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INFORMATION AND

COMMUNICATIONS
TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12
Integrated Resource Package 2003
Updated September 2004
IRP 129
Ministry of Education

National Library of Canada Cataloguing in Publication Data


Main entry under title:
Information and communications technology 11 and 12 :
integrated resource package 2003
Also available on the Internet .
ISBN 0-7726-5180-9
1. Electronic data processing Study and teaching
(Secondary) - British Columbia. 2. Computer graphics
Study and teaching (Secondary) British Columbia.
3. Computer networks Study and teaching (Secondary)
British Columbia. 4. Computer programming Study and
teaching (Secondary) British Columbia. I. British
Columbia. Ministry of Education.
LB1028.43.C3I53 2004

004. 0712711

C2004-960070-2

Copyright 2003 Ministry of Education, Province of British Columbia.


Copyright Notice
No part of the content of this document may be reproduced in any form or by any means, including electronic storage,
reproduction, execution or transmission without the prior written permission of the Province.
Proprietary Notice
This document contains information that is proprietary and confidential to the Province. Any reproduction,
disclosure or other use of this document is expressly prohibited except as the Province may authorize in writing.
Limited Exception to Non-reproduction
Permission to copy and use this publication in part, or in its entirety, for non-profit educational purposes within
British Columbia and the Yukon, is granted to all staff of B.C. school board trustees, including teachers and
administrators; organizations comprising the Educational Advisory Council as identified by Ministerial Order; and
other parties providing direct or indirect education programs to entitled students as identified by the School Act or the
Independent School Act.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . III

PREFACE: USING THIS INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE


Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12


Rationale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information and Communications Technology Kindergarten to Grade 12 Chart . . . . . .
Considerations for Program Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pathways and Modules Overview Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview of Pathways, Modules, and Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1
3
4
8
9

THE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 CURRICULUM


The Nature of ICT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applied Digital Communications 11
Gathering and Processing 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refining and Organizing 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Presenting and Communicating 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Technologies 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applied Digital Communications 12
Gathering and Processing 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refining and Organizing 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Presenting and Communicating 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Technologies 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Media Development 11
Desktop Digital Video 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2D Graphic Design and Publishing 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3D Design and Animation 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Web Publishing 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Media Development 12
Desktop Digital Video 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2D Graphic Design and Publishing 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3D Design and Animation 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Web Publishing 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 I

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Computer Information Systems 11


Workstations and Communications 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Systems and Management 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Technologies 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internetworking Concepts 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Computer Information Systems 12
Workstations and Communications 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Systems and Management 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Technologies 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internetworking Concepts 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Computer Programming 11
Introduction to Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Graphics and User Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Computer Programming 12
Arrays, Files, and Searching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrays and Sorting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Object-Oriented Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48
50
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
78

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 APPENDICES


Appendix A: Prescribed Learning Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix B Learning Resources: General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix B: Grade Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix C: Assessment and Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

II INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

A-3
B-3
B-7
C-3

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Many people contributed their expertise to this document. The projects primary co-ordinator
was Glen Holmes. Bill Kempthorne and Richard DeMerchant provided additional assistance in
completing the project. The project coordinators would like to thank all the other ministry
personnel and partners in education who participated in this process.

INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE WRITING TEAM


Kevin Amboe

School District No. 36 (Surrey)

Ross B. Dunning

School District No. 36 (Surrey)

Michael Ewan

School District No. 63 (Saanich)

Gerry Fraser

School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)

Francine Giacomazza

School District No. 41 (Burnaby)

David Richardson

School District No. 27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 III

IV INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

PREFACE: USING THIS INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE

his Integrated Resource Package (IRP)


provides basic information teachers
will need in order to implement
Information and Communications
Technology 11 and 12 (ICT 11 and 12).
This document supersedes Information
Technology 11 and 12 Integrated Resource
Package (1996).
The information contained in this IRP is
also available on the ministry web site at:
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/
The following paragraphs provide
descriptions about each section of this IRP.

THE INTRODUCTION
The introduction provides general
information about Information and
Communications Technology 11 and 12,
including special features and requirements.
It also provides a rationale for teaching
Information and Communications
Technology in BC schools and includes
specific considerations for program delivery.

THE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS


TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM
The provincially prescribed curriculum
for Information and Communications
Technology 11 and 12 is structured using four
major pathways, with eight modules within
each pathway. A four-credit course consists
of four modules. Specific curriculum
information for each module is presented
in a four column format, as follows:
provincially prescribed learning outcomes
suggested instructional strategies for
achieving the learning outcomes
suggested assessment strategies for
determining how well students are
achieving the outcomes
learning resources

Prescribed Learning Outcomes


Prescribed learning outcomes are the legally
required content standards for the provincial
education system. They define the required
attitudes, skills, and knowledge for each
subject. Learning outcomes are statements of
what students are expected to know and be
able to do at an indicated grade. Learning
outcomes are clearly stated and expressed in
measurable terms. All learning outcomes
complete this stem: It is expected that
students will . . . .
It is expected that student achievement will
vary in relation to learning outcomes.
Evaluation, reporting, and student
placement are dependent on the professional
judgment and experience of teachers, guided
by provincial policy.
Suggested Instructional Strategies
Instruction involves the use of techniques,
activities, and methods to meet diverse
student needs and deliver the prescribed
curriculum. Teachers are free to adapt the
suggested instructional strategies or
substitute others that will enable their
students to achieve the prescribed learning
outcomes. Specialist and generalist teachers
developed these strategies to assist their
colleagues; they are suggestions only.
Suggested Assessment Strategies
The assessment strategies suggest a variety
of ways to gather information about student
achievement. Some assessment strategies
relate to specific activities; others are general.
Specialist and generalist teachers developed
these strategies to assist their colleagues;
they are suggestions only.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 V

PREFACE: USING THIS INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE

Learning Resources

THE APPENDICES

Provincially Recommended Learning


Resources
These materials have been evaluated
through the provincial evaluation process,
and have received Ministers Order. The
recommended resources are included in the
Learning Resources column of the IRP when
they support one or more of the
accompanying prescribed learning
outcomes. See Appendix B for ordering
information for the recommended learning
resources.

The appendices provide additional


information about the curriculum and
further support for the teacher.

Web Sites
Due to their transitory nature, web sites
are not typically evaluated as part of the
provincial evaluation process. However, in
some cases, the Internet is the most up-todate source of information relevant to
students in Information and Communications
Technology 11 and 12. The web sites listed in
the Learning Resources column are current
as of March 2004. Although the sites listed do
not have recommended status, they have
been provided to support student research
and/or to assist teachers in developing
course plans. Local approval is required
before use. Teachers should preview the sites
in order to select those that are appropriate
for their students. Teachers must also ensure
that students are aware of school district
policies on Internet and computer use.

VI INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

Appendix A lists the prescribed learning


outcomes for the curriculum. For each
pathway, the prescribed learning outcomes
are organized by module. There is an
additional cross-curricular module, The
Nature of ICT.
Appendix B consists of general information
about learning resources, as well as
information about the provincially
recommended resources, presented in the
format of a Grade Collection. Appendix B
includes titles, descriptions, and ordering
information for the recommended learning
resources in the Grade Collections for ICT 11
and 12. As of March 2004, additional
resources are being evaluated to address the
gaps in these initial Grade Collections.
New resources will be evaluated on an
ongoing basis. The new provincial
recommendations will be posted on the
ministry web site at:
http://www.bced.gov.bc.cairp_resources/
lr/resource/consub.htm. Teachers are
advised to check the web site on a
regular basis.
Appendix C consists of general information
about classroom assessment and evaluation,
including:
assessment for learning
assessment of learning
criterion-referenced assessment and
evaluation

PREFACE: USING THIS INTEGRATED RESOURCE PACKAGE

Pathway and Grade

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

Module

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Network Technologies 2

Students consider the basic intricacies of a network and


some of the problems related to maintaining a functional
and safe network.

It is expected that students will:

Prescribed Learning
Outcomes

The Prescribed Learning


Outcomes column lists the
specific learning outcomes
for each module.

access sources for network security information


assess the security of a network structure
install and use network management tools,
including security, imaging, backup, and remote
controls
calculate network capacity limitations and plan for
network upgrades
configure and manage servers for user
authentication, file, and print services
deploy and use applications on a network
use network operating systems utilities to monitor,
manage, and troubleshoot data transfers

Brainstorm with students network security issues they


are aware of. Have them conduct online research to
identify a variety of network security problems and
potential solutions for each. Have students work in pairs
or small groups to create a report outlining the security
issues and how they can be addressed to create a safe
network.
Design a lab situation for students where they must
install and use network management tools, including
security, imaging, backup, and remote controls.
Have students access management software. Ask them
to explain what needs to be defined prior to creating
share points and print cues.
Have students use the Internet to identify when and how
software needs to be upgraded. Have them work in
pairs to create a report outlining what factors they
considered and the ways they addressed them.
Invite students to develop and demonstrate their ability
to use and deploy applications on a network.
Have students test the use of network operating systems
utilities (e.g., data capturing-Lanwiser, sniffer, WOW
packet, network monitor).

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

Observe
Recommended Resources

The Suggested
Assessment Strategies
offer a wide range of
assessment approaches
useful in evaluating
whether students have
met the prescribed
learning outcomes.
Teachers should consider
these as examples they
might modify to suit
their own needs and
instructional goals.

Observe students as they manage each type of


server. Note the ease and efficiency with which they
are able to organize servers logically and use both
user and group privileges.

Guide to Networking Essentials, Third Edition


Peter Nortons Introduction to Computers,
Fifth Edition

Question

Ask students to explain why they selected a specific


network tool and how they use it. Look for
evidence that they can identify root problems and/
or desired results and can give a reasoned
explanation for why that specific tool is
appropriate.

Collect

the

Assess students reports for the number of security


issues identified and the solutions provided.
Do students reports on network upgrades cover a
range of issues and provide information on how
each issue can be addressed?

Web Sites

Peer Assessment

Network Security:

http://www.cert.org/
(CERT Coordination Center)

Have students give each other feedback on how


well they set up and operated each type of server
and the clarity and completeness of the file and
print structures they created. Students might also
give each other feedback on how well they used
each type of network management tool. After the
peer feedback sessions, have students make plans
for improvement.

http://www.incidents.org
(SANS Institue)
http://www.nipc.gov/
(National Infrastructure Protection Center-US
Government)

Self-Assessment

Have students reflect on and analyse their personal


security needs. Ask them to consider what is an
appropriate balance between functional and
optimal security.

The Suggested
Instructional Strategies
column suggests a
variety of instructional
approaches that include
group work, problem
solving, and the use of
technology. Teachers
should consider these
as examples they might
modify to suit the
developmental level
of their students.

Pathway and Grade

LEARNING RESOURCES

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

Suggested Assessment
Strategies

Suggested Instructional
Strategies

Recommended
Resources
Provincially
recommended learning
resources that support
one or more of the
learning outcomes for
the module. Ordering
information is found in
Appendix B.
Web Sites
The selected web sites
may be useful for
teachers and/or
students. They do not
have recommended
status. As with all
supplementary
resources, local
approval is required
before use.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 VII

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

his Integrated Resource Package (IRP)


sets out the provincially prescribed
curriculum for Grade 11 and 12
Information and Communications Technology
(ICT). The development of this IRP has been
guided by the following principles of learning:
Learning requires the active participation of
the student.
People learn in a variety of ways and at
different rates.
Learning is both an individual and a group
process.
In addition to these three principles, this
document recognizes that young people of
varied backgrounds, interests, abilities, and
needs attend British Columbias schools.
Wherever appropriate for this curriculum,
ways to meet these needs and to ensure equity
and access for all learners have been
integrated as much as possible into the
learning outcomes, instructional activities, and
assessment activities.
ICT 11 and 12 is based on recommendations
arising from the Information and
Communications Technology Curriculum Review
Report 2001. ICT 11 and 12, in draft format,
was available for public review and response
in 2003. Feedback from educators, students,
parents, and other educational partners
informed the development of this document.

RATIONALE
The aim of the Information and
Communications Technology curriculum is to
help students develop the attitudes, skills, and
knowledge needed to live, learn, and work
effectively in an information-rich technological
society. Students should be exposed to
experiences that encourage them to enjoy and
value information and communications
technology, develop positive habits of mind,

and understand and appreciate the role of ICT


in human affairs. This curriculum involves the
development of:
information literacy
positive attitudes toward technology
problem-solving and critical-thinking skills
related to the use of technology
information technology literacy
lifelong learning patterns and skills
knowledge relevant to careers in ICT
The study of information and communications
technology (ICT) is increasingly important.
Technological skills are becoming mandatory
in the workplace and are a prerequisite for
employment. Students today require the
ability to reason and communicate, to solve
problems, and to understand and use ICT for a
variety of purposes. Students also need
opportunities to develop the skills required for
e-learning so they are better prepared to
pursue future learning opportunities.
Literacy in the area of information and
communications technology can be defined as
the ability to obtain and share knowledge
through investigation, study, instruction, and
transmission of information by means of
digital media technology. Since technology is
undergoing constant and rapid change, the
ICT-literate person will possess the skills and
abilities to learn and operate current
technology, and adapt to new technologies
developed to electronically gather, process,
evaluate, synthesize, and share data with
others.
Students who are literate in ICT access data
efficiently and effectively, evaluate data
critically and competently, use data accurately
and creatively, and use current technology to
communicate and solve problems. They
actively assess and question the implications
of technology innovation on society. The end

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 1

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

result of literacy in ICT is the use of


technology as a tool for organization,
communication, research, and problemsolving.
The learning outcomes in this IRP build on
and expand the learning outcomes addressed
at the K to 10 levels but are not dependent
upon any specialized courses that may be
available at the Grade 9 and 10 levels. The
skills and knowledge addressed by this IRP
are relevant to students continuing their
education in information and communications
technology or entering the workforce directly.
The following chart outlines various ways that
content can be delivered from Kindergarten to
Grade 12.

2 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12


Information and Communications Technology
Kindergarten to Grade 12
K to 7
Integrated into all
subject areas

Grade 8
Integrated into all
subject areas

Grade 8
Separate course
based on the INT
8 to 10 IRP

Grade 8
Specialized locally
developed courses

Grade 9
Integrated into all
subject areas

Grade 9
Separate course
based on the INT
8 to 10 IRP

Grade 9
Specialized locally
developed courses

Grade 10
Separate course based
on the INT 8 to 10 IRP
(INT 10)

Grade 10
BAA courses

Grade 10
Integrated into all
subject areas

Grade 11

Grade 11

Grade 11

Digital
Media
Development

Computer
Information
Systems

Computer
Programming

(ICTM 11)

(ICTS 11)

Modular Survey
Course
(Any 4 Grade 11
modules)

Grade 11

Grade 11

Grade 11

Integrated
into all
subject areas

Applied
Digital
Communications
(ICTC 11)

(ICTP 11)

(ICTX 11)

Grade 12

Grade 12

Grade 12

Grade 12

Grade 12

Grade 12

Integrated
into all
subject areas

Applied
Digital
Communications

Digital
Media
Development

Computer
Information
Systems

Computer
Programming

(ICTC 12)

(ICTM 12)

(ICTS 12)

Modular Survey
Course
(Any 4 Grade 12
modules)

(ICTP 12)

(ICTX 12)

This chart outlines various ways in which ICT content can be delivered from Kindergarten to Grade 12.
INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 3

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

CONSIDERATIONS FOR PROGRAM DELIVERY


This section contains additional material to
help educators prepare their ICT 11 and 12
courses, including the following information:
suggested instructional strategies
suggested assessment strategies
social and ethical implications of using
ICT tools
responding to sensitive issues
creating a safe and healthy environment
inclusion, equity, and access for all learners
working with the ICT community
working with the aboriginal community
copyright and responsibility
Suggested Instructional Strategies
Instructional strategies have been included for
each module in a pathway. These strategies
are suggestions only, designed to provide
guidance for teachers planning instruction to
meet the prescribed learning outcomes.
The strategies may be teacher directed,
student directed, or both. A one-to-one
relationship does not necessarily exist
between learning outcomes and instructional
strategies, nor is this organization intended to
prescribe a linear approach to course delivery.
It is expected that teachers will adapt, modify,
combine, and organize instructional strategies
to meet the needs of students and respond to
local requirements.
Each set of instructional strategies starts with
a context statement followed by several
examples of learning activities. The context
statement is included to provide clarification
of the modules expected instructional
emphasis.
Activities should encourage students to
explore, take risks, exhibit curiosity, and make
and correct errors so that they gain confidence

4 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

in their abilities to solve complex problems


and use various aspects of information and
communications technology.
Creative problem-solving and critical-thinking
processes such as reasoning and making
connections are vital to increasing students
aptitude and effectiveness with ICT tools and
should be integrated throughout all pathways
in this curriculum. Instructional strategies
should be focused on activities related to these
processes wherever possible.
Suggested Assessment Strategies
The assessment strategies in this IRP describe
a variety of ideas and methods for gathering
evidence of student achievement. Teachers
determine the best assessment methods for
gathering this information.
Some strategies relate to particular activities,
while others are general and could apply to
several activities.
Social and Ethical Implications of Using
Information and Communications
Technology Tools
Society faces a growing number of ethical
issues and challenges as a result of the use of
information and communications technology,
such as breach of copyright, circulation of
defamatory information, invasion of privacy,
plagiarism, and piracy. Ethical and responsible
use of technology involves respect for
copyright restrictions, user licensing
agreements, and protection of privacy.
Activities that intentionally damage data or
equipment are both inappropriate and illegal.
Through direct experience in a variety of
situations, students can learn that it is possible
to successfully complete tasks without
violating ethical standards.

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

Responding to Sensitive Issues


Issues may arise in ICT classrooms that are not
intended. In preparing for sensitive issues that
may arise, teachers may wish to consider the
following:
Inform an administrator or counsellor when
a concern arises.
Establish a classroom environment that is
open to free enquiry and to various points
of view.
Preview media materials and set guidelines
for student access to sensitive Internet
material.
Promote critical thinking and openmindedness, and refrain from taking sides,
denigrating, or promoting propaganda.
Know district policies regarding the rights
of individuals and the need for permissions
when students are videotaping, filming,
photographing, and recording. Establish a
procedure for filing any necessary release
forms.

Have students been given guidelines


regarding safe Internet use?
Are students aware of the location and use
of safety items such as eye-wash solutions,
fire extinguishers (suitable for electrical
fires), safety blankets, sinks, face masks, and
WHMIS labelling?
Are students aware of the location of power
switches and fuse boxes?
Do students know the maximum wattage
for electrical AC cables, power outlets, and
circuits?
Do students know about correct handling
of hazardous materials such as acids,
adhesives, caustics, flammable materials,
fumes, poisons, powdered materials,
solvents, and electricity?
Are facilities and equipment suitable and in
good repair?
Is equipment secure when not in class use?
Consideration should also be given to correct
ergonomics and related issues such as wrist,
eye, and back fatigue.

Creating a Safe and Healthy Environment


Students will be accessing the World Wide
Web and need to be aware of potential safety
issues (e.g., exposure to unsuitable or harmful
material; potential harm resulting from
disclosure of personal information). Teachers
should be familiar with district policies and
guidelines related to Internet safety, and
should establish clear guidelines with
students for safe use of the Internet.
Safety concerns also include the use of,
storage, and handling of potentially
hazardous material and equipment. To ensure
a safe learning environment, it is essential that
teachers address the following questions prior
to, during, and after an activity:
Have students been given specific
instruction about how to use facilities,
materials, and equipment appropriately?
Do they fully understand these
instructions?

Inclusion, Equity, and Accessibility for All


Learners
Young people of varied backgrounds,
interests, and abilities attend British
Columbias schools. The Kindergarten to
Grade 12 school system is committed to
meeting the needs of all students. When
selecting specific topics, activities, and
resources to support the implementation of
ICT 11 and 12, teachers are encouraged to
ensure that these choices support inclusion,
equity, and accessibility for all students. In
particular, teachers should ensure that
classroom instruction, assessment, and
resources reflect sensitivity to diversity and
incorporate positive role portrayals, relevant
issues, and themes such as inclusion, respect,
and acceptance.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 5

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

Government policy supports the principles of


integration and inclusion of students who
have English as a second language and of
students with special needs. Most of the
instructional and assessment strategies in this
IRP can be used with all students, including
those with special and/or ESL needs. Some
strategies may require adaptations to ensure
that those with special and/or ESL needs can
successfully achieve the prescribed learning
outcomes. Modifications can be made to the
prescribed learning outcomes for students
with Individual Education Plans.
For more information about resources and
support for students with special needs,
refer to the following web site
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/specialed/
For more information about resources and
support for ESL students, refer to
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/esl/

communities are diverse in terms of language,


culture, and available resources, each
community will have its own unique protocol
to gain support for integration of local
knowledge and expertise. To begin discussion
of possible instructional and assessment
activities, teachers should first contact
Aboriginal education co-ordinators, teachers,
support workers, and counsellors in their
district who will be able to facilitate the
identification of local resources and contacts
such as Elders, chiefs, tribal or band councils,
Aboriginal cultural centres, Aboriginal
Friendship Centres, or Mtis organizations.
In addition, teachers may wish to consult the
various Ministry of Education publications
available, including the Planning Your
Program section of the resource, Shared
Learnings (1998). This resource was developed
to help all teachers provide students with
knowledge of, and opportunities to share
experiences with, Aboriginal peoples in BC.

Working with the ICT Community


All aspects of learning in information and
communications technology may be greatly
enriched when professionals and experienced
amateurs from the community are involved.
These individuals could be guests in the
classroom or involve students as visitors in
their work environments.
Working with the Aboriginal Community
The Ministry of Education is dedicated to
ensuring that the cultures and contributions
of Aboriginal peoples in BC are reflected in all
provincial curricula. To address these topics
in the classroom in a way that is accurate and
that respectfully reflects Aboriginal concepts
of teaching and learning, teachers are strongly
encouraged to seek the advice and support of
local Aboriginal communities. As Aboriginal

6 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

For more information about these


documents, consult the Aboriginal
Education web site:
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/abed/
welcome.htm
Copyright and Responsibility
Copyright is the legal protection of literary,
dramatic, artistic, and musical works; sound
recordings; performances; and
communications signals. Copyright provides
creators with the legal right to be paid for
their work and the right to say how their work
is to be used. There are some exceptions in the
law (i.e., specific things permitted) for schools
but these are very limited, such as copying for
private study or research. The copyright law
determines how resources can be used in the
classroom and by students at home.

