________

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Independent Student Transportation Form for Students on IEPs


The following independent student transportation form was borrowed from the Minneapolis
Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

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INDEPENDENT STUDENT TRANSPORTATION


To be completed by School:
School: ____________________________________________________

SID#: _______________________

Student Name: ______________________________

Birthday: ____________________

Age: __________

Student Address: ____________________________________________

Phone: ______________________

__________________________________________________________
Travel From: _________________

To: _________________________

Time: _______________________

Travel From: _________________

To: _________________________

Time: _______________________

Case Manager: _________________________

School Phone: __________________

Date: __________

If driving, license and proof of insurance required.


License #: __________________________________

Insurance provider & #: ________________________

To be completed by Parent/Guardian:

The above-named student has consent to independently transport him/her self to the worksite and
back to school.
I understand that the student will be transporting him/her self independently and will not hold those
supervising the student at the worksite or the school responsible during the time the student is in
transit.
Parent/Guardian: __________________________________________

Date: _________________

In case of Emergency: __________________________________ Phone: _______________________

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Paid Competitive Early Release Plan


The following paid competitive early release form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

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144

PAID COMPETITIVE EARLY RELEASE PLAN


Student Name: _____________________________________________

SID#: _______________________

Grade: _____________________

DOB: _______________________

Age: ________________________

Work Based Learning Coordinator: _________________________


Signed Training Agreement?

Yes

Coordinator Phone#: _________________

No

Employer: ___________________________________

Employer Phone#: ____________________________

Tentative Work Schedule: ____________________________________________________________________


Parental Permission Obtained By: ________________________

Written: _________

Verbal: _________

Plan: ____________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Administrator Approval: ______________________________________ Date: _________________________
Student Signature: __________________________________________ Date: _________________________

Student must maintain successful employment to be released early from school.

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Paid Competitive Early Release Plan for Students on IEPs


The following paid competitive early release form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

146

PAID COMPETITIVE EARLY RELEASE PLAN


Student Name: _____________________________________________

SID#: _______________________

Grade: _____________________

DOB: _______________________

Age: ________________________

Work Based Learning Coordinator: _________________________

Coordinator Phone#: _________________

Case Manager: ________________________________________

Case Manager Phone#: _______________

Signed Training Agreement?

Yes

No

Employer: ___________________________________

Employer Phone#: ____________________________

Tentative Work Schedule: ____________________________________________________________________


Parental Permission Obtained By: ________________________
Is WBL Service on students IEP?

Yes

No

Written: _________

Verbal: _________

(if no, significant change must be done before starting)

Plan: ____________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Administrator Approval: ______________________________________ Date: _________________________
Student Signature: __________________________________________ Date: _________________________

Student must maintain successful employment to be released early from school.

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Student Placement Request


The following student placement request form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

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Male

Female

Date:

Parent Name: ______________________ Parent Address (if different from student):

Student ID#:

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011
Birthdate:

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Comments:

Indicate Health Related Concerns (see school nurse) and attach medical plan if needed:

5. ___________________________________ 6. _____________________________________

Age:

4. __________________________________

Coordinator Phone#:

Quarter:

______________________________________

2. ___________________________________ 3. _____________________________________

Current Grade:

School Year:

Work ______________________

1. __________________________________

Previous worksites attended (most recent first):

Attendance Contact & Phone#:

Work-Based Learning Coordinator:

School/Program:

_______________________________________

_______________________________________ Phone: Home ______________________ _______________________________________

Student Address:

Circle:

Student Name: __________________________

Student Placement Request Form

149

Site Choices:

Quarter 2
Site Choices:

Quarter 3
Site Choices:

Quarter 4

Placement:

Placement:

Placement:

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011
___ School Bus
___ School Bus with lift
___ City Bus
Yes / No Bus Trained:

___ School Bus

___ School Bus with lift

___ City Bus

Bus Trained:

Yes / No Bus Trained:

___ City Bus

___ School Bus with lift

___ School Bus

Transportation Needs:

Comments:

