Chapter 1 Resource Masters

Consumable Workbooks
Many of the worksheets contained in the Chapter Resource Masters booklets are available as consumable workbooks. Study Guide and Intervention Workbook Skills Practice Workbook Practice Workbook 0-07-828029-X 0-07-828023-0 0-07-828024-9

ANSWERS FOR WORKBOOKS The answers for Chapter 1 of these workbooks can be found in the back of this Chapter Resource Masters booklet.

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Permission is granted to reproduce the material contained herein on the condition that such material be reproduced only for classroom use; be provided to students, teacher, and families without charge; and be used solely in conjunction with Glencoe’s Algebra 2. Any other reproduction, for use or sale, is prohibited without prior written permission of the publisher. Send all inquiries to: The McGraw-Hill Companies 8787 Orion Place Columbus, OH 43240-4027 ISBN: 0-07-828004-4 Algebra 2 Chapter 1 Resource Masters

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Contents
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Lesson 1-1
Study Guide and Intervention . . . . . . . . . . . 1–2 Skills Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Reading to Learn Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Lesson 1-6
Study Guide and Intervention . . . . . . . . . 31–32 Skills Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Reading to Learn Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Chapter 1 Assessment
Chapter 1 Test, Form 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37–38 Chapter 1 Test, Form 2A . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39–40 Chapter 1 Test, Form 2B . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41–42 Chapter 1 Test, Form 2C . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43–44 Chapter 1 Test, Form 2D . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45–46 Chapter 1 Test, Form 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47–48 Chapter 1 Open-Ended Assessment . . . . . . . 49 Chapter 1 Vocabulary Test/Review . . . . . . . . 50 Chapter 1 Quizzes 1 & 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Chapter 1 Quizzes 3 & 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Chapter 1 Mid-Chapter Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Chapter 1 Cumulative Review . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Chapter 1 Standardized Test Practice . . . . 55–56 Standardized Test Practice Student Recording Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A1 ANSWERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2–A30

Lesson 1-2
Study Guide and Intervention . . . . . . . . . . . 7–8 Skills Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Reading to Learn Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Lesson 1-3
Study Guide and Intervention . . . . . . . . . 13–14 Skills Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Reading to Learn Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Lesson 1-4
Study Guide and Intervention . . . . . . . . . 19–20 Skills Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Reading to Learn Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Lesson 1-5
Study Guide and Intervention . . . . . . . . . 25–26 Skills Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Reading to Learn Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

©

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

iii

Glencoe Algebra 2

It is also a helpful tool for ELL (English Language Learner) students. The Chapter 1 Resource Masters includes the core materials needed for Chapter 1. offer an historical or multicultural look at the concepts. Vocabulary Builder There is one master for each lesson. Pages vii–viii include a student study tool that presents up to twenty of the key vocabulary terms from the chapter. WHEN TO USE This master can be used as a study tool when presenting the lesson or as an informal reading assessment after presenting the lesson. short-term projects. and assessment options. used with students who have weaker mathematics backgrounds or need additional reinforcement. Reading to Learn Mathematics One master is included for each lesson. or as activities for days when class periods are shortened. WHEN TO USE Use these masters as reteaching activities for students who need additional reinforcement. Remind them to add definitions and examples as they complete each lesson. You may suggest that students highlight or star the terms with which they are not familiar. These problems more closely follow the structure of the Practice and Apply section of the Student Edition exercises. Students are to record definitions and/or examples for each term. extensions. Study Guide and Intervention Each lesson in Algebra 2 addresses two objectives. Finally. All of the materials found in this booklet are included for viewing and printing in the Algebra 2 TeacherWorks CD-ROM. or widen students’ perspectives on the mathematics they are learning. WHEN TO USE These may be used as extra credit. These exercises are of average difficulty. The first section of each master asks questions about the opening paragraph of the lesson in the Student Edition. These are not written exclusively for honors students. Skills Practice There is one master for each lesson.Teacher’s Guide to Using the Chapter 1 Resource Masters The Fast File Chapter Resource system allows you to conveniently file the resources you use most often. students are asked to summarize what they have learned using various representation techniques. Additional questions ask students to interpret the context of and relationships among terms in the lesson. Encourage them to add these pages to their Algebra 2 Study Notebook. but are accessible for use with all levels of students. Practice WHEN TO USE These provide additional practice options or may be used as homework for second day teaching of the lesson. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill iv Glencoe Algebra 2 . WHEN TO USE Give these pages to students before beginning Lesson 1-1. These pages can also be used in conjunction with the Student Edition as an instructional tool for students who have been absent. Enrichment WHEN TO USE These masters can be There is one extension master for each lesson. These provide computational practice at a basic level. These materials include worksheets. There is one Study Guide and Intervention master for each objective. The answers for these pages appear at the back of this booklet. These activities may extend the concepts in the lesson.