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

In order to respect copyright it is necessary to


understand the law. It is unlawful to do the
following, unless permission has been given
by a copyright owner:
photocopy copyrighted material to avoid
purchasing the original resource for any
reason
photocopy or perform copyrighted material
beyond a very small part. In some cases the
copyright law considers it fair to copy
whole works, such as an article in a journal
or a photograph for purposes of research
and private study, criticism and review
show videotaped television or radio
programs to students in the classroom
unless these are cleared for copyright for
educational use (there are exceptions such
as for news and news commentary taped
within one year of broadcast which by law
have record keeping requirementssee web
site below for more details)
photocopy print music, workbooks,
instruction materials, instruction manuals,
teacher guides, and commercially available
tests and examinations
show at schools videotapes which are not
cleared for public performance
perform music or do performances of
copyrighted material for entertainment
(i.e., for purposes other than a specific
educational objective)
copy work from the Internet without an
express message that the work can be
copied.

Permission from or on behalf of the copyright


owner must be given in writing. Permission
may also be given to copy or use all or some
portion of copyrighted work through a licence
or agreement. Many creators, publishers, and
producers have formed groups or collectives
to negotiate royalty payments and copying
conditions for educational institutions. It is
important to know what licences are in place
and how these affect the activities you are
involved in. Some licenses may also have
royalty payments which are determined by
the quantity of photocopying or the length of
performances. In these cases, it is important to
assess the educational value and merits of
copying or performing certain works to
protect the financial exposure of your
educational institution (i.e., only copy or use
that portion that is absolutely necessary to
meet an educational objective).
It is important for education professionals,
parents and students to respect the value of
original thinking and the importance of not
plagiarizing the work of others. The works of
others should not be used without their
permission.
For more information about copyright,
refer to the following web site
http://cmec.ca/copyright/indexe.stm
for further details.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 7

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

Pathways and Modules Overview


Applied Digital
Communications
(ICTC)

Digital Media
Development
(ICTM)

Computer
Information
Systems (ICTS)

Computer
Programming
(ICTP)

Module 1

Gathering and
Processing 1

Desktop Digital
Video 1

Workstations and
Communications 1

Introduction to
Programming

Module 2

Refining and
Organizing 1

2D Graphic Design
and Publishing 1

Systems and
Management 1

Programming
Methodology

Module 3

Presenting and
Communicating 1

3D Design
and Animation 1

Network
Technologies 1

Programming
Structures

Module 4

New
Technologies 1

Web Publishing 1

Internetworking
Concepts 1

Graphics and
User Interfaces

Module 5

Gathering and
Processing 2

Desktop Digital
Video 2

Grade
11

Workstations and Arrays, Files, and


Communications 2
Searching

Module 6

Refining and
Organizing 2

2D Graphic Design
and Publishing 2

Systems and
Management 2

Arrays and
Sorting

Module 7

Presenting and
Communicating 2

3D Design
and Animation 2

Network
Technologies 2

Object-Oriented
Programming

Module 8

New
Technologies 2

Web
Publishing 2

Internetworking
Concepts 2

Application
Development

Grade
12

The learning outcomes related to The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be
integrated with the four modules that comprise any ICT 11 or 12 course.

8 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

Modular
Survey
Course
(ICTX)
Schools may
create a survey
course by
combining any
four modules
from any of the
ICT pathways at
the appropriate
grade level.
When
constructing a
Grade 12 survey
course, consider
whether any
prerequisite
learning from
earlier modules
is required.

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

OVERVIEW OF PATHWAYS, MODULES,


AND COURSES
Pathways and Modules
The prescribed learning outcomes for ICT 11
and 12 are grouped into four pathways; each
pathway consists of eight modules. The
pathways reflect the broad areas of learning in
information and communications technology;
the modules reflect groupings of concepts.
The four pathways are as follows:
Applied Digital Communications
Digital Media Development
Computer Information Systems
Computer Programming
In addition to the four pathways, there is a set
of prescribed learning outcomes for The
Nature of Information and Communications
Technology (ICT). These learning outcomes
are common to all pathways, and should be
integrated throughout.
The modules were designed as stand-alone
teaching units, each requiring an equal
amount of instructional time. Teachers are
expected to adjust instructional times to meet
timetable limitations and diverse student
needs.
The Pathways and Modules Chart on the
preceding page provides an overview of ICT
pathways and modules for Grade 11 and
Grade 12.
ICT Courses
The Information and Communications
Technology 11 and 12 curriculum offers
schools the flexibility to structure courses to
accommodate student needs and interests
while considering teacher expertise and school
timetables.

Each module is designed to represent onequarter of a course so that schools may mix
and match modules to suit student needs.
Schools may choose to offer a course based on
four modules from a single pathway or a
combination of modules from more than one
pathway. As knowledge in the area of ICT is
generally cumulative, the order in which
modules are offered to students should be
considered carefully.
A Grade 11 course should consist of four
modules from the first level (Modules 1 to 4),
while a Grade 12 course should consist of four
modules from the second level (Modules 5 to 8).
If a course is offered that is composed of
modules selected from different pathways, the
course can be reported using the Modular
Survey Course code (ICTX11 or ICTX12). The
order in which various modules is offered is
left to the professional judgment and expertise
of teachers. However, when constructing a
Grade 12 survey course, teachers should
consider whether any prerequisite learning
from earlier modules is required.
Reporting ICT 11 and 12 courses follows
normal procedures for reporting senior level
courses.
The Nature of Information and
Communications Technology (ICT)
The Nature of ICT learning outcomes are
common to all pathways of ICT 11 and 12.
The learning outcomes address the attitudes,
skills, and knowledge that support students
understanding of the nature of ICT and its
impact on self, work, and society. The
outcomes have been identified separately
to facilitate direct teaching of these ideas
but are more effective if integrated in the
four modules used to create a course.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 9

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

The Applied Digital Communications


Pathway (ICTC)
The learning outcomes in the Applied Digital
Communications pathway focus on the
development of speed, proficiency, and
breadth of knowledge with the use of
common application software. Each of the
following modules is presented at two levels,
to allow basic and advanced learning:
Gathering and Processing 1, 2
Refining and Organizing 1, 2
Presenting and Communicating 1, 2
New Technologies 1, 2
The Nature of ICT learning outcomes should
be integrated throughout an ICTC 11 or 12
course.
The Digital Media Development Pathway
(ICTM)
The learning outcomes in the Digital Media
Development pathway focus on the technical
side of visual media development. Each of the
following modules is presented at two levels,
to allow basic and advanced learning:
Desktop Digital Video 1, 2
2D Graphic Design and Publishing 1, 2
3D Design and Animation 1, 2
Web Publishing 1, 2
The Nature of ICT learning outcomes should
be integrated throughout an ICTM 11 or 12
course.
Although it is not essential to present the
modules in sequential order, this sequence
will provide opportunities for students to
expand their knowledge and apply this
knowledge to other areas.
The Computer Information Systems
Pathway (ICTS)
The learning outcomes in the Computer
Information Systems pathway focus on the
technical side of computer systems and the

10 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

connectivity of those systems. Each of the


following modules is presented at two levels,
to allow basic and advanced learning:
Workstations and Communications 1, 2
Systems and Management 1, 2
Network Technologies 1, 2
Internetworking Concepts 1, 2
The Nature of ICT learning outcomes should
be integrated throughout an ICTS 11 or 12
course.
It is not in the best interest of any student to
attempt modules in this pathway at Grade 12
without having learned the material presented
at the Grade 11 level.
The Computer Programming Pathway
(ICTP)
The learning outcomes in the Computer
Programming pathway focus on the
development of programs using a structured,
object-oriented programming language. It is
recommended that the modules identified in
this pathway be taken sequentially in order
to ensure student success and limit the
difficulties students may experience. The eight
modules are as follows:
Introduction to Programming
Programming Methodology
Programming Structures
Graphics and User Interfaces
Arrays, Files, and Searching
Arrays and Sorting
Object-Oriented Programming
Application Development
The Nature of ICT learning outcomes should
be integrated throughout an ICTP 11 or 12
course.
Students who have some prior experience in
computer programming may have a basic
understanding of the principles in several of
these modules, but the uniqueness of each
programming language may require students
to follow the entire modular pathway.

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

A Modular Survey Course (ICTX)


A survey course can be created from The
Nature of ICT and four modules from any of
the four pathways at the appropriate grade
level. When selecting modules to construct a
Grade 12 survey course, consider whether any
prerequisite learning from earlier modules is
required. Two examples of Grade 11 and 12
courses that combine different modules follow.
Other combinations are also possible.

Example 1
Grade 11 ICTX:

Gathering and Processing 1


Desktop Digital Video 1
Workstations and Communications 1
Introduction to Programming

Grade 12 ICTX:

Gathering and Processing 2


Desktop Digital Video 2
Workstations and Communications 2
Arrays, Files, and Searching

The Nature of ICT learning outcomes would


be integrated across both courses.
Example 2
Grade 11 ICTX:

Introduction to Programming
Programming Methodology
Workstations and Communications 1
Systems and Management 1

Grade 12 ICTX:

Arrays, Files, and Searching


Arrays and Sorting
Workstations and Communications 2
Systems and Management 2

The Nature of ICT learning outcomes would


be integrated across both courses.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 11

CURRICULUM
Information and Communications
Technology 11 and 12

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12


THE NATURE OF ICT
The prescribed learning outcomes for The Nature of
ICT address the attitudes, skills, and knowledge that
support students understanding of the nature of ICT
and its impact on self, work, and society. These
learning outcomes are common to all four pathways
of ICT 11 and 12 and should be integrated with the
four modules that comprise an ICT 11 or ICT 12
course.

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


It is expected that students will:
demonstrate a moral, ethical, legal, and
courteous approach to the use of technology
demonstrate self-reliance in the use of
electronic research techniques to construct
personal knowledge and meaning
access, use, and communicate information
from a variety of technologies
assess various health and safety issues specific
to the technology being used, including
personal use of the Internet
become discerning users of mass media and
electronic information
use technology to support collaboration and
interaction with others
employ principles of project management
when conducting their work (e.g., value
accuracy, precision, correctness; teamwork;
self-evaluation for purposes of improvement)
employ a variety of strategies to identify,
investigate, and solve problems, including
troubleshooting strategies
assess the impact of technology on their
personal privacy
assess career opportunities in information and
communications technology industries, as well
as the required technological and
employability skills (e.g., communication,
interpersonal skills, and problem-solving)
demonstrate skills and attitudes related to
successful lifelong learning

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 15

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Gathering and Processing 1
It is expected that students will:
use touch keyboarding techniques for
personal use
use electronic tools such as the spell checker,
dictionary, and thesaurus to correct common
language and style errors and enhance the
quality of their work
construct personal and business documents
that use:
- headers and footers
- page numbering
- graphics
create spreadsheet documents containing
various cell layouts, formats, alignment, and
formulas with relative and absolute cell
references
assess sources for reliability, bias, and context
(e.g., differences between print and electronic
sources)
identify search strategies, including unique
keywords and phrases, to locate information
using Internet search tools
cite sources from the Internet and other
resources
show respect for the opinions, contributions,
and roles of team members

16 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop basic ICT literacy skills and
demonstrate basic employability skills as they
work together to solve problems and communicate
with one another.
Provide opportunities for students to practise
proper keyboarding techniques by having them
develop personal documents such as an
autobiography introducing themselves to the
teacher.
Have students create a spreadsheet to track a
monthly budget and expense summary. Ask them
to assume that they are living independently and
paying all expenses. The spreadsheet should
identify dates, descriptions of expense areas,
budgeted amounts, and expenses. Ask students to
calculate total spending and the percent of total
spending in each expense area and then graph the
results.
Discuss with students the legal and ethical issues
related to copying work from electronic and print
sources. Then show them the correct ways to cite
sources. Have students work in teams of two or
three to research a topic of interest and develop a
word-processed report with accurate citations.
Provide students with a topic and have them
locate relevant web sites. Ask them to create a
table to record author, source, and authors
geographical location.
Establish intra-class partners or pen pals with
another school. Have students access a common
education resource such as Schoolnet or a districthosted collaboration tool. Have them discuss the
advantages and disadvantages of participating
with a virtual classmate.

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Watch individual students as they enter data, and
give specific advice about how to improve their
keyboarding techniques.
Question
Ask students to explain how they determined the
extent to which various sources were reliable and
unbiased. Assess the reasonableness and logic of
their responses.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
A Guide to Microsoft Office 2003 for
Information and Communication Technologies
Using Information Technology: A Practical
Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth Edition

Collect
Assess students spreadsheets for completeness
of the list of expenses, use of formulas, cell
formatting, and use and placement of graphs or
charts.
Peer Assessment
Have students generate criteria for effective group
work, with emphasis on showing respect for the
opinions, contributions, and roles of team
members. Have them develop and use a rubric for
peer assessment using the criteria generated.

Web Sites

Self-Assessment

Copyright Information:

Generate with students a list of criteria to


independently assess the documents they
developed, giving particular attention to page
numbering, headers and footers, and graphics.

http://www.accesscopyright.ca/
(formerly Cancopy)
http://www.cmec.ca/else/
(Council of Ministers of Education, Canada)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 17

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Refining and Organizing 1
It is expected that students will:
create and manage different types of files
use a variety of file transfer procedures
design and produce electronic and print
publications for specific purposes and
audiences
use software features such as shortcuts,
macros, function keys, menus, and buttons
provide clarity to information within
spreadsheet documents using:
- headers and footers
- fills and borders
- charts and graphs
- title rows and columns with cell and
document protection
use database software to create a flat file
database

18 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop ICT skills and literacy to create
different types of documents that demonstrate
understanding and appropriate use of software
features.
Have groups of students develop a tricks and
tips handbook on the use of features such as
macros, function keys, menus, and buttons.
Ask students to locate a resource that provides
items and pricing information in a downloadable
form (e.g., CSV, DIF files). Ask them to incorporate
this data into a spreadsheet or database.
Have groups of students develop a spreadsheet of
the costs of computer lab equipment and furniture
purchased to set up a new small company with
eight employees. The spreadsheet should include
entries for the identity, number, and cost per unit
of each item, the total cost for each item type, and
the cost of the entire order, including tax. The
spreadsheet should also contain company
information on each page of the document.
Invite students to work independently to create a
simple database to track their course assignments
and tests, including due dates and marks. At this
level, it is not necessary to have the database
calculate the total subject mark from the marks
entered.

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Examine how students organize and store
documents. Note the extent to which they locate
files, group like materials by date or topic, and
name files appropriately.
Watch how students transfer documents from an
online service. Note the extent to which they:
- correctly select an appropriate source
- save the information to a local drive
- load information into a local application
- preserve type, format, and validity of data

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
A Guide to Microsoft Office 2003 for
Information and Communication Technologies

Question
Ask students to explain how they determined
which type of document to create for a particular
task. Do they clearly identify the purpose and
audience?
Collect
Assess students spreadsheets for:
- appropriate use of headers and footers
- correct use of formulas
- accuracy of calculations
- appropriate and accurate incorporation of
company information

Web Sites

Peer Assessment
Have students assess one anothers work for
clarity and utility.
Self-Assessment
Have pairs of students develop and independently
use criteria for the production of spreadsheets and
database documents.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 19

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Presenting and Communicating 1
It is expected that students will:
design and create a multimedia solution to an
identified problem
prepare and deliver a presentation using
presentation graphics software that
incorporates:
- slide formatting
- graphics
- sound
create and manage a personal web site
use collaborative problem-solving and
decision-making skills to complete business
and school tasks
act as a leader and follower in group projects
and team activities
use the tools associated with distributed
learning

20 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students expand their employability and ICT skills
by creating and using multimedia files for
distribution and presentation.
Ask small groups of students to create and deliver
multimedia presentations to help solve an
identified problem in the school or community.
Problems should be straightforward, such as a
sports team or special interest group that needs to
raise funds, or a school or community group that
wants people to participate in its activities.
Have pairs of students identify and analyse
several personal web sites. Ask them to create a
list of features of a good web site and a list of
features of a poor web site. Each pair of students
should then create a personal web site about
someone or something that is of mutual interest,
meets the criteria for a good web site, and avoids
the perils of a poor web site.
Brainstorm with the class issues relevant to the
safe and appropriate use of electronic forums such
as a web forum, Usenet group, or public chat
room.
Work with students to develop a set of rules to
guide participation in an online forum. Have them
apply the rules in a class discussion on a project.

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Assess students presentations for:
- content (supports objectives)
- organization
- presentation (control of text size, fonts,
paragraphs, spacing, and positions)
- interaction with audience (to solicit audience
feedback)

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
A Guide to Microsoft Office 2003 for
Information and Communication Technologies

Question
Have students explain what rules are important
when using a chat room and why people should
follow those rules. Do they elaborate their
responses by describing adaptations of rules for
particular situations?
Collect
Assess students web pages for clear presentation;
appropriate mix of colour, text, and graphics; and
the appropriateness of links to relevant sites.
Peer Assessment
Have students develop criteria to assess each
others teamwork skills, focusing on individual
contributions and the ability to lead or follow as
appropriate to role.
Self-Assessment
Convert students list of rules for participation in
electronic forums into a self-assessment scoring
guide. Use a four- or five-point scale from Never
to Always.

Web Sites
Online Forums:
http://www.schoolnet.ca/
(Canadas Schoolnet)
Employability Skills:
http://canconnect.ic.gc.ca/certificate/
(Industry Canada)
http://www.discoverit.org/
(Software Human Resource Council)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 21

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


New Technologies 1
It is expected that students will:
explain school policies associated with
appropriate use of the Internet
select appropriate application software for a
given task
merge data between software applications
evaluate and use record management
procedures for maintaining shared documents
and templates
explain the implications to personal and
business environments of computer viruses
and the use of virus protection and firewall
software
explain how Internet technologies such as
cookies allow servers to track personal use of
the Internet
identify threats to global communication
networks, including computer viruses and
denial-of-service attacks
explore various products created to protect
personal information on computers, including
anti-virus software and firewalls

22 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop advanced ICT skills and
knowledge and evaluate software, procedures, and
technology.
Discuss with students the use of record
management procedures for maintaining shared
documents and templates. Work with them to
develop a template for creating a multimedia
document and procedures for its use.
Have students develop a multimedia document on
an aspect of Internet security. Provide time for
them to critique each others work.
Have students research and evaluate different
types of virus protection software.
Ask students to keep a journal during this module
to record their views on how the use of technology
has influenced the way they now work and think.
Discuss the importance of maintaining positive
attitudes toward lifelong learning. For the last
entry, ask them to predict how new technology
might influence their lives in the future.

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe students as they use the Internet. Look
for evidence of courteous use, effective searching,
respect for personal privacy, adherence to safety
guidelines, and ethical use.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources

Question
Have students explain why they chose a particular
software product for a given task. Do they give
specific, logical reasons for their choices?
Collect
Have students select examples of work completed
during the course that best illustrates that they:
- use technology ethically
- can work effectively in groups as either a leader
or a follower (include peer and selfassessments)
- are efficient, responsible, and competent users
of the Internet
- can create effective documents for various
purposes and audiences
Peer Assessment
Have students pass their multimedia documents
to each member of the group for editing and
feedback. When the document returns to the
originator, he or she can accept, reject, or modify
the suggestions in the final document.
Self-Assessment
Have students list their strengths and limitations
in the use of record management procedures and
in merging data between applications. Ask them
to identify goals for improvement in these areas.

Web Sites
Internet Security:
http://www.cert.org/
(CERT Coordination Center)
http://www.incidents.org
(SANS Institute)
Web Sites
Privacy:
http://www.oipcbc.org/
(The Office of the Information and
Privacy Commissioner-Government of BC)
http://www.connect.gc.ca/cyberwise
(Illegal and Offensive Content on the InternetGovernment of Canada)
Scams:
http://www.phonebusters.com/
(Phonebusters)
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/
(RCMP)
http://www1.ifccfbi.gov/
(Internet Fraud Complaint Center-FBI/National
White Collar Crime Center)
Internet Safety:
http://www.media-awareness.ca
(Media Awareness Network)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 23

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Gathering and Processing 2
It is expected that students will:
use touch keyboarding techniques for
personal and business use
identify the limitations of electronic tools such
as spelling and grammar checkers
construct and modify personal and business
documents that use:
- bulleted lists
- tables
- columns
- page, section, and column breaks
- graphics
- hyperlinks
use advanced software features such as
shortcuts, function keys, menus, buttons,
macros, linked text boxes, and templates to
more efficiently compose and edit documents
apply ethical standards with respect to
privacy, confidentiality, piracy, plagiarism, and
personal behaviour while using electronic
tools to gather information
demonstrate strategies that protect personal
privacy while using the Internet
show respect for the opinions and
contributions of others while participating in
or leading teams
explain how common browsers and search
engines operate

24 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop skills related to advanced features
of selected software, use ethical standards regarding
information, and apply employability skills.
Have groups of students develop and word
process a code of ethics and list of acceptable
behaviours when using computers and software in
the school. Ask students to present some of the
information in bulleted lists and tables.
Have groups of students compare available web
browsing software. Ask students to rate the
browsers and recommend features to disable
during regular use.
Ask students to prepare a word-processed report
about their favourite Internet browsers. The report
should explain how the browser works.
Have small groups of students develop criteria to
evaluate several search engines and display their
findings in a table.
Invite groups to prepare an oral report about
search engines, explaining how they work. Have
them include their evaluation information.

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe individual students as they enter data
and develop strategies to improve their use of
shortcuts, function keys, menus and buttons, and
macros.
Observe students as they work to assess the extent
to which they conform to ethical standards (e.g.,
use of Internet, confidentiality, privacy).

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources

Question
Have students explain how they created various
documents. Ask students to specify how they used
templates, spell checkers, the thesaurus, and
dictionaries.
Collect
When students present their oral reports, assess
the extent to which they are able to:
- state their opinions about each search engine
clearly and concisely
- offer specific evidence, including details and
examples, to support their opinions
- sustain a focus on the topic (no irrelevant
information)
- present their ideas in a logical order that
connects one point to another
- present a logical conclusion based on the
information they have offered
- speak clearly and confidently

Web Sites
Employability Skills:
http://canconnect.ic.gc.ca/certificate/
(Industry Canada)
http://www.discoverit.org/
(Software Human Resource Council)

Peer Assessment
Have groups of students present their code of
ethics and list of acceptable behaviours to the
class. Ask them to invite other students to make
suggestions for improvement.
Self-Assessment
Ask students to review their reports on browsers.
Did they identify key features, assess limitations,
identify features that increase functionality, and
accurately cite sources?