Yes / No Bus Trained:

___ City Bus

___ School Bus with lift

___ School Bus

Transportation Needs:

Comments:

Yes / No

Bus Agreement Signed: Yes / No Bus Agreement Signed: Yes / No Bus Agreement Signed: Yes / No Bus Agreement Signed: Yes / No

Transportation Needs:

Comments:

Transportation Needs:

Comments:

______________________ AM/PM ______________________ AM/PM ______________________ AM/PM ______________________ AM/PM

Placement:

3. ____________________ AM/PM 3. ____________________ AM/PM 3. ____________________ AM/PM 3. ____________________ AM/PM

2. ____________________ AM/PM 2. ____________________ AM/PM 2. ____________________ AM/PM 2. ____________________ AM/PM

1. ____________________ AM/PM 1. ____________________ AM/PM 1. ____________________ AM/PM 1. ____________________ AM/PM

Site Choices:

Quarter 1

150

Student Placement Request for Students on IEPs


The following student placement request form was borrowed and modified from the
Minneapolis Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

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Male

Female

Date:

Parent Name: ______________________ Parent Address (if different from student):

Student ID#:

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

_____

_____

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Comments:

Indicate Health Related Concerns (see school nurse) and attach medical plan if needed:

(09)DHH

_____ (08)OHI

6. _____________________________________

_____ (07)Vision Imp

_____ (06)Phy Imp

_____ (07)ASD

5. _____________________________________

_____

(04)Speech

_____ (03)DCD

4. _____________________________________

_____ (02)EBD

_____ SNAP

_____ (01)SLD

3. _____________________________________

and so forth:

Disability: Mark all that apply, indicate Primary with a number 1, Secondary with a number 2, 2. _____________________________________

1. _____________________________________

Birthdate:

__________________________

Age:

Work-Based Learning Coordinator:


Phone#:

Quarter:

______________________________________

Previous worksites attended (most recent first):

Current Grade:

School Year:

Work ______________________

Last IEP Date: ____________________ Last Assessment Date:

Attendance Contact & Phone#:

Case Manager :
Phone#:

School/Program:

_______________________________________

_______________________________________ Phone: Home ______________________ _______________________________________

Student Address:

Circle:

Student Name: __________________________

Student Placement Request Form

152

Site Choices:

Quarter 2
Site Choices:

Quarter 3
Site Choices:

Quarter 4

Placement:

Placement:

Placement:

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011
___ School Bus
___ School Bus with lift
___ City Bus
Yes / No Bus Trained:

___ School Bus

___ School Bus with lift

___ City Bus

Bus Trained:

Yes / No Bus Trained:

___ City Bus

___ School Bus with lift

___ School Bus

Transportation Needs:

Comments:

Yes / No Bus Trained:

___ City Bus

___ School Bus with lift

___ School Bus

Transportation Needs:

Comments:

Yes / No

Bus Agreement Signed: Yes / No Bus Agreement Signed: Yes / No Bus Agreement Signed: Yes / No Bus Agreement Signed: Yes / No

Transportation Needs:

Comments:

Transportation Needs:

Comments:

______________________ AM/PM ______________________ AM/PM ______________________ AM/PM ______________________ AM/PM

Placement:

3. ____________________ AM/PM 3. ____________________ AM/PM 3. ____________________ AM/PM 3. ____________________ AM/PM

2. ____________________ AM/PM 2. ____________________ AM/PM 2. ____________________ AM/PM 2. ____________________ AM/PM

1. ____________________ AM/PM 1. ____________________ AM/PM 1. ____________________ AM/PM 1. ____________________ AM/PM

Site Choices:

Quarter 1

153

Incident Report
The following incident report form was borrowed from the Minneapolis Public Schools
Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

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154

INCIDENT REPORT
Student Name: _______________________________________
Todays Date: __________________

SID#: _________________________

Person Completing Report: _______________________________

Date of Incident: __________________________


People Involved: ___________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Others Present: ____________________________________________________________________________
Description of Incident: ______________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Outcome:
_________ Parent/Guardian contacted
_________ Police Liason contacted __________ Police Report Filed (attach copy)
_________ Mediation _________ Meeting with Social Worker _________ Meeting with Case Manager
_________ Medical treatment (if so, date/where: _________________________________________________)
_________ Other (please describe):
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________

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Worksite Visit Report


The following worksite visit report form was borrowed and modified from the Minneapolis
Public Schools Transitions Plus Community Based Vocational Training program.