• Full-size answer keys are provided for the assessment masters in this booklet. The following lists describe each assessment master and its intended use. • Form 3 is an advanced level test with free-response questions.Assessment Options The assessment masters in the Chapter 1 Resource Masters offer a wide range of assessment tools for intermediate and final assessment. • The Open-Ended Assessment includes performance assessment tasks that are suitable for all students. Bubble-in and grid-in answer sections are provided on the master. includes a list of the vocabulary words in the chapter and ten questions assessing students’ knowledge of those terms. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill v Glencoe Algebra 2 . Intermediate Assessment • Four free-response quizzes are included to offer assessment at appropriate intervals in the chapter. Sample answers are provided for assessment. This master includes free-response questions. which may appear on the standardized tests that they may encounter. • Forms 2A and 2B contain multiple-choice questions aimed at the average level student. Answers • Page A1 is an answer sheet for the Standardized Test Practice questions that appear in the Student Edition on pages 52–53. grid-in. • Forms 2C and 2D are composed of freeresponse questions aimed at the average level student. Grids with axes are provided for questions assessing graphing skills. and quantitativecomparison questions. • The answers for the lesson-by-lesson masters are provided as reduced pages with answers appearing in red. • A Vocabulary Test. • The Standardized Test Practice offers continuing review of algebra concepts in various formats. It can also be used as a test. Grids without axes are provided for questions assessing graphing skills. Continuing Assessment • The Cumulative Review provides students an opportunity to reinforce and retain skills as they proceed through their study of Algebra 2. These tests are similar in format to offer comparable testing situations. This improves students’ familiarity with the answer formats they may encounter in test taking. • A Mid-Chapter Test provides an option to assess the first half of the chapter. These tests are similar in format to offer comparable testing situations. Chapter Assessment CHAPTER TESTS • Form 1 contains multiple-choice questions and is intended for use with basic level students. suitable for all students. A scoring rubric is included for evaluation guidelines. This practice includes multiplechoice. All of the above tests include a freeresponse Bonus question. It is composed of both multiple-choice and free-response questions. This can also be used in conjunction with one of the chapter tests or as a review worksheet.

NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1 Reading to Learn Mathematics Vocabulary Builder Vocabulary Builder This is an alphabetical list of the key vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 1. complete each term’s definition or description. Add these pages to your Algebra Study Notebook to review vocabulary at the end of the chapter. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition/Description/Example absolute value algebraic expression Associative Property        uh·SOH·shee·uh·tihv Commutative Property          kuh·MYOO·tuh·tihv compound inequality Distributive Property        dih·STRIH·byuh·tihv empty set Identity Property intersection Inverse Property (continued on the next page) Glencoe/McGraw-Hill © vii Glencoe Algebra 2 . As you study the chapter. Remember to add the page number where you found the term.

NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1 Reading to Learn Mathematics Vocabulary Builder Vocabulary Term Found on Page (continued) Definition/Description/Example irrational numbers open sentence rational numbers Reflexive Property set-builder notation Substitution Property Symmetric Property        suh·MEH·trihk Transitive Property Trichotomy Property        try·KAH·tuh·mee union © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill viii Glencoe Algebra 2 .

5.2. 14 14. 2 6. Example 2 if x Replace each variable with the given value. x(y 5) . cd 26. b c 10d) 215 4a 81. 12 13.2 bd 31. (5 (3 23)2 32)2 (8 4 6 2 1 2)2 14 3. a b c © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1 Lesson 1-1 Evaluate 3x2 3 and y 0.3 17. 1. 20 (4 1 4 2)3 18 6 4 2 34. Example 1 [18 (6 4)] Evaluate [18 2 [18 10] 8 2 4 (6 2 4)] 2. 9(32 7. ac 22. 2.7 Glencoe Algebra 2 c 7.8 18. 8(42 6 8 3 7 12. d(a 6. c2 b a d 1 d 6 5c 19. 21.5 13.5 5) 3 (9) 3( 4.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-1 Study Guide and Intervention Expressions and Formulas Order of Operations Order of Operations 1. 52 9. Simplify the expressions inside grouping symbols. 5(6c 20. 3. 3 25. (b 23.5) 27 13. c 4. 6(7) 15. 2 49. and d 4 Evaluate each expression if a 16.45 15 27. a c d 6b c) 54.25 6) 135 52 144 62 40 20 2) 23 4 1 22 6 2(4) 6 32) 8. (7 11.1 d 8. b 8b c)2 b d 1 .4 b b 21 4 4 d 24. 11 5. 6 5 38 240 24 3.5 Exercises Find the value of each expression. Do all multiplications and divisions from left to right. 3x2 x(y 5) 3 (3)2 3(0. 4. Do all additions and subtractions from left to right. Evaluate all powers. ab d 8. 14 4. 6 4 22 4 9 8 3 2 6 11 4 15 10. 16 (6 2) 17 2.

She will then find the volume of the beach ball in cubic centimeters and divide by the number of breaths to find the average volume of air per breath. The volume of a sphere is given by the formula V 4 3 r . The BMR of an 80-year-old man is given by the formula BMR 12w (0. You will need to buy 9 reams to print 172 copies. you can use the formula r number of reams needed. 1. where V is the volume of the 3 sphere and r is its radius. Sarah takes 40 breaths to blow up the beach ball. For a science experiment.6 You cannot buy 8.86 cm 2.) 50. How many reams of paper must you buy to print 172 copies of a 25-page booklet? Substitute n r (172)(25) 500 43. First she converts the radius to centimeters using the formula C 2. where r is the 500 of a booklet that is p pages long.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-1 Study Guide and Intervention Expressions and Formulas (continued) Formulas A formula is a mathematical sentence that uses variables to express the relationship between certain quantities. Exercises For Exercises 1–3. 500 8. A person’s basal metabolic rate (or BMR) is the number of calories needed to support his or her bodily functions for one day.000 500 172 and p 25 into the formula r np . use the following information. Example To calculate the number of reams of paper needed to print n copies np . where C is a length in centimeters and I is the same length in inches. What is the volume of the beach ball in cubic centimeters? (Use 3. Sarah counts the number of breaths needed for her to blow up a beach ball. What is the average volume of air per breath? about 1250 cm3 4. How many centimeters are there in 9 inches? 22. where w is the man’s weight in pounds. Her beach ball has a radius of 9 inches. If you know the value of every variable except one in a formula. you can use substitution and the order of operations to find the value of the unknown variable.02)(6)12w.015 cm3 3.54I. What is the BMR of an 80-year-old man who weighs 170 pounds? 1795 calories © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 Glencoe Algebra 2 .14 for .6 reams of paper.