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 25

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Refining and Organizing 2
It is expected that students will:
create a complex set of linked spreadsheet
documents for personal or business use
use formulas, data planning, key fields, report
functions, and relationships effectively within
a database
prepare and use software macros in wordprocessing, spreadsheet, and database
software
organize information from a variety of
sources, using computer software, for various
audiences and purposes
choose the most appropriate type of software
for an assigned task, giving consideration to
price, quality, creation, open standards, and
open source
create and incorporate graphics and sound
files into electronic documents and
presentations
use effective methods of backup document
storage
evaluate file compression methods to
compress and decompress data
use appropriate transportation or storage
media for a given type of data

26 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students use advanced document development,
integration, and management skills to create
professional-looking products.
Have students work independently to create a
spreadsheet to record marks earned in a given
subject. The spreadsheet should be structured to
total the marks earned, determine an overall
percentage mark in that subject, and show the
letter grade equivalent for that percent.
Invite students to work in groups to develop a
rating scale and use it to evaluate a piece of
software. Ask each person in the group to
complete the rating scale. Ask the group to create a
single workbook file. Then have them create a
summary score sheet to incorporate data from
each persons rating.
Have students incorporate graphics (e.g., line art,
charts, and images) to enhance a word-processing,
database, or spreadsheet file.
Ask students to work in small groups to create a
software inventory database. The database should
include the title, vendor, version, and description
of the software. The database must report the
quantity of each item.
Have students assess the pros and cons of
different storage technologies such as floppy
disks, CD-ROMs, and digital media cards
(e.g., Compact Flash, Smart Media). Have them
include a cost, volume, and performance analysis.

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Confirm that students have backed up documents
and files.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources

Question
Note students choices of software and features
they use. Do their choices help them successfully
complete tasks?
Collect
Evaluate the set of linked spreadsheets for:
- cell formatting
- overall page organization
- use of formulas
- linking of pages within the document
Assess student-produced databases for:
- use of formulas
- data organization
- reports and relationships created
Peer Assessment
Have students develop a set of criteria for the
evaluation of documents that incorporate original
sound and graphics. Students should then use the
criteria to evaluate each others documents.

Web Sites

Self-Assessment
Have students critique their own methods and
uses of data compression and decompression for
saving and transmitting files.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 27

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Presenting and Communicating 2
It is expected that students will:
prepare and deliver presentations using
presentation graphics software, incorporating:
- image manipulation
- timing
- linking
- slide transition features
- interactivity
apply various skills, methods, strategies, and
technical tools to communicate with a variety
of audiences
use collaborative problem-solving and
decision-making skills to complete business,
school, and personal tasks
describe effective project management and
teamwork strategies
use available Internet communication tools for
personal or business purposes
apply the principles of distributed learning in
a web-based learning environment

28 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students use advanced ICT skills to create highquality electronic documents and presentations that
encourage the development of high-level
communications skills.
Brainstorm with students topics related to special
events. The events might be associated with school
or community, or they might be national,
international, religious, or historical. Have groups
select a special-event topic, create a plan, and do
the research on their topic. Then ask students to
work independently to develop their sections of
the presentation. Tell them that their
communications must be shared electronically.
Have students develop a personal timeline for a
project based on a timeline developed for a group
project. Tell them that their personal timelines
need to fit into the flow of activities as outlined by
the group.
Ask students to work in pairs to create an
electronic tutorial. To begin, have each pair select a
problem they have recently encountered with a
computer operation. Tell them that the electronic
tutorial will be posted online to help people learn
how to do this particular computer operation.
Further, the tutorial must be more than a text
document.

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Check the communications and participation
activities of each student with respect to online
learning.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources

Question
Students should be able to explain how they used
the Internet as a communication tool, including its
advantages and disadvantages as a
communication tool for business, school, and
personal tasks.
Collect
Have students select from work they have
completed to provide evidence that they can create
documents for different audiences and purposes.
Do they use appropriate language, formatting, and
features appropriate to their audience and
purpose?
Peer Assessment
Ask students to identify skills and attitudes that
make a valuable ICT team member and to use that
list to assess a partners portfolio. Encourage
students to select one aspect of teamwork to
improve upon and develop a plan for
improvement.

Web Sites
Project Management:
http://www.pmi.org/
(Project Management Institute)

Self-Assessment
Ask students to evaluate their personal
involvement in and contribution to group
problem-solving activities. A rubric developed in
earlier modules could be used as the basis for
evaluation.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 29

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


New Technologies 2
It is expected that students will:
describe and evaluate the advantages and
disadvantages of a variety of electronic
communications environments and Internet
service providers
evaluate risks and consider ways to mitigate
threats of computer viruses through the use of
virus protection and firewall software
evaluate online learning tools
describe the use of online learning tools for
self-directed and self-paced learning
evaluate different types of personal
computing/digital devices that could be used
for educational purposes
explain the impact of recent developments in
biotechnology and other emerging
technologies on our society
explain relationships between concerns about
privacy and new technologies, including
spyware and content filtering
identify ethical, social, and legal issues
relevant to biotechnology and artificial
intelligence

30 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students have opportunities to explore ICT issues
and new technology in order to identify the potential
impact technology will have on their future lives.
Have students work in small groups to create tools
to evaluate various electronic communications
environments. Ask groups to compare and assess
their evaluation tools before revising and using
them to evaluate the environments. Invite students
to share their findings with the class. When all
groups have presented, ask students to decide
which electronic communication environment
would best serve the needs of the class.
Set up classroom debates on topics such as
content filtering versus academic freedom, use
of spyware versus right to privacy, or
biotechnologya new technology or a new
disease? After all groups have debated, ask
students to decide whether they consider
emerging technology to be good or bad for society,
and have them present a written summary of their
position.
Provide the class with a list of available personal
digital assistants (PDAs) and ask them what they
know about them. Divide the class into groups,
and assign a different PDA to each group. Ask
students to explain the limitations of this
technology.

APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Note what students do to protect their data and
check for viruses.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources

Question
Have students explain what they liked and
disliked about each type of online learning tool.
Which tools work best for them?
Collect
Have students describe and comment on their
personal involvement in and contribution to
groups assessing various Internet service
providers. Assess the descriptions and comments
for understanding of group processes.
Peer Assessment
Have students develop a rubric for evaluating
participation in classroom debates. Ask them to
use the rubric to evaluate the debate presentations.
Self-Assessment
Have students write personal reflections on the
positive and negative impacts of new technologies
on their lives.

Web Sites
Internet Security:
http://www.cert.org/
(CERT Coordination Center)
http://www.incidents.org
(SANS Institute)
Privacy:
http://www.oipcbc.org/
(The Office of the Information and Privacy
Commissioner-Government of BC)
http://www.connect.gc.ca/cyberwise/
(Illegal and Offensive Content on the InternetGovernment of Canada)
Internet Safety:
http://www.media-awareness.ca
(Media Awareness Network)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 31

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Desktop Digital Video 1
It is expected that students will:
define the stages of digital video production
(e.g., pre-production, production, and postproduction)
describe a variety of digital tools and formats
used by professionals in the industry
design a storyboard for a digital video
production
use appropriate layering, transitions, and
filters in the desktop production of digital
video
use a variety of existing media elements to
create desktop digital video productions with
defined structures
analyse the effectiveness of a desktop video
production for a specified audience
demonstrate an understanding of the intrinsic
storage, security, and codec issues involved
with desktop video
assess the legal and ethical issues of using
source material from movies or television

32 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop a basic understanding of the
processes and tools involved in digital video
production.
Explain to students the stages of development,
pre-production, production, and post-production
in a movie project. Have them research the
importance of storyboarding, scriptwriting,
assigning team tasks, and targeting an intended
audience.
Show students how to use and care for the basic
production equipment used to collect raw content
for digital productions, such as cameras, lights,
microphones, tripods, and computers.
Use a simple tutorial to guide students in digital
video editing. The tutorial might include
importing clips into a timeline, changing the
length of clips, creating transitions, adding titles
and other effects, adding sound and music, using
online help available either on the local computer
or on the Internet, and explaining how to save
projects in a secure manner.
Have groups of students analyse and critique
professional ads, claymations, and music videos.
Invite students to develop a plan and create a
digital movie project using the development, preproduction, production, and post-production
format for video projects.
Have the class assess common TV programs
(e.g., news, dramas, sitcoms) for evidence of
digital manipulation.

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe students as they work with equipment.
Do they use equipment appropriately and ensure
file security?
Question
Have students participate in class discussions on
the intellectual property of images and sounds. Do
they raise issues about the fair use of materials?

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
After Effects & Photoshop: Animation and
Production Effects for DV and Film
Final Cut Pro 4 and the Art of Filmmaking
Using Information Technology: A Practical
Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth Edition

Collect
Assess student storyboards and scripts for their
appropriateness for specified audiences.
Peer Assessment
Have students assess one anothers work using
the following questions:
- Does the project meet the requirements of the
assignment?
- Have imaging techniques been used
effectively?
- What visual elements could be improved?
- Are textures and colours appropriate?
- Is the product aimed at the target audience?
Self-Assessment
Have students assess their own group skills,
including their contributions to the group. Did
they complete all assigned tasks? Did they
volunteer to take on any additional
responsibilities?

Web Sites
Software Available Through
Provincial Agreements:
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp_resources/lr/
brk_main.htm
(Ministry of Education)
http://www.eracbc.ca
(BC Resource Acquisition Consortium)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 33

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


2D Graphic Design and Publishing 1
It is expected that students will:
describe a variety of digital-imaging tools and
formats used by industry professionals
use the tools available to set basic colour and
graphic design characteristics of a file or
document to aid viewing and clarify meaning
select graphic file formats appropriate for use
in print, video, or web
construct a complex document using a variety
of page layout and graphic design concepts
and tools
select and use appropriate textures, templates,
and filters in 2D media
compose 2D images using processes and tools
such as layering, wire frame models, textures,
lighting, and perspective
consider the ethical issues relevant to
misrepresenting the work of others by digital
manipulation
use peripheral devices to capture source
material for 2D media documents

34 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop basic knowledge related to the
processes and tools used in the production of 2D
documents.
Have students work in groups to research and
create a glossary of key terms related to image
creation and desktop publishing, (e.g., optical
centre, symmetrical balance, contrast, harmony,
fonts, vector graphics, and graphic formats).
Invite students to work in groups to create a
collage on a technology theme using newspaper
and magazine photos. Use their work to illustrate
the concepts of layering, contrast, and colour.
Have students create composite photos with a
photo manipulation program using stock photos,
student photos, and Internet graphics based on
themes such as movie stars, vacations, recreation,
and music groups. Discuss the importance of
layers, history, the undo feature, and removing
and inserting elements (e.g., backgrounds).
Have students use photos and text to create
magazine covers or ads using a combination of
page layout and imaging software.
Ask students to use filters to create morphs of
photos. Filters should be applied, using masking
techniques, to specific areas of each photo, such as
eyes of a portrait or the sky or sea of a landscape.
Have students use a computer program to recreate an environment in their home or school
using lighting, perspective, and textures.

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Examine the way students apply filters and masks
to images. Are they able to retrace their steps
using the undo feature rather than reverting to the
original when undesirable results are achieved?
Question
Ask students to discuss issues relevant to photo
manipulation. Do they identify legal and ethical
issues?
Collect

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
After Effects & Photoshop: Animation and
Production Effects for DV and Film
FlashTM MX 2004 Accelerated: A Full-Color
Guide
A Guide to Web Development Using
Macromedia DreamWeaver MX with
Fireworks MX and FlashTM MX
Photoshop for Right-Brainers: The Art of
Photo Manipulation

Assess student work portfolios to determine


strengths and areas to improve. Hold individual
conferences to give students feedback.
Peer Assessment
Have students assess one anothers projects using
the following questions:
- Does the project meet the requirements of the
assignment?
- Have imaging techniques been used
effectively?
- What visual elements could be improved?
- Are textures and colours appropriate?
- Is the product aimed at the target audience?
Self-Assessment
Ask students to compare one of their magazine
covers or ads to actual publications. Have them
identify key visual cues and production values
(e.g., type of paper, lighting effects) that make a
product look professional.

Web Sites
File Formats:
http://www.m4if.org/
(MPEG4 Industry Forum)
http://www.jpeg.org/
(international JPEG and JBIG groups)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 35

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


3D Design and Animation 1
It is expected that students will:
explain the impact of digital animation on
society
define terms associated with digital animation
such as layering, channels, paths, and transitions
identify and use a variety of tools and
resources for creating digital animation
content
use digital animation terminology
plan digital content before producing it
design and create original animation content
using a variety of animation tools and media
elements
explain the advantages and disadvantages of
specific output formats for delivering digital
content
acknowledge ideas and material taken from
other sources

36 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop basic knowledge of the
development processes and software tools used in
the production of digital animation files.
Have small groups of students select five
television shows or movies and analyse the
contributions made by 3D animation techniques.
Ask students to assess and critique the integration
of 3D elements into live action.
Ask students to make predictions about what the
design and animation industry might be capable
of in five years by comparing current techniques
to what was common five years ago.
Invite students to work in pairs to quiz one
another on the terms used in the fields of 3D
design and animation.
Have groups of students plan and develop short
animated compositions. The process should
include storyboarding, scriptwriting, assigning
team tasks, and identifying target audiences.
Ask students to research and list several 3D
design/animation applications. They should
categorize the applications by target audiences
(e.g., beginner, slightly skilled, or professional
user).
Challenge students to create a 3D model of a
common household object such as a piece of
furniture or a kitchen appliance. Have them apply
simple animation techniques such as lighting,
texture, and motion to the model.

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
As students analyse television shows and movies
for 3D animation effects, note instances where
they do and do not identify visual effects. Use this
information for future lessons.
Collect
Provide students with questions to use to conduct
and televise group discussions on working
together.
- What does it mean to be part of a team?
- What happens when a team member lets you
down?
- How important is communication to a team?
Assess the videos for technical quality and
content.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
After Effects & Photoshop: Animation and
Production Effects for DV and Film
FlashTM MX 2004 Accelerated: A Full-Color
Guide
A Guide to Web Development Using
Macromedia DreamWeaver MX with
Fireworks MX and FlashTM MX

Peer Assessment
Ask the teams to complete evaluations of group
efforts by responding to the following:
- Did all team members offer and accept ideas
and suggestions?
- Did team members work co-operatively to
solve problems?
- How equitable was the division of work? Did
each person do his or her share?

Web Sites

Self-Assessment
Have students write brief reflections to describe
their contributions to story development,
storyboarding, scriptwriting, and production.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 37

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Web Publishing 1
It is expected that students will:
create a plan for the development of web
documents and web sites
describe and use a variety of tools to edit
Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)
describe the limitations of HTML
understand and apply World Wide Web
Consortium (W3C) standards
design interactive web media that balance the
use of large graphic files with the need to
provide efficient downloads
design interactive web media using a variety
of digital tools and web editors
use conventions for naming files and folder
hierarchy
use FTP protocol to update a web site
insert hyperlinks in original content
acknowledge ideas and material taken from
other sources
use web site program validators

38 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop basic knowledge of the
development processes and software tools used in
the production of web page files and personal web
sites.
Have students research the evolution of World
Wide Web (WWW) standards and languages.
Student reports should include reference to the
efforts of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
to develop interoperable web technologies.
Have students analyse the hierarchical
organization of a web site for the logical grouping
of resources and topics. Encourage students to
identify strengths and weaknesses in the layout
and accessibility of information.
Ask students to create a site map of their web site
or another well designed web site identified by the
teacher.
Ask students to identify several programs used to
create web content and compare and contrast their
operations and output. Have them assemble a list
of online tutorials for these programs.
Ask students to evaluate and analyse the content
of web sites for bias, privacy, and ethical and legal
considerations.
Have teams of students create interactive web
documents such as theme pages that include
survey, quiz, or media components.
Have students use a web-based HTML validator
to check their web sites for valid links to pages
and images. Students can use the validator
available from the World Wide Web Consortium to
analyse graphics and content download times.
Have students update and manage a web page
and its contents hosted on a remote server that
employs the FTP protocol. Ensure students divide
their content into distinct folders by web page and
employ proper file-naming protocols.

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe how teams work together to create
interactive web documents. Look for project
organization, planning, division of responsibilities,
and focus on project concept (e.g., colour scheme,
naming, titles).
Question

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
FlashTM MX 2004 Accelerated: A Full-Color
Guide
A Guide to Web Development Using
Macromedia DreamWeaver MX with
Fireworks MX and FlashTM MX

Ask students to explain criteria they would use to


critique a web site. Do they identify features such
as the relative strength and weakness of the
layout, colour choice, text, titles, and ease of
navigation?
Collect
Have students select examples of their work
completed during the course that best illustrates
that they:
- use technology ethically
- are efficient, responsible, and competent users
of the Internet
- can use appropriate processes and software
tools to create digital animation files and web
sites
Peer Assessment
Model for students how to give constructive
feedback to others. Then ask students to review
the work of another student and provide useful
feedback.

Web Sites
Web Standards:
http://www.w3.org/
(World Wide Web Consortium-W3C)

Self-Assessment
Have each student create an About My Web Site
page that describes her or him as the producer and
explains her or his knowledge, skill, and
computing experiences.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 39

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Desktop Digital Video 2


It is expected that students will:
incorporate advanced keying, layering, and
nesting techniques into their desktop video
productions
describe available output formats including
DVD, digital tape, and Video Compact Disk
(VCD)
compare and contrast the uses, advantages,
and disadvantages of various output formats
apply appropriate output formats specific to
intended delivery systems
create advanced projects using video, sound,
and animation in desktop video productions
select rendering techniques for desktop video
production
identify skills needed to work in video, film,
and television production
document the stages in the creation of a video
production (e.g., pre-production, production,
and post-production)

40 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students use advanced software features to create
desktop video productions and store files in various
formats.
Review with students the stages of a video project.
Have them collect some raw footage for editing.
Ensure they follow correct handling, safety, and
security procedures.
Have teams of students create a storyboard and a
preliminary script for a movie project.
Give students a digital video editing exercise that
encourages the use of several editing techniques
such as layering, timelining, keying, and sound
manipulation.
Challenge students to plan and create a digital
movie using the development, pre-production,
production, and post-production stages. Students
should use different programs to incorporate a
variety of advanced techniques such as layering,
special effects, importing animations and images
from other sources, and manipulating sound.

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe students as they work with equipment
and computers, noting their ability to handle
equipment correctly.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
After Effects & Photoshop: Animation and
Production Effects for DV and Film
Final Cut Pro 4 and the Art of Filmmaking

Question
Ask students to explain how they created a
particular video project. Have they maximized the
use of available software and hardware?
Collect
Assess student storyboards and scripts for clarity,
completeness, and ability to demonstrate the
project theme.
Peer Assessment
Have students discuss the following questions in
teams:
- What does teamwork mean?
- What happens when a team member lets you
down?
- How important is communication to a team?
- How important is it to distribute work in an
equitable way?
Self-Assessment
Have students record what they learned while
transforming raw footage into final product.

Web Sites
Software Available Through
Provincial Agreements:
http://awww.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp_resources/lr/
brk_main.htm
(Ministry of Education)
http://www.eracbc.ca
(BC Resource Acquisition Consortium)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 41

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


2D Graphic Design and Publishing 2
It is expected that students will:
compose documents using advanced layering,
masking, channels, and paths
create documents that demonstrate use of a
variety of methods of photo retouching and
manipulation
use various software tools to optimize digital
content for display size, file size, quality, and
ease of distribution
describe publishing and production
techniques necessary to ensure a quality
product (e.g., page layout, colour separation,
and spot colour)
create 2D media using advanced keying
techniques, special effects, and software tools
identify the steps (workflow) in 2D publishing
and the associated skills needed at each step

42 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students use advanced software features to create
graphic and desktop-published documents that
demonstrate the use of graphic and layout tools.
Have students colourize a black-and-white
drawing using layers and painting techniques.
Give students several pictures that need
retouching. Have them use a variety of techniques
to correct imperfections such as scratched
negatives and discolouration.
Have students create a large (e.g., two-page)
spread that includes page borders, gutters, text
boxes, and visual clues such as drop shadows. The
final product should be printed as a proof with
printers marks and be spot-colour-ready.
Ask pairs of students to create a three-column
folding brochure using desktop publishing
software. Tell them the purpose of the brochure is
to provide information about career opportunities
available in the image-editing and desktoppublishing industries.
Working in groups, have students create minitutorials to demonstrate specific imaging
techniques.

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe as students plan and implement the
workflow to develop a 2D publishing project. Do
they demonstrate knowledge of appropriate skills
at each step?
Question

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
After Effects & Photoshop: Animation and
Production Effects for DV and Film
Photoshop for Right-Brainers: The Art of
Photo Manipulation

While they are image editing, ask students to


explain the steps they are taking to fix flaws.
Collect
Assess students final products for:
- quality of the source
- degree of difficulty required
- originality
Peer Assessment
Have students assess one anothers graphic
products using questions such as:
- Does the product meet the requirements of the
assignment?
- Is the product well crafted?
- Have imaging techniques been used
effectively?
- What visual elements could be improved?
- Are textures and colours appropriate?
- Is the product appropriate for the target
audience?
Self-Assessment

Web Sites
File Formats:
http://www.m4if.org/
(MPEG4 Industry Forum)
http://www.jpeg.org/
(international JPEG and JBIG groups)

Have students critique their own digital products


after they have presented their work to the class.
Encourage students to identify ways to improve
their work.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 43

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

It is expected that students will:

Students use advanced software features to create


graphics that demonstrate the use of motion,
layering, and sound tools.

apply advanced layering concepts to integrate


animation with sound and graphics
produce animated products that incorporate
the reproduction of natural motions using a
variety of media elements
develop a detailed plan that specifies the
intended outcomes of a digital project
use effective lighting, manipulation of
perspectives, and biometrics in animation
projects
identify milestones in the development of
virtual reality technology
identify factors that affect the time required
for rendering digital animations
monitor the success of a project and identify
ways to improve it
identify skills needed to work in industries
using manual animation as opposed to those
using computer-assisted animation

Ask students to identify the skills required to


create professional quality productions.
Have students work individually or in small
groups to plan the steps required to formulate and
create a complex 3D animated project that
involves using different applications. Students
should storyboard and plan to include multiple
layers of 3D animation, 2D graphics, and sound.
Have students formulate a plan to deal with time
and process issues.
Have students interview people working in 3D
animation to learn about education and training
required. They should research postsecondary
institutions as to the availability of required
courses in their area. Have students prepare a
multimedia presentation to share their findings.
Have students create a timeline indicating the
milestones in the development of virtual reality
technology.

