CONTENTS

JUNE 23, 2016

21

Volume 23 Issue 8

GUN CONTROLLED

Should the LGBT community arm its members, or ally
itself with organizations pushing for
greater gun restrictions?
by John Riley

TAKING PRIDE

32

An assortment of photographs from the 2016 Capital Pride
Parade and Festival
Photography by Ward Morrison and Todd Franson
Additional photography by Randy Shulman and Julian Vankim

50

FALSETTOLAND

With the bland and unappealing Last Year Was
Complicated, Nick Jonas proves eye-candy doesn’t
equal ear-candy
by Gordon Lamont Ashenhurst

OVERTURE p.7 SPOTLIGHT: EVITA p.9 OUT ON THE TOWN p.12
OPERA: FIDELIO AT THE INSERIES p.13 THE FEED: GUN CONTROLLED p.21
NEXT TO NORMAL p.24 SCENE: NIGHT OUT AT THE NATIONALS p.26
COMMUNITY p.29 FEATURE: TAKING PRIDE p.32 GALLERY p.49
MUSIC: FALSETTOLAND p.50 STAGE: REDISTRICTING p.51
MUSIC: TRUE TO FORM p.52 NIGHTLIFE p.55
SCENE: TOWN’S PRIDE NIGHT p.57 LISTINGS p.57 LAST WORD p.62
The bitches who make this shit... #masthead

Editorial Editor-in-Chief Randy Shulman Art Director Todd Franson Managing Editor Rhuaridh Marr Senior Editor John Riley Contributing Editor Doug Rule
Senior Photographers Ward Morrison, Julian Vankim Contributing Illustrator Scott G. Brooks Contributing Writers Gordon Ashenhurst,
Sean Bugg, Frank Carber, Fallon Forbush, Sean Maunier, Troy Petenbrink, Kate Wingfield Webmaster David Uy Production Assistant Julian Vankim
Sales & Marketing Publisher Randy Shulman National Advertising Representative Rivendell Media Co. 212-242-6863 Distribution Manager Dennis Havrilla
Patron Saint Chris Nelson Cover Photography Ward Morrison
Metro Weekly 1775 I St. NW, Suite 1150 Washington, DC 20006 202-638-6830
All material appearing in Metro Weekly is protected by federal copyright law and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publishers. Metro Weekly assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials submitted for publication. All such submissions are subject to
editing and will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Metro Weekly is supported by many fine advertisers, but we cannot accept responsibility for claims made by advertisers, nor can we accept responsibility for materials provided by advertisers or their
agents. Publication of the name or photograph of any person or organization in articles or advertising in Metro Weekly is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of such person or organization.

© 2016 Jansi LLC.

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

5

Overture
WAITING TO EXHALE
T

HIS IS THE ISSUE YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN HOLDING LAST WEEK. OUR TRADITIONAL POST-PRIDE ISSUE
depicting on the cover a massive, exuberant crowd in front of the Capital Pride mainstage, and featuring pages upon
pages of photographs from Pride weekend’s parade and festival. It captures a spirit that words cannot truly convey,
showing the breadth of our community and its supporters, as they take a moment to show D.C. — and the world — that we
matter more than ever, that we’re going to fight for every right, that we’re going to grind our (high) heels until we fully stamp
out homophobia, that we are no longer in the shadows, meeting up in dank, secretive makeshift bars, that we are out in force,
bringing a touch of quality, a note of class, and a lot of love to every person’s life we touch.
This is the issue you should have been holding last week.
And then, Orlando.
To have been at Capital Pride’s festival on Sunday, June 12,
and attempting to process the devastating, painfully raw news
of what transpired mere hours earlier at Pulse Nightclub — in
a Floridian city known for magic and joy in its purest form —
was nothing short of surreal. What happened in Orlando did
not stop the celebrations (Pride has too much momentum for
that), and it was too new to fully alter the tenor of the event,
though there were moments of poignancy — a minute of
silence lead by Capital Pride President Bernie Delia, dedications from event headliners Meghan Trainor and Charlie Puth
to the 49 victims and 53 survivors of the horrific massacre by a
gunman with affections for ISIS and a deep-seated hatred for
gays. We struggled to make sense of it while maintaining our
right to feast on $18 corn dogs. Many of us just put it aside until
later, which is completely understandable.
Only the night before, at one of the largest parades Capital
Pride had ever produced, we celebrated with throngs of
straight allies, marching, waving, celebrating our heroes,
banging on drums, throwing batons as high as they’d go,
painting our bodies, donning our finest drag (damn the heat
and melting foundation), riding motorcycles, cavorting flamboyantly on floats blasting eardrum-shattering music, carrying
flags (mostly of the rainbow variety), brushing shoulders with
the British Ambassador and his wife, and throwing beads to
onlookers frenzied to collect as many glittery, multicolored
strands as possible.
It was fun. It was festive. It was empowering. It was amazing.
Sunday is always more sedate by comparison, a day to convene comfortably and gape in awe at our sheer numbers. For
the staff of Metro Weekly, it’s long been a work day — as work
days go, running up to people and asking them to smile for the
camera only to frequently be met with a playful, “I’d better be
on the cover!”, is pretty enjoyable.
But Pride that Sunday became a different kind of workday,
at least for one member of our staff. Managing editor Rhuaridh
Marr strapped himself to his computer and reported throughout the day as the horrific events unfolded, to the point where
we got so much traffic at one point, it felled the website for
about an hour.
In all, Rhuaridh filed more than 15 stories over a 24 hour

period. He then wrote our eloquent, moving cover story last
week, “Tragedy in Orlando: A Special Report,” which pulled
the incomprehensible events into a cohesive narrative, offering as much perspective as possible. We know more since, and
the conversation has moved past the heinous, sick actions of
Omar Mateen and into the realm of social change, where gays
often find themselves. This time it’s gun control and the failure of Congress to pass any sort of legislation on Monday, due
to either partisanship or deeply entrenched ties to the NRA
— perhaps the most revolting, self-rationalizing (and unfortunately massively wealthy) organization to desecrate our
country. That the NRA can value the right to own a military
grade automatic weapon over over our right not to be gunned
down by them is mind-boggling. When discussing gun control, “It’s not expected to pass” should not be a media-recited
mantra that we as a country are proud of. In fact, we should
be ashamed and appalled that action wasn’t taken after Sandy
Hook or Virginia Tech or San Bernardino or too many others
to recount here. Democrats are as much to blame for this
absurd gridlock, but mostly it comes down to the unwillingness to budge by Republican lawmakers, who, after a moment
of mock remorse for the LGBT community, continued to put
their own self-interests ahead of the good of society.
On the pages within — and on our website, where you’ll
find hundreds upon hundreds more — you’ll see our community in celebratory mode, smiling, buoyant, freely expressing themselves in whatever means suits. Perhaps the most
surprising photo of the thousands taken by Ward Morrison,
Todd Franson, Julian Vankim and myself, was one in which
a rainbow spontaneously appeared in a cooling water spray
from a parked fire engine. Alongside the rainbow, the Capitol.
If that’s not a sign of support from a gay-friendly God, I don’t
know what is.
This is the issue you should have been holding last week.
But you’re holding it now. So relax for a moment and smile. Be
among strangers and friends who share the very thing that’s
special about you. Exhale.
You’ve earned it.
Randy Shulman
Editor

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

7

COURTESY OF OLNEY THEATRE CENTER

Spotlight

All About Eva

Rebecca Zampelli takes on an iconic figure at Olney — that is, when she’s not busy with her chickens

W

E JUST HAD OUR FIRST RUN-THROUGH,” SAYS
Rebecca Zampelli, breathless from chasing chickens
around her West Virginia yard. Wait, what? The star
of Olney’s Evita raises chickens? “For the eggs,” she laughs.
“They’re like having little pets. They’re way more entertaining
than we ever thought they’d be when we first got them. They run
up to you when you come out of the house and ask for treats.”
Poultry aside, Zampelli is eager to see how audiences will
respond to Wade Davis’ non-traditional staging of the Andrew
Lloyd Webber musical about Argentina’s political firebrand, Eva
Peron. “I’m sure it will please some people a lot, and probably
piss off some people a lot. I think that means it’s good theater.”

The classic Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, which also stars
Robert Ariza as Che and features choreography by Christopher
D’Amboise, opens Saturday on Olney’s Mainstage. Playing the
role has offered Zampelli better insight to another polarizing
blonde in modern politics.
“The big thing about Eva Peron is that people either fucking hated her or she’s depicted next to the Virgin Mary in
Argentinian homes,” she says. “There are very few people who
are wishy-washy about Hillary Clinton. They either love her and
want to send her right to the top, or they would rather vote for
fucking Donald Trump to keep her out of the White House.”

— Randy Shulman

To July 24 at the Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road in Olney, Md. Tickets are $38 to $75.
Call 301-924-3400 or visit olneytheatre.org.
JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

9

Spotlight
ABOVE AND BEYOND

Club Glow presents an “IndepenDANCE weekend” with
one of the biggest and longest-lasting sensations in contemporary dance music. Founded in 2000, the London-based
trio of DJs/producers Jono Grant, Tony McGuinnes and
Paavo Siljamaki run the influential progressive house label
Anjunabeats and produce trance-influenced, pop-oriented
original tracks with a roster of regular vocalists, many of
whom join for a full-scale live touring production that goes,
well, above and beyond the typical DJ night out, whether
at a warehouse club or an outdoor festival. Friday, July 1,
and Sunday, July 3. Doors at 9 p.m. Echostage, 2135 Queens
Chapel Rd. NE. Tickets are $40 to $50. Call 202-503-2330
or visit echostage.com. (Doug Rule)

GARRISON STARR

A native of Mississippi, indie folk-rocker Garrison Starr got
her start as a recording artist two decades ago. Listen to her
sweet voice and sophisticated songs, drawing clear influences from the Beatles, Indigo Girls and Shawn Colvin, and you
realize she should be a bigger deal than she is. “Sometimes
I do wonder why I haven’t found more of a mainstay place
in the music industry,” Starr told Metro Weekly a few years
back. “I haven’t really broken through in my career, to a
level that some of my peers have.” It probably has something to do with her often complicated lyrics, which convey
the pain of growing up in conservative Mississippi and
coming out while a student at the University of Mississippi.
Starr performs a solo acoustic set as opener on tour for folk
singer-songwriter Joe Purdy. Tuesday, June 28, at 7:30 p.m.
at The Hamilton, 600 14th St. NW. Tickets are $14.75 to
$22.25. Call 202-787-1000 or visit thehamiltondc.com. (DR)

PATTI LABELLE

Strathmore presents a rescheduled run of dates by the
Grammy-winning soul singer, who had to cancel the original April dates on doctor’s orders. Labelle has been an
influence to everyone from Mary J. Blige to Alicia Keys to
Christina Aguilera — whom she advised on the recent season
of NBC’s The Voice — and Rolling Stone has called her one of
the “Greatest Singers of All Time.” Thursday, June 30, and
Friday, July 1, at 8 p.m. The Music Center at Strathmore,
10701 Rockville Pike, North Bethesda. Tickets are $65 to $150.
Call 301-581-5100 or visit strathmore.org. (DR)

10

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

AUSTIN CRITTENDON

Out On The Town

Shark Week

CAPITAL FRINGE MUSIC FESTIVAL

This first-ever music festival is a precursor to the mammoth anything-goes theater festival, which will run for three weeks in
July. Pop act Shark Week is the best-known act to play the Baldacchino Tent at Old City Farm and Guild on Saturday, June
25. Also performing are Juanita Cash, Dos Santos Anti-Beat Orquesta, Kino Musica, 178 Product featuring Sal P. of Liquid
Liquid, and Rufus Da B’More Brass Factory. Sunday, June 26, sees sets by Naga Champa, Daniel Bachman, Big Lazy, Future
Generations, Ed Hamell, Beninghove’s Hangmen, Sitali, and Underground System. Festival runs from noon to 10:30 p.m. both
days. Old City Farm and Guild, 925 Rhode Island Ave. NW. Free. Call 202-737-7230 or visit capitalfringe.org.