What is the temperature in kelvins when the temperature is 55 degrees Celsius? 328 K 5 (F 9 22. (168 7)32 43 152 8. 9r2 (s2 1)t 105 20. 0 2v 2w r 19. 5 6(7 3(2 5) 4 12 2) 7 7. and w 1 . 3 . TEMPERATURE The formula K C 273 gives the temperature in kelvins (K) for a given temperature in degrees Celsius. s2r 3v 5s rv3 s2 t t wt 3 15. 2st 4rs 84 11. (3 8)2(4) 1 [ 9 3 3 97 4. 6r 2s 0 1. 2(3r w) 7 r)] 16. s 3. 1. 7s 22 21. s 2r 16v 1 13. What is the temperature in degrees Celsius when the temperature is 68 degrees Fahrenheit? 20 C © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-1 5. w(s r) 2 12. [3(5) 128 22]5 85 Evaluate each expression if r 9. t 12.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-1 Skills Practice Expressions and Formulas Find the value of each expression. w[t (t 25 2 18. 10(3)] 7 6. (4s)2 144 14. 18 2 3 27 2. 4 17. 9 6 2 1 13 3. v 0. TEMPERATURE The formula C 32) gives the temperature in degrees Celsius for a given temperature in degrees Fahrenheit. 2 10.

(c 16. What is Faith’s predicted profit this season if her orchard produces 300 bushels of apples? $4860 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 4 Glencoe Algebra 2 . d d)b 3. What is the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit when the temperature is 40 degrees Celsius? 40 F 24. 3 Evaluate each expression if a 13. What will the height of the object be after 6 seconds? 144 ft 25. 20 7. PHYSICS The formula h 120t 16t2 gives the height h in feet of an object t seconds after it is shot upward from Earth’s surface with an initial velocity of 120 feet per second. 3(4 3. 12. 2. 1 5. AGRICULTURE Faith owns an organic apple orchard. ( 2)3 8. she has developed the formula P 20x 0. ac3 20. 1 [ 5 4 ( 8)2 5 9 42) [20 16 2(62 3 22)] 88 52(3) 85 (17 11)]} 41 (3)(8) 3) 2(4 (5)(10) 18 8)] 16 1 5 32 3 . ac4 d b2de c e2 b[a 22 c) 67 21. 2ab2 (d 3 23. 1. 18 9.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-1 Practice (Average) Expressions and Formulas Find the value of each expression. 9bc 141 9 C 5 22. ab c 8. 12 6.b 4 5( 3)] ( 1)2 5 4( 9) 37) 53 1 . c 14. ab2 15. and e d 45 d2 12 de)e2 (c 1 e 8 12 70 d(b c) ac 17. [4(5 10. (b 19. 11. 4(12 4. From her experience the last few seasons. TEMPERATURE The formula F 32 gives the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit for a given temperature in degrees Celsius. 1 [6 2 8(13 6 7) 2 (5 {5 42] 11 3(4) 3) [34 2 20 3 2.01x2 240 to predict her profit P in dollars this season if her trees produce x bushels of apples. 1 d) 2 ] 206 18.

Then divide what you get by 2. (parentheses. Multiply the difference of 13 and 5 by the sum of 9 and 21. • Nurses use the formula F V t d Pre-Activity to control the flow rate for IVs. Add the result to 10. There is a customary order for grouping symbols. Helping You Remember 4. Sample answer: Please excuse my dear Aunt Sally.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-1 Reading to Learn Mathematics Expressions and Formulas How are formulas used by nurses? Read the introduction to Lesson 1-1 at the top of page 6 in your textbook. Identify the innermost expression(s) in each of the following expressions. multiplication and division. different people might get different answers. {14 22) [5(8 [8 8] 6) (3 4 (3 2(10 12)2]} 22) 7)] (8 (63 6) and (10 100) (3 12) 7) 2. a. 9 c. exponents. t represents drop factor time and is measured in drops minutes . [(3 b. addition and subtraction) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 5 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-1 . Braces are used outside of brackets. 1350 8 60 Reading the Lesson 1. and is measured in • Write the expression that a nurse would use to calculate the flow rate of an IV if a doctor orders 1350 milliliters of IV saline to be given over 8 hours. Do not find the value 20 of this expression. V represents the flow rate volume . [(13 5)(9 21) 10] 2 3. Then use grouping symbols to show how the instructions can be put in the form of a mathematical expression. with a drop factor of 20 drops per milliliter. Think of a phrase or sentence to help you remember the order of operations. F represents the per minute. Brackets are used outside of parentheses. Name the quantity that each of the variables in this formula represents and the units in which each is measured. and is measured in drops of solution and is measured in milliliters d represents the per milliliter. Why is it important for everyone to use the same order of operations for evaluating expressions? Sample answer: If everyone did not use the same order of operations. Read the following instructions.