3D Design and Animation 2

44 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe students selection of software to create
graphics for documents. Did they select software
appropriate to the kind of production, workflow,
and storage requirements?
Question

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
After Effects & Photoshop: Animation and
Production Effects for DV and Film
FlashTM MX 2004 Accelerated: A Full-Color
Guide

Ask students to explain how they would plan a


video animation project. Do their plans include
consideration of collection of content, software
and hardware requirements, division of tasks, and
time?
Collect
Evaluate graphics for:
- motion
- layering
- use of sound
- syncronization of sound with motion

Web Sites
Postsecondary Information:
http://www.openingdoorsbc.com/
(CEISS/Ministry of Advanced Education)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 45

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Web Publishing 2
It is expected that students will:
describe the importance of design elements in
the creation and development of web page
templates
assess various methods of delivering content
on the Web, using both client-side and serverside technology
collaborate with others to create unique web
solutions
investigate advanced web solutions to collect
and sort data on a web server
assess issues of personal security and privacy
in a digital society
describe and use a variety of tools available to
create advanced web content, including
layering, masking, and animation
identify technical and non-technical skills of
developers in the web-publishing industry
define relative and absolute addressing
design web sites that incorporate correct path
structures

46 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students use advanced software features to create
graphic and desktop-published documents that
demonstrate awareness and use of web solution
tools.
Have students evaluate pre-existing web sites for
consistency in design between pages. Introduce
the concepts of templates, cascading style sheets,
and revisable objects.
Ask students to design a task that requires
collection of data (e.g., online poll, customer
survey, registration form). Have students identify
the technical options such as CGIs, JavaScripts, or
active content (PHP, ASP).
Have students prepare a multimedia presentation
to present what they learned from interviewing
people in the web design field about educational
requirements and expectations held by clients in
the community.
Ask students to interview a local club or
community group on their web site requirements.
Have students develop a plan for the group based
on their needs.
Have students discuss technical versus nontechnical aspects of developing a web site. Ask
them to define the skills associated with each and
how best to get technical and non-technical people
to collaborate.
Have students create a web site that conveys their
findings regarding good web site design practices.

DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe how students plan and create web pages.
Do they use appropriate processes and methods to
ensure a consistent look and feel for their
products?

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
FlashTM MX 2004 Accelerated: A Full-Color
Guide

Question
Ask students to explain the key characteristics of
web site structures. Why should URLs be kept as
short as possible?
Collect
Have students consult individuals or local
businesses and create complex web solutions
based upon their findings. Assess the content of
their web sites for evidence that they addressed
specific client needs and applied a common design
theme.
Examine a student-authored web document, and
note the extent to which:
- structure and syntax are correct
- comments and documentation are complete
- the document functions correctly when viewed
in various web browsers
- links in and between pages work correctly
Peer Assessment
Have students critique each others web page
designs and layouts to help each other improve
the functionality of web pages.

Web Sites
Web Standards:
http://www.w3.org/
(World Wide Web Consortium-W3C)
http://www.php.net/
(PHP Project-Apache Software Foundation)

Self-Assessment
Have students assess their personal contributions
to group tasks.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 47

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Workstations and Communications 1


It is expected that students will:
describe the history and evolution of
computers
identify and describe the components of a
computer system, explaining the type and
function of each component
define computer workstation and network
terminology and indicate the purpose of
items, including:
- motherboard components (e.g., BIOS,
CMOS, and PRAM)
- parallel and serial devices and buses
- ports and their associated communication
identify and use the steps in the troubleshooting process
describe the attributes of various visual
display technologies and adapter types
identify a variety of peripheral devices and
explain the connection and operation of each
describe the function, operation, and use of
management tools of various storage
technologies
install and connect physical components,
internal devices, and cabling
explain how changing various hardware
components and architectures affects the
performance of a computer
demonstrate an understanding of safety issues
associated with working on computer
hardware
use troubleshooting methods to solve
configuration problems associated with
adding or changing hardware components
and peripherals

48 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students are introduced to the history and
fundamentals of the computer workstation and
terminology associated with the computer.
In a lab log, have students document the
configuration of a functioning PC and describe its
parts. The lab log can be used to document all
student observations, activities, and responses.
Have students create timelines and overviews
showing critical developments in technology. Ask
them to note significant developments in the
evolution of the PC as well as various peripherals
and hardware that have been developed over this
time period.
Have students research the parts of a computer
and create a labelled and annotated diagram.
Have them include the various parts of a
computer and peripherals.
Outline for students the steps in the troubleshooting process, and explain the reasons for
the steps and process. Have students outline a
sequence for troubleshooting computer and
network-related problems to include in their lab
log.
Ask students to brainstorm a list of some of the
more common hardware and software problems
they might encounter. Review grounding and
bonding safety precautions and the use of a
ground strap where necessary.
Have students assess the relative importance of
various I/O technologies such as USB, parallel,
Firewire, and SCSI.
Provide students with RGB (analog), S-Video,
and DVI connections. Have students prepare a
summary of the advantages and disadvantages of
each, considering criteria such as cost, resolution,
and display quality.
Have students compare older analog-programmed
devices, such as a player piano, to newer digital
devices. Have them emphasize the importance of
binary states as a principle of programming.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
As students work on projects, do they show
understanding of safety issues associated with
working on computer hardware?
Question
Ask students to explain how they conducted their
Internet research. The focus should be on the
organization and procedures used to arrive at the
information.
Ask students to outline the steps they would
follow to troubleshoot various computer
problems.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Peter Nortons Introduction to Computers,
Fifth Edition
Using Information Technology: A Practical
Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth Edition

Collect
Work with the class to develop a rating scale to
document lab competency. Key areas may include
knowledge of:
- key computer components and peripherals
- common problem areas and solutions
- parameters required if a system must be rebuilt
or replaced

Web Sites

Peer Assessment
Have students evaluate their own and other class
members use of language. Ask students to
identify language and vocabulary that is unique to
technology and determine how its use might affect
their ability to help or support non-techies.
Self-Assessment
Have students evaluate their own understanding,
participation, and efficiency in:
- Internet research
- hands-on problem solving

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 49

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Systems and Management 1
It is expected that students will:
describe the history and evolution of
operating systems
install and configure an operating system
investigate, install, and use security and
backup solutions
investigate and compare proprietary and
open-source applications
evaluate and apply upgrading management
procedures such as patches and fixes
install application software
manage a workstation operating system,
including:
- installing appropriate drivers
- assigning a destination printer
- adding peripherals
- altering user-level security
- applying rights and permissions to
software applications
follow a consistent process to troubleshoot OS
problems

50 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students gain an understanding of operating systems
and how they allow workstations to function and
software to be used.
Have students research the history of operating
systems (OSs) using a search engine. Have them
note significant developments in the evolution of
the OS, considering different platforms developed
over this time period. Ask students to create a
timeline and overview showing critical
developments in the OS.
Invite students to critique an OS of their choice.
Ask them to share their findings and debate the
merits of different OSs in an online discussion.
Have students install an OS on a stand-alone PC.
The system unit should be wiped clean and ready
for a clean install. Students may work
individually or in small teams. Ask each student
or group to install the OS, selected software, and
peripheral drivers and make the PC ready for use.
Have students work alone or in small teams to
install and update a patch to a common OS.
Ask students to work in pairs to connect a variety
of peripherals and ensure that appropriate drivers
are installed, both from disk and from the Internet
as a download. Then, have pairs change
workstations and test another pairs work.
Have students work in small teams to install and
configure a range of software packages, including
proprietary and freeware applications. Have them
examine the process and consider what else may
be affected when various application suites are
installed.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
As students work on lab assignments, observe the
extent to which they are systematic, efficiently
recognize and resolve problems, and document
results accurately.
Monitor the conduct of students during an online
discussion and debate. Note the etiquette
associated with their work as well as the content
of what they say. Ensure all students are involved
in the discussion.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources

Question
Ask students to explain how they conducted their
Internet research. Did they organize their work
efficiently and use appropriate procedures?
Have students describe in their journals the steps
they took to do the installation processes, and any
problems or issues they encountered.
Collect
Examine students documents describing the
advantages and disadvantages of the OSs, the
timeline, and the overview showing critical
developments in the OS. Are there any gaps in
students understanding of operating systems?
Self-Assessment
Ask students to reflect on the following questions
in their journals:
- What is the most important event in the history
of computing or programming?
- What area of computing do you want to know
more about?
- What is the most significant advance in human
and machine interfacing?

Web Sites
Search Engines:
http://www.google.ca/
(Google)
http://search.yahoo.com/
(Yahoo)
http://www.dogpile.com/
(Dogpile)
http://www.alltheweb.com
(All the Web)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 51

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

It is expected that students will:

Students examine the development, terminology, and


basic operation of networks to predict future
developments based on emerging technology.

identify and describe terminology used for the


units, rates, and encoding of data
communication
differentiate between binary, decimal, and
hexadecimal number systems
define network terminology, including
encapsulation, collisions, and collision
domains
explain the history of computer networks and
critique network systems
identify and explain different types of
software used to set up a network
plan, create, and configure a peer-to-peer
network
plan, install, and configure a network
operating system
apply and document naming standards for
resources and devices on a network
manage a network operating system
effectively, including:
- disabling or enabling network protocols
- installing appropriate network drivers
- establishing server-client connections
- assigning a destination printer
- adding additional peripherals
- altering security-level user access
- applying network rights and permissions to
software applications
troubleshoot network problems, addressing
documentation, standards, and accepted
performance standards

Have students create a web dictionary of network


terminology that they can add to as the course
progresses.
Review exponents and the decimal system.
Demonstrate the similarity between the base 2 and
base 10 number systems. Highlight the historical
and intellectual importance of representing
information as ones and zeros. Have students
create a binary version of a common item such as
time or common coins.
Have students analyse how to set up a network. In
groups, have students divide the tasks and
responsibilities of developing a network among
themselves. Have them rotate roles so that each
team member experiences the various positions
(e.g., leader, team recorder, designer, builder, and
gofer). As a culminating activity, have students
collaborate to write definitions of the roles of those
involved in project development and
management.
Create a small demonstration lab (e.g., server,
workstation, and a peripheral such as a network
printer). Have pairs of students work through the
connections, install software, and configure the
system to operate as a LAN.
Develop a networking problem statement that is
constructively ambiguous to offer students
opportunities for creative problem solving. Select
a problem that is relevant both to the topic at hand
and to students own lives (e.g., create a plan for a
home network based on home layout).

Network Technologies 1

52 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Create a lab assessment using a small
demonstration lab, and have pairs of students set
up a LAN. Observe the extent to which students:
- follow an efficient order of installation
- require a minimum of assistance and/or
directions
- are able to verify the validity of their final
solution

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Guide to Networking Essentials, Third Edition
Networking Basics, Second Edition
Peter Nortons Introduction to Computers,
Fifth Edition

Question
Assess students solutions to an ambiguous
network problem. Did they consider more than
one solution? What criteria did they use to select
the final solution?
Collect
Have students submit their web dictionary and
journal. Assess their work for evidence of ongoing
involvement in class activities and willingness to
reflect on their learning.
Peer Assessment
Establish with students a set of criteria for
evaluating network project work. Have students
evaluate each others network project work based
on that set of criteria.

Web Sites
LAN Standards:
http://www.ethermanage.com/ethernet/
(Charles Spurgeons Ethernet Web Site)

Self-Assessment
Have students monitor and evaluate the resources
they access to collect information and solve
problems. Have they created a list of common
resource sites, or do they reinvent the wheel
when faced with each new problem?

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 53

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Internetworking Concepts 1
It is expected that students will:
describe the importance of the International
Organization for Standardization (ISO) in the
creation of open standards for networking
identify and describe the seven layers of the
OSI (Open System Interconnection) reference
model
describe how interoperability makes the
Internet possible
outline the history and development of
Internet technologies (e.g., RFCs)
identify and describe the four layers of the
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol (TCP/IP) model
demonstrate an understanding of wide area
networks (WANs) and local area networks
(LANs)
identify and explain logical and physical
network topologies and the segmentation of
networks
define the purpose and function of LAN/
WAN devices, including modems, switches,
routers, hubs, bridges, and repeaters
demonstrate an understanding of hardware
and logical addressing schemes
identify common network protocols
explain how protocols are used to move data
along the network

54 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students examine the history and development of the
Internet and the standards and services that permit
the Internet to function.
Have students participate in an online discussion
about interoperability and its importance to the
Internet. Provide opportunities for students to
relate this process to the creation of requests for
comments (RFCs) through online discussion.
Present a mini-lecture on the importance of the
International Organization for Standardization.
Have students use notes from the lecture and
online research to summarize the importance of
these standards.
Have students analyse a human conversation and
compare it to a computer data communication. Set
up a role-playing exercise to demonstrate this
analogy.
Invite students to create an animation or
storyboard to outline various network topologies.
Have them include image clips found on the
Internet representing each topology, and annotate
their presentation.
Have students use a vector graphics software
program to design a LAN/WAN including
devices such as repeaters, hubs, bridges, switches,
and routers. Have them become familiar with the
icons that represent these LAN/WAN devices
before starting the project.
Ask students to activate run commands to
determine the IP addresses for computers on a
LAN (ipconfig and ipconfig/all). Have them use a
spreadsheet to create a list of the IP addresses.
Have students research network standards. Ask
them to consider how each standard was created,
what it replaced, and the extent to which it is an
open or proprietary standard.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Monitor students online discussions and debates.
Note the etiquette associated with their work as
well as the content of what they say.
Collect
Assess students documents analysing a human
conversation as an analogy for data
communication. Look for evidence that they
recognize and understand how conversations
work: stopping and starting, use of process cues
(e.g., inflection, pause), syntax, and formality/
informality of language.
Create and administer an online quiz on the two
primary models used to study the Internet (OSI
and TCP/IP) in a Course Management System
(CMS).
Collect student diagrams of network topology.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Guide to Networking Essentials, Third Edition
Networking Basics, Second Edition
Peter Nortons Introduction to Computers,
Fifth Edition

Peer Assessment
Have students identify criteria for a good
representation (storyboard or animation) of a
network topology and use it to assess one
anothers products.
Self-Assessment
Provide students with a list of criteria to assess
their own research skills, including the following
points:
- locate relevant sources
- summarize key information
- present the information in an appropriate way

Web Sites
http://www.iso.org/
(ISO)
http://www.ietf.org/
(The Internet Engineering Task Force-RFCs)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 55

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Workstations and Communications 2
It is expected that students will:
describe the Electrical Industries Association
(EIA) and Telecommunications Industry
Association (TIA) standards
identify the Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers (IEEE) standards that
relate to LANs
define and use terminology of the Ethernet
standard for LAN communications
describe the electrical and mechanical issues
associated with deploying computer hardware
in a workplace
identify advantages and disadvantages of
various cable and connector types
demonstrate knowledge of electronics and
signalling terminology
define the purpose of patch panels and
backbone cabling
develop a network design and identify
physical environment needs for network
devices and cabling
differentiate between network analysers, time
domains and reflectometers, breakout boxes,
power meters, and oscilloscopes
use a variety of test equipment to verify
network performance and its adherence to
standards, and locate faults

56 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop an understanding of the
electronics, wiring, and hardware of computers and
computer networks.
Have students conduct online research to identify
the standards created by the Electrical Industries
Association (EIA), Telecommunications Industry
Association (TIA), and Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Ask students to work
in pairs to create reports outlining the standards
and how these standards apply to their work.
Identify for students different types of cables and
connectors used for networking computers, and
describe how each would be used. Have students
work in pairs to use appropriate tools to create
and test different types of cables.
Have students describe processes for troubleshooting problems when using cables and
connectors. Ask them to share their processes with
the class to facilitate the development of a
standardized class process.
Have students work in small groups to build a
simple network. Students should use appropriate
equipment to test the viability of their network
and determine if it functions in the most efficient
manner possible. Have students then move from
one network to another to test the work of other
groups and recommend improvements.
Have students reflect on rule-based standards.
Have them explain and categorize prescriptive
versus conceptual standards and explain how the
type of standard affects its use in troubleshooting
situations.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

LEARNING RESOURCES

Observe

Recommended Resources

Observe students as they work in the lab. Do they


follow procedures, document results, and refer to
standards and documentation as needed?

Guide to Networking Essentials, Third Edition


Networking Basics, Second Edition

Question
Ask students to explain how they created and
tested the cables they made. Do their responses
provide evidence of the use of correct terminology
and procedural knowledge?
Collect
Look for evidence in students reports that they
understand the function and need for standards
organizations such as the Electrical Industries
Association (EIA), Telecommunications Industry
Association (TIA), and Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers (IEEE).
Peer Assessment
Encourage students to provide feedback to one
another regarding the problem-solving and
troubleshooting strategies they used as they
worked.
Self-Assessment
Have students assess their ability to select and use
test equipment to verify network performance and
locate faults. Ask them to develop a plan to
improve areas that need attention.

Web Sites
Standards:
http://www.tiaonline.org/
(Telecommunications Industry Association)
http://standards.ieee.org/
(Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 57

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Systems and Management 2


It is expected that students will:
prepare network audits, including inventory,
facilities, security, and operational aspects
generate network documentation, including:
- a network map or blueprint
- name, IP, and MAC address for each device
- hardware inventory
identify the difference between updates and
software patches with respect to function,
installation, and configuration
assess strategies for network management
plans
develop a network management plan that
includes:
- licensing and rights management
- user and group permissions
- user profiles
- administrative control and user
management
develop and maintain a network operation
and maintenance manual
compare deployment strategies for
workstations, applications, upgrades, and
remote system management
evaluate testing protocols and procedures to
determine the effectiveness of a network
design
develop criteria to evaluate the effectiveness
of a network
develop a continued plan for network
operation and maintenance, including criteria
for:
- upgrading a network (e.g., user stations
and network hardware and software)
- protecting data and programs
- purchasing, acquiring, licensing, and
distributing hardware and software
- providing user support (e.g., help desk,
technician, LAN tech, online)

58 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students apply what they learned in previous
modules to network planning and administration.
Have students work in small groups to develop an
efficient and effective mechanism for auditing the
inventory, facilities, security, and operational
aspects of the network they are working with.
Have groups share their results with the class, and
ask other students to critique their work. Have
groups improve their mechanisms before handing
them in.
Have students work in pairs using an appropriate
software program to generate a network map or
blueprint, including IP and MAC addresses for
each device.
Invite a guest speaker to tell the class why a
network management plan is necessary and to
explain how to develop a plan (including
licensing, permissions, profiles, rights, groups, and
objects) that addresses user and administrative
needs. Have students then work in small groups
to create a management plan for the classroom
network. Have groups share their plan with the
rest of the class so that suggestions can be made
for improvements.
Have students work in pairs to develop and
maintain a network operation and maintenance
manual.
Create a set of labs for students to evaluate and
test protocols and procedures to determine the
effectiveness of a network design.
Have students work in small groups to develop a
set of criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of a
network and a method of using those criteria.
Have groups share their criteria and their
mechanism for using them with the rest of the
class for critiquing.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

LEARNING RESOURCES

Observe

Recommended Resources

As students critique one anothers work, do they


ask clarifying questions, give constructive advice,
and speak respectfully?

Guide to Networking Essentials, Third Edition

Question
Ask students to classify results of network troubleshooting as hardware, software, or configuration.
Do they explain which faults can be corrected
through remote management and which require
physical changes to the network?
Collect
Do students network management plans clearly
indicate an understanding of administrative needs
and the necessity for ease of use?
Peer Assessment
Have students critique the network audit
mechanisms. Encourage them to note deficiencies
and suggest improvements (e.g., Has the group
correctly identified all the physical and policy
components of the audit, including user policy,
password requirements, and physical security?).

Web Sites

Self-Assessment
Ask students to consider what it would be like to
be a network administrator. Have them determine
the educational requirements, describe the kind of
work involved, and state reasons they would or
would not want such a position.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 59

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Network Technologies 2
It is expected that students will:
access sources for network security
information
assess the security of a network structure
install and use network management tools,
including security, imaging, backup, and
remote controls
calculate network capacity limitations and
plan for network upgrades
configure and manage servers for user
authentication, file, and print services
deploy and use applications on a network
use network operating systems utilities to
monitor, manage, and troubleshoot data
transfers

60 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students consider the basic intricacies of a network
and some of the problems related to maintaining a
functional and safe network.
Brainstorm with students network security issues
they are aware of. Have them conduct online
research to identify a variety of network security
problems and potential solutions for each. Have
students work in pairs or small groups to create a
report outlining the security issues and how they
can be addressed to create a safe network.
Design a lab situation for students where they
must install and use network management tools,
including security, imaging, backup, and remote
controls.
Have students access management software. Ask
them to explain what needs to be defined prior to
creating share points and print cues.
Have students use the Internet to identify when
and how software needs to be upgraded. Have
them work in pairs to create a report outlining
what factors they considered and the ways they
addressed them.
Invite students to develop and demonstrate their
ability to use and deploy applications on a
network.
Have students test the use of network operating
systems utilities (e.g., data capturing-Lanwiser,
sniffer, WOW packet, network monitor).