FILM
IN DEFENSE OF FOOD

Focus-In Film Series presents a
screening of a documentary based
on Michael Pollan’s bestselling
book investigating food in America,
what we buy and eat, and arguing for a more plant-based diet.
The screening, at the Hyattsville
Busboys & Poets, is followed by a
Q&A with local activists and politicians. Wednesday, June 29, at 6:30
p.m. The Zinn Room at Busboys
& Poets, 5331 Baltimore Ave.,
Hyattsville, Md. Suggested donation of $5. Call 301-779-2787 or visit
busboysandpoets.com.

INDEPENDENCE DAY:
RESURGENCE

Eugh. No. Nobody needs this. While
the first film — released 20 years
ago — was fun, there’s absolutely
no reason to warrant this sequel,
which also lacks Will Smith. Smart
man. Opens Friday, June 24. Area
theaters. Visit fandango.com.
(Rhuaridh Marr)

THE SHALLOWS

Billed as a “shark survival thriller,”
Blake Lively is stranded on a buoy
while surfing and forced to survive
as a great white shark considers her
for lunch. Probably best not to see
it before heading off to your beach
vacation. Opens Wednesday, June
29. Area theaters. Visit fandango.
com. (RM)

STAGE
ANOTHER WAY HOME

Anna Ziegler’s wry, uplifting drama
closes the season at Theater J,
offering a production directed by
Shirley Serotsky and starring Rick
Foucheux and Naomi Jacobson as
parents visiting a summer camp
where their son has gone missing.
The cast also includes Shayna Blass,
Thony Mena and Chris Stinson.
Now in previews with official opening Monday, June 27, at 7:30 p.m.
Pride Night is Thursday, July 7.
To July 17. The Aaron and Cecile
Goldman Theater, Washington,
D.C.’s Jewish Community Center,
1529 16th St. NW. Tickets are $37
to $67. Call 202-777-3210 or visit
theaterj.org.

EL PASO BLUE

Jose Carrasquillo directs a GALA
Hispanic Theatre production of
Octavio Solis’ riff on the Oedipus
Rex classic, a wild and comic tale
of lust, revenge, identity and the
blues. Closes Sunday, June 26. GALA
Theatre at Tivoli Square, 3333 14th
St. NW. Tickets are $20 to $38. Call
202-234-7174 or visit galatheatre.org.

GET USED TO IT!
A MUSICAL REVUE

The LGBT-focused company
Rainbow Theatre Project presents
a run of composer/lyricist Tom
Wilson Weinberg’s musical revue,
written in 1992 during a low point
for the gay rights movement. But
Get Used To It! remains funny,
touching and timely, with a focus
on the community’s struggles with
politics, religion, love and acceptance, as relayed through 18 original
songs. H. Lee Gable directs. Now
to July 10. Mead Theatre Lab at
Flashpoint, 916 G St. NW. Tickets
are $35. Call 202-315-1310 or visit
rainbowtheatreproject.org.

GRAVEDIGGER’S TALE

Comedic actor Louis Butelli performs in a kid-friendly, one-man
interactive play devised by director
Robert Richmond. Arriving with a
trunk and a book, Butelli plays the
Gravedigger, who responds to questions from the audience about court
life in Elsinore using the text from
Hamlet. Remaining performances
are Friday, June 24, and Saturday,
June 25, at 10:30 a.m., and Sunday,
June 26, at 12 p.m. in the Elizabethan
Garden. Folger Theatre, 201 East
Capitol St. SE. Free. Call 202-5447077 or visit folger.edu.

KINKY BOOTS

Cyndi Lauper produced Tony gold
with songs about a showgirl named
Lola, in a story about the power of
drag queens and shoes. The production stops at the Kennedy Center
as part of its first national touring
production. Directed by Jerry
Mitchell, adapted from the British
film by Harvey Fierstein. To July
10. Kennedy Center Opera House.
Tickets are $25 to $199. Call 202-4674600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

13

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES

(HHHHH)
Good-natured
and
cheerful,
Signature’s La Cage aux Folles
works hard to please its crowd.
There will be no surprises in
the story of longtime gay couple
Georges and Albin and the comic
conundrum of how to entertain the
homophobic parents of their son’s
fiancée without revealing their
identities. Put simply, if you are a
devotee, it delivers: you will hear
the songs, enjoy the jokes, and share
the moments. Director Matthew
Gardiner delivers a show that’s fastpaced and punchy, moving seamlessly between the La Cage nightclub and the behind-the-scenes
dramas of Georges and Albin. Lee
Savage’s sets and Frank Labovitz’s
costumes keep it bold with an
eye-popping palette of garishly gorgeous color. To July 10. Signature
Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., in
Arlington. Tickets are $40 to $95.
Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org. (Kate Wingfield)

RX LOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

MOXIE: A HAPPENSTANCE
VAUDEVILLE

LONE OPERA

Nick Olcott brings Fidelio, Beethoven’s only opera, to the InSeries

T

HERE IS CROSS-DRESSING,” SAYS NICK OLCOTT. “IT’S A VERY INTERESTing piece from that standpoint.” But gender-bending isn’t necessarily notable feature of Beethoven’s opera, Fidelio, in which as woman impersonates a man to rescue
her husband from political imprisonment. “In opera, women playing men is accepted and
standard, and it’s a part of the art form. It never was considered unusual,” says Olcott, who
directed the show for The InSeries, setting it in the 20th Century, in an unnamed South
American dictatorship.
“It’s Beethoven, so the music is absolutely magnificent,” he says, adding, “but dramaturgically, it’s problematic.” Beethoven referred to the work as “his shipwreck” and “his
problem child,” and his lack of experience in opera is apparent. The German classical giant
revised the piece repeatedly during his lifetime.
“It’s very much a tale about love but with a happy ending,” says Olcott. “And it’s not a
deeply political piece as it has been portrayed over the years.”
Still, Olcott calls the music “very powerful,” noting that “it is certainly fascinating to see
Beethoven’s mind at work.” — Doug Rule
Fidelio plays Saturday, June 25, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, June 26, at 4 p.m., at the
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $23 to $46.
Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.

14

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

Helen Hayes Award-winning
Happenstance Theater presents
another devised work, a theatrical
collage inspired by the Great Age
of Vaudeville, infused with the joys
and struggles of the lives of the performers who will perform the work.
As directed by Sabrina Mandell and
Mark Jaster, Moxie offers hijinks,
live music, period costumes, nostalgic beauty and physical comedy in
its homage to popular late 19th century theatrical style. Opens in previews Friday, June 24, at 8 p.m. To
July 17. Round House Theatre, 4545
East-West Highway, Bethesda. Call
240-644-1100 or visit roundhousetheatre.org.

NEXT TO NORMAL

Keegan Theatre serves up Tom
Kitt and Brian Yorkey’s moving and modern Pulitzer Prizewinning show, that deals with the
devastating toll that mental illness
can have on a relationship and a
family. Mark A. Rhea and Colin
Smith direct a cast featuring Kari
Ginsburg, Chad Wheeler, David
Landstrom, Caroline Dubberly,
Christian Montgomery and Scott
Ward Abernethy. To July 10.
Keegan Theatre, 1742 Church St.
NW. Tickets are $45 to $55. Call
202-265-3768 or visit keegantheatre.com.

THE BRIDGES OF
MADISON COUNTY

Robert James Waller’s best-selling novel about an Iowa housewife
and her life-changing, whirlwind
romance with a traveling photographer gets the musical treatment,
in this Tony Award-winning production by composer Jason Robert
Brown and Pulitzer Prize-winning
writer Marsha Norman (’night,
Mother). Bartlett Sher directs. Opens

Oral
Fixation
you can listen
to any story at

MetroWeekly.com
just look for the
“speak” button

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

15

a long wait. But the Dixie Chicks
have regrouped for the DCX World
Tour MMXVI, which also features
Anderson East and Josh Herbert.
Saturday, June 25, at 7 p.m. Jiffy
Lube Live, 7800 Cellar Door Drive,
Bristow, Va. Tickets are $42 to
$350. Call 703-754-6400 or visit
thejiffylubelive.com.

GAY MEN’S CHORUS OF
WASHINGTON: ONE WORLD

Potomac Fever and Rock Creek
Singers, both select groups of the
Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington,
host an international choral event
also featuring Schola Cantorosa
from Hamburg, Germany, and the
Homonics from Dublin, Ireland.
Saturday, June 25, at 8 p.m. Atlas
Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St.
NE. Tickets are $20 to $25. Call
202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.

JUDITH HILL

DEL SHORES: SINGULARLY SORDID

Baltimore’s Spotlighters Theatre presents this stand-up comedy show by the creator of the
Sordid Lives franchise, who has also served as a writer/director in TV (Queer as Folk) and
stage (Southern Baptist Sissies). Singularly Sordid focuses on Shores’ experience returning to
singledom as a 50-something divorcee, as well as dishing on Dolly Parton, Leslie Jordan and
his own encounters as a “minor gay celebrity.” Friday, June 24, at 8 p.m. Spotlighters Theatre,
817 Saint Paul St., Baltimore. Tickets are $25. Call 410-752-1225 or visit spotlighters.org.
Tuesday, June 28, at 7:30 p.m. Runs
to July 17 in the Kennedy Center
Eisenhower Theater. Tickets are
$49 to $129. Call 202-467-4600 or
visit kennedy-center.org.

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

After a ravishing production last
fall of Cole Porter’s musical take
on Shakespeare’s classic, the
Shakespeare Theatre Company
ends its season with Ed Sylvanus
Iskandar’s provocative, new, allmale production that features the
pop music of Tony- and Grammywinning composer Duncan Sheik
(Broadway’s Spring Awakening),
including a 30-minute musical
intermezzo. Stage and screen actors
Maulik Pancholy (Weeds, 30 Rock)
and Peter Gadiot (Once Upon A Time
in Wonderland) play Katherina and
Petruchio, respectively, in a cast
that also includes Andre De Shields,
Telly Leung, Gregory Linington,
Matthew Russell, Tom Story, Oliver
Thornton and Bernard White in
featured performances. Closes
Sunday, June 26. Sidney Harman
Hall, Harman Center for the Arts,
610 F St. NW. Call 202-547-1122 or
visit shakespearetheatre.org.