Thus. 1. 1. 908 yd 0. 0. Zeros at the end of a decimal fraction are significant. – In general. is 210 grams. 38. For example.050 mm has 2 significant digits.000 km has 5 significant digits. For example. The measurement 200 g has one significant digit. Nonzero digits and zeros between significant digits are significant. Underlined zeros in whole numbers are significant. Round the result to 3 significant digits. – 210 g – 5. 370. The measurement 104. measured to the nearest gram. 9. 2. the measurement 9.20 m 2.071 m has 4 significant digits. 0. The mass of the same object.20 10 2 g 3 5 2 3 Solve. 30. and 0.1 13. a computation involving multiplication or division of measurements cannot be more accurate than the least accurate measurement in the computation.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-1 Enrichment Significant Digits All measurements are approximations. 1. 23 m 1.000 km – 4 6. 9. 3. – 37 does not represent a measurement.5 63 cm 14. Example The mass of 37 quarters is 210 g. The measurement 0.6 m 4. 370. 0. 2. 9. the result of computation involving multiplication or division of measurements should be rounded to the number of significant digits in the least accurate measurement. 4. 3.000 km – 1 7.000 ft – 520 ft 11.54 m 35 m2 11 10.01 mm 4. Find the mass of one quarter. 0. the mass of an object. 7. The measurement 210 g has 3 significant digits. 12.68 g 37 210 has 3 significant digits.0 m 12.7 104 g 3 8.5 cm 25 23.01 mm 121. measured to the – nearest 100 g. 8314.70 cm 3. and 1.0605 mg 6 5. 11. Round each result to the correct number of significant digits. is 200 g. The significant digits of an approximate number are those which indicate the results of a measurement. 5 and 0. Why? mass of 1 quarter Write the number of significant digits for each measurement. 0.1 mm Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1820 yd 6 150 m2 Glencoe Algebra 2 © .

34 1 2 Q. b. 73 N. R 9. R 15. 9.2 Q. Q. 3. R 2. N. 1. R 15 3 7.02 Q. and integers. R Glencoe Algebra 2 © 7 Lesson 1-2 rationals (Q). 3. 1. R Q I N W Z real numbers rational numbers irrational numbers natural numbers whole numbers integers {all rationals and irrationals} {all numbers that can be represented in the form . R 8. 894. 36 9 Q. W. 81 Z. rationals (Q). Q. Q. 8. reals (R) Exercises Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs. wholes (W). W. 2 5 I. R 18.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-2 Study Guide and Intervention Properties of Real Numbers Real Numbers All real numbers can be classified as either rational or irrational. R 5. R 4. where m and n are integers and n n is not equal to 0} {all nonterminating. 0. 5. 6 7 Q. 3. 26. 4. 1. Q. 2. R 25 5 10. integers (Z). 8. R 11. N. R 17. 2. R 12. 3. W. 192. 11. 7. whole numbers. Q. 1 Z.1 Q. 42 I. reals (R) . 33.3 Q. R Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 19. R 16. …} m Example a. R 3.17 Q. R 13.000 N. 2. 6. 7. R 20. W. 4. R 6. 25 25 5 naturals (N). 8 13 Q. nonrepeating decimals} {1. 4. Z. 0. 1. 5. 2. The set of rational numbers includes several subsets: natural numbers. R 14. Z. Q. 11 3 Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs. Q. 0 W. I. Z.0005 Q. …} {…. 6. Z. …} {0. Z.

2r 10. 10(6g 3h) 4(5g h) 51s 5. 12 a 3 13t b 4 k 2 j 5 3. 8(2. 1 (4j 5 2k 6j 3k) 20a 4.9x.3x) 77 10. and c Property Commutative Associative Identity Inverse Distributive a (a a a a(b b b) 0 a Addition b c 0 0 ab a a a ( a) a (b c) a b b a a (b c) 1 a 1 a Multiplication (a b) c a 1 a ( a) c) If a is not zero. 40s 18t 5t 11s 3. 2.1x)3 0.2(7x 39.9x 3y 12y 3y (3 0.5x 6) 16.5j 3b 8. 1. 12. ac and (b Example 9x 3y 12y Simplify 9x 0.1s) 6(1.4j 8. then a c)a ba ca 1 1 a a.9))x 8.5) 12.7k 10.5r 2.7x 3 p 4 1 r 5 16 3 r 5 1 p 2 62.9j 9.9x) (9 ( 0.75m 14.2k 5f ) 11. 1.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-2 Study Guide and Intervention Properties of Real Numbers (continued) Properties of Real Numbers Real Number Properties For any real numbers a. 40 2 (18 3 105c 6n 12 3n) 2.2s 5) (10 4. 8(3a b) 4(2b a) 2. 4(20 26h 4p) 3 (4 4 4a 16p) 8.4r 80g 7.5m(12 5. b. 5. 12y 12)y Commutative Property ( ) Distributive Property Simplify. 2(15 45c) 1 p 4 5 (12 6 4 r 5 18c) 140g 15.4e 13.9k 4.1x 15y Exercises Simplify each expression. 9x ( 0.4s) 6. 50(3a 2n b) 20(b 2a) 2j © 7 8 190a 70b Glencoe Algebra 2 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill . (7 120h 2(3.6(e 4. 9(7e 4p 4f) 0.7x 17. 4(10g 39f 80h) 20(10h 5g) 8. 14( j 9 2) 3j(4 7) 20 18.