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe students as they manage each type of
server. Note the ease and efficiency with which
they are able to organize servers logically and use
both user and group privileges.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Guide to Networking Essentials, Third Edition

Question
Ask students to explain why they selected a
specific network tool and how they use it. Look for
evidence that they can identify root problems
and/or desired results and can give a reasoned
explanation for why that specific tool is
appropriate.
Collect
Assess students reports for the number of security
issues identified and the solutions provided.
Do students reports on network upgrades cover a
range of issues and provide information on how
each issue can be addressed?
Peer Assessment
Have students give each other feedback on how
well they set up and operated each type of server
and the clarity and completeness of the file and
print structures they created. Students might also
give each other feedback on how well they used
each type of network management tool. After the
peer feedback sessions, have students make plans
for improvement.
Self-Assessment

Web Sites
Network Security:
http://www.cert.org/
(CERT Coordination Center)
http://www.incidents.org
(SANS Institute)
http://www.nipc.gov/
(National Infrastructure Protection Center-US
Department of Homeland Security)

Have students reflect on and analyse their


personal security needs. Ask them to consider
what is an appropriate balance between functional
and optimal security.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 61

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Internetworking Concepts 2
It is expected that students will:
explain the relationship between binary
numbering and IP addressing
explain the relationship between hexadecimal
and MAC addressing
demonstrate an understanding of the
functional and operational differences
between hardware servers for:
- web application
- file servers
- proxy servers
- mail servers
- dynamic host configuration protocol
(DHCP)
- domain name servers (DNS)
define and explain the importance of
standards for Internet services, including:
- markup languages (HTML, XML)
- scripting languages for web sites (CGI,
PHP, JavaScript)
- mail protocols (SMTP, POP, IMAP)
- file transfer protocols (FTP, WebDAV)
- chat protocols (IRC, AIM)
demonstrate an understanding of virtual
terminal applications
use command line tools to perform network
testing, including name lookup, route tracing,
and verification of local IP configuration
explain how network devices on local area
networks use Address Resolution Protocol
(ARP) before forwarding data to a destination

62 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students consider the complexities of a network and
some of the problems related to connecting different
parts of a network and different types of networks
together.
Have students create a spreadsheet or Javaenabled web page to convert between the binary
numbering system and IP addressing and between
hexadecimal and MAC addressing. Have students
create a written explanation of these differences
and compare their findings to those of other
classmates in order to enhance their own work.
Brainstorm with students ways to write about
comparative data. Have students use online
resources to identify the differences between a
variety of hardware servers for web application,
file servers, proxy servers, mail servers, and
dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP).
Have students work in small groups to create a
report outlining the differences.
Have students install and configure updates and
software patches. Ask them to identify the
differences between the two activities and outline
what they are.
Have groups of students create a definition and
exemplar for each term covered in this module
(e.g., XML, PHP, DNS). Compile student responses
as a document or web page for ongoing class
reference.
Provide students with access to virtual terminal
applications, and demonstrate their operation.
Have students identify the advantages of this
model over conventional client-server models.
Have students use a command line of a
workstation, router, or managed switch interface
to perform network configurations and troubleshooting. Ask them to use basic commands,
including ipconfig, ping, and traceroute.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
As students install and configure updates and
software patches, note the ease and efficiency with
which they perform each task.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Guide to Networking Essentials, Third Edition
Networking Basics, Second Edition

Question
Ask students to explain how they performed
upgrades and installed patches, noting the depth
of understanding demonstrated, ability to follow
accepted procedures, and ability to solve problems
in the process.
Collect
Assess students reports comparing servers. Do
the reports show an understanding of the various
kinds of servers and their applications?
Peer Assessment
Have students critique the class definitions of key
terms for clarity and correctness.
Self-Assessment
Have students create a system managers checklist
for common installation and managed functions.
In their journals, have students reflect upon their
ability to follow procedures and note faults in the
process.

Web Sites
LAN Standards:
http://www.ethermanage.com/ethernet/
(Charles Spurgeons Ethernet Web Site)
Server Software and Protocols:
http://www.isc.org/
(Internet Software Consortium)
http://www.ietf.org/
(The Internet Engineering Task Force)
http://www.php.net/
(PHP Project-Apache Software Foundation)
http://www.apache.org/
(The Apache Software Foundation)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 63

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Introduction to Programming
It is expected that students will:
explain the history of the development of
programming languages, including digital
and analog programming techniques
explain the influences of technological
advancements related to programming
classify programming languages as legacy
(e.g., Fortran, Cobol), teaching (e.g., Pascal,
Modula), object-oriented (e.g., C++, JAVA),
scripting (e.g., PERL, CGI), and meta-language
(e.g., HTML, JavaScript)
demonstrate basic command line events as
they relate to software instructions
explain how programming makes technology
possible
apply correct programming and ICT
terminology
use assigned steps to develop software
construct and edit programs containing
input/output, read/write, and simple
variables

64 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop an understanding of programming
language and gain proficiency in the use of high-level
programming language.
Have groups of students research a topic on the
development of programming languages, such as
contributors to the development of programming
languages, technological advancements that
influenced programming development, or
technological advancements that influenced
society.
Lead students through the features of a basic
program, and apply simple modifications. Have
students then run the program with minor
changes and observe/track the effects. Have them
keep a record of the error messages created by
actions such as deleting letters, punctuation, or
expressions.
Have students work in small groups to create an
algorithm to solve a problem in pseudo-code,
where the problem is unrelated to computers (e.g.,
how to change a tire). Have students test their
solution by physically executing the algorithm
developed.
Challenge students to develop a question-andanswer game, including the steps of problem
definition, algorithm, coding, and testing. Provide
them with a hard copy of the code to enter, edit,
and test. Using this process as a model, have
students create their own programs in response to
a set of problems.
Have students create and maintain a glossary of
programming and ICT terms that can be added to
throughout the course.
Invite students to work in groups to research the
components of an everyday item such as a cell
phone or microwave oven. Ask them to identify
the decisions that are made by the technology
embedded in this device.
Have students develop a flow and fix list to help
their partners in assessing and improving their
program troubleshooting (debugging) skills.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe students as they solve problems related to
programming. Note how they develop solutions
and evaluate their problem-solving and planning
processes.
Question
Ask students to explain how they developed a
solution to a given problem. Can students identify
specific features of a problem and come up with
possible solutions?
Collect
Assess students programs for:
- programmer header information
- variable, type, procedure identifiers
- internal formatting and style
- logic errors
- syntax and grammar errors
- accuracy of execution
- user interface
Self-Assessment
Have students use the flow and fix lists they
developed to assess their own program troubleshooting (debugging) skills.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Glencoe Introduction to Computer Science
Using JavaTM
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic, Version 5 and 6
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic.Net
Java: How to Program, Fourth Edition
Programming in C++: Lessons and
Applications
Using Information Technology: A Practical
Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth Edition

Web Sites
ICT Terminology:
http://cnets.iste.org/
(International Society for Technology in Education)
www.ictliteracy.info
(ICT Literacy Forum)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 65

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Programming Methodology
It is expected that students will:
demonstrate proficiency in problem analysis
create step-by-step algorithms and express the
solution in pseudo-code
model appropriate programming structures
during the coding phase
construct basic flow and hierarchy charts
using appropriate symbols
create complete internal and external program
documentation, including programmers
block, comments, structures, assumptions,
user manual, sample runs, and known errors
use the steps of software development,
debugging, and updating when completing
programming projects
use variables and constants, including real,
integer, Boolean characters, and strings
create programs using conditional statements
and looping structures
select variable types and names to represent
the data within it

66 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop proficiency in problem-solving,
planning, and creating programs.
Have students use existing algorithms and
programs to create flow charts that use symbols
for input/output.
Invite small groups of students to develop a
standard template for programming projects,
including:
- problem definition
- algorithm development
- flow charts
- internal documentation
- user documentation
- assumptions
- sample runs
- known errors
Ask students to create programs involving
variables, mathematics, conditional structures, and
looping, such as:
- determining a students age in days, hours, and
minutes
- drawing an image with text characters
- creating tables of squares and cubes
- determining if a number is even or odd
- calculating wage and overtime
- guessing high/low
- calculating letter grade

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe how students problem-solve the steps of
completing a daily task. Note how they:
- interact in a group
- identify the components of the task
- develop the steps to complete the task
Question
Ask students to explain how they develop an
algorithm and how they develop a program from
the algorithm. Can they distinguish between
algorithms, pseudo-code, and actual program
code?

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic.Net
Java: How to Program, Fourth Edition
Programming in C++: Lessons and
Applications
Programming Logic and Design, Second
Edition

Collect
Assess students programs for the extent to which
they meet the requirements of the task.
Peer Assessment
Have students analyse their group work and
identify skills and activities that made their group
effective and those that interfered with their work.
As a class, have students develop a rubric to assess
teamwork skills in future group activities.

Web Sites

Self-Assessment
Have students reflect on their level of
participation in group projects and make plans for
improvement.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 67

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Programming Structures
It is expected that students will:
use programming methodology and apply
advanced flow chart diagrams
perform a program trace to monitor variables
and states
develop programs that apply knowledge of:
- programming structures
- syntax and grammar of a high-level
language
- conditional repeating loops
- simple subroutines that use methods or
procedures
- intermediate variable structures, such as
records and data types
- mathematical functions such as random,
div, and modulus
design parameter and variable passing
subroutines
explain the process of recursion
apply concepts of recursion to programming
applications
develop error-handling techniques to capture
potential crashes

68 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop proficiency in advanced problem
solving and the creation of programs that use
complex procedures.
Provide students with a functional and nonfunctional program with logic errors, such as local
versus global variable references, to trace the run
of the program. Have them conduct a state trace to
locate program problems.
Challenge students to research and report on the
development cycle of an advanced program.
Have students construct a program to evaluate
logical expressions from combinations of input. Be
sure to include AND, OR, NOT, and
combined evaluations. Have students use their
program to complete a table of results and specific
scenarios.
Invite students to revisit a previously created
program to break it apart into sections of code and
convert each section of code into a new
subprogram. Have them modify the main
program to contain calls to subprograms, and
include communicating variable information
between subprograms by value, name, and
reference.
Have students develop a programming solution
for a recursion problemthe Towers of Hanoi.
Provide students with a handout containing five
different-sized or -coloured circles and three icons
to act as pegs. Have students move the circles one
at a time without placing a larger circle on a
smaller circle, until they have the whole pile in the
original order on a different peg. Help students
draw conclusions about how recursion can solve
problems for an infinite number of pegs and
circles versus a limited non-recursion version.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe how students troubleshoot programs to
find and correct errors. In particular, note how
they ask for help from each other and how they
interact as they help each other.
Question
Ask students to explain how they identify and
correct errors in programs. Do they use
programming terminology accurately in their
explanations?
Collect
Assess programs created by students to
address specific problems and exhibit certain
characteristics identified by the teacher, such as
generating a random number within a userspecified range.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Glencoe Introduction to Computer Science
Using JavaTM
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic.Net
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic, Version 5 and 6
Java: How to Program, Fourth Edition
Programming in C++: Lessons and
Applications
Programming Logic and Design, Second
Edition

Self-Assessment
Have students reflect on the problem-solving
strategies and communication skills they used
when attempting to solve the Towers of Hanoi
problem. Ask them the following questions:
- Which strategies were most effective?
- How can understanding about your own
thinking aid in problem-solving?

Web Sites

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 69

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Graphics and User Interfaces


It is expected that students will:
define the unified (universal) modelling
language (UML) as it applies to program
development
apply unified modelling language constructs to
software and interface development
document the development process using
artifacts from the UML, including:
- requirements table
- use case diagram
- conceptual model
- class diagram
- collaboration diagram
- implementation diagrams
create user-friendly interfaces that use
appropriate visual cues, including:
- background and text colour
- representative graphics and icons
- spatial organization
- hierarchical menu structures
create graphical objects with colour and
movement
design interactive graphical user interfaces

70 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop proficiency in incorporating
graphics into computer programs.
Have students explore software applications to
assess user interfaces. Have them consider events,
menus, and visual aesthetics and input structures
(text, checkbox, or radio) that they might want to
use in the future.
Invite students to work in pairs to develop a plan
for a user interface for a particular piece of
software.
Have students work in small groups to explore the
use of various graphic object tools to create lines
and objects, fill the objects, and move the objects.
Have students then create short line-art
animations.
Challenge students to plan and implement a user
interface to access a collection of programs they
have created or to create a simplified calculator
with a GUI.
Work with students to develop the tools to create a
doodle program. Have them then design and
implement a doodle program that allows users to
start and stop drawing and erase.
Have students research an aspect or feature of
programming user interaction. Then ask them to
pair up to teach each other the aspect they
researched. Collect the tutorials to create a
reference collection for the class.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe how students solve problems and interact
with others. Are they courteous and respectful in
their interactions?
Question
Ask students to explain how they worked with
other members of the class to improve their
programs. Did they willingly accept constructive
criticism?

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic.Net
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic, Version 5 and 6
Java: How to Program, Fourth Edition
Programming Logic and Design,
Second Edition

Collect
Check students research projects for references to
ergonomics, aesthetics, acknowledgement of
future developments, and types of input.
Peer Assessment
Develop criteria for each program to evaluate
programming style, utility, and aesthetics. Have
students use the criteria to give feedback to others
on how to improve their assignments before
submitting them to the teacher.
Web Sites
UML:
http://www.omg.org/
(Object Management Group)
http://www.uml-forum.com/
(Online Forum)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 71

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Arrays, Files, and Searching


It is expected that students will:
implement sequential and binary searching
techniques
select a conventional variable or array based
on the type and use of data to be stored
create programs that apply the use of file
techniques
use one-dimensional and parallel array
indexing, naming, and sizing techniques
create programs that use and manipulate
array structures to solve problems
apply structured programming techniques to
solve complex problems

72 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop proficiency in programming to
solve complex problems.
Brainstorm with students the types of data storage
that require arrays. Have groups of students
develop array structures that could be used to
store specific data types.
Ask students to generate sample data for a data
structure and enter it into a text file. Then ask
them to use the programming language to open
the file and read the values into the data structure.
Have small groups of students modify data fields
and add new data to an existing program.
Have students complete a project using arrays to
store data. Ask them to:
- reverse data in an array
- do palindrome testing
- parse text data for correct spelling and spacing
Invite students to work in teams to solve a
problem that involves the use of arrays. Give them
10 or 15 minutes to work independently on a
solution. Then ask each student to move to the
workstation of another student in their team and
continue programming the solution. Repeat this
process until every team member has worked at
each of the team workstations.
Have students maintain a procedure or program
fragment library with code that they can reuse on
future assignments. This library should be
updated throughout the course.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe students as they create programs to solve
problems. Do they clarify the problems and
generate possible solutions before acting?
Question
Have students describe what they have added to
their portfolios and explain why they included
these items.
Collect
Assess students algorithms for completeness and
structure.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Glencoe Introduction to Computer Science
Using JavaTM
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic.Net
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic, Version 5 and 6
Java: How to Program, Fourth Edition
Programming in C++: Lessons and
Applications
Programming Logic and Design,
Second Edition

Peer Assessment
Provide students with two examples of search
strategies, and have them defend the advantages
of one strategy over the other. Have them critique
one anothers positions.
Have students critique one anothers programs.
Encourage students to comment on the following
points:
- appropriate variable definitions
- size, naming, and indexing of arrays
- appropriate program structure

Web Sites

Self-Assessment
Have students use the programming criteria to do
a self-evaluation of the programs they have
created.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 73

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Arrays and Sorting
It is expected that students will:
classify variables requiring an array structure
determine needs for 2D and 3D arrays
use defined variable structures within
programs, including 2D and 3D arrays
select appropriate sorting techniques,
including bubble, quick, and merge
extract subsets of data from within a variable
or array
apply advanced array indexing and naming
techniques

74 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop proficiency in integrating complex
techniques into computer programs.
Invite students to explore various ways of sorting
data. For example, have them:
- create an algorithm describing how to sort a list
of 10 names in a particular order
- develop an alternative sort routine, using a
single technique to sort the list
- create a master program that allows a user to
select among the individual techniques
Have students first describe the differences
between 2D and 3D arrays and then identify the
practical applications of each.
Ask students to assess the strengths and
limitations of a sort technique. Have students
assessing the same sort technique meet to compare
their findings.
Have students work in small groups to create a
game that requires them to use advanced
programming techniques. Programs may be
developed using a text or graphic environment.
Games might include tic-tac-toe, checkers, connect
four, word search, and various board games.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Observe
Observe students as they create programs and
solve problems. Do they weigh negative and
positive consequences when planning a course of
action?
Question
Ask students to explain how they established
criteria for arrays of 2 or 3 dimensions. What were
the key decision points?
Collect
Assess students algorithms for completeness and
structure.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Glencoe Introduction to Computer Science
Using JavaTM
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic.Net
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic, Version 5 and 6
Java: How to Program, Fourth Edition
Programming in C++: Lessons and
Applications
Programming Logic and Design,
Second Edition

Peer Assessment
Have students critique one anothers programs for
ease of coding, efficiency, and execution speed.
Self-Assessment
Have students self-evaluate their games on the
following criteria:
- engagement
- ease of play
- user interface
- completeness (all possible solutions considered)

Web Sites

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 75

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Object-Oriented Programming
It is expected that students will:
explain the relationship between binary
numbering and IP addressing
use a variety of methods to break down the
object model
distinguish between variable and static objects
explain inheritance, polymorphism, and
hierarchies
apply advanced troubleshooting techniques
understand the importance of class structures
in a building block of object-oriented
programming
use class structures, including public and
private objects, declarations, modifiers, and
constructors

76 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students develop proficiency in complex
programming functions and troubleshooting
strategies.
Provide students with a drawing class structure.
Have them modify the features of the class and
add their own features to add utility to the
program.
Have students modify an existing program by
switching from a modular/procedural approach
to problem solving to an object-oriented approach.
Have them report on the merit of each approach
and the problem-solving strategies they used in
making the program changes.
Assign groups of students one of the following
topics: variable objects; static objects; public,
private, and member functions; constructors;
inheritance; polymorphism; and hierarchies. Have
groups research their topic to become experts in
specific areas. Ask groups to present their findings
to the class.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Question
Ask students to explain the merits of modular and
procedural approaches when solving problems.
Note the extent to which they are able to explain
the advantages of each approach (e.g., the reduced
development cycle using a modular approach).
Collect
Assess students object-oriented solutions for the
problem-solving section, looking for structure,
efficient use of code, and complete solution to the
problem.

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
Glencoe Introduction to Computer Science
Using JavaTM
An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic.Net
Java: How to Program, Fourth Edition
Programming in C++: Lessons and
Applications
Programming Logic and Design,
Second Edition

Peer Assessment
Have students analyse their work and identify
skills and activities that made their group effective
and those that interfered with their work.
Self-Assessment
Have students assess their programming skills to
identify the concepts and techniques they
understand and areas where they need additional
help or re-teaching.

Web Sites

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 77

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Application Development
It is expected that students will:
analyse a commercial software program for
structures, documentation , productivity, and
utility
create unified (universal) modelling language
(UML) diagrams, including requirements
table, use case, class, sequence, and state
diagrams, to document the program
development required
create programs that demonstrate appropriate
user interfaces
interact as a productive member of an
application development team
evaluate the design and structure of a project
plan, including development, maintenance
costs, human resources, teamwork, and
environment
design and develop a programming project,
including needs analysis, user requirements,
elements of a solution, and timelines

78 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12

SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES


Students produce complex programs that incorporate
advanced functions, and diagnose and correct nonfunctioning programs.
Assign students a role to play as an owner of a
small to medium-sized business. In role, have
students assess several software applications on
their ability to meet company needs. Work with
students to identify possible criteria for
assessment (e.g., structure, documentation,
productivity, utility, user learning curve, and social
implications). Have each business present and
defend its findings.
Have students perform a gap analysis to
determine the need for a new type of software.
Have them develop and outline a software
development project plan that includes scope of
definition, development, and testing.
Invite students to work in project teams to
program a major project such as a data
management solution for a student information
system or an airline, including employees,
administration, clients, and planes.
Have students identify the environment they
would be most comfortable assessing (school or
business). Ask them to role-play CIOs making
decisions for a technology company with 50 or
more employees. In role, have students analyse
the needs of their company and use UML
diagrams to document those needs.
Challenge students to research and identify job
skills associated with the publishing process of
newspapers, magazines, or books. Where possible,
have them include career information and postsecondary training requirements.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES


Question
Ask students to explain why they chose the
environment they did (business/school) for the
role-playing exercise.
Collect

LEARNING RESOURCES
Recommended Resources
TM

Java : How to Program, Fourth Edition


Programming Logic and Design,
Second Edition

Have students hand in the UML diagrams they


created for documenting the needs of the company
or school. Do the diagrams follow the definitions
of UML? Did students perform an appropriate and
complete breakdown?
Peer Assessment
Have students develop project assessment tools
to evaluate how well individual assignments met
the project plan. Encourage emphasis on the
programming and development requirements of
the project.
Self-Assessment
Have students design and find market pricing for
their own computer system. Encourage them to
reflect on need to have and nice to have
components.

Web Sites
UML:
http://www.omg.org/
(Object Management Group)
http://www.uml-forum.com/
(Online Forum)

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 79

APPENDIX A
Prescribed Learning Outcomes

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

THE NATURE
ICT

OF

The prescribed
learning outcomes
for The Nature of ICT
address the attitudes,
skills, and knowledge
that support students
understanding of the
nature of ICT and its
impact on self, work,
and society. These
learning outcomes
are common to all
four pathways of ICT
11 and 12 and should
be integrated with the
four modules that
comprise an ICT 11
or ICT 12 course.

It is expected that students will:


demonstrate a moral, ethical, legal, and courteous approach to the
use of technology
demonstrate self-reliance in the use of electronic research
techniques to construct personal knowledge and meaning
access, use, and communicate information from a variety of
technologies
assess various health and safety issues specific to the technology
being used, including personal use of the Internet
become discerning users of mass media and electronic information
use technology to support collaboration and interaction with others
employ principles of project management when conducting their
work (e.g., value accuracy, precision, correctness; teamwork; selfevaluation for purposes of improvement)
employ a variety of strategies to identify, investigate, and solve
problems, including troubleshooting strategies
assess the impact of technology on their personal privacy
assess career opportunities in information and communications
technology industries, as well as the required technological and
employability skills (e.g., communication, interpersonal skills,
and problem-solving)
demonstrate skills and attitudes related to successful lifelong
learning

A-3

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11
Learning outcomes for The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be integrated
with the four modules that comprise the ICT course at this level.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

GATHERING AND
PROCESSING 1

Students develop
basic ICT literacy
skills and
demonstrate basic
employability
skills as they work
together to solve
problems and
communicate with
one another.

REFINING AND
ORGANIZING 1
Students develop
ICT skills and
literacy to create
different types of
documents that
demonstrate
understanding
and appropriate
use of software
features.