MUSIC
A CAPITOL FOURTH: SMOKEY
ROBINSON, KENNY LOGGINS,
AMBER RILEY

It’s not something you’ll want to do

16

every year — there’s far too many
tourists — but everyone should
experience the National Symphony
Orchestra’s A Capitol Fourth concert at least once. Jack Everly
leads the NSO in a performance
of American favorites and classical
masterworks, while several military
bands will add to the patriotic spirit. Additional performances come
from a selection of musical greats,
including Smokey Robinson, Kenny
Loggins, Gavin DeGraw, Amber
Riley and Sutton Foster, while the
cast of the Gloria Estefan-themed
Broadway musical On Your Feet
will also perform. The festivities
conclude with what organizers tout
as “the biggest, most distinctive
fireworks display in the nation,” all
set to Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture.
Monday, July 4, at 8 p.m. West
Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building.
Free. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org/nso for more
information.

BE STEADWELL

Strathmore Artist-in-Residence
and live-looping artist Be Steadwell
offers a blend of soul, folk, hiphop and jazz she calls “queer-pop,”
drawing inspiration from her experiences as a queer, black woman. In
addition to using a loop pedal for
vocal layering, Steadwell sings, raps
and beatboxes in her intriguing,
memorable compositions, including
the sweet love letter to her D.C.
hometown, “Not Gonna Move to

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

New York.” One of her latest works
is the Strathmore-commissioned
“Home” featuring a choral arrangement of voices with a folk/soul vibe.
Wednesday, June 29, at 7:30 p.m.
Amp by Strathmore, 11810 Grand
Park Ave. North Bethesda. Tickets
are $17. Call 301-581-5100 or visit
strathmore.org.

BLUE NOTE 75

Thelonious Monk and Herbie
Hancock are among an impressive
roster of jazz artists who debuted
with the storied label Blue Note
Records, and Blue Note 75 aims to
carry on that tradition by presenting
some of the best young voices in the
genre. Billed as a supergroup, the
evening features keyboardist Robert
Glasper, guitarist Lionel Loueke,
bassist Derrick Hodge, drummer
Kendrick Scott, tenor saxophonist
Marcus Strickland, and trumpeter
Ambrose Akinmusire. The group
will play from each artist’s own repertoire as well as put spins on Blue
Note classics. Thursday, June 30,
at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701
Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria.
Tickets are $65. Call 703-549-7500
or visit birchmere.com.

DIXIE CHICKS

We still haven’t heard new music
from Natalie Maines, Emily
Robison and Martie Maguire since
the trio last joined forces to release
the Grammy-winning Taking the
Long Way a decade ago. Talk about

If you saw either the 2009 Michael
Jackson tour documentary This Is
It or the 2013 film 20 Feet From
Stardom, you’ll no doubt recall
powerhouse vocalist Judith Hill —
either as Jackson’s backup vocalist
and moving duet partner on “I Just
Can’t Stop Loving You,” or as an
unheralded background singer, one
who has worked with the likes of
John Legend, Stevie Wonder, Elton
John and Ringo Starr. But the L.A.
native was also a contestant on the
fourth season of The Voice in 2013.
Hill headlines a tour in support of
last year’s debut solo album Back
in Time, co-produced by Prince.
Friday, June 24, at 8 p.m. Bethesda
Blues & Jazz Supper Club, 7719
Wisconsin Ave. Tickets are $40
to $45. Call 240-330-4500 or visit
bethesdabluesjazz.com.

KATHY SLEDGE

The Grammy-nominated Kathy
Sledge, former lead singer of Sister
Sledge (“We Are Family”), is now
touring a jazz-steeped tribute to
Billie Holiday. Saturday, June 25,
and Sunday, June 26, at 8 p.m. and
10 p.m. Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin
Ave. NW. Tickets are $40 to $45,
plus $12 minimum purchase. Call
202-337-4141 or visit bluesalley.com.

MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER

Having got her start in bars and
coffeehouses in the D.C. area in the
early ‘’80s, Mary Chapin Carpenter
is a “Hometown Girl” par excellence.
The country singer-songwriter, who
now lives in Charlottesville, Va.,
told Metro Weekly a few years ago
that Wolf Trap, where she performs
almost every year, “is one of my
most treasured and favorite places.”
She returns in support of The Things
That We Are Made of, her 14th studio album focused on thriving in
middle age despite hardships — in
her case divorce and a near-death
experience. The Milk Carton Kids
open. Saturday, July 2, at 8 p.m. The
Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

17

COMEDY
THE KENNEDY CENTER’S
DISTRICT OF COMEDY FESTIVAL

A milestone in the recognition of
comedy as a true performing art, the
Kennedy Center presents its first
comedy festival. Among the onenight-only highlights remaining
are: A Stand-up Showcase on the
Millennium Stage featuring emerging New York comedians Jared
Freid, Anthony DeVito and Greg
Stone from America’s Got Talent,
on Friday, June 24, at 6 p.m.; Glee’s
Jane Lynch in her one-woman variety show See Jane Sing on Friday,
June 24, at 7 p.m.; and American
film producer and director Judd
Apatow (The 40-Year-Old Virgin,
Trainwreck) with special guests
Michael Che and Pete Holmes,
on Saturday, June 25, at 7 p.m.
Kennedy Center. Call 202-4674600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

THE SECOND CITY’S ALMOST
ACCURATE GUIDE TO AMERICA

PAUL SIMON

Considered one of the greatest American songwriters, Paul Simon makes his
long-overdue Wolf Trap debut. Simon will sing from his amazing repertoire of classic
pop standards, some of them from his time with Art Garfunkel, as well as songs from
his new studio album Stranger to Stranger. Monday, June 27, and Tuesday, June 28,
at 8 p.m. The Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $48 to
$130 and include a copy of the new CD. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.

What if the history of America were
written by some of the country’s
most revered contemporary comedians? That’s the premise behind
The Second City’s Almost Accurate
Guide to America, which the
Kennedy Center co-commissioned
from the leading improv comedy
troupe as part of the District of
Comedy Festival. The show will
even uproot the stalwart Shear
Madness for a six-week run in the
Theater Lab. To July 31. Kennedy
Center Theater Lab. Tickets are $49
to $64. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.

READINGS
FREDA KELLY

Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $25
to $50. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org.

NATIONAL SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA

“Dreamworks
Animation
in
Concert” is the latest movie-focused NSO program at Wolf Trap,
featuring visually stunning footage
from recent animated blockbusters — everything from Shrek to
Madagascar to Kung Fu Panda —
accompanied by live performances
of their scores. Justin Freer conducts the NSO in a performance
of works by Hans Zimmer, John
Powell, Alexandre Desplat, Alan
Silvestri, and Danny Elfman.
Thursday, June 30, at 8:30 p.m. The
Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551
Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $25
to $45. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or
visit wolftrap.org.

WOLF TRAP OPERA’S ARIA
JUKEBOX

“Aria Jukebox” features popular
opera tunes selected by the audience
and performed by soloists from Wolf

18

Trap Opera Company’s 2016 Filene
Young Artists program, accompanied by company director Kim
Witman on piano. Tickets include a
wine and cheese reception. Sunday,
June 26, at 3 p.m., reception starts at
2 p.m. The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635
Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $32
to $48. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org.

DANCE
CHAMBER DANCE PROJECT

Former New York-based ballet
company ushers in its third season
in D.C. by presenting three world
premieres — two New Orleansthemed works by guest choreographers Victor Adebusola, a D.C. hiphop artist, and Jennifer Archibald
of New York, as well as one by artistic director Diane Coburn Bruning
with original music by Bryce
Dessner of the band The National.
This year’s “Ballets & Brass” season
also features music performed by
D.C.’s street band Brass Connection
and Chamber Dance Project prin-

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

cipal musician Claudia Chudacoff.
Now to June 26. Lansburgh
Theatre, 450 7th St. NW. Tickets
are $20 to $50. Call 202-547-1122 or
visit chamberdance.org.

LIGHT SWITCH DANCE THEATRE

A site-specific, project-based
company dedicated to multidisciplinary performances in nontraditional spaces, Sandra C. Atkinson’s
Light Switch Dance Theatre creates socially conscious art driven
by the human condition. Its latest work, Nest, uses contemporary
dance, visual art, music and film to
investigate the concepts of home
for those without one. The company is joined by special guests Next
Reflex Dance Collective, presenting
a new work, Jump In, inspired by
Maya Angelou’s children’s poetry
book Life Doesn’t Frighten Me and
featuring original music composed
by Nate Masters. Saturday, June 25,
at 8 p.m., and Sunday, June 26, at 2
p.m. Dance Place, 3225 8th St. NE.
Tickets are $25 in advance, or $30 at
the door. Call 202-269-1600 or visit
danceplace.org.

The Beatles’ devoted secretary and
friend tells her behind-the-scenes
story in the 2013 documentary Good
Ol’ Freda, which Amp by Strathmore
presents followed by a post-screening Q&A hosted by WAMU’s Ally
Schweitzer. Saturday, June 25, at
8 p.m. Amp by Strathmore, 11810
Grand Park Ave. North Bethesda.
Tickets are $25 to $40. Call 301-5815100 or visit strathmore.org.