( ) 9. Q. ( ) Comm. x 22. ( ) Name the additive inverse and multiplicative inverse for each number.8 33. Iden. y a 3y z 4a y x 3a2 3y 1 (8 2 z 0 1 2z) 10h 2g z) 13m 1) 8 2a2 3x 3a 2z 3 1 23. 6. 3(m 25. Z.5 Mult. 5y 1 5y Assoc. 15x(1) 15x 1 Mult. a2 24. 4. ( ) 12. 4 4 15 4 4 . (10b 12b) 7b (12b 10b) 7b Assoc. 3 x x 3 8.875 Q. 19. 3x 21. R 2. 10. R 3. 34 N. 5 5 Simplify each expression. 2(r w) 2r 2w Add. 1 15 5 4 16. Iden.25 18. 15. R Name the property illustrated by each equation. W. W. 6(2 © (5x 3) 2v 1 (15d 3 10d) 10d Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 9 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-2 . (3g 5 2x 3h) z) v) 3 5x 5g 5(2m 4(2v 2 13h 8z 20.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-2 Skills Practice Properties of Real Numbers Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs. Q. 9 Z. 3 3 4 1. 0. 1. 3a 0 3a Comm.6(25)]0. R 12 3 N. 2x 26. 0. 0. R 5. Q. 14. 15 17. 15. 1. 13.25. 2r (3r 4r) (2r 3r) 4r Distributive 11. 525 Z. Inv.6[25(0. 7. Q. Z.5)] [0. R 30 I.

6 6 35 Simplify each expression. 7 3. Distributive Add. 4c 4a) 4a 12y) 1 (10a 5 5 3 x 6 5 1 12 8x 6y 13y 31. Ian drives his car at 50 miles per hour for (t 2) hours. ( ) 17.4.8 Q. Name the additive inverse and multiplicative inverse for each number. 16 Z. Iden. 0 N. R 5. 9. 3(2x)y 1 4 Distributive 14. Q.6. 4c 28. 2(4 3y 7y 10s) 2x 2x (3 3y 3x 6y) 8x 4(7s y) 4(5 2r) x 24. 23. Inv. 2. it follows that a 1 a 1 . ( ) 11. b b false. ( ) 16. 5 6 0. 7x (9x 8) (7x 9x) 8 Comm. Q. 11a 2c 13b (4c 15) 12y 7a 2c) 1 (8 2 1 (2x 4 3b 4a 16b y 5r y) 3 58s 26.5 16 11 20. Explain your reasoning. 13. 25 36 I. R 8.4 21. 7n 2n (7 2)n Mult. Iden. 19. R 7. R 35 Z. 0. (110t 100) mi 32.625 11 11 . 5x (4y 3x) 5x (3x 4y) 10. counterexample: 5 1 © 5 4 1 4 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 10 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 8x 27. W. 5 1.6 1. 22. 2 4. Z. 6425 2. 5(x y) 5x 5y Add. R 6. R 31. 0. Inv. R Name the property illustrated by each equation.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-2 Practice (Average) Properties of Real Numbers Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs. Write a simplified expression for the sum of the distances traveled by the two cars. TRAVEL Olivia drives her car at 60 miles per hour for t hours. Q. 5x 25. I. NUMBER THEORY Use the properties of real numbers to tell whether the following statement is true or false: If a b. 4y 1y Comm. 3x 2y 3 2 x y 15. 3(r 29. R Q. Z. 16 16 55. 5(3x y) 5(3x 1y) Assoc. W. Q. 1. 18. 30. (6 6)y 0y (3 2)(xy) Assoc. ( ) 12. 4n 0 4n Mult.

57 2.” Explain why one of these numbers is rational and the other is irrational. but they are grouped differently on the two sides of the equation.57 and 0. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 11 Glencoe Algebra 2 . Consider the equations (a b) c a (b c) and (a b) c c (a b).NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-2 Reading to Learn Mathematics Properties of Real Numbers How is the Distributive Property useful in calculating store savings? Read the introduction to Lesson 1-2 at the top of page 11 in your textbook. Sample answer: Add all the individual coupon amounts or add the amounts for the scanned coupons and multiply the sum by 2. The number 0. Sample answer: (12 12 (18 45) 12 18) 63 45 75 30 45 75.010010001… is a non-repeating decimal because. there is no block of digits that repeats. and the commutative property says you can switch the order when two numbers that are being added or multiplied. An association is a group of people who are connected or united. and the associative property says that you can switch the grouping when three numbers are added or multiplied. The numbers 2. Then illustrate this property by finding the sum 12 18 45 in two different ways. Helping You Remember 4. (a b) c a (b c).5757… is a repeating decimal because there is a block of digits. How can you tell which property is being used in each equation? The first equation uses the Associative Property of Multiplication. Refer to the Key Concepts box on page 11. 2.010010001… both involve decimals that “go on forever. b. • Why are all of the amounts listed on the register slip at the top of page 11 followed by negative signs? Sample answer: The amount of Pre-Activity each coupon is subtracted from the total amount of purchases so that you save money by using coupons. 57. • Describe two ways of calculating the amount of money you saved by using coupons if your register slip is the one shown on page 11. So this number is an irrational number. So the second equation uses the Commutative Property of Multiplication. The quantities a. although the digits follow a pattern. Sample answer: 2. so this number is rational. that repeats forever. and c are used in the same order. Write the Associative Property of Addition in symbols. Reading the Lesson Lesson 1-2 1. How can the meanings of the words commuter and association help you to remember the difference between the commutative and associative properties? Sample answer: A commuter is someone who travels back and forth to work or another place. The second equation uses the quantities in different orders on the two sides of the equation. One of the equations uses the Associative Property of Multiplication and one uses the Commutative Property of Multiplication. 3.