It is expected that students will:


use touch keyboarding techniques for personal use
use electronic tools such as the spell checker, dictionary, and
thesaurus to correct common language and style errors and
enhance the quality of their work
construct personal and business documents that use:
- headers and footers
- page numbering
- graphics
create spreadsheet documents containing various cell layouts,
formats, alignment, and formulas with relative and absolute cell
references
assess sources for reliability, bias, and context (e.g., differences
between print and electronic sources)
identify search strategies, including unique keywords and
phrases, to locate information using Internet search tools
cite sources from the Internet and other resources
show respect for the opinions, contributions, and roles of team
members

It is expected that students will:


create and manage different types of files
use a variety of file transfer procedures
design and produce electronic and print publications for specific
purposes and audiences
use software features such as shortcuts, macros, function keys,
menus, and buttons
provide clarity to information within spreadsheet documents
using:
- headers and footers
- fills and borders
- charts and graphs
- title rows and columns with cell and document protection
use database software to create a flat file database

A-4

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

PRESENTING AND
COMMUNICATING 1

Students expand
their employability
and ICT skills by
creating and using
multimedia files for
distribution and
presentation.

NEW
TECHNOLOGIES 1
Students develop
advanced ICT
skills and knowledge
and evaluate
software, procedures,
and technology.

It is expected that students will:


design and create a multimedia solution to an identified problem
prepare and deliver a presentation using presentation graphics
software that incorporates:
- slide formatting
- graphics
- sound
create and manage a personal web site
use collaborative problem-solving and decision-making skills to
complete business and school tasks
act as a leader and follower in group projects and team activities
use the tools associated with distributed learning

It is expected that students will:


explain school policies associated with appropriate use of the
Internet
select appropriate application software for a given task
merge data between software applications
evaluate and use record management procedures for maintaining
shared documents and templates
explain the implications to personal and business environments of
computer viruses and the use of virus protection and firewall
software
explain how Internet technologies such as cookies allow servers to
track personal use of the Internet
identify the threats to global communication networks, including
computer viruses and denial-of-service attacks
explore various products created to protect personal information
on computers, including anti-virus software and firewalls

A-5

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12
Learning outcomes for The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be integrated
with the four modules that comprise the ICT course at this level.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

GATHERING AND
PROCESSING 2

Students develop
skills related to
advanced features
of selected software,
use ethical
standards regarding
information, and
apply
employability
skills.

REFINING AND
ORGANIZING 2
Students use
advanced
document
development,
integration, and
management skills
to create
professionallooking products.

It is expected that students will:


use touch keyboarding techniques for personal and business use
identify the limitations of electronic tools such as spelling and
grammar checkers
construct and modify personal and business documents that use:
- bulleted lists
- tables
- columns
- page, section, and column breaks
- graphics
- hyperlinks
use advanced software features such as shortcuts, function keys,
menus, buttons, macros, linked text boxes, and templates to more
efficiently compose and edit documents
apply ethical standards with respect to privacy, confidentiality,
piracy, plagiarism, and personal behaviour while using electronic
tools to gather information
demonstrate strategies that protect personal privacy while using
the Internet
show respect for the opinions and contributions of others while
participating in or leading teams
explain how common browsers and search engines operate

It is expected that students will:


create a complex set of linked spreadsheet documents for personal
or business use
use formulas, data planning, key fields, report functions, and
relationships effectively within a database
prepare and use software macros in word-processing, spreadsheet,
and database software
organize information from a variety of sources, using computer
software, for various audiences and purposes
choose the most appropriate type of software for an assigned task,
giving consideration to price, quality, creation, open standards,
and open source
create and incorporate graphics and sound files into electronic
documents and presentations
use effective methods of backup document storage
evaluate file compression methods to compress and decompress
data
use appropriate transportation or storage media for a given type of
data

A-6

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 12

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

PRESENTING AND
COMMUNICATING 2

Students use
advanced ICT skills
to create high-quality
electronic documents
and presentations
that encourage the
development of highlevel communications
skills.

NEW
TECHNOLOGIES 2
Students have
opportunities to
explore ICT issues
and new technology
in order to identify
the potential impact
technology will have
on their future lives.

It is expected that students will:


prepare and deliver presentations using presentation graphics
software, incorporating:
- image manipulation
- timing
- linking
- slide transition features
- interactivity
apply various skills, methods, strategies, and technical tools to
communicate with a variety of audiences
use collaborative problem-solving and decision-making skills to
complete business, school, and personal tasks
describe effective project management and teamwork strategies
use available Internet communication tools for personal or business
purposes
apply the principles of distributed learning in a web-based learning
environment

It is expected that students will:


describe and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of a
variety of electronic communications environments and Internet
service providers
evaluate risks and consider ways to mitigate threats of computer
viruses through the use of virus protection and firewall software
evaluate online learning tools
describe the use of online learning tools for self-directed and selfpaced learning
evaluate different types of personal computing/digital devices that
could be used for educational purposes
explain the impact of recent developments in biotechnology and
other emerging technologies on our society
explain relationships between concerns about privacy and new
technologies, including spyware and content filtering
identify ethical, social, and legal issues relevant to biotechnology
and artificial intelligence

A-7

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11
Learning outcomes for The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be integrated
with the four modules that comprise the ICT course at this level.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

DESKTOP DIGITAL
VIDEO 1

Students develop a
basic understanding
of the processes and
tools involved in
digital video
production.

2D GRAPHIC
DESIGN AND
PUBLISHING 1
Students develop
basic knowledge
related to the
processes and tools
used in the
production of 2D
documents.

It is expected that students will:


define the stages of digital video production (e.g., pre-production,
production, and post-production)
describe a variety of digital tools and formats used by
professionals in the industry
design a storyboard for a digital video production
use appropriate layering, transitions, and filters in the desktop
production of digital video
use a variety of existing media elements to create desktop digital
video productions with defined structures
analyse the effectiveness of a desktop video production for a
specified audience
demonstrate an understanding of the intrinsic storage, security,
and codec issues involved with desktop video
assess the legal and ethical issues of using source material from
movies or television

It is expected that students will:


describe a variety of digital-imaging tools and formats used by
industry professionals
use the tools available to set basic colour and graphic design
characteristics of a file or document to aid viewing and clarify
meaning
select graphic file formats appropriate for use in print, video, or
web
construct a complex document using a variety of page layout and
graphic design concepts and tools
select and use appropriate textures, templates, and filters in 2D
media
compose 2D images using processes and tools such as layering,
wire frame models, textures, lighting, and perspective
consider ethical issues relevant to misrepresenting the work of
others by digital manipulation
use peripheral devices to capture source material for 2D media
documents

A-8

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

3D DESIGN AND
ANIMATION 1

Students develop
basic knowledge of
the development
processes and
software tools used
in the production of
digital animation
files.

WEB PUBLISHING 1
Students develop
basic knowledge of
the development
processes and
software tools used
in the production of
web page files and
personal web sites.

It is expected that students will:


explain the impact of digital animation on society
define terms associated with digital animation such as layering,
channels, paths, and transitions
identify and use a variety of tools and resources for creating digital
animation content
use digital animation terminology
plan digital content before producing it
design and create original animation content using a variety of
animation tools and media elements
explain the advantages and disadvantages of specific output
formats for delivering digital content
acknowledge ideas and material taken from other sources

It is expected that students will:


create a plan for the development of web documents and web sites
describe and use a variety of tools to edit Hypertext Markup
Language (HTML)
describe the limitations of HTML
understand and apply World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
standards
design interactive web media that balance the use of large graphic
files with the need to provide efficient downloads
design interactive web media using a variety of digital tools and
web editors
use conventions for naming files and folder hierarchy
use FTP protocol to update a web site
insert hyperlinks in original content
acknowledge ideas and material taken from other sources
use web site program validators

A-9

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12
Learning outcomes for The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be integrated
with the four modules that comprise the ICT course at this level.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

DESKTOP DIGITAL
VIDEO 2

Students use
advanced software
features to create
desktop video
productions and
store files in various
formats.

2D GRAPHIC
DESIGN AND
PUBLISHING 2
Students use
advanced software
features to create
graphic and
desktop-published
documents that
demonstrate the use
of graphic and
layout tools.

It is expected that students will:


incorporate advanced keying, layering, and nesting techniques
into their desktop video productions
describe available output formats, including DVD, digital tape,
and Video Compact Disk (VCD)
compare and contrast the uses, advantages, and disadvantages of
various output formats
apply appropriate output formats specific to intended delivery
systems
create advanced projects using video, sound, and animation in
desktop video productions
select rendering techniques for desktop video production
identify skills needed to work in video, film, and television
production
document the stages in the creation of a video production (e.g.,
pre-production, production, and post-production)

It is expected that students will:


compose documents using advanced layering, masking, channels,
and paths
create documents that demonstrate use of a variety of methods of
photo retouching and manipulation
use various software tools to optimize digital content for display
size, file size, quality, and ease of distribution
describe publishing and production techniques necessary to
ensure a quality product (e.g., page layout, colour separation, and
spot colour)
create 2D media using advanced keying techniques, special effects,
and software tools
identify the steps (workflow) in 2D publishing and the associated
skills needed at each step

A-10

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 12

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

3D DESIGN AND
ANIMATION 2

Students use
advanced software
features to create
graphics that
demonstrate the use
of motion, layering,
and sound tools.

WEB PUBLISHING 2
Students use
advanced software
features to create
graphic and desktoppublished documents
that demonstrate
awareness and use of
web solution tools.

It is expected that students will:


apply advanced layering concepts to integrate animation with
sound and graphics
produce animated products that incorporate the reproduction of
natural motions using a variety of media elements
develop a detailed plan that specifies the intended outcomes of a
digital project
use effective lighting, manipulation of perspectives, and biometrics
in animation projects
identify milestones in the development of virtual reality technology
identify factors that affect the time required for rendering digital
animations
monitor the success of a project and identify ways to improve it
identify skills needed to work in industries using manual animation
as opposed to those using computer-assisted animation

It is expected that students will:


describe the importance of design elements in the creation and
development of web page templates
assess various methods of delivering content on the Web, using
both client-side and server-side technology
collaborate with others to create unique web solutions
investigate advanced web solutions to collect and sort data on a
web server
assess issues of personal security and privacy in a digital society
describe and use a variety of tools available to create advanced
web content, including layering, masking, and animation
identify technical and non-technical skills of developers in the
web-publishing industry
define relative and absolute addressing
design web sites that incorporate correct path structures

A-11

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11
Learning outcomes for The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be integrated
with the four modules that comprise the ICT course at this level.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

WORKSTATIONS AND
COMMUNICATIONS 1

Students are
introduced to the
history and
fundamentals of the
computer
workstation and
terminology
associated with the
computer.

SYSTEMS AND
MANAGEMENT 1
Students gain an
understanding of
operating systems
and how they allow
workstations to
function and
software to be used.

It is expected that students will:


describe the history and evolution of computers
identify and describe the components of a computer system,
explaining the type and function of each component
define computer workstation and network terminology and
indicate the purpose of items, including:
- motherboard components (e.g., BIOS, CMOS, and PRAM)
- parallel and serial devices and buses
- ports and their associated communication
identify and use the steps in the troubleshooting process
describe the attributes of various visual display technologies and
adapter types
identify a variety of peripheral devices and explain the connection
and operation of each
describe the function, operation, and use of management tools of
various storage technologies
install and connect physical components, internal devices, and
cabling
explain how changing various hardware components and
architectures affects the performance of a computer
demonstrate an understanding of safety issues associated with
working on computer hardware
use troubleshooting methods to solve configuration problems
associated with adding or changing hardware components and
peripherals

It is expected that students will:


describe the history and evolution of operating systems
install and configure an operating system
investigate, install, and use security and backup solutions
investigate and compare proprietary and open-source applications
evaluate and apply upgrading management procedures such as
patches and fixes
install application software
manage a workstation operating system, including:
- installing appropriate drivers
- assigning a destination printer
- adding peripherals
- altering user-level security
- applying rights and permissions to software applications
follow a consistent process to troubleshoot OS problems

A-12

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

NETWORK
TECHNOLOGIES 1
Students examine
the development,
terminology, and
basic operation of
networks to predict
future developments
based on emerging
technology.

It is expected that students will:


identify and describe terminology used for the units, rates, and
encoding of data communication
differentiate between binary, decimal, and hexadecimal number
systems
define network terminology, including encapsulation, collisions,
and collision domains
explain the history of computer networks and critique network
systems
identify and explain different types of software used to set up a
network
plan, create, and configure a peer-to-peer network
plan, install, and configure a network operating system
apply and document naming standards for resources and devices
on a network
manage a network operating system effectively, including:
- disabling or enabling network protocols
- installing appropriate network drivers
- establishing server-client connections
- assigning a destination printer
- adding additional peripherals
- altering security-level user access
- applying network rights and permissions to software
applications
troubleshoot network problems, addressing documentation,
standards, and accepted performance standards

A-13

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

INTERNETWORKING
CONCEPTS 1
Students examine
the history and
development of the
Internet and the
standards and
services that permit
the Internet to
function.

It is expected that students will:


describe the importance of the International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) in the creation of open standards for
networking
identify and describe the seven layers of the OSI (Open System
Interconnection) reference model
describe how interoperability makes the Internet possible
outline the history and development of Internet technologies (e.g.,
RFCs)
identify and describe the four layers of the Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) model
demonstrate an understanding of wide area networks (WANs) and
local area networks (LANs)
identify and explain logical and physical network topologies and
the segmentation of networks
define the purpose and function of LAN/WAN devices, including
modems, switches, routers, hubs, bridges, and repeaters
demonstrate an understanding of hardware and logical addressing
schemes
identify common network protocols
explain how protocols are used to move data along the network

A-14

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12
Learning outcomes for The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be integrated
with the four modules that comprise the ICT course at this level.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

WORKSTATIONS AND
COMMUNICATIONS 2
Students develop an
understanding of the
electronics, wiring,
and hardware of
computers and
computer networks.

It is expected that students will:


describe the Electrical Industries Association (EIA) and
Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) standards
identify the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
standards that relate to LANs
define and use terminology of the Ethernet standard for LAN
communications
describe the electrical and mechanical issues associated with
deploying computer hardware in a workplace
identify advantages and disadvantages of various cable and
connector types
demonstrate knowledge of electronics and signalling terminology
define the purpose of patch panels and backbone cabling
develop a network design and identify physical environment
needs for network devices and cabling
differentiate between network analysers, time domains and
reflectometers, breakout boxes, power meters, and oscilloscopes
use a variety of test equipment to verify network performance and
its adherence to standards, and locate faults

A-15

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

SYSTEMS AND
MANAGEMENT 2
Students apply
what they learned
in previous
modules to network
planning and
administration.

It is expected that students will:


prepare network audits, including inventory, facilities, security, and
operational aspects
generate network documentation, including:
- a network map or blueprint
- name, IP, and MAC address for each device
- hardware inventory
identify the difference between updates and software patches with
respect to function, installation, and configuration
assess strategies for network management plans
develop a network management plan that includes:
- licensing and rights management
- user and group permissions
- user profiles
- administrative control and user management
develop and maintain a network operation and maintenance
manual
compare deployment strategies for workstations, applications,
upgrades, and remote system management
evaluate testing protocols and procedures to determine the
effectiveness of a network design
develop criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of a network
develop a continued plan for network operation and maintenance,
including criteria for:
- upgrading a network (e.g., user stations and network hardware
and software)
- protecting data and programs
- purchasing, acquiring, licensing, and distributing hardware and
software
- providing user support (e.g., help desk, technician, LAN tech,
online)

A-16

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

NETWORK
TECHNOLOGIES 2

Students consider
the basic intricacies
of a network and
some of the
problems related to
maintaining a
functional and safe
network.

INTERNETWORKING
CONCEPTS 2
Students consider the
complexities of a
network and some of
the problems related
to connecting
different parts of a
network and
different types of
networks together.

It is expected that students will:


access sources for network security information
assess the security of a network structure
install and use network management tools, including security,
imaging, backup, and remote controls
calculate network capacity limitations and plan for network
upgrades
configure and manage servers for user authentication, file, and
print services
deploy and use applications on a network
use network operating systems utilities to monitor, manage, and
troubleshoot data transfers

It is expected that students will:


explain the relationship between binary numbering and IP
addressing
explain the relationship between hexadecimal and MAC
addressing
demonstrate an understanding of the functional and operational
differences between hardware servers for:
- web application
- file servers
- proxy servers
- mail servers
- dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP)
- domain name servers (DNS)
define and explain the importance of standards for Internet
services, including:
- markup languages (HTML, XML)
- scripting languages for web sites (CGI, PHP, JavaScript)
- mail protocols (SMTP, POP, IMAP)
- file transfer protocols (FTP, WebDAV)
- chat protocols (IRC, AIM)
demonstrate an understanding of virtual terminal applications
use command line tools to perform network testing, including
name lookup, route tracing, and verification of local IP
configuration
explain how network devices on local area networks use Address
Resolution Protocol (ARP) before forwarding data to a destination

A-17

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11
Learning outcomes for The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be integrated
with the four modules that comprise the ICT course at this level.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

INTRODUCTION TO
PROGRAMMING

Students develop an
understanding of
programming
language and gain
proficiency in the
use of high-level
programming
language.

PROGRAMMING
METHODOLOGY
Students develop
proficiency in
problem-solving,
planning, and
creating programs.

It is expected that students will:


explain the history of the development of programming languages,
including digital and analog programming techniques
explain the influences of technological advancements related to
programming
classify programming languages as legacy (e.g., Fortran, Cobol),
teaching (e.g., Pascal, Modula), object-oriented (e.g., C++, JAVA),
scripting (e.g., PERL, CGI), and meta-language (e.g., HTML,
JavaScript)
demonstrate basic command line events as they relate to software
instructions
explain how programming makes technology possible
apply correct programming and ICT terminology
use assigned steps to develop software
construct and edit programs containing input/output, read/write,
and simple variables

It is expected that students will:


demonstrate proficiency in problem analysis
create step-by-step algorithms and express the solution in pseudocode
model appropriate programming structures during the coding
phase
construct basic flow and hierarchy charts using appropriate
symbols
create complete internal and external program documentation,
including programmers block, comments, structures,
assumptions, user manual, sample runs, and known errors
use the steps of software development, debugging, and updating
when completing programming projects
use variables and constants, including real, integer, Boolean
characters, and strings
create programs using conditional statements and looping
structures
select variable types and names to represent the data within it

A-18

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

PROGRAMMING
STRUCTURES

Students develop
proficiency in
advanced problem
solving and the
creation of programs
that use complex
procedures.

GRAPHICS AND
USER INTERFACES
Students develop
proficiency in
incorporating
graphics into
computer programs.

It is expected that students will:


use programming methodology and apply advanced flow chart
diagrams
perform a program trace to monitor variables and states
develop programs that apply knowledge of:
- programming structures
- syntax and grammar of a high-level language
- conditional repeating loops
- simple subroutines that use methods or procedures
- intermediate variable structures, such as records and data types
- mathematical functions such as random, div, and modulus
design parameter and variable passing subroutines
explain the process of recursion
apply concepts of recursion to programming applications
develop error-handling techniques to capture potential crashes
It is expected that students will:
define the unified (universal) modelling language (UML) as it
applies to program development
apply unified modelling language constructs to software and
interface development
document the development process using artifacts from the UML,
including:
- requirements table
- use case diagram
- conceptual model
- class diagram
- collaboration diagram
- implementation diagrams
create user-friendly interfaces that use appropriate visual cues,
including:
- background and text colour
- representative graphics and icons
- spatial organization
- hierarchical menu structures
create graphical objects with colour and movement
design interactive graphical user interfaces

A-19

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12
Learning outcomes for The Nature of ICT are common to all pathways and should be integrated
with the four modules that comprise the ICT course at this level.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

ARRAYS, FILES,
AND SEARCHING

Students develop
proficiency in
programming to
solve complex
problems.

ARRAYS AND
SORTING

Students develop
proficiency in
integrating
complex techniques
into computer
programs.

OBJECT-ORIENTED
PROGRAMMING
Students develop
proficiency in
complex
programming
functions and
troubleshooting
strategies.

It is expected that students will:


implement sequential and binary searching techniques
select a conventional variable or array based on the type and use
of data to be stored
create programs that apply the use of file techniques
use one-dimensional and parallel array indexing, naming, and
sizing techniques
create programs that use and manipulate array structures to solve
problems
apply structured programming techniques to solve complex
problems

It is expected that students will:


classify variables requiring an array structure
determine needs for 2D and 3D arrays
use defined variable structures within programs, including 2D
and 3D arrays
select appropriate sorting techniques, including bubble, quick,
and merge
extract subsets of data from within a variable or array
apply advanced array indexing and naming techniques

It is expected that students will:


develop programs that demonstrate the management of
complexity in object-oriented programming
use a variety of methods to break down the object model
distinguish between variable and static objects
explain inheritance, polymorphism, and hierarchies
apply advanced troubleshooting techniques
understand the importance of class structures in a building block
of object-oriented programming
use class structures, including public and private objects,
declarations, modifiers, and constructors

A-20

APPENDIX A: PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12


COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12

Prescribed Learning Outcomes

APPLICATION
DEVELOPMENT
Students produce
complex programs
that incorporate
advanced functions,
and diagnose and
correct nonfunctioning
programs.

It is expected that students will:


analyse a commercial software program for structures,
documentation, productivity, and utility
create unified universal modelling language (UML)
diagrams, including requirements table, use case, class,
sequence, and state diagrams, to document the program
development required
create programs that demonstrate appropriate user interfaces
interact as a productive member of an application
development team
evaluate the design and structure of a project plan, including
development, maintenance costs, human resources,
teamwork, and environment
design and develop a programming project, including needs
analysis, user requirements, elements of a solution, and
timelines

A-21

APPENDIX B
Learning Resources:
General Information

APPENDIX B: LEARNING RESOURCES General Information

his section contains general


information on recommended
learning resources, and provides the
titles, descriptions, and ordering information
for the recommended learning resources in
these initial Information and Communications
Technology 11 and 12 Grade Collections.

number of the learning outcomes. Additional


resources are more topic-specific and
support individual curriculum organizers or
clusters of outcomes.
The ministry updates the Grade
Collections on a regular basis on the
ministry web site
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/
irp_resources/lr/resource/gradcoll.htm
Please check this site for the most current
list of recommended learning resources
in the Grade Collection for each IRP.