KIM HALL

“Othello Was My Grandfather:
Shakespeare in the African
Diaspora” is a lecture, part of the
Shakespeare Anniversary Lecture
Series presented by the Folger
Institute, by the Barnard College
professor, whose groundbreaking
work on racial discourses in 16th
and 17th century Britain has helped
generate a new wave of scholarship on race in Shakespeare and
Renaissance literature. Monday,
June 27, at 7 p.m. Folger Theatre,
201 East Capitol St. SE. Tickets are
$15. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu. l

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

19

RANDY SHULMAN

theFeed

Code Pink Vigil, June 12

GUN CONTROLLED

Should the LGBT community arm its members, or ally itself with
organizations pushing for greater gun restrictions? By John Riley

O

N THE EVENING OF OCTOBER 10, 2012, WAYNE MCNEIL SAT ON
his front porch in Mobile, Ala., listening to music at the end of a long, hard
day. As midnight neared, he stood up to go indoors. A sudden noise — a firecracker? — caused him to spin around. He saw two young men standing in the street,
one brandishing a gun. McNeil desperately tried to get into his house. Instead, he
stumbled and collapsed on the stoop, two slugs lodged deep in his chest.
“One of the men held his gun in my face and asked if I liked it,” says McNeil. “And
I said, ‘No.’” When McNeil held his arm up to defend himself, he was shot a third
time at point-blank range, through the armpit. “The bullet lodged in my back,” he
says. “Somehow, miraculously, I’m still alive.”
After life-saving surgery, McNeil gave no thought to becoming an advocate for
greater restrictions on firearms. But the May 2014 shooting that killed six and injured
14 others near the University of California, Santa Barbara convinced him he needed
to take some type of action.
Turning to the Internet, McNeil found an organization called Everytown for Gun
Safety. He wrote to them about his own ordeal and was invited to become part of the
group’s Survivor Network, which connects people who have survived violent crimes
and helps them become public advocates for sensible gun restrictions. The Survivor
Network also provides a support system for victims, which was activated as soon as
news broke of the mass shooting that killed 49 people and injured 53 others at a gay

nightclub in Orlando, Fla., during
the early hours of June 12.
“After people started to emerge
from the shock of what we were
seeing, everybody started reaching
out to each other,” he says. “I personally don’t know how I would
have made it through Sunday without having people who truly understand what it feels like to see that
news and to know what bullets are
like, or to know what it’s like to lose
a loved one.”
Cable news broadcast wall-towall coverage of the shootings, the
focus largely placed on gunman
Omar Mateen’s stated allegiance to
ISIS and the anti-LGBT sentiments
that purportedly fueled his rage. The
focus quickly shifted to the availability of weapons designed to quickly kill
large amounts of people. How was
Mateen able to obtain a gun, despite
having previously been placed on an
FBI terrorist watch list? The fires for
debate were fully fueled.
The Human Rights Campaign
immediately endorsed several gun

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

21

control measures, including limiting access to assault-style nightclub and expect them to respond to a mass shooter
rifles, expanding background checks, and preventing peo- with a semi-automatic rifle, and not shoot and kill people,
ple with a history of domestic abuse from purchasing guns. is ridiculous.”
On Monday, the Senate heard four gun-related measures,
Watts, a Denver-based mother of five, is the founder
including two supported by Democrats. One would have of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. She
expanded background checks for all licensed and private utterly rejects arguments put forth by groups like the Pink
gun sales. The other would prevent people on government Pistols, calling them “NRA talking points.”
watch lists from accessing guns, and deny the sale of a gun
“Look at the states in America that have passed stronger
to anyone who might seem likely to
gun laws,” she says. “Those states have
engage in terrorist activities. All four
seen their rates of domestic homicide
measures failed, casualties of partisanby gun, police shootings by civilians
ship (and NRA donor dollars).
with guns, mass shootings, gun trafSupporters
of
the
Second
ficking — all of these gun crimes — cut
Amendment reject the idea that restrictin half. But when you look at a state like
ing firearm use is the right course of
Missouri, that had strong gun laws and
action in the wake of serious gun-rereversed them, you see a spike in gun
lated tragedies, instead preferring to
homicides and suicides.”
deadliest mass shootings in
arm themselves. Following the Orlando
Watts argues that the NRA is “not
recent history
attack, the Pink Pistols, an LGBT group
about saving lives at all” — they just
that seeks to educate and train LGBT
want to sell more guns. The key to
people in firearm use for self-protecsaving lives is stronger gun regulations.
tion, saw a significant boost in interest.
“It’s just like climate change. You
Pulse nightclub, Orlando
The total number of chapters increased
can decide you don’t want to believe it,
to 40 and membership on the group’s
but credible scientists agree, on climate
June 2016
public Facebook page surged.
change and on gun violence. The best
49 killed, 53 injured
“A gun was used, so it’s got to be the
way to prevent gun violence is to have
gun’s fault,” says Gwendolyn Patton,
stronger national gun laws,” she says.
First Speaker of the Pink Pistols. “But
She also points out that federal laws
Virginia Tech
that doesn’t address the issue that it
are much more likely to effect change
April 2007
wasn’t a gun that did this. A person did
than a “state-by-state patchwork.”
32 killed, 23 injured
this using a gun. It sounds like a differ“The Chicago area has strong gun
ence about a distinction, but it’s not. It’s
laws,” Watts points out. “But guess
very important, because the attitude
what? You can go 20 minutes over the
that ‘the gun did it’ is largely projection.
border into Indiana, you can be a crimiSandy Hook Elementary
And we can’t afford to be engaging in
nal, and still buy a truckload of guns at a
December 2012
emotional projection when we’re dealgun show, take them back over the bor27 killed, 2 injured
ing with such a critical issue.”
der, and sell them out of the back of your
Patton, who lives in the suburbs
truck to kids. It happens every day.”
of Philadelphia, says the Pink Pistols
As the mother of a gay teenager, the
don’t necessarily object to background
Orlando shootings “hit close to home”
Luby’s Cafeteria, Texas
checks, as long as the data is not
for Watts. Arguments by pro-gun
October 1991
retained and used to create a national
groups that the death toll could have
registry. Such registries, she points out,
been lower had people been armed is
23 killed, 27 injured
have resulted in firearm confiscation in
victim-blaming, Watts says.
New York, Washington, and post-Ka“It’s almost like saying these people
trina New Orleans. She notes that a
at the Orlando nightclub were responSan Ysidro McDonald’s, San Diego
background check is only good as the
sible for their own murders. They’re
data put into it, emphasizing the need
not,” she says. “They were not in the
July 1984
for up-to-date, accurate information.
wrong place at the wrong time. They
21 killed, 19 injured
A person who mistakenly ends up on a
were in the right place in a nation with
restricted list must be able to petition to
the wrong gun laws.”
(Deaths don’t include perpetrators)
have themselves removed, she asserts.
With each shooting, affected comIn the wake of Orlando, Patton has
munities — whether LGBT people
suggested lifting prohibitions like those in Florida that after Orlando, women’s groups after a Planned Parenthood
prevent patrons from taking their guns into clubs and bars, shooting in November, or African-Americans and religious
which she nicknames “victim disarmament zones.” She’s groups after a shooting at a church in Charleston, S.C. —
also floated the idea of “designated defenders,” people per- have begun to foster relationships with gun violence premitted to carry firearms into nightspots and use them in the vention organizations like Everytown and Moms Demand
event of an attack.
Action. In turn, those organizations have borrowed a page
“It’s asinine,” says Shannon Watts. “The idea that we’re from the LGBT movement’s push for marriage equality,
going to arm people who are dancing and drinking in a choosing to work on a state-by-state basis to reform gun

5
1
2
3
4
5

22

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

23

laws, rather than looking to the U.S. Congress for solutions.
“Much like marriage equality, it’s not going to happen
unless people use their voices and their votes,” Watts says.
She also notes that the political landscape for those who
support tougher firearm restrictions is more favorable than
it was before President Obama took office.
“Eight years ago, no Democrats wanted to talk about
this issue. Flash forward to 2016, guns was the wedge issue

among Democrats, when they were fighting to be the strongest on the issue,” she says. “And now, going into the general
election, Secretary Clinton is calling this the most important
issue to vote on in 2016.”
It’s an issue that, for Watts, supplants all others.
“I personally have a hard time focusing on the economy,
and healthcare, and education, if I don’t know my 15-yearold is going to make it home from school.” l

NEXT TO NORMAL

Two weeks after Orlando, the LGBT community is finding its focus, politicians are returning to
normal, and the investigation into Omar Mateen deepens By Rhuaridh Marr

W

E STAND WITH YOU TODAY AS WE GRIEVE
together,” Attorney General Loretta Lynch said
at a press conference in Orlando this week. “And
long after the cameras are gone, we will continue to stand
with you as we grow together in commitment, solidarity and
in equality.”
Lynch was speaking directly to the local community,
after announcing that $1 million in emergency funding
would be provided to the area. The funds will be used to
help the investigation into the murder of 49 people at the
hands of Omar Mateen in the early hours of June 12, as well
as pay for the overtime accrued by the first responders and
police officers who ensured that death toll wasn’t many
magnitudes higher.
Almost two weeks since the worst mass shooting in
recent history, a lot has happened. We’ve learned about the
49 victims, most of whom hailed from the Latin community.
Their friends and families have filled newsfeeds, television
screens and print media with details of lives cut tragically
short. The Human Rights Campaign turned the front of
their D.C. headquarters into a giant memorial, while vigils
across the world mourned those lost, celebrated their lives,
and looked to the future of the LGBT rights movement.
LGBT organizations have banded together to tackle
rampant gun violence, with HRC president Chad Griffin
blaming the Orlando massacre on “a toxic combination of
two things: a deranged, unstable individual who had been
conditioned to hate [LGBT] people, and easy access to
military-style guns.” Activists, celebrities and thousands of
others flocked to social media to demand tighter gun legislation, with Oscar-winning screenwriter Dustin Lance Black
writing in an editorial for Entertainment Weekly that it was
“time to disarm hate.” The community that forced Reagan’s
government to take AIDS seriously in the ’80s has now
turned its attention to guns.
We’ve also watched as politicians reacted to the shooting and then returned to their everyday routine. President
Obama called it “an attack on the LGBT community,”
Clinton told LGBT people she had their back, and Trump
watched his favorability ratings plummet after several
inflammatory speeches. In Congress, Republicans not only
voted down stronger gun regulations, but also ignored
protections for LGBT people. The House Rules Committee

24

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

blocked a vote on preventing federal contractors from discriminating against LGBT people, a mere three days after
the Orlando shootings. It was hardly surprising, given the
chair of the committee, Rep. Pete Sessions (R), had insisted
that Pulse wasn’t an LGBT nightclub, but rather a “young
person’s nightclub” with “mostly Latinos” present.
Above all else, we’ve had some startling revelations
about Omar Mateen, the 29-year-old American citizen who
bought a handgun and a rifle and opened fire in a nightclub
full of people. His ex-wife called him “mentally unstable and
mentally ill,” the FBI confirmed they’d twice investigated
him but lacked the evidence to go further, while colleagues,
classmates and Pulse regulars told news media that Mateen
was struggling with his sexuality. Then the announcement
that Mateen’s wife, Noor Salman, knew he was planning
some sort of attack — and apparently texted with Mateen
during his rampage. She now faces prosecution for not alerting law enforcement to her husband.
Mateen’s actions during his three hour stand-off with
police inside Pulse are also under intense scrutiny — and
as Lynch stood in Orlando and pledged to help a community heal, she found herself and the Department of Justice
under fire for redacting the names of ISIS and its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, from transcripts of Mateen’s
conversations with 911 operators. Mateen had allegedly
pledged allegiance to both during a 50-second call to 911
after he began shooting. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R)
called the decision to redact the names “preposterous,”
though the DoJ claimed it had done so to avoid giving
Mateen a platform for “hateful propaganda.”
But as investigations focus on Mateen, his actions, and
the immediate aftermath, life in Orlando is returning to
some degree of normalcy. The streets surrounding Pulse
nightclub have mostly reopened, and Orlando Police and
the FBI have completed their investigation work inside the
club itself. A tweet by Orlando Police perhaps best summarized the sentiments of many in the wake of the tragedy:
“As investigation at Pulse scene wraps up and activity has
ceased, what’s left is profound sadness.”
As for Pulse, owner Barbara Poma told Today that she
would reopen the club as a tribute to the victims.
“We’re not going to let someone take this away from us,”
she said. “I will not let hate win.” l

Scene

26

Team DC’s Night OUT at the Nationals - Tuesday, June 14
Photography by Ward Morrison
See and purchase more photos from this event at www.metroweekly.com/scene

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

27

28

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

Community
p.m. For an appointment call
202-745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.