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WORKSITE VISIT REPORT


Worksite: ___________________________________

Worksite contact: _____________________________

Address: ____________________________________

Contact phone#: _____________________________

School: _____________________________________

WBL program: _______________________________

WBL coordinator: _____________________________

Job coach: __________________________________

# of days/wk @ worksite: _______________________

Work Shift(s): ________________________________

# of students @ worksite: ______________________

Student-to-staff ratio: __________________________

Tasks performed at worksite: _________________________________________________________________


_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Strengths of the worksite? __________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Are weekly performance profiles accurate and up-to-date?

Yes

Does every student at the worksite have a completed Training Agreement?


Are there any workload, safety, or legal issues at this site?

Yes

No
Yes

No

No

What needs work.? _______________________________________________________________________


_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Comments:
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Report by: _________________________________________________ Date: _________________________
Note to WBL Coordinator: Site visits must be evaluated a minimum of once per quarter,
with copies of the report provided to job coaches, program leads, and school administration.

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Potential Worksite Evaluation Form


The following potential worksite evaluation form was created by this policy guides author.

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POTENTIAL WORKSITE EVALUATION FORM


Worksite: _________________________________

Worksite Contact: __________________________

Evaluated By: _____________________________

Date of Evaluation: _________________________

Logistical
Feature

Present

Not Present

Potential

Present

Not Present

Potential

Open during the school day


Open during after-school afternoon/evening hours
Within 5 miles of school site
Accessible by public transit
Openness to hosting WBL students
Willingness to provide on-site orientation and job-specific safety
training for students
Willingness to expose students to a range of job possibilities at
the site
Willingness to work with school site in carrying out individualized
training plans
Space available for WBL/job coaches and students to
gather/meet
Space available to keep/store WBL-specific supplies
Required staff uniforms or dress code? (if yes, explain)
Can accommodate more than 1 WBL student at a time (#
estimate?)
Physically demanding environment? (if yes, explain)
Other (please describe):
Other (please describe):
Other (please describe):
Comments on potential site logistics:

Legal/Ethical
Feature
Availability of worksite supervisor(s) that would be
knowledgeable of his/her field
Presence of positive role model figures (supervisors, employees)
Wages, if to be paid, are in line with the norms for the area (and
meet or exceed minimum wage, unless a disability waver is
obtained)
Knowledgeable of and in compliance with child-labor laws
Knowledgeable of and in compliance with OSHA
Documentation of workers compensation and liability insurance
Employee handbook is present, available, and reflects
understanding of ethical principles
System for accurately recording work hours
Provision for restroom breaks at least every 4 hours (openness
to higher frequency if medical condition requires it)
Provision for meal break if working 8 hour shift
Environment free of race/sex/religion harassment

MinaBlylyStrauss,Spring2011

159

Provision of overtime payment (if of legal age to work that many


hoursi.e. adult learners)
Some site workers perform Hazardous Occupations
Specifics for SPED WBL student placements:
Hosting WBL students wont threaten existing employees
jobs
Openness to WBL placements of set duration and/or on a
rotating schedule
Students not automatically entitled to employment after
completing predetermined time of service
Other (please describe):
Other (please describe):
Other (please describe):
Comments on potential sites legal acceptability:

Other
Feature
Field of work that students have expressed interest in
Extreme sound, visual and/or other stimuli that may be difficult
for those with sensory differences (if yes, explain)

Present

Not Present

Potential

Would a background check be required for students/school staff


working at the site?
Other (please describe):
Other (please describe):
Other (please describe):
General comments/impression:

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