WHAT ARE RECOMMENDED LEARNING


RESOURCES?
Recommended learning resources are
resources that have undergone a provincial
evaluation process using teacher evaluators
and have Ministers Order granting them
provincial recommended status. These
resources may include print, video, software
and CD-ROMs, games and manipulatives,
and other multimedia formats. They are
generally materials suitable for student use,
but may also include information aimed
primarily at teachers.

HOW CAN TEACHERS CHOOSE LEARNING


RESOURCES TO MEET THEIR CLASSROOM
NEEDS?
Teachers must use either:
provincially recommended resources
OR
resources that have been evaluated
through a local, board-approved process.

Information about the recommended


resources is organized in the format of a
Grade Collection. A Grade Collection can be
regarded as a starter set of basic resources
to deliver the curriculum. In many cases, the
Grade Collection provides a choice of more
than one resource to support curriculum
organizers, enabling teachers to select
resources that best suit different teaching
and learning styles. Teachers may also wish
to supplement Grade Collection resources
with locally approved materials.

Prior to selecting and purchasing new


learning resources, an inventory of those
resources that are already available should
be established through consultation with the
school and district resource centres.
Information about ministry initiatives to
support resource acquisition can be
found at:
http://www.bced.gov.bc.cairp_resources/
lr/resource/res_main.htm

WHAT KINDS OF RESOURCES ARE FOUND IN


GRADE COLLECTION?

WHAT ARE THE CRITERIA USED TO EVALUATE


LEARNING RESOURCES?

Learning resources in a Grade Collection are


categorized as either comprehensive or
additional. Comprehensive resources
provide a broad coverage of a significant

The Ministry of Education evaluates learning


resources that support BC curriculum, and
that will be used by teachers and/or

B-3

APPENDIX B: LEARNING RESOURCES General Information

students for instructional and assessment


purposes. Evaluation criteria focus on
content, instructional design, technical
design, and social considerations.
Additional information concerning the
review and selection of learning
resources is available from the ministry
publication, Evaluating, Selecting and
Managing Learning Resources: A Guide
(Revised 2002)
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/resdocs/
esm_guide.pdf

WHAT FUNDING IS AVAILABLE FOR


PURCHASING LEARNING RESOURCES?
As part of the selection process, teachers
should be aware of school and district
funding policies and procedures to
determine how much money is available for
their needs. Funding for various purposes,
including the purchase of learning resources,
is provided to school districts. Learning
resource selection should be viewed as an
ongoing process that requires a
determination of needs, as well as long-term
planning to co-ordinate individual goals and
local priorities.

B-4

APPENDIX B
Grade Collections
B-5

APPENDIX B: INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 Grade Collections

outcomes, rather than the learning of a


particular piece of software, are the basis for
any course regardless of the pathway. Reviews of appropriate software and hardware
are regularly published in a variety of computer and trade magazines as well as on the
Internet. These sources should be consulted
before making any decisions with respect to
use or acquisition of software or hardware.
Selection of a particular tool should consider:

ICT 11 AND 12 GRADE


COLLECTIONS
Although there is no single comprehensive
resource that meets all the learning outcomes
for each pathway, there are a number of
resources that provide support for student
learning in various modules. For the modules not supported by print resources,
software help files and Internet research
activities can be used to provide information
and learning support.

existing hardware and upgrade schedule


platform requirements
instructor expertise and training requirements
time needed to develop student skill versus
learning curricular material
cross-curricular applicability
general flexibility and utility
post-secondary software use and the ease
with which students can make any transition
local business use and the ease with which
students can make any transition
provincially negotiated software agreements

The following Grade Collection charts list


the recommended learning resources for
each pathway, showing the curriculum
connection to individual modules within
each pathway. The charts are followed by an
annotated bibliography. Teachers should
check with suppliers for complete and up-todate ordering information. Most suppliers
maintain web sites that are easy to access.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS


TECHNOLOGY TOOLS

Included at the end of this section is a chart


called Information and Communications Technology Tools. This chart lists a variety of
software that can be used to support the
learning outcomes. Many of these products
include on-line help and support for student
learning. Inclusion on this list does not
constitute recommended status or endorsement of a particular product. Teachers may
identify other equally useful applications.

It is expected that students in any of the


pathways in Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12 will have access
to current computer technology and software
(e.g., programming languages, office applications, digital video software, digital photography software, animation software, and
computer systems software). Depending on
the pathways offered, students may also
need access to hardware such as electronic
testing equipment, wire, cables, routers,
switches and hubs for networking, video and
still photography cameras, scanners, and
colour printers.
Use of industry-standard software is encouraged but should not be the underlying basis
of learning in any pathway. The learning

B-6

APPENDIX B: INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 11 AND 12 Grade Collections

MEDIA ICONS KEY

PROVINCIALLY NEGOTIATED SOFTWARE


AGREEMENTS

The following icons identify the media


formats of the recommended resources in the
annotated bibliographies of the Grade
Collections. Not all media formats are found
in each Grade Collection.

The Ministry of Education works with school


districts to negotiate cost-effective access to
software and licensable web-based information. In many cases, the negotiated agreements are time limited and may not always
be available. Before making any software
purchase it is advisable to determine if the
desired software can be acquired through
one of these agreements. In addition, some of
the agreements include additional curriculum support materials that support the use
of the software.

Audio Cassette
CD-ROM
Film
Games/Manipulatives

Please refer to the ministry web site for


information about provincial licenses for
software and other related tools.
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp_resources/
lr/resource/res_main.htm

Multimedia
Music CD
Print Materials
Record
Slides
Software
Video
Web Site

B-7

Gathering and
Processing
1

Refining and
Organizing
1

Presenting and
Communicating
1

New
Technologies
1

Gathering
and
Processing
2

Refining and
Organizing
2

Presenting and
Communicating
2

New
Technologies
2

The
Nature of
ICT

Comprehensive Resources
There are no
comprehensive resources
for Applied Digital
Communications 11 and 12
at this time.
Additional Resources - Print
A Guide to Microsoft
Office 2003 for Information
and Communication
Technologies
Using Information
Technology: A Practical
Introduction to Computers
& Communications, Fifth
Edition

For the comprehensive resources, indicates satisfactory to good support for the majority of the learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
For the additional resources, indicates support for one or more learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
Indicates minimal or no support for the prescribed learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
Updated August 2004

B-8

Appendix B: Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12 GRADE COLLECTIONS

Appendix B

Applied Digital Communications 11 and 12 Grade Collection

Desktop
Digital
Video 1

2D Graphic
Design and
Publishing 2

3D Design
and
Animation 1

Web
Publishing
1

Desktop
Digital
Video 2

2D Graphic
Design and
Publishing 2

3D Design
and
Animation 2

Web
Publishing
2

The
Nature of
ICT

Comprehensive Resources
There are no
comprehensive resources
for Digital Media
Development 11 and 12 at
this time.
Additional Resources - Print
After Effects &
Photoshop: Animation and
Production Effects for DV
and Film
Final Cut Pro 4 and the Art
of Filmmaking
Flash MX 2004
Accelerated: A Full-Color
Guide
A Guide to Web
Development Using
Macromedia
Dreamweaver MX with
Fireworks MX and Flash
MX
Photoshop for RightBrainers: The Art of Photo
Manipulation
Using Information
Technology: A Practical
Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth
Edition
For the comprehensive resources, indicates satisfactory to good support for the majority of the learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
For the additional resources, indicates support for one or more learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
Indicates minimal or no support for the prescribed learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
Updated August 2004

B-9

Appendix B: Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12 GRADE COLLECTIONS

Appendix B

Digital Media Development 11 and 12 Grade Collection

Workstations and
Communications
1

Systems and
Management
1

Network
Technologies
1

Internetworking
Concepts
1

Workstations and
Communications
2

Systems and
Management
2

Network
Technologies
2

Internetworking
Concepts
2

The
Nature of
ICT

Comprehensive Resources
There are no
comprehensive
resources for
Computer
Information Systems
11 and 12 at this
time.
Additional Resources - Print
Guide to Networking
Essentials, Third
Edition
Networking Basics,
Second Edition
Peter Norton's
Introduction to
Computers, Fifth
Edition
Using Information
Technology: A
Practical
Introduction to
Computers &
Communications,
Fifth Edition

For the comprehensive resources, indicates satisfactory to good support for the majority of the learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
For the additional resources, indicates support for one or more learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
Indicates minimal or no support for the prescribed learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
Updated August 2004

B-10

Appendix B: Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12 GRADE COLLECTIONS

Appendix B

Computer Information Systems 11 and 12 Grade Collection

Introduction
To
Programming

Programming
Methodology

Programming
Structures

Graphics
and
User
Interfaces

Arrays, Files,
and
Searching

Arrays
and
Sorting

ObjectOriented
Programming

Application
Development

The
Nature of
ICT

Comprehensive Resources
There are no
comprehensive resources
for Computer Programming
11 and 12 at this time.
Additional Resources - Print
Glencoe Introduction to
Computer Science Using
Java
An Introduction to
Programming Using
Microsoft Visual
Basic.Net
An Introduction to
Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic,
Versions 5 and 6
Java: How to Program,
Fourth Edition
Programming in C++:
Lessons and Applications
Programming Logic and
Design, Second Edition
Using Information
Technology: A Practical
Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth
Edition
For the comprehensive resources, indicates satisfactory to good support for the majority of the learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
For the additional resources, indicates support for one or more learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
Indicates minimal or no support for the prescribed learning outcomes within the curriculum organizer.
Updated August 2004

B-11

Appendix B: Information and Communications Technology 11 and 12 GRADE COLLECTIONS

Appendix B

Computer Programming 11 and 12 Grade Collection

APPENDIX B: APPLIED DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


Grade Level:

A Guide to Microsoft Office 2003 for


Information and Communication
Technologies

10 11

12

Author(s): Brown, B. et al.

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

General Description:
Book, available in soft or hard cover, employs a project-based approach for learning Office
2003, and includes Outlook, Word, Access, and PowerPoint. The publisher's web site,
lvp.com, provides additional chapters in PDF format that cover different operating systems,
personal finance, keyboarding skills, Internet use, email, and an introduction to computers
with discussion on the history of computers and computer networks. The vocabulary
presented in the text is available as an MS Word document. The data files required in the
text are also available for download. Students can download relevant data files from the
publisher's lpdatafiles.com web site. Teacher resource materials are available but have not
been evaluated.
Audience
General

Supplier: Lawrenceville Press


P.O. Box 704
Pennington, NJ 08534
(609) 737-1148

Tel:

Fax: (609) 737-8564

Web Address: www.lvp.com


Hard Cover Text: $39.95 US
Soft Cover Text: $34.50 US

Price:

ISBN/Order No: Hard Cover Text: 1-58003-078-5


Soft Cover Text: 1-58003-077-7
Copyright: 2004

Category: Student, Teacher Resource


Grade Level:

Using Information Technology: A


Practical Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth Edition

10 11

Author(s): Williams, B. et al.

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

General Description:
Resource consists of a text with an accompanying Instructor's Resource Kit (on CD-ROM).
The text covers a variety of fundamental computing concepts such as software, hardware,
data, and procedures. The information is not in-depth, but can be useful for providing an
overview to the introductory level modules in all pathways. Text provides "real-world"
examples for every chapter, as well as a summary, and a variety of assessment questions.
Resource addresses some of the topics not covered by the other resources, such as program
structure, UML, and application development. The Instructor's Resource Kit includes
teaching tips, projects, tutorials, test banks and PowerPoint presentations. This resource
could be useful for teachers new to the course and for teachers with limited computer
background. The CD-ROM also includes Page Out online course creation software with
already prepared content, testing, and gradebook. The text has a Click Along feature where
students can go to a web site for regularly updated information on topics throughout the
book: www.mhhe.com/cit/uit5e/complete/clickalong. This web site also contains chapter
summaries, self marking quizzes (with results emailed to the instructor), crossword
exercises, and challenge extension exercises.
System requirements for Windows: Windows 98, 2000, XP, or ME; 24Mb RAM
(32Mb recommended); Pentium II or faster; CD-ROM drive 4x or faster; SVGA colour
monitor running at least 256 colour and a resolution of 800 x 600; Netscape Navigator
4.7 or Internet Explorer 5.0, 5.5, 6.0; Sound Blaster or compatible sound card; external
speakers or headphones; Macromedia Flash Player 6.
Audience
General
Category: Student, Teacher Resource

B-12

Supplier: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. (Ontario)


300 Water Street
Whitby, ON L1N 9B6
Tel:

(905) 430-5000

Toll Free:

1-800-565-5758 (orders)

Fax: (905) 430-5194

Web Address: www.mcgrawhill.ca


Price:

Text: $79.86
Instructor's Resource Kit: $50.00

ISBN/Order No: Text: 0-07-248555-8


Instructor's Resource Kit: 0-07-252729-3
Copyright: 2003

12

APPENDIX B: DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


After Effects & Photoshop: Animation
and Production Effects for DV and Film

Grade Level:

10 11

12

! !

Author(s): Foster, J.
Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

General Description:

Book provides tutorials using both After Effects and Photoshop to create digital video
Supplier: Firefly Books Ltd.
content. Most of the projects require use of recent, professional versions of these
66 Leek Crescent
applications. The tutorial examples are good but do not provide student examples or ideas
Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1H1
for independent student work. The accompanying DVD-ROM includes After Effects and
(416) 499-8412
Tel:
Fax: (416) 499-1142
Photoshop plug-ins and applications. (Minimum After Effects 6.0 and
Photoshop/Image Ready CS).
1-800-387-6192
Toll Free:
System requirements for Macintosh: Mac OS X 10.2.6 or later; DVD drive
System requirements for Windows: Windows 2000/XP; DVD drive

Web Address: www.fireflybooks.com


Price:

$69.95

ISBN/Order No: 0-7821-4317-2

Audience
General

Copyright: 2004

Category: Student, Teacher Resource


Grade Level:

Final Cut Pro 4 and the Art of


Filmmaking

10 11

12

! !

General Description:
Book provides an easy-to-follow introduction to desktop video editing with Final Cut Pro
4 using step-by-step instructions and numerous illustrations. The introduction offers tips
for video shooting with Final Cut Pro in mind. Other chapters deal with editing, adding
effects, finishing touches, and the final steps of archiving, printing videotape, burning, and
compressing.
The accompanying DVD-ROM provides a tutorial, as well as the finished product of the
tutorials. There is also some demonstration software.

Supplier: Firefly Books Ltd.


66 Leek Crescent
Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1H1

System requirements for Macintosh: Mac OS 10.3; 256 Mb RAM; G4 processor or


higher; DVD-ROM player

Web Address: www.fireflybooks.com

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

Tel:

(416) 499-8412

Toll Free:

1-800-387-6192

Price:
Audience
General

Fax: (416) 499-1142

$83.95

ISBN/Order No: 0-7821-4300-8


Copyright: 2004

Category: Student, Teacher Resource

Grade Level:

Flash MX 2004 Accelerated: A


Full-Color Guide

10 11

12

! !

General Description:
Resource provides an introduction to using Flash. The tutorial examples can be used for
student projects. The book includes a 'bridging' section that allows for users of older
versions of the software to comfortably migrate to the newest version. An accompanying
CD-ROM provides the sample projects and illustrations of the examples used in the book,
but no tutorials.
Audience
General

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004


Supplier: Firefly Books Ltd.
66 Leek Crescent
Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1H1
Tel:

(416) 499-8412

Toll Free:

1-800-387-6192

Fax: (416) 499-1142

Web Address: www.fireflybooks.com

Category: Student, Teacher Resource

Price:

$41.95

ISBN/Order No: 89-314-3506-1


Copyright: 2004

B-13

APPENDIX B: DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


Grade Level:

A Guide to Web Development Using


Macromedia Dreamweaver MX with
Fireworks MX and Flash MX

10 11

12

Author(s): Malfas, E. et al.

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

General Description:
Resource can be used as an introduction for three modules in the first level of this pathway:
2D Graphic Design and Publishing 1; 3D Design and Animation 1; and Web Publishing 1.
It does not cover digital video or provide support for any of the more advanced modules.
Students learn about web development and how to use Dreamweaver to create static and
dynamic web sites. The accompanying teacher resource materials on CD-ROM contain
teaching notes, assignments, and quizzes. The publisher's web site, lvp.com, provides
additional chapters in PDF format that cover different operating systems, personal finances,
keyboarding skills, Internet use, email, and an introduction to computers with discussion on
the history of computers and computer networks. The vocabulary presented in the text is
available as an MS Word document. The data files required in the text are also available
for download. Students can download relevant data files from the publisher's
lpdatafiles.com web site.
Audience
General

Supplier: Lawrenceville Press


P.O. Box 704
Pennington, NJ 08534
(609) 737-1148

Tel:

Fax: (609) 737-8564

Web Address: www.lvp.com


Hard Cover Text: $39.95 US
Soft Cover Text: $34.50 US
Teacher Resource CD-ROM: $59.95 US

Price:

ISBN/Order No: Hard Cover Text: 1-58003-030-0


Soft Cover Text: 1-58003-029-7
Teacher Resource CD-ROM: 1-58003-031-9
Copyright: 2003

Category: Student, Teacher Resource

Photoshop for Right-Brainers: The Art


of Photo Manipulation

Grade Level:

10 11

12

! !

General Description:
Book, in two parts, provides an engaging tutorial-style instruction to using Photoshop.
The first part focuses on techniques and process; the second on examples designed to
demonstrate specific techniques. The tutorials are good but there are no suggestions for
students to undertake individual projects. Some background in Photoshop or similar
applications is assumed. The accompanying CD-ROM consists of the images used on the
book. They are not in the public domain and are only for use with the book.
Audience
General

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004


Supplier: Firefly Books Ltd.
66 Leek Crescent
Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1H1
Tel:

(416) 499-8412

Toll Free:

1-800-387-6192

Fax: (416) 499-1142

Web Address: www.fireflybooks.com

Category: Student, Teacher Resource

Price:

$69.95

ISBN/Order No: 0-7821-4313-X


Copyright: 2004

B-14

APPENDIX B: DIGITAL MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


Grade Level:

Using Information Technology: A


Practical Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth Edition

10 11

Author(s): Williams, B. et al.

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

General Description:
Resource consists of a text with an accompanying Instructor's Resource Kit (on CD-ROM).
The text covers a variety of fundamental computing concepts such as software, hardware,
data, and procedures. The information is not in-depth, but can be useful for providing an
overview to the introductory level modules in all pathways. Text provides "real-world"
examples for every chapter, as well as a summary, and a variety of assessment questions.
Resource addresses some of the topics not covered by the other resources, such as program
structure, UML, and application development. The Instructor's Resource Kit includes
teaching tips, projects, tutorials, test banks and PowerPoint presentations. This resource
could be useful for teachers new to the course and for teachers with limited computer
background. The CD-ROM also includes Page Out online course creation software with
already prepared content, testing, and gradebook. The text has a Click Along feature where
students can go to a web site for regularly updated information on topics throughout the
book: www.mhhe.com/cit/uit5e/complete/clickalong. This web site also contains chapter
summaries, self marking quizzes (with results emailed to the instructor), crossword
exercises, and challenge extension exercises.
System requirements for Windows: Windows 98, 2000, XP, or ME; 24Mb RAM
(32Mb recommended); Pentium II or faster; CD-ROM drive 4x or faster; SVGA colour
monitor running at least 256 colour and a resolution of 800 x 600; Netscape Navigator
4.7 or Internet Explorer 5.0, 5.5, 6.0; Sound Blaster or compatible sound card; external
speakers or headphones; Macromedia Flash Player 6.
Audience
General
Category: Student, Teacher Resource

B-15

Supplier: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. (Ontario)


300 Water Street
Whitby, ON L1N 9B6
Tel:

(905) 430-5000

Toll Free:

1-800-565-5758 (orders)

Fax: (905) 430-5194

Web Address: www.mcgrawhill.ca


Price:

Text: $79.86
Instructor's Resource Kit: $50.00

ISBN/Order No: Text: 0-07-248555-8


Instructor's Resource Kit: 0-07-252729-3
Copyright: 2003

12

APPENDIX B: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


Grade Level:

Guide to Networking Essentials, Third


Edition

10 11

12

! !

Author(s): Tomsho, G. et al.


General Description:

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

Resource, for the study of fundamental networking technologies, deals with beginner and
advanced level networking topics. The text addresses networking concepts, network
administration, network design, physical media, network operations, communications and
protocols, security, network architectures, problem solving for networks, as well as
standards and specifications. Each chapter includes chapter summaries, a glossary of key
terms, review questions, projects, and case studies. There are no accompanying instructor's
materials, or answers for the questions.

Supplier: Nelson Thomson Learning


1120 Birchmount Road
Scarborough, ON M1K 5G4
Tel:

1-800-268-2222

Toll Free:

1-800-268-2222/1-800-668-0671

Fax: 1-800-430-4445

Web Address: www.nelson.com


Audience
General

Price:

Not available

ISBN/Order No: 0-619-13087-3

Category: Student, Teacher Resource

Copyright: 2003
Grade Level:

Networking Basics, Second Edition

10 11

12

! !

Author(s): Ciampa, M.
General Description:
Text provides an introduction to the fundamentals of networking technology for both local
area and wide area networks. Lessons include objectives, vocabulary, exercises, projects,
and simulations. Resource is useful for both the beginner and novice of networking.

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

Audience
General

Tel:

1-800-268-2222

Toll Free:

1-800-268-2222/1-800-668-0671

Category: Student, Teacher Resource

Web Address: www.nelson.com

Supplier: Nelson Thomson Learning


1120 Birchmount Road
Scarborough, ON M1K 5G4
Fax: 1-800-430-4445

Not available

Price:

ISBN/Order No: 0-619-05582-0


Copyright: 2003
Grade Level:

Peter Norton's Introduction to


Computers, Fifth Edition

10 11

Author(s): Norton, P.
General Description:

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

Resource, for Windows only, consists of a soft cover student book, an Instructor's Manual
and Key, and an optional electronic student workbook. Topics covered include output
devices, processing data, storing information, operating systems, networks, the Internet,
application software, graphics, software programming, and living with computers. Text
features include Web-integrated text, Norton Online notes, visual essays, feature articles,
discussion questions, ethical issues, and research activities. The Instructor's Manual and
Key, with CD-ROM, contains classroom presentations, questions, and assessment. The
optional electronic workbook provides reinforcement and review activities. This is clearly
an introduction to computers and is intended for a student audience with little or no
experience with ICT. Additional resources are required to provide depth. A new teacher in
the field would find the resource useful. The following publisher's web site offers teaching
tips, extra projects, a question bank, and classroom presentations:
www.norton.glencoe.com.