IDENTITY offers free and
confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East
Diamond Ave., and in Takoma
Park, 7676 New Hampshire
Ave., Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6
p.m. For appointments other
hours, call Gaithersburg, 301300-9978, or Takoma Park,
301-422-2398.
METROHEALTH CENTER
Vickii Vox (Photo: Ty Nolan, via Facebook) and Vincent Hill (Photo via Facebook).

A CELEBRATION OF LIFE FOR
VINCENT HILL
Memorial service, complete with live performances, will honor the life of
beloved Arena employee, also known for his drag persona Vicki Voxx

A

rena Stage is bidding a final goodbye to one of its most beloved employees:
former wig, hair and makeup supervisor Vincent Hill, who passed away on
Sunday, May 1. In addition to his work at various local theaters, and as a touring makeup artist for performers such as Chaka Khan and Stephanie Mills, Hill was
known to many as drag legend Vicki Voxx, a former performer at Ziegfeld’s and the
winner of multiple drag titles during the ’80s and ’90s.
Various Arena Stage staffers will offer remarks at the memorial, to also feature live
performances by Alyson Williams, Eleasha Gamble, Nehal Joshi and Bobby Smith,
who will perform an excerpt from La Cage Aux Folles, and a drag performance medley by local drag personalities Ella Fitzgerald, Tula and Monet Dupree. Vicki Voxx’s
dresses, outfits, crowns and trophies will also be displayed during the service.
“There will be moments that are heartfelt, touching, and there will be moments
that are uplifting,” says Steven Simon, one of the scheduled speakers. “One of the
things I want to see is people smiling and clapping and on their feet at the end, as we
remember the joy he brought and the fun he had. He wanted to make people smile and
laugh and have a good time.” — John Riley
THURSDAY, June 23
The DC ANTI-VIOLENCE
PROJECT (DC AVP), the group

dedicated to combating antiLGBT hate crimes, holds its
monthly meeting at The DC
Center. 7-8:30 p.m. 2000 14th St.
NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.
The DC Center, in conjunction
with the Mayor’s Office on
AAPI Affairs and the Mayor’s
Office of LGBTQ Affairs, hosts
LIFE AS AAPI LGBT, a meeting
and panel discussion focusing
on issues that affect LGBT
Asian/Pacific Islander youth.
6-7 p.m. 601 New Jersey Ave.
NW, 4th Floor Conference
Room. For more information,
visit thedccenter.org.

The LATINO LGBT TASK
FORCE holds its monthly
meeting at The DC Center. 6-7
p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite
105. For more information, call
202-682-2245 or visit thedccenter.org.

Weekly Events
ANDROMEDA
TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH

offers free HIV testing, 9-5
p.m., and HIV services (by
appointment). Call 202-2914707, or visit andromedatransculturalhealth.org.

DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC)

practice session at Takoma
Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St.
NW. 7:30-9 p.m. swimdcac.org.

DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay
and lesbian square-dancing
group features mainstream
through advanced square
dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas
Circle NW, 7-9:30 p.m. Casual
dress. 301-257-0517, dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES
Northern Virginia social
group meets for happy hour
at Sheraton in Reston, 11810
Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.

HIV TESTING at Whitman-

Walker Health. At the Elizabeth
Taylor Medical Center, 1701
14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At
the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30

offers free, rapid HIV testing.
Appointment needed. 1012 14th
St. NW, Suite 700.
202-638-0750.

SMYAL offers free HIV Testing,
3-5 p.m., by appointment and
walk-in, for youth 21 and
younger. 202-567-3155 or testing@smyal.org.

US HELPING US hosts a

Narcotics Anonymous Meeting,
6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia
Ave. NW. The group is independent of UHU.
202-446-1100.

WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE for young LBTQ

women, 13-21, interested in
leadership development. 5-6:30
p.m. SMYAL Youth Center, 410
7th St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

FRIDAY, June 24
CHRYSALIS arts & culture

group goes to E Street Theater,
between 10th & 11th Streets
NW, to view LGBT-themed
documentary Southwest of
Salem, as part of AFI Docs Film
Festival. Film begins at 8:45.
Tickets must be ordered in
advance from American Film
Institute, via afi.com/afidocs.
For more information, Craig,
202-462-0535. craighowell1@
verizon.net.

GAMMA, a confidential sup-

port group for men who are
gay, bisexual, questioning and
who are married or involved
with a woman, meets on the
second and fourth Fridays of
the month. GAMMA also offers
additional meeting times and
places for men in Northern
Virginia and Maryland. 7:309:30 p.m. St. Thomas’ Parish
Episcopal Church, 1772 Church
St. NW. For more information,
visit GAMMAinDC.org.

LGB PSYCHOTHERAPY
GROUP for adults in

Montgomery County offers a
safe space to explore coming

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

29

out and issues of identity. 10-11:30
a.m. 16220 S. Frederick Rd., Suite
512, Gaithersburg, Md. For more
information, visit thedccenter.org.
The DC Center holds its CENTER
AGING MONTHLY LUNCH social
for members of D.C.’s senior community. 12-2 p.m. 2000 14th St.
NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org or call
202-682-2245.
The DC Center starts a biweekly

SURVIVOR SUPPORT GROUP

for LGBT people facing obstacles
in healing from intimate partner
violence, hate crimes, assault, bullying, or other forms of physical or
emotional trauma. The group aims
to provide survivors with therapeutic techniques and tools that
empower them to heal from violence, but stop cycles of violence in
their communities. 6-7 p.m. 2000
14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more
information, contact Sam Shinberg,
LGSW, at survivorsupport@thedccenter.org.

WOMEN IN THEIR TWENTIES, a

social discussion and activity group
for LBT women, meets at The DC
Center on the second and fourth
Fridays of each month. Group
social activity to follow the meeting. 8-9:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW,
Suite 105. For more information,
visit thedccenter.org.

Weekly Events
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC)

practice session at Hains Point,
927 Ohio Dr. SW. 6:30-8 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.

HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker

Health. At the Elizabeth Taylor
Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson
Center, 2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9
a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appointment
call 202-745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.

METROHEALTH CENTER

offers free, rapid HIV testing.
Appointment needed. 1012 14th St.
NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.

PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-

affirming social group for ages
11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road
NW. Contact Tamara, 202-3190422, layc-dc.org.

SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a
social atmosphere for GLBT and
questioning youth, featuring dance
parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. More info, catherine.chu@
smyal.org.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-6
p.m., by appointment and walk-in,
for youth 21 and younger. Youth
Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-5673155, testing@smyal.org.

30

SATURDAY, June 25

DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC)

DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds

members of the LGBT community,
holds Saturday morning Shabbat
services, 10 a.m., followed by
Kiddush luncheon. Services in
DCJCC Community Room, 1529
16th St. NW. betmish.org.

DIGNITYUSA offers Roman
Catholic Mass for the LGBT
community. 6 p.m., St. Margaret’s
Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave.
NW. All welcome. Sign interpreted.
Visit dignitynova.org.

GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at
Quaker House, 2111 Florida Ave.
NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.

BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, includ-

FRIENDS MEETING OF
WASHINGTON meets for worship,

Weekly Events
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by

ing others interested in Brazilian
culture, meets. For location/time,
email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.
com.

DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC)

practice session at Hains Point, 972
Ohio Dr., SW. 8:30-10 a.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.

DC FRONT RUNNERS running/

walking/social club welcomes all
levels for exercise in a fun and supportive environment, socializing
afterward. Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd &
P Streets NW, for a walk; or 10 a.m.
for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.

DC SENTINELS basketball

practice session at Hains Point,
972 Ohio Dr., SW. 9:30-11 a.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.

10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW,
Quaker House Living Room (next
to Meeting House on Decatur
Place), 2nd floor. Special welcome
to lesbians and gays. Handicapped
accessible from Phelps Place gate.
Hearing assistance. Quakersdc.org.

HSV-2 SOCIAL AND SUPPORT
GROUP for gay men living in the

DC metro area. This group will be
meeting once a month. For information on location and time, visit
H2gether.com.
Join LINCOLN

CONGREGATIONAL TEMPLE –
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST for

team meets at Turkey Thicket
Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan
Ave. NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all
levels, gay or straight. teamdcbasketball.org.

an inclusive, loving and progressive
faith community every Sunday.
11 a.m. 1701 11th Street NW, near
R in Shaw/Logan neighborhood.
Lincolntemple.org.

DIGNITYUSA sponsors Mass for

METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY
CHURCH OF NORTHERN
VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led

LGBT community, family and
friends. 6:30 p.m., Immanuel
Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary
Road, Alexandria. All welcome. For
more info, visit dignitynova.org.

GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses
critical languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s, 900 U St.
NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@gmail.com.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing in Takoma
Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For
appointments other hours, call 301422-2398.

SUNDAY, June 26
ADVENTURING outdoors group

hikes 7.1 moderate miles in Prince
William Forest Park near Quantico,
Va. Bring beverages, lunch, bug
spray, sunscreen and about $8 for
fees. Carpool at 9 a.m. from parking lot on Army-Navy Drive near
Pentagon City Metro Station. Jerry,
703-920-6871. Adventuring.org.

Weekly Events
LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS

MEMORIAL EPISCOPAL CHURCH

celebrates Low Mass at 8:30
a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300
Cathedral Ave. NW. 202-232-4244,
allsoulsdc.org.

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

by Rev. Emma Chattin. Children’s
Sunday School, 11 a.m. 10383
Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-6910930, mccnova.com.

NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN
CHURCH, inclusive church with

GLBT fellowship, offers gospel
worship, 8:30 a.m., and traditional
worship, 11 a.m. 5 Thomas Circle
NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.
org.

ST. STEPHEN AND THE
INCARNATION, an “interra-

cial, multi-ethnic Christian
Community” offers services in
English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton
St. NW. 202-232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
CHURCH OF SILVER SPRING

invites LGBTQ families and individuals of all creeds and cultures to
join the church. Services 9:15 and
11:15 a.m. 10309 New Hampshire
Ave. Uucss.org.

MONDAY, June 27
Weekly Events
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC)

practice session at Hains Point,
927 Ohio Dr. SW. 7-8:30 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.

practice, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Garrison
Elementary, 1200 S St. NW. Visit
dcscandals.wordpress.com.

HIV Testing at WHITMANWALKER HEALTH. At the
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center,
1701 14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At
the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
For an appointment call 202-7457000. Visit whitman-walker.org.

KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY
(K.I.) SERVICES, 3333 Duke St.,

Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4
p.m. 703-823-4401.

METROHEALTH CENTER offers
free, rapid HIV testing. No
appointment needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m.
1012 14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202638-0750.
NOVASALUD offers free HIV test-

ing. 5-7 p.m. 2049 N. 15th St., Suite
200, Arlington. Appointments: 703789-4467.

SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5
p.m., by appointment and walk-in,
for youth 21 and younger. Youth
Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-5673155 or testing@smyal.org.

THE DC CENTER hosts Coffee
Drop-In for the Senior LGBT
Community. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000
14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
US HELPING US hosts a black gay
men’s evening affinity group. 3636
Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.

WASHINGTON WETSKINS
WATER POLO TEAM practices 7-9

p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300
Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers
with at least basic swimming ability
always welcome. Tom, 703-2990504, secretary@wetskins.org,
wetskins.org.

WHITMAN-WALKER HEALTH

HIV/AIDS Support Group for
newly diagnosed individuals,
meets 7 p.m. Registration required.
202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.

TUESDAY, June 28
The DC Center’s GENDERQUEER
DC support and discussion group
for people who identify outside the
gender binary, meets on the fourth
Tuesday of every month. 7-8:30
p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105.
For more information, visit thedccenter.org.

Weekly Events
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly

dinner in Dupont/Logan Circle
area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com,
afwashington.net.

DC FRONT RUNNERS running/

walking/social club serving greater D.C.’s LGBT community and
allies hosts an evening run/walk.
dcfrontrunners.org.

THE GAY MEN’S HEALTH
COLLABORATIVE offers free

HIV testing and STI screening
and treatment every Tuesday.
5-6:30 p.m. Rainbow Tuesday
LGBT Clinic, Alexandria Health
Department, 4480 King St. 703746-4986 or text 571-214-9617.
james.leslie@inova.org.

HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker
Health. At the Elizabeth Taylor
Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson
Center, 2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9
a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appointment
call 202-745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of
THE DC CENTER hosts “Packing

Party,” where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube.
7 p.m., Green Lantern, 1335 Green
Court NW. thedccenter.org.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS—

LGBT focused meeting every
Tuesday, 7 p.m. St. George’s
Episcopal Church, 915 Oakland
Ave., Arlington, just steps from
Virginia Square Metro. For
more info. call Dick, 703-5211999. Handicapped accessible.
Newcomers welcome. liveandletliveoa@gmail.com.

SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5
p.m., by appointment and walk-in,
for youth 21 and younger. Youth
Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-5673155, testing@smyal.org.

SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ
YOUTH ages 13-21 meets at

WEDNESDAY, June 29
The DC Center hosts a monthly
meeting of its HIV PREVENTION
WORKING GROUP. 6-8 p.m. 2000
14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more
information, visit thedccenter.org.

THE LAMBDA BRIDGE CLUB

JOB CLUB, a weekly support program for job entrants and seekers,
meets at The DC Center. 6-7:30 p.m.
2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For
more info, www.centercareers.org.

Weekly Events

METROHEALTH CENTER offers

AD LIB, a group for freestyle con-

versation, meets about 6:30-6 p.m.,
Steam, 17th and R NW. All welcome. For more information, call
Fausto Fernandez, 703-732-5174.

US HELPING US hosts a support

DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC)

Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY
MEN’S HEALTH AND WELLNESS/
STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m., 1701

14th St. NW. Patients are seen on
walk-in basis. No-cost screening
for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes
testing available for fee. whitman-walker.org.

HISTORIC CHRIST CHURCH

offers Wednesday worship 7:15 a.m.
and 12:05 p.m. All welcome. 118 N.
Washington St., Alexandria. 703549-1450, historicchristchurch.org.

meets for Duplicate Bridge. 7:30
p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St SE
(across from Marine Barracks). No
reservations needed. All welcome.
202-841-0279 if you need a partner.

SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m.
Cathy Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

group for black gay men 40 and
older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.

St. NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.

practice session at Hains Point,
927 Ohio Dr. SW. 7-8:30 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.

free, rapid HIV testing. No
appointment needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m.
1012 14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202638-0750.

NOVASALUD offers free HIV
testing. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 2049 N.
15th St., Suite 200, Arlington.
Appointments: 703-789-4467.

DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds

practice, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Garrison
Elementary, 1200 S St. NW.
Dcscandals.wordpress.com.

PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club
for mature gay men, hosts weekly
happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian
Kitchen, 1637 17th St. NW. Carl,
703-573-8316.

FREEDOM FROM SMOKING, a
group for LGBT people looking
to quit cigarettes and tobacco use,
holds a weekly support meeting at
The DC Center. 7-8 p.m. 2000 14th

Submit your community event for
consideration at least 10 days prior
to the Thursday publication you
would prefer it to appear. Email to
calendar@metroweekly.com. l

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

31

TAKIN
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JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

NG PRIDE

An assortment of photographs
from the 2016 Capital Pride Parade
and Festival, June 11 & 12
By Ward Morrison and Todd Franson
Additional photography by
Randy Shulman and Julian Vankim
More photos at MetroWeekly.com

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

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ALL IMAGES ©SUSAN KRAVITZ

Gallery

From the forthcoming

Mascara, Mirth & Mayhem: Independence Day on Fire Island
photographs by Susan Kravitz.
Releasing on July 4, 2016. Available for pre-order at
www.mascaramirthmayhem.com or www.susankravitz.com
JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

49

YU TSAI

Music + Stage

Falsettoland

With the bland and unappealing Last Year Was Complicated,
Nick Jonas proves eye-candy doesn’t equal
ear-candy By Gordon Lamont Ashenhurst

F

OR MANY, THE JONAS BROTHERS ARE BEST REMEMBERED AS A POP
culture punchline, due in part to their squeaky clean image and purity ring publicity. They did not do much in the way of providing a memorable soundtrack to
the teen pop mania they inspired in the trail of similar acts such as Hanson and, well,
Hanson. Yes, they had hits (of sorts), but arguably nothing that wormed its way into
one’s ears as much as other boy band teen-idols, such as the Backstreet Boys, Brother
Beyond and One Direction.
Now that brother Nick has grown up and gone solo, all this leans in his favor, as
he arguably has no songs as huge as mainstream radio staples “I Want It That Way”
or “Backstreet’s Back” to redefine himself against. On 2014’s Nick Jonas, his first
post- purity ring album that, unsurprisingly, carved out much more “edgy” style than
before, he was savvy enough to work with hip producers such as Jason Evigan (Maroon
5, Jason Derulo) and Sir Nolan (Selena Gomez, Jason Derulo). However, his latest
release, Last Year Was Complicated (HHHHH), fails to make the same bold strokes.
The album’s biggest problem is that Jonas doesn’t stretch himself at all, preferring to
let his producers do all the heavy lifting. Despite various contemporary, polished production surfaces, high profile duets (global superstar Tove Lo, anyone?), and even some
swearing, the record is curiously self-conscious and flat. Not that this need be a problem

50

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

for a singer who can sell on celebrity alone,
but previous single “Jealous,” his biggest
international hit to date, was as much
ear-candy as Jonas is eye-candy. Opening
with a smattering of skittery club-centric
songs successfully showcases his knack
for an easy listening experience, but the
sheer lyrical and melodic predictability of
songs such as “Voodoo” and “Champagne
Problems” undermine the glassy synths
that do their best to camouflage their
lack of identity. Ultimately, pleasant soon
becomes plodding, making Complicated
difficult to take in the one sitting.
Despite the reflective album title, the
album isn’t entirely bogged down by anxiety and confusion, with several productions elevating the mood by moving things
to the club. Indeed, he fares slightly better where the album finds more sprightly
form, such as on the thick ‘80s electro
pulse of “Champagne Problems,” a song
that pops its cork production-wise and yet
goes slightly flat with the actual song the
grooves are cushioning.
However, most songs slavishly follow
the Justin Timberlake next-door formula,

a setback in itself, such as on
the slightly patronizing “Good
Girls.” He is an unconvincing
lover on “Touch,” perhaps
because much of his stance
here seems borrowed blatantly from Michael Jackson and
sounds like an Invincible outtake. His already questionable
taste level is further questioned
on “Bacon,” a lukewarm slice
of smut so overcooked it would
embarrass Robin Thicke.
The sappy R’n’B ballads
could easily be any one of his
many peers (from Jason Derulo
to the latest solo whichever One
Direction member is up at bat);
they tend to blend together. Yet
he does shine on limited bursts
of uptempo dance-geared pop
songs that are sadly few and far
between. “Chains” is an exception, but may as well simply
be Beyoncé’s “Halo” with added profanity. It is telling that the

album’s true gem, the ambiguously titled “Under You,” is
in the same spirit as “Jealous.”
It’s proof that when given more
emphatic material, the results
are much more assured and
impressive.
Although he is a passable vocalist, rather than a
truly skilled one, Jonas often
lacks expression, adding to
the album’s sense of being all
smouldering technique and
glassy surface, without much
soulful or melodic substance.
His falsetto is as good as the
current crop of tattooed teeny-bop heartthrobs, but as with
Justin Timberlake’s hellishly
determined upper range before
him, is utterly without character, which is something that
can too often be said about the
songs themselves. Last Year
Was Complicated is simply smooth and unequivocally bland. l

TERESA WOOD

Last Year Was Complicated is now available on iTunes, Amazon and Spotify.

REDISTRICTING

District Merchants contemplates race, religion and
reality without the preacher

J

UST BY VIRTUE OF STUPID FUCKING BIRD, AARON
Posner’s reinvention of Chekhov’s The Seagull, anything
issuing from his pen should be given the benefit of the
doubt. The reason being that Posner writes for an underserved
audience: neurotics who like their humor fast and sharp and
their hearts and minds challenged by an irreverent but secretly
optimistic view of the human condition.
It’s all present and accounted for in his new play, District
Merchants (HHHHH), a clever and literarily-imaginative rendering of Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice, set in a post-Civil
War Washington D.C. in which Shylock’s rivals Antoine and
Bassanio are African-American. Though it tracks the original
plot, for Posner it is an opportunity to jet off into race and gender

issues that have contemporary urgency and relevance: the experience of post-slavery Blacks; Jews in America; the relationship
between Jews and Blacks; and what it means to be an outsider.
Posner works hard to understand and capture what he has
not lived, and it shows. To all his loaded issues, Posner injects not
only his usual brand of irreverent humor, but also a powerfully
intelligent ambiguity. We don’t necessarily know there will be
happy endings for the lovers and we don’t get any pat answers to
its many moral questions. Posner’s characters and conundrums
are just too complex.
This complexity, with all its moving parts, makes for a challenge the Folger production never quite conquers. It is partly
in director Michael John Garces’ slightly ponderous execution,
which allows pauses to drag and monologues to sound bookish.
It is also that the play may be more readable than it is performable. Whatever it is, there is an absence of necessary oomph
and only a few players buck the mood. Top of the list is Akeem
Davis as manservant Lancelot. Arriving like he’s been sent to
the rescue, Lancelot buzzes with the authentic agitation of life
and eyes that betray worry for a world he can hustle, but never
quite get. Next is Celeste Jones giving her Nessa, the rather
stock wiser-than-her-boss servant, a compellingly peeved and
expressive investment. As the two young women, heiress Portia
and Shylock’s daughter Jessica, Maren Bush and Dani Stoller
bring convincingly bright energies, but they have too little to play
against in their less than convincing lovers. Finally, although
Matthew Boston’s Shylock is nuanced and interestingly scary in
his anger and ambivalence, his encounters with Craig Wallace’s
impassive Antoine never sing.
Even if this production can’t quite drive Posner’s complex
train, it’s a chance to think about race, religion and reality without the preacher. — Kate Wingfield

District Merchants runs to July 3 at Folger Theatre, 201 E. Capitol St. SE. Tickets are $35 to $75. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu.
JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

51

COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP

Music

True to Form

The Avett Brothers’ ninth release strives for growth, but falls back on
some well-worn tropes By Sean Maunier

W

HAT BEGAN IN 2000 AS THE MODEST PROJECT OF BROTHERS SETH
and Scott Avett has since ballooned into a seven-member folk juggernaut.
Since 2009’s breakout hit I and Love and You, the band has successfully
turned a small, loyal following into a large, devoted fanbase by riding folk rock’s surge
in popularity over the past few years. Many bands have found success following the
lead of Mumford and Sons in marrying indie rock with elements of bluegrass and
Americana, but few have achieved the popularity and commercial success of the Avett
Brothers, currently playing a series of sold-out live shows across the United States.
All that baggage makes it a little hard to know what to do with True Sadness
(HHHHH). The band’s ninth studio album is certainly upbeat and celebratory, but
it lacks some of the punch of their earlier work. Here, the Avett Brothers seem to
be flirting with a greater variety of instrumentation and stylistic borrowings, but
they largely forego experimentation and stick to a style of simple folk rock melodies
wrapped around familiar topics. This is not necessarily a weakness — maintaining a
tight and consistent style allows them to keep the album focused on a single sound and
set of themes. Still, the experimentation is often muted, and between the twangy banjo,
acoustic guitar and rollicking fiddle, it’s hard not to get the impression that we have
heard this done before.
The album begins with “Ain’t No Man,” a boisterous anthem that seems readymade for festival crowds to stomp and clap along to. It’s a solid opener, and thematically, it sets the tone for the rest of the album, which explores themes of longing,
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JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

faith, disappointment, and human frailty. True Sadness maintains a fun, upbeat
tone despite its title, but the energy
of “Ain’t No Man” doesn’t quite carry
through the rest of it. Where the band’s
approach falters somewhat is in the lack
of cohesion, both between the songs and
internally. The Avett Brothers go from
theme to theme, barely touching on each
one before moving along to the next. Set
against the cheery, toe-tapping backdrop
of banjos and fiddles, potentially vulnerable songs like “Divorce Separation Blues”
feel stripped of the emotional weight they
might otherwise have had and instead
come across as a bit hollow.
Other tracks simply fall flat.
“Smithsonian,” a song heavy on banjo and
fiddle that bounces along but never quite
seems to go anywhere, also rings hollow
— the lyrics, claiming to have made the
discovery that “life isn’t easy and lunch
isn’t free,” are presumably meant to be
tongue and cheek, but become grating the
more they are repeated. This discontinuity is strange for a band that has delivered a rawer, more organic sound on past
releases. The genuine emotion that came
through so strongly on I and Love and You
is still there, but now it feels as though it is

being sung with a grin, a wink
and a nudge.
Despite these shortcomings, the Avett Brothers have
a strong foundation to work
from, and there are many things
they get right on True Sadness.
The banjo on “Satan Pulls the
Strings” gives this song a rollicking, tearing-through-themidwest-in-a-pickup
vibe,
while “No Hard Feelings” and
“Fisher Road to Hollywood”
feature soft vocals against
gentle, acoustic instrumentation — an approach that works
well in spite of its simplicity.
Beyond their more traditional
folk rock stylings, the Brothers
also show a certain willingness
to experiment with other elements, which allows them to
explore some interesting avenues. The song “You are Mine”
is a particular highlight, starting with a bouncing banjo that
moves into a thumping bassline, and quickly brings in a cascading piano and even a synthesizer. All of these elements could easily have clashed, but instead somehow work beautifully together,

the acoustic sounds keeping the
song grounded while the synths
lend it a nostalgic quality. “May
it Last” is a swelling, almost
cinematic closing track with
an orchestral hook that brings
home the idea of facing past
mistakes and future hardships
with faith, confidence and a
sense of humour.
Most of the tracks on True
Sadness are listenable enough,
and it’s possible that hearing
them through headphones or
a car stereo simply doesn’t
do them justice. A song like
“Victims of Life” might come
across as banal on its own, but
its repetitiveness and its swelling chorus line make it thoroughly stadium-friendly. The
Avett Brothers will no doubt
have many more chances to
play them in front of crowded
arenas and amphitheatres as they continue to tour the country
this summer. While True Sadness is held back by its timidity and
formulaic approach, an infectious optimism and some genuinely
enjoyable moments ultimately redeem it. l

True Sadness will be available on iTunes, Amazon and Spotify on Friday, June 24.

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

53

NightLife
Photography by
Ward Morrison

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

55

Scene

DrinksDragDJsEtc...
Thursday
June 23

Prize • Doors open
10pm, 21+ • $5 Cover or
free with college ID

9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 5-9pm •
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • Music videos
featuring DJ Wess

DC EAGLE
Doors open at 5pm •
Happy Hour, 5-8pm •
$2 Bud and Bud Light
Draughts, $3 Domestic
Bottles, $4 Rail and
Import Bottle Beer,
$6 Call • Strip Down
Thursdays — Happy
Hour starts with shirtless
men drink free rail and
domestic, 5-8pm • Men
down to their underwear drink $1 rail and
domestic, 10pm-12am
• DJ Kudjo Onyx starts
spinning, 9pm-1am •
Best Undressed Contest
at 11:30pm • $250 in
event tickets and prizes
• No Cover • 21+

COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $6 Call
Martini, $3 Miller
Lite, $4 Rail, $5 Call,
4-9pm • $3 Rail Drinks,
10pm-midnight, $5
Red Bull, Gatorade and
Frozen Virgin Drinks •
Locker Room Thursday
Nights • DJs Sean
Morris and MadScience
• Best Package Contest
at midnight, hosted by
Ba’Naka • $200 Cash

Town’s Pride Night - Saturday, June 11
Photography by Ward Morrison
See and purchase more photos from this event at www.metroweekly.com/scene

FREDDIE’S BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Ladies Drink Free Power
Hour, 4-5pm • Shirtless
Thursday, 10-11pm •
DJs BacK2bACk
JR.’S
All You Can Drink for
$15, 5-8pm • $3 Rail
Vodka Highballs, $2
JR.’s drafts, 8pm-close •
Flashback: Music videos
from 1975-2005 with DJ
Jason Royce, 8pm-12am
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat the Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo

NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm • No
Cover • Pride Cherry
Pop, with Justin Morse,
8pm
SHAW’S TAVERN
Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$3 Miller Lite, $4 Blue
Moon, $5 Rails and
House Wines & HalfPriced Pizzas • Lobster
Thursdays, 5pm-close •
Paint Nite, Second Floor,
7:30pm
THROBBING
THURSDAYS
@THE HOUSE
NIGHTCLUB
3530 Georgia Ave. NW
Diverse group of all
male, all nude dancers
• Doors open 9pm •
Shows all night until
close, starting at 9pm
• $5 Domestic Beer, $6

Imports • $12 cover •
For Table Reservations,
202-487-6646 • rockharddc.com
TOWN PATIO
Open 6pm • Happy Hour
all night, $4 drinks and
draughts • 21+
TRADE
1410 14th St. NW
Doors open 5pm • Huge
Happy Hour: Any drink
normally served in a
cocktail glass served in a
huge glass for the same
price, 5-10pm • Beer and
wine only $4
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
• 9pm • Cover 21+

Friday
June 24
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Friday
Night Videos with
resident DJ Shea Van
Horn • VJ • Expanded
craft beer selection •
No Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
All You Can Drink
Happy Hour • $15
Rail and Domestic,
$21 Call & Imports,
6-9pm • Guys Night
Out • Free Belvedere
Vodka, 11pm-Midnight,
$6 Belvedere Vodka
Drinks all night • DJ
MadScience presents
Frigid Bitch • DJ Keenan
Orr downstairs • $10
cover 10pm-1am, $5
after 1am • 21+

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

57

DC EAGLE
Doors open at 5pm •
Happy Hour, 5-8pm •
$2 Bud and Bud Light
Draughts, $3 Domestic
Bottles, $4 Rail and
Import Bottle Beer,
$6 Call • Centaur
Motorcycle Club on Club
Bar — $2 Draughts and
Jello Shots, 9pm-2am •
Fetish Friday — Shibari/
Kinbaku (rope) demo by
Pup Cooper, 9pm-midnight • No Cover • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $5
Smirnoff, all flavors, all
night long
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1,
4-9pm • $2 Skyy
Highballs and $2 Drafts,
10pm-midnight • Pop
and Dance Music Videos
with DJ Darryl Strickland
• $5 Coronas, $8 Vodka
Red Bulls, 9pm-close

58

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat the
Clock Happy Hour — $2
(5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4
(7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • No Cover •
Friday Night Videos with
Jack Rayburn, 9:30pm
SHAW’S TAVERN
Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$3 Miller Lite, $4 Blue
Moon, $5 Rails and
House Wines & HalfPriced Pizzas
TOWN
Patio open 6pm • DC
Bear Crue Happy Hour,
6-11pm • $3 Rail, $3
Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • No
cover before 9:30pm •
21+ • Drag Show starts
at 10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Miss Tatianna, ShiQueeta-Lee, Riley Knoxx
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
upstairs, DJs BacK2bACk
downstairs following the

show • GoGo Boys after
11pm • Doors open at
10pm • For those 21 and
over, $12 • For those
18-20, $15 • Club: 18+ •
Patio: 21+
TRADE
1410 14th St. NW
Doors open 5pm • Huge
Happy Hour: Any drink
normally served in a
cocktail glass served in a
huge glass for the same
price, 5-10pm • Beer and
wine only $4 • DJ Jeff
Prior, 10pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers,
hosted by LaTroya Nicole
• Ladies of Ziegfeld’s,
9pm • Rotating Hosts •
DJ in Secrets • VJ Tre in
Ziegfeld’s • Cover 21+

Saturday
June 25
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 3-9pm • $5
Absolut & Tito’s, $3
Miller Lite after 9pm

• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover •
Music videos featuring
various DJs
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Drag Yourself to Brunch
at Level One, 11am-2pm
and 2-4pm • Featuring
Kristina Kelly and the
Ladies of Illusion •
Bottomless Mimosas and
Bloody Marys • Happy
Hour: $3 Miller Lite,
$4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• AFTERGLOW Dance
Party, 10pm-close The
Ladies of LURe present
BARE, the Ladies’ Night
Party, 10pm-close • $5
Rail Drinks all night •
Doors open 10pm • $5
Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Doors open at 8pm •
Happy Hour, 8-10pm •
$2 Bud and Bud Light
Draughts, $3 Domestic
Bottles, $4 Rail and
Import Bottle Beer, $6
Call • No Cover • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH
BAR
Drag Queen Broadway
Brunch, 10am-3pm

• Starring Freddie’s
Broadway Babes • Crazy
Hour, 4-7pm • Freddie’s
Follies Drag Show,
8-10pm, hosted by Miss
Destiny B. Childs • No
Cover

SHAW’S TAVERN
Bottomless Mimosas,
10am-3pm • Happy
Hour, 5-7pm • $3 Miller
Lite, $4 Blue Moon, $5
Rails and House Wines
& Half-Priced Pizzas

GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $5
Bacardi, all flavors, all
night long

TOWN
Patio open 2pm • DC
Rawhides host Town
& Country: Two-Step,
Line Dancing, Waltz and
West Coast Swing, $5
Cover to stay all night
• Doors open 6:30pm,
Lessons 7-8pm, Open
dance 8-10:50pm •
CTRL presents: Proud,
11pm-close • Featuring
DJs Adam Koussari-Amin
and Devon Trotter • DJ
Wess spins downstairs
• Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Miss Tatianna, ShiQueeta-Lee, Riley Knoxx
and Ba’Naka • Doors
open 10pm • $12 Cover
• 21+

JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
Highballs, $7 Vodka
Red Bulls
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Guest DJs • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer, House Rail Drinks
and Mimosas, $4,
11am-5pm • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 3-9pm
• Jawbreaker’s 2nd
Year Anniversary Party,
9:30pm • Featuring DJ
Chord and DJ Kelly • $5
Absolut and $5 Bulleit
Bourbon • No Cover

TRADE
1410 14th St. NW
Doors open 2pm • Huge
Happy Hour: Any drink
normally served in a
cocktail glass served in a
huge glass for the same
price, 2-10pm • Beer and
wine only $4
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Men of Secrets, 9pm •
Guest dancers • Ladies
of Illusion with host Ella
Fitzgerald • Doors at 9
p.m., first show at 11:30
p.m. • DJs • Doors open
8pm • Cover 21+

Sunday
June 26

hosted by Robert Bise,
10pm-close • 21+
DC EAGLE
Doors open at 12pm •
$2 Bud and Bud Light
Draughts all day and
night, $3 Domestic
Bottles, $4 Rail and
Import Bottle Beer, $6
Call • BBQ and Beer
Bust, 2-7pm • No Cover
• 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH
BAR
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm •
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm-1am
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Mama’s Trailer Park
Karaoke downstairs,
9:30pm-close

9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 3-9pm •
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
$4 Stoli, Stoli flavors
and Miller Lite all day
• Homowood Karaoke,

JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights
and $3 Skyy (all flavors),
all day and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Drag Brunch, hosted
by Shi-Queeta-Lee,

11am-3pm • $20
Brunch Buffet • House
Rail Drinks, Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Pop Goes the World
with Wes Della Volla at
9:30pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 3-9pm
• No Cover
ROCK HARD SUNDAYS
@THE HOUSE
NIGHTCLUB
3530 Georgia Ave. NW
Diverse group of all
male, all nude dancers
• Doors open 9pm •
Shows all night until
close, starting at 9pm
• $5 Domestic Beer, $6
Imports • $12 cover •
For Table Reservations,
202-487-6646 • rockharddc.com
SHAW’S TAVERN
Brunch with Bottomless
Mimosas, 10am-3pm •
Sunday Funday Karaoke,
2nd Floor, 3-7pm • $5
Stoli Cocktails • Happy
Hour, 5-7pm • $3 Miller

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

59

Lite, $4 Blue Moon, $5
Rails and House Wines
& Half-Priced Pizzas
TOWN PATIO
Open 2pm • Cornhole,
Giant Jenga, and Flip-cup
inside Town
TRADE
1410 14th St. NW
Doors open 2pm • Huge
Happy Hour: Any drink
normally served in a
cocktail glass served in a
huge glass for the same
price, 2-10pm • Beer and
wine only $4
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
9pm • Cover 21+

Monday
June 27
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 5-9pm •
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports

60

• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
• $4 Small Plates, $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail,
$3 Miller Lite, $5 Call,
4-9pm • Monday
Night’s A Drag, hosted
by Kristina Kelly •
Doors open at 10pm •
Showtime at 11:30pm
• $3 Skyy Cocktails,
$8 Skyy and Red Bull •
$8 Long Islands • No
Cover, 18+
DC EAGLE
Doors open at 5pm •
Happy Hour, 5-8pm •
Free Pool all day and
night • Endless Happy
Hour prices to anyone
in a DC Eagle T-Shirt •
$1 Bud and Bud Light
Draughts, $3 Domestic
Bottles, $4 Rail and
Import Bottle Beer, $6
Call • No Cover • 21+

FREDDIE’S BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour all night
long • Puppy-Oke: Open
Mic Night Karaoke,
9:30pm-close
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1,
4-9pm • Showtunes
Songs & Singalongs,
9pm-close • DJ James •
$3 Draft Pints, 8pm-midnight
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat the Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Texas Hold’em Poker,
8pm • Dart Boards
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm • No
Cover
SHAW’S TAVERN
Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$3 Miller Lite, $4 Blue
Moon, $5 Rails and

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

House Wines and HalfPriced Pizzas • Trivia
with Jeremy, 7:30pm
TRADE
1410 14th St. NW
Doors open 5pm • Huge
Happy Hour: Any drink
normally served in a
cocktail glass served in a
huge glass for the same
price, 5-10pm • Beer and
wine only $4

Tuesday
June 28
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 5-9pm •
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
• $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis

COBALT/30 DEGREES
DJ Honey Happy Hour:
$2 Rail, $3 Miller Lite,
$5 Call, 4-9pm • SIN
Service Industry Night,
10pm-close • $1 Rail
Drinks all night
FREDDIE’S BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour all night
long, 4pm-close
JR.’S
Birdie LaCage Show,
10:30pm • Underground
(Indie Pop/Alt/Brit Rock),
9pm-close • DJ Wes
Della Volla • 2-for-1,
5pm-midnight
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat the Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Karaoke and Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm • No
Cover • Safe Word:

A Gay Spelling Bee,
8-11pm • Prizes to the
top three spellers • After
9pm, $3 Absolut, Bulleit
& Stella
SHAW’S TAVERN
Half Priced Burgers &
Pizzas, 5pm-close • $5
House Wines & Sam
Adams Drafts, 5pm-close
TOWN PATIO
Open 6pm • Yappy Hour
• Bring Your Dogs • $4
Drinks and Draughts
TRADE
1410 14th St. NW
Doors open 5pm • Huge
Happy Hour: Any drink
normally served in a
cocktail glass served in a
huge glass for the same
price, 5-10pm • Beer and
wine only $4

Wednesday
June 29
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 5-9pm •
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail,
$3 Miller Lite, $5 Call,
4-9pm • Wednesday
Night Karaoke, hosted
by Miss India Larelle
Houston, 10pm-2am •
$4 Stoli and Stoli Flavors
and Miller Lite all night
• No Cover • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • $6
Burgers • Drag Bingo
Night, hosted by Ms.
Regina Jozet Adams,
8pm • Bingo prizes •
Karaoke, 10pm-1am
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour all night
long, 4pm-close

JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1 Free, 4-9pm
• Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm • The Feud:
Drag Trivia, hosted by
Ba’Naka, 10-11pm, with
a $200 prize • $2 JR.’s
Drafts and $4 Vodka ($2
with College ID or JR.’s
Team Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
SmartAss Trivia Night,
8pm and 9pm • Prizes
include bar tabs and tickets to shows at the 9:30
Club • $15 Buckets of
Beer for SmartAss Teams
only • Bring a new team
member and each get a
free $10 Dinner
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm • No
Cover
SHAW’S TAVERN
Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$3 Miller Lite, $4 Blue
Moon, $5 Rails and
House Wines and HalfPriced Pizzas • Piano Bar
Second Floor, 8pm-close

TOWN PATIO
Open 6pm • $4 drinks
and draughts, 6-9pm •
Nashville Wednesdays:
Pop-Country music and
line dancing, with line
dancing lessons from DC
Rawhides every other
week
TRADE
1410 14th St. NW
Doors open 5pm • Huge
Happy Hour: Any drink
normally served in a
cocktail glass served in a
huge glass for the same
price, 5-10pm • Beer and
wine only $4
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Night, 10-11pm,
12-12:30am • Military
Night, no cover with military ID • DJ Don T. in
Secrets • 9pm • Cover
21+ l

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

61

LastWord.
People say the queerest things

“I never thought her life would be ended
right in front of my eyes.

— ISAIAH HENDERSON, speaking at a memorial service for his mother, Brenda Marquez McCool, who was one of 49 people
killed at Pulse nightclub in Orlando. While trying to escape with Isaiah, McCool was shot in the back. She told Isaiah to
keep running, rather than help her, which ultimately saved his life.

“ Words like abomination
popped off my skin like hot grease.”
— FRANK OCEAN, in a post on his Tumblr reacting to the Orlando shootings, detailing the hate he would hear when he attended church. “Many hate us and wish we didn’t exist,” he continued. “Many are annoyed by our wanting to be married like
everyone else or use the correct restroom like everyone else. Many don’t see anything wrong with passing down the same
old values that send thousands of kids into suicidal depression each year.”

“ We have to
fear the sodomites more than the jihadis.”
— PASTOR JAMES DAVID MANNING of ATLAH Church in Harlem, in his YouTube show The Manning Report. He told his followers that gay people represented a greater threat than Islamic extremism. “Show me how Muslims are stronger than the sodomites in terms of their destruction, their forces, their political power?” he ranted.

“I am the prime minister but
I’m not the dictator.”
— AUSTRALIAN PRIME MINISTER MALCOLM TURNBULL , responding during a Q&A to a woman who asked why the parliament
couldn’t vote to allow marriage equality, rather than submit the proposal to a plebiscite (public vote), which is expected to
cost upwards of $120 million. Turnbull is believed to be holding the public vote to appease
ultra-conservative members of his party.

“Today I am finally ready, willing and able to be
my true, authentic self.”
—SAM JOHNSON, recognized by the Seattle Times as one of the top high school soccer players in Western Washington, in
an Instagram post. Johnson has come out in the wake of the Orlando shootings, OutSports reports, sending a letter to his
extended family saying, “I have been silent for a very long time...but I decided that the time was now.”

62

JUNE 23, 2016 • METROWEEKLY

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