x4. 1(1) 1 The identity for multiplication is 1. 1. i Example 1 Is there some number. { 1. x3. 3. and so on. 0 2 2. 1} is a group with respect to multiplication because all four properties hold. . in the set such that i a a a for all a? 0 1 1 1 0. 1 2 3 … . i. {multiples of 5}. Example 2 The set { 1. a . addition yes 3. Associative Property: For all numbers in the set. Identity: Inverse: 1( 1) 1. Identity: c) (1 (a 2) b) c? 3. (1)( 1) 1. 1 is the inverse of 1 since ( 1)( 1) 1. multiplication no 5. The set has closure for addition. (2) the Associative Property. and 1 is in the set. …}. and 1 is the identity. is a b in the set? 0 1 1. The set is not a group with respect to addition because only three of the four properties hold. 0 2 2 2 0. But the set does not contain 3. 1 is the inverse of 1 since (1)(1) 1. {irrational numbers}. Tell whether the set forms a group with respect to the given operation. multiplication no 4. multiplication no 6. and 1 is the identity. and (4) an inverse for each member of the set. Associative Property: ( 1)[( 1)( 1)] ( 1)(1) 1. have an inverse. Does the set {0. addition no 2 2 2 2. (3) a member which is an identity. does a (b 0 (1 2) (0 1) 2. …} form a group with respect to addition? Closure Property: For all numbers in the set. ( 1)(1) 1. (1)(1) 1 The set has closure for multiplication. {x. 1 (2 3) The set is associative for addition. and so on. and so on The set is associative for multiplication. 1. Is the set { 1. 2. addition no © 8. . …} addition no 7. {integers}. {integers}. {rational numbers}. such that a a a a i? The integer inverse of 3 is 3 since 3 3 0. and 2 is in the set. 3. . x2. 2. and so on. The identity for addition is 0. addition yes Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 12 Glencoe Algebra 2 .NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-2 Enrichment Properties of a Group A set of numbers forms a group with respect to an operation if for that operation the set has (1) the Closure Property. and 0 is the identity for addition. Inverse: Does each number. Each member has an inverse. there is no inverse for 3. 1} a group with respect to multiplication? Closure Property: ( 1)( 1) 1. Therefore. a.

Example 2 18 Exercises Write an algebraic expression to represent each verbal expression. the sum of 100 and four times a number 100 4n n) 5n 6. Word Expression and. Six times the difference of a number and two is equal to 14. n 3 Example 1 Write a verbal sentence to represent 6(n 2) 14. the product of 3 and the sum of 11 and a number 3(11 7.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-3 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Equations Verbal Expressions to Algebraic Expressions The chart suggests some ways to help you translate word expressions into algebraic expressions. 9. 5n n 3 35 79 The difference of three times a number and 35 is equal to 79. 3n 10. difference. four times the sum of a number and 3 4(n 3. Sample answers are given. 13 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Lesson 1-3 . the sum of six times a number and 25 6n 2. four times the square of a number increased by five times the same number 4n 2 8. 2(n3 11. 4n Twice the sum of the cube of a number and three times the 3n2) n square of the number is equal to four times the number. increased by. quotient 1 of a number) 2 Operation addition subtraction multiplication division Write an algebraic expression to represent 18 less than the quotient of a number and 3. Any letter can be used to represent a number that is not known. more than minus. of (as in divided by. sum. 7 less than fifteen times a number 15n 25 3) 7 9n 6 n 4. less than times. product. plus. decreased by. 1. 23 more than the product of 7 and a number 7n 23 Write a verbal sentence to represent each equation. 8 The quotient of five times a number and the sum of the number and 3 is equal to the difference of the number and 8. the difference of nine times a number and the quotient of 6 and the same number 5.

1 (100 4x) 5 4 20 x 5 Exercises Solve each equation. For any real numbers a. or division. 3x 11. for p p f 4 s 20 4r q 2y 1 k 2 6. a 18. c c Example 1 100 100 8x 8x 100 8x x Solve 100 140 140 40 5 100 8x 140. 5 n 2 9 1 x 2 a 3 8 5x 8 3. 4. 5(4 12. for j j a 3 h c 1 12 7 17. for x x 108. if a b. © 3b 12g x k) 5m c. 16. 5t 6. and c. if c is not zero. if a b. 4x 14t. for y y 12 10 3 m n 20. for m m 20n 5n 1 3y Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 14 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 2xy 22. 0. for f f 42 24 2d 4t 4 x 3 18 23. then a c b c and a c b c. for s s 10. 13 15 8 1 6t 2(z 5 4 7) 10k 8. . 3. Example 2 4x 4x 5y 5y 4x 5y y y Solve 4x 100 100 100 4x 4x 5y 100 for y. for t t 12. 100 16 15. and c. 120 13. 4n 10 50 3 y 4 17 98 20 9. h 20. 1. 21.5 k) 2p 75 60 80 53 2n 5 n 28 5r 20 1 2 14. 2x 102 x 9 Solve each equation or formula for the specified variable. for b b 1. For any real numbers a. 17 5. for g g 7. subtraction. 19.7 2.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-3 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Equations (continued) Properties of Equality multiplication.1 3 4 7. Check your solution. 2 m 3 45 15 1 3 2 4 2.5s 25. 3(2j 24. b. Addition and Subtraction Properties of Equality Multiplication and Division Properties of Equality You can solve equations by using addition.2b 10. s 2t 3pq r d 2 10. b. a b then a c b c and. 7 8. 3s 4.

then d f 1.8n Solve each equation or formula for the specified variable. increased by 7 2. for p p x 2 y I rt 24. the product of 11 and the square of a number n) 11n2 are given. for y y 2A x 26. 3t 19. A number divided by 3 is the difference of 2 and twice the number. 15. If 7x 14. y 1 x 4 12. x 18.5b 10. 4 3b 5x 7 20 6 2 15 1 2 2b 22 5 20. for h h © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 15 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-3 11. then 14 7x. 4 times a number. 4m 17. 9. b2 3 b 10.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-3 Skills Practice Solving Equations Write an algebraic expression to represent each verbal expression. y 3 2 2y Three added to the square of a number is the number. . If d 1 f. Check your solution. I 25. 23. Name the property illustrated by each statement. Subtraction ( ) 14. 6 times the sum of a number and 5 4.5b.2n 34 5 5 4n 5 0. 3 times the difference of 4 and a number 3(4 6. If a 0. If (8 7)r 30. 21. and 0. 2. then 15r 30. 8 less than 5 times a number 4n 6(n 7 5) 5n 3n 9 8 3. The sum of 8 and 3 times a number is 5. the product of 3 and a number. Transitive ( ) 13. Symmetric ( ) Solve each equation. 8 3x 5 The difference of a number and 8 is 16. for x x 4y 48 A 2 r2 2 r . Write a verbal expression to represent each equation. 1. Sample answers 7. a 5x 2a 5 Substitution ( ) 2 2t 3x 18 4 5 5 24 3 3 5 16. divided by 9 5. A 2 r2 2 rh. then a 10. n 8 16 8. 7–10. A prt. 4v 22. 12.

6(2) 4g 76. w width. If h 13 12 52. 1. 9. 10 cm 26. then 2(2q 12m 1) 45. If t 11. h mc2. 13. 13. 14 15. GEOMETRY The length of a rectangle is twice the width. 7. $16 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 16 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 3y 4y3 are given. of a number and 5 is 3 times the sum of twice the number and 1. 5 s 6 4n 3 4 59 11 1 12 5 17 5 1 8 4 1. 5(6 3 7 E c2 h t 20. The total cost of the rented clubs and the green fees for each person was $76. Symmetric ( ) Subtraction ( ) Solve each equation. If 4m 1) 4. 1 less than twice the square of a number 5(m Write a verbal expression to represent each equation.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-3 Practice (Average) Solving Equations Write an algebraic expression to represent each verbal expression. 6y 1 6 3c 2 2(E U ) w2 1 Solve each equation or formula for the specified variable. Two of the friends rented clubs for $6 each. What was the cost of the green fees for each person? g green fees per person. E Define a variable. 1. E 23. GOLF Luis and three friends went golfing. 9 16. 3 4 Division ( ) 15. 25.8 8 21 18. 5–8.6r 5 4v) v 7. the sum of two consecutive integers y 5 2 1) n 2y 2 (n 1 1) 3. 6x 5 5 7 9x 3(2y 4 5 1) 19. for v v 22. 5 times the sum of a number and 1 4. 17. 5 2x 4 6. write an equation. 2 more than the quotient of a number and 5 2. 2(2w) 2w 60. 10. Find the width if the perimeter is 60 centimeters. then 52 22. for I I gt 2 24. The difference of 5 and twice a number is 4. and solve the problem. c 2d 3 1 2 Iw 2 1 . 3c 2(c 1) 8. Sample answers 5. then Multiplication ( ) 8 1 n 2 6r 1 14. Three times a number is 4 times the cube of the number. for d d U. Check your solution. Name the property illustrated by each statement. If 8(2q 12. m 5 3(2m 1) The quotient Three times a number is twice the difference of the number and 1. for m m vt gt2. 21. then h t 10.

c. Do not actually solve the equation. In your equation. expressions do not.42m 153. she agreed to pay $28 per day plus $0. 2. If she kept the truck for 3 days and the rental charges (without tax) were $153.72 Helping You Remember 3. a. Read the following problem and then write an equation that you could use to solve it. How are algebraic expressions and equations related? Sample answer: An equation is a statement that says that two algebraic expressions are equal. The equal sign is like the line of symmetry. and operation signs. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 17 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-3 . you are looking at yourself. how many miles did Louisa drive the truck? 3(28) 0. The symmetric property of equality allows you to interchange the two sides of an equation. The reflexive property says that every number is equal to itself.42 per mile. How are algebraic expressions and equations alike? Sample answer: Both contain variables. When Louisa rented a moving truck. How are algebraic expressions and equations different? Sample answer: Equations contain equal signs.72. Pre-Activity P (220 6 A) I or P (220 A) I 6 Reading the Lesson 1. In geometry. let m be the number of miles driven.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-3 Reading to Learn Mathematics Solving Equations How can you find the most effective level of intensity for your workout? Read the introduction to Lesson 1-3 at the top of page 20 in your textbook. • To find your target heart rate. what two pieces of information must you supply? age (A) and desired intensity level (I ) • Write an equation that shows how to calculate your target heart rate. b. constants. symmetry with respect to a line means that the parts of a figure on the two sides of a line are identical. Sample answer: When you look at your reflection. How can the words reflection and symmetry help you remember and distinguish between the reflexive and symmetric properties of equality? Think about how these words are used in everyday life or in geometry.

1. A B B B Draw a Venn diagram and three overlapping circles. The intersection of A and B consists of all elements in both A and B. (A 10. S Draw a Venn diagram and shade the region indicated.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-3 Enrichment Venn Diagrams Relationships among sets can be shown using Venn diagrams. A 4. A B) (B C C) 8. 7. First find the intersection of A and B. A 6. Then find its complement. (A 9. The complement of A consists of all elements not in A. A 3. Example Shade the region (A ∩ B) . and finding the complement. intersection. Is the intersection operation associative? yes © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 18 Glencoe Algebra 2 . Is the union operation associative? yes 12. See students’ diagrams. The circles represent sets A and B. A B (A B) means the complement of the intersection of A and B. which are subsets of set S. See students’ diagrams. Then shade the region indicated. You can combine the operations of union. (A B) B) C C 11. A B A B A S S S The union of A and B consists of all elements in either A or B. (A B B B) 2. Study the diagrams below. A 5.

5w 2z 2y 34 11. y  7 1 . 7 x 3x 11 7. w 4x 12 8. • Words Absolute Value For any real number a. 3 wz 4 20 24. 5 w z 15 7 41 2 4. the absolute value of a is the opposite of a. a a.  2x Evaluate  4  2x Example 2 if x 4 and y 3y 2x Evaluate 2x 3. 8w 31 22. 7yz 30 9 16. 6y z yz 6 14. xyz 1 5z 2 wxz 54 19. 2x y 5y 6 18. z 42z y 40 12. 3. 3y  4  2 6  4  12 4 12 8 2( 4) 3(3)  8 9  17 17 Exercises Evaluate each expression if w 1. xz xz 24 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 19 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-4 10. 14 2w xy 4 17. and a a. x 5 2w 1 5. 6 4. z 35yz 39 13. 10 xw 2 . if a is positive or zero. Absolute Value Expressions Example 1 if x  4 6. x y z 6. 2x 8 4 2. the absolute value of a is a. The symbol x is used to represent the absolute value of a number x. 3wx 1 4x 4 8y 27 15.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-4 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Absolute Value Equations The absolute value of a number is the number of units it is from 0 on a number line. yz 4w 23. if a 0. If a is negative. 12 10x 10y 1 8y 2 3 21. • Symbols For any real number a. x z 2. wz xy 23 9. if a 0. zz xx 32 w 17 20. and z 2 6.

40 14. 30} 14 2x 23x 15 4x a 11 . Check your solutions. where b Use the definition of absolute value to solve equations containing absolute value expressions. 5f 15. 1 4p 3 15 5 9 24 37 { 52. Always check your answers by substituting them into the original equation. 15 8. 12} 10 {6. Exercises Solve each equation. 8 4 3 2k 5a 1 4x 3 3x 5 12 0 { 1. 5n 9. 22} 45 { 40. Example Case 1 Solve 2x b 17 17 20 10 3 17. 3x 12. 9} 2m {3} 45 { 15. 1. 4b 16. 16 11 { 2. 5b 7. Case 2 a 2x 3 2x 3 3 2x x 3  14 3  17 17 b 17 17 14 7 17 17 17 17 ✓ a 2x 3 2x 3 3 2x x 2x 2(10) 20 3 3 CHECK 3 17 3 17 3 17 17 17 17 17 ✓ There are two solutions. 2. x 5. if a b then a b or a b. x 3. 50} 16 8 2 3n { 2} p 1 4 3x 20 {12} 1 4 23. 0. t 4. 10 and CHECK 2( 7) 7.1 2 11 1 7 10.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-4 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Absolute Value Equations (continued) Absolute Value Equations For any real numbers a and b. 2b {2. 6 1 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 20 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 11. m 6. Check your solutions. Sometimes computed solutions are not actual solutions. 12 {4}  1 x 3 3 3f 2x 1 2 10} 9} 13.

3 1 6w 1. x 2. 13. 5a 10 { 2. 2} 15. 3n 2 1 2 1 5 . Evaluate each expression if w 1. 3k 6 2 4 8 . 6.4 w 1 7 Solve each equation. 9y z 17 4. 2} 21. y 3 2 { 5. 47 y 1 11 {4. 2x x 9 { 3. y 3.  9y 27 3. and z 10. 8d 4d 5 13 { 2. 2 6 15 24. 10z 31 131 6. 3 3 16.2 10. 11} 18. 4} 22.4. 7x 3x 2 18 { 4. 10} 23. 2} 25. 44  2x y 45 9. 8x 3y 5x 21 7.  3x 2y 4 4 12. 25 5z 1 24 8.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-4 Skills Practice Solving Absolute Value Equations 0. 24w 3. 1} 14. p 7 14 20. 6 6 26. 2g 6 0 { 3} 17. k 10 9 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 21 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-4 . 17z 170 2y 5.6 11. 3} 19. 23w 12 { 2. Check your solutions. 56a 2 5 1 . 10 1 c { 9. 5w 2 2.

7x 18. 2b 8. 5 27 11 3 3s { 8} 5 0 { 2. For example. maximum: 54% 22 Glencoe Algebra 2 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill . and d 4 12 3b 1 7c 5 2d 5 114 5 1. 15 132 4 23  0. a 19. A poll with a stated margin of error of 3% predicts that candidate Tonwe will receive 51% of an upcoming vote. 8 23. b 8. 17} 29 { 13. 5x 20. x © 51 3. OPINION POLLS Public opinion polls reported in newspapers are usually given with a margin of error. 2b 5. 32 52d 2w 3 4 7 { 3. 17c 6.9 F. 65 