Supplier: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. (Ontario)


300 Water Street
Whitby, ON L1N 9B6

System requirements for Windows: Windows 95 or later; Internet Explorer 5.5 or


higher; Pentium II 300 MHz; 32 Mb RAM; CD-ROM drive; graphics card; screen
resolution 600 x 800.

Copyright: 2003

Audience
General
Category: Student, Teacher Resource

B-16

Tel:

(905) 430-5000

Toll Free:

1-800-565-5758 (orders)

Fax: (905) 430-5194

Web Address: www.mcgrawhill.ca


Price:

Student Text: $57.08


Instructor's Manual and Key: $445.95

ISBN/Order No: Student Text: 0-07-826421-9


Instructor's Manual and Key: 0-07-830957-3

12

APPENDIX B: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


Grade Level:

Using Information Technology: A


Practical Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth Edition

10 11

Author(s): Williams, B. et al.

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

General Description:
Resource consists of a text with an accompanying Instructor's Resource Kit (on CD-ROM).
The text covers a variety of fundamental computing concepts such as software, hardware,
data, and procedures. The information is not in-depth, but can be useful for providing an
overview to the introductory level modules in all pathways. Text provides "real-world"
examples for every chapter, as well as a summary, and a variety of assessment questions.
Resource addresses some of the topics not covered by the other resources, such as program
structure, UML, and application development. The Instructor's Resource Kit includes
teaching tips, projects, tutorials, test banks and PowerPoint presentations. This resource
could be useful for teachers new to the course and for teachers with limited computer
background. The CD-ROM also includes Page Out online course creation software with
already prepared content, testing, and gradebook. The text has a Click Along feature where
students can go to a web site for regularly updated information on topics throughout the
book: www.mhhe.com/cit/uit5e/complete/clickalong. This web site also contains chapter
summaries, self marking quizzes (with results emailed to the instructor), crossword
exercises, and challenge extension exercises.
System requirements for Windows: Windows 98, 2000, XP, or ME; 24Mb RAM
(32Mb recommended); Pentium II or faster; CD-ROM drive 4x or faster; SVGA colour
monitor running at least 256 colour and a resolution of 800 x 600; Netscape Navigator
4.7 or Internet Explorer 5.0, 5.5, 6.0; Sound Blaster or compatible sound card; external
speakers or headphones; Macromedia Flash Player 6.
Audience
General
Category: Student, Teacher Resource

B-17

Supplier: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. (Ontario)


300 Water Street
Whitby, ON L1N 9B6
Tel:

(905) 430-5000

Toll Free:

1-800-565-5758 (orders)

Fax: (905) 430-5194

Web Address: www.mcgrawhill.ca


Price:

Text: $79.86
Instructor's Resource Kit: $50.00

ISBN/Order No: Text: 0-07-248555-8


Instructor's Resource Kit: 0-07-252729-3
Copyright: 2003

12

APPENDIX B: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


Grade Level:

Glencoe Introduction to Computer


Science Using Java

10 11

12

! !

Author(s): Liberty, J. et al.


General Description:

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

Student text and accompanying teacher resource manual provide a well-organized


introduction to computer programming using Java. The emphasis is on object-oriented
programming. The resource does not cover programming methodology, graphics and user
interfacing, or application development. The hardcover student text comprises 18 chapters.
Chapter features include overviews, objectives, topic checks, key terms, margin exercises,
sidebars, chapter summaries, and resources. Feature articles focus on careers, ethics,
computer concepts, and computers in the future. The text also includes a Technology
Handbook section that deals with ethical computer use, copyright, safe surfing, etiquette,
research tips, web site evaluation, and word processing tips. The teacher resource manual
provides a course overview and includes lesson plans, answer keys, and blackline masters.
Also included is a CD-ROM that contains a Java 2 software development kit, source
code, PowerPoint presentations, and test generator software. The resource also includes
topics for the Computer Science AP exam.

Supplier: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. (Ontario)


300 Water Street
Whitby, ON L1N 9B6
Tel:

(905) 430-5000

Toll Free:

1-800-565-5758 (orders)

Fax: (905) 430-5194

Web Address: www.mcgrawhill.ca


Price:

Student Text: $72.95


Teacher's Manual with CD: $100.76

ISBN/Order No: Student Text: 0-07-822593-0


Teacher's Manual with CD: 0-07-824519-2

Copyright: 2004
The publisher's web site provides additional material for students, teachers and parents:
www.glencoe.com/sec/computered/usingjava/. Students can work through self-assessment
exercises or view source code for exercises from the text. There are also PowerPoint
presentations outlining some of the work covered. Listings and connections to other Java
resources are available. Once the teacher resource manual has been purchased there are
other resources available that include PowerPoint presentations to support lessons,
Advanced Placement resources, test banks, and textbook updates.
System requirements for Macintosh: Apple system 7.5 or later; MAC OS; 32 Mb
RAM; VGA; CD-ROM Drive; Microsoft PowerPoint 98
System requirements for Windows: Windows 95 or later; 486 or higher; 8 Mb RAM,
CD-ROM Drive; Microsoft PowerPoint 97 or higher
Audience
General
Category: Student, Teacher Resource
Grade Level:

An Introduction to Programming Using


Microsoft Visual Basic.Net

10 11

12

! !

Author(s): Brown, B. et al.


General Description:

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

Resource, consisting of a student text (available in hard or soft cover, with or without
Visual Basic.Net software) and teacher resource materials on CD-ROM, provides an
introduction to using Microsoft Visual Basic.Net. It does not cover application
development or programming methodologies including flow charts, UML, traces and
project teams. Student text includes critical thinking exercises and projects of varying
difficulty levels. The software includes Visual Studio.Net, Visual Basic.Net and the
MSDN Library. The CD-ROM includes visual aids, application files, data files and a test
generator. The publisher's web site, lvp.com, provides additional chapters in PDF format
that cover different operating systems, personal finances, keyboarding skills, Internet use,
email, and an introduction to computers with discussion on the history of computers and
computer networks. The vocabulary presented in the text is available as an MS Word
document. The data files required in the text are also available for download. Students can
download relevant data files from the publisher's lpdatafiles.com web site. A teacher's
resource package is also available, but has not been evaluated.

Supplier: Lawrenceville Press


P.O. Box 704
Pennington, NJ 08534

System requirements for Windows: Windows 2000, 2003 or XP; 500 Mb of available
space; Super VGA; CD or DVD drive
Audience
General
Category: Student, Teacher Resource

B-18

Tel:

(609) 737-1148

Fax: (609) 737-8564

Web Address: www.lvp.com


Price:

Hard Cover Text: $49.95 US


Soft Cover Text: $44.50 US
Teacher's Resource CD-ROM: $59.95 US

ISBN/Order No: Hard Cover Text: 1-58003-038-6


Soft Cover Text: 1-58003-037-8
Teacher's Resource CD-ROM: 1-58003-039-4
Copyright: 1999

APPENDIX B: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


An Introduction to Programming Using
Microsoft Visual Basic, Versions 5 and
6
Author(s): Brown, B. et al.

Grade Level:

10 11

12

! !
Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

General Description:
Resource, consisting of a student text and a teachers' resource package, provides an
introduction to computer programming using Visual Basic. It does not cover application
development, or programming methodologies, including flow charts, traces, UML, OOP, or
Project Teams. The student text, available in either soft or hardcover, comprises fifteen
chapters and includes Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 Working Model Edition on CD-ROM.
The teacher's resource package includes assignments, quizzes and worksheets. A master
CD-ROM, included, contains application files, tests, and answer files. The publisher's
website, lvp.com, provides additional chapters in PDF format that cover different operating
systems, personal finances, keyboarding skills, Internet use, email, and an introduction to
computers with discussion on the history of computers and computer networks. The
vocabulary presented in the text is available as an MS Word document. The data files
required in the text are also available for download. Students can download relevant data
files from the publisher's lpdatafiles.com web site.
System requirements for Windows: Windows 95, 98, NT, or newer; CD-ROM Drive;
MS Word 97, or newer
Not evaluated for Macintosh.

Supplier: Lawrenceville Press


P.O. Box 704
Pennington, NJ 08534
(609) 737-1148

Tel:

Fax: (609) 737-8564

Web Address: www.lvp.com


Hard Cover Text w/CD-ROM: $47.95 US
Soft Cover Text w/CD-ROM: $42.50 US
Teacher's Resource Package w/CD-ROM: $49.95 US

Price:

ISBN/Order No: Hard Cover Text w/CD-ROM: 1-879233-21-5


Soft Cover Text w/CD-ROM: 1-879233-20-7
Teacher's Resource Package w/CD-ROM: Not
available
Copyright: 1999

Audience
General
Category: Student, Teacher Resource

Java: How to Program, Fourth Edition

Grade Level:

10 11

12

! !

Author(s): Deitel, H. M. et al.


General Description:

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

This teacher resource consists of a text with an accompanying instructor's resource CD.
The text provides a thorough treatment of the fundamentals of object-oriented
programming in Java, following a logical progression from beginner to advanced level.
It also includes an extensive case study that introduces object-oriented design with the
UML. The format and density of this text makes it less suitable for independent student
use. The instructor's resource CD-ROM provides solutions to the programming problems
and both .html and .pdf versions of the text
.
System requirements for Windows: Windows 95 or later; PC with a Pentium-Class
processor; 133 MHz or faster; 24 Mb RAM; 2Gb hard disk space; CD-ROM drive; Internet
access, Internet Explorer 5.5 or Netscape 4.0 or higher; screen resolution 600 x 800;
Microsoft Word.
System requirements for Linux: Red Hat Linux 6.2 or later; PC with
Pentium/Compatible processor; 166 MHz or faster processor; 32 Mb of RAM; 2Gb hard
disk space; Internet browers; CD-ROM Drive; screen resolution 600 x 800; word
processor that can read or import Microsoft Word or Text documents.

Supplier: Pearson Education Canada


26 Prince Andrew Place
Don Mills, ON M3C 2T8

Audience
General
Category: Teacher Resource

B-19

Tel:

(416) 447-5101

Toll Free:

1-800-387-8028/7851

Fax: 1-800-563-9196

Web Address: www.pearsoned.ca


Price:

Text: Not available


Instructor's Resource CD: Not available

ISBN/Order No: Text: 0-13-034151-7


Instructor's Resource CD: 0-13-062301-6
Copyright: 2002

APPENDIX B: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11 AND 12 Grade Collections


Grade Level:

Programming in C++: Lessons and


Applications

10 11

12

! !

Author(s): D'Orazio, T. B.
General Description:

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

University-level text teaches C++ language and object-oriented design. The focus is on
developing programs for solving a variety of engineering and science problems. Each
chapter is divided into two parts: lessons and application examples. The lessons deal with
C++ language elements and programming techniques; the application examples deal with
program design. Students with high language proficiency could use this text independently.
The publisher's web site, http://mcgrawhillengineeringcs.com/mhhe/catalog, includes a link
to the password-protected author's site. Access, obtained by purchasing the resource,
includes support materials, source code, test materials, and instructional support materials.

Supplier: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. (Ontario)


300 Water Street
Whitby, ON L1N 9B6
Tel:

(905) 430-5000

Toll Free:

1-800-565-5758 (orders)

Web Address: www.mcgrawhill.ca


Price:

Audience
General

Fax: (905) 430-5194

$76.46

ISBN/Order No: 0-07-242412-5

Category: Teacher Resource

Copyright: 2004
Grade Level:

Programming Logic and Design, Second


Edition

10 11

12

! !

Author(s): Farrell, J.
General Description:

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

Resource provides the beginning programmer with a guide to developing structured


program logic. Text assumes no programming language experience and does not focus on
one particular language. This resource can be used to clarify the process of program
development, including problem definition and clarification; algorithm development and
use; pseudocode; and programming code and development. It does not teach a
programming language. It teaches how to program but does not use pseudocode. The
publisher's web site provides an instructor's manual with lesson plans, tips, PowerPoint,
solutions, a testbank, and importable content for Blackboard and WebCT. A new edition of
this resource is now available but has not been evaluated.

Supplier: Nelson Thomson Learning


1120 Birchmount Road
Scarborough, ON M1K 5G4

Audience
General

Tel:

1-800-268-2222

Toll Free:

1-800-268-2222/1-800-668-0671

Fax: 1-800-430-4445

Web Address: www.nelson.com


Not available

Price:

ISBN/Order No: 0-619-06315-7


Copyright: 2002

Category: Student, Teacher Resource


Grade Level:

Using Information Technology: A


Practical Introduction to Computers &
Communications, Fifth Edition

10 11

Author(s): Williams, B. et al.

Year Recommended in Grade Collection: 2004

General Description:
Resource consists of a text with an accompanying Instructor's Resource Kit (on CD-ROM).
The text covers a variety of fundamental computing concepts such as software, hardware,
data, and procedures. The information is not in-depth, but can be useful for providing an
overview to the introductory level modules in all pathways. Text provides "real-world"
examples for every chapter, as well as a summary, and a variety of assessment questions.
Resource addresses some of the topics not covered by the other resources, such as program
structure, UML, and application development. The Instructor's Resource Kit includes
teaching tips, projects, tutorials, test banks and PowerPoint presentations. This resource
could be useful for teachers new to the course and for teachers with limited computer
background. The CD-ROM also includes Page Out online course creation software with
already prepared content, testing, and gradebook. The text has a Click Along feature where
students can go to a web site for regularly updated information on topics throughout the
book: www.mhhe.com/cit/uit5e/complete/clickalong. This web site also contains chapter
summaries, self marking quizzes (with results emailed to the instructor), crossword
exercises, and challenge extension exercises.
System requirements for Windows: Windows 98, 2000, XP, or ME; 24Mb RAM
(32Mb recommended); Pentium II or faster; CD-ROM drive 4x or faster; SVGA colour
monitor running at least 256 colour and a resolution of 800 x 600; Netscape Navigator
4.7 or Internet Explorer 5.0, 5.5, 6.0; Sound Blaster or compatible sound card; external
speakers or headphones; Macromedia Flash Player 6.
Audience
General
Category: Student, Teacher Resource

B-20

Supplier: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. (Ontario)


300 Water Street
Whitby, ON L1N 9B6
Tel:

(905) 430-5000

Toll Free:

1-800-565-5758 (orders)

Fax: (905) 430-5194

Web Address: www.mcgrawhill.ca


Price:

Text: $79.86
Instructor's Resource Kit: $50.00

ISBN/Order No: Text: 0-07-248555-8


Instructor's Resource Kit: 0-07-252729-3
Copyright: 2003

12

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY TOOLS


The following chart provides a list of suggested software for use with the four pathways in ICT 11 and
12. Inclusion on this list does not constitute recommended status or endorsement of a particular
product. Teachers may identify other equally useful applications.
Before making any purchase it is advisable to determine if the software can be acquired through one of
a number of provincially negotiated software agreements. Some of the agreements include additional
curriculum support materials that support the use of the software. For further information about special
pricing and provincial licenses for software please refer to the following Ministry web site:
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp_resources/lr/resource/res_main.htm
Title

Publisher

Function / Purpose

Applied Digital Communications


AppleWorks

Apple

Word Processing / Spreadsheet / Database /


Presentation Graphics

FirstClass

Open Text

Word Processing / Presentation / Conferencing /


Email

Microsoft Office

Microsoft

Star OfficeTM

Sun MicrosystemsTM

WordPerfect Office

Corel

Word Processing / Spreadsheet / Database /


Presentation Graphics

Digital Media Development


3D Studio Max

AutoDesk

3D animation and design

After Effects

Adobe

Video editing

Authorware

Macromedia

3D animation and design

CineStreamTM

Discreet

ColdFusion

Macromedia

Web development and deployment

Director

Macromedia

3D animation and design

Dreamweaver

Macromedia

Web design

Final Cut Pro

Apple

Video editing

Fireworks

Macromedia

Graphics editing

FlashTM

Macromedia

3D animation and design

FreeHand

Macromedia

3D animation and design

FrontPage

Microsoft

Web design

Video editing

GoLive

Adobe

Media (web) development

Illustrator

Adobe

Graphic design (web page)

iMovie

Apple

Video editing

B-21

Title

Publisher

Function / Purpose

Digital Media Development, cont.


LightWave

NewTek

3D animation and design

Maya

Alias

3D animation and design

MovieMaker

Microsoft

Video editing

Photoshop

Adobe

Digital photograph editing

Pinnacle StudioTM

Pinnacle Systems

Video editing

Premier

Adobe

Video and digital photograph editing

QuarkXPress

QuarkTM

Digital photograph editing

Screenblast Movie
StudioTM

Sony Pictures Digital

Video editing and DVD creation

Studio MX

Macromedia

Web design plus

VideoStudioTM

Ulead

Video editing and DVD creation

VideoWave

RoxioTM

Video editing and DVD creation

Computer Information Systems


Linux

Red Hat (as an


example)

Mac OS

Apple

Windows

Microsoft

Operating System

Computer Programming
C++

Sun MicrosystemsTM

Programming language

C++BuilderTM

Borland

Program development support tool for C++

DelphiTM

Borland

Programming language

JavaTM

Sun MicrosystemsTM

Programming language

JBuilderTM

Borland

Program development support tool for Java

Perl

Open Source

Programming language

Visual Basic

Microsoft

Programming language

Visual C++

Microsoft

Programming language

B-22

APPENDIX C
Assessment and Evaluation

APPENDIX C: ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

What does the evidence of this learning


look like?

Classroom Assessment and Evaluation


Assessment is the systematic gathering of
information about what students know, are
able to do, and are working toward.
Assessment evidence can be collected using
a wide variety of methods, such as:
projects
student self-assessments and peer
assessments
quizzes and tests (written, oral, practical)
samples of student work
oral and written reports
observation
journals and learning logs
performance reviews
portfolio assessments

Assessment for learning is criterionreferenced, in which a students achievement


is compared to established criteria rather
than to the performance of other students.
Criteria are based on prescribed learning
outcomes, as well as on suggested
achievement indicators or other learning
expectations (e.g., Performance Standards).
Students benefit most when assessment
feedback is provided on a regular, ongoing
basis. When assessment is seen as an
opportunity to promote learning rather than
as a final judgment, it shows students their
strengths and suggests how they can
develop further. Students can use this
information to redirect their efforts, make
plans, communicate with others (e.g., peers,
teachers, parents) about their growth, and set
future learning goals.

Student performance is evaluated from the


information collected through assessment
activities. Teachers use their insight,
knowledge about learning, and experience
with students, along with the specific criteria
they establish, to make judgments about
student performance in relation to prescribed
learning outcomes.

Assessment of Learning
Assessment of learning can be addressed
through summative assessment, including
large-scale assessments and teacher
assessments. These summative assessments
can occur at the end of the year or at periodic
stages in the instructional process.

There are two major types of assessment, each


serving a different purpose.
Assessment for learning is assessment for
purposes of greater learning achievement.
Assessment of learning is assessment for
purposes of providing evidence of
achievement for reporting.
Assessment for Learning
Classroom assessment for learning provides
ways to engage and encourage students to
become involved in their own day-to-day
assessment to promote their own achievement.
This type of assessment serves to answer the
following questions:
What do students need to learn to be
successful?

C-3

Large-scale assessments, such as Foundation


Skills Assessment (FSA) and Graduation
Program exams, gather information on
student performance throughout the
province and provide information for the
development and revision of curriculum.
These assessments are used to make
judgments about students achievement in
relation to provincial and national standards.
There is no large-scale provincial assessment
for ICT 11 and 12.

APPENDIX C: ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

Assessment of Learning

Assessment for Learning


formative assessment: ongoing in the
classroom

summative assessment: occurs at the end of


year or at key stages

teacher assessment, student self-assessment,


and/or student peer assessment

teacher assessment
may be either criterion-referenced (based on
prescribed learning outcomes) or normreferenced (comparing student achievement
to that of others)

criterion-referencedcriteria based on
prescribed learning outcomes identified
in the provincial curriculum, reflecting
performance in relation to a specific
learning task

used to make judgments about students


performance in relation to provincial
standards

involves both teacher and student in a


process of continual reflection and review
about progress

information on student performance


throughout the province provides
information for the development and revision
of curriculum

teachers adjust their plans and engage in


corrective teaching in response to formative
assessment

Criterion-Referenced Assessment and


Evaluation

Graduation Portfolio Assessment


Information Technology is one of the six
organizers in the Graduation Portfolio.
Students can demonstrate their use of
information technology skills in a variety of
ways in order to meet the requirements of
this aspect of the Portfolio.

In criterion-referenced evaluation, a
students performance is compared to
established criteria rather than to the
performance of other students. Evaluation in
relation to prescribed curriculum requires
that criteria be established based on the
learning outcomes.

Please refer to the Graduation Portfolio


Assessment and Focus Areas: A Program
Guide for further information.
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/graduation/
portfolio/

Criteria are the basis for evaluating student


progress. They identify, in specific terms, the
critical aspects of a performance or a product
that indicate how well the student is meeting
the prescribed learning outcomes. For
example, weighted criteria, rating scales, or
performance rubrics (reference sets) are ways
that student performance can be evaluated
using criteria.
Wherever possible, students should be
involved in setting the assessment criteria.
This helps students develop an
understanding of what high-quality work or
performance looks like.

C-4

APPENDIX C: ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

Criterion-referenced evaluation may involve these steps:


Step 1

Identify the prescribed learning outcomes (as articulated in this IRP) that will be used as
the basis for assessment.

Step 2

Establish criteria. When appropriate, involve students in establishing criteria.

Step 3

Plan learning activities that will help students gain the knowledge, skills, or attitudes
outlined in the criteria.

Step 4

Prior to the learning activity, inform students of the criteria against which their work will
be evaluated.

Step 5

Provide examples of the desired levels of performance.

Step 6

Conduct the learning activities.

Step 7

Use appropriate assessment tools (e.g., rating scale, checklist, rubric) and methods (e.g.,
observation, collection, self-assessment) based on the particular assignment and student.

Step 8

Review the assessment data and evaluate each students level of performance or quality of
work in relation to criteria.

Step 9

Where appropriate, assign a letter grade to indicate how well the criteria are met.

Step 10

Report the results of the evaluation to students and parents/guardians.

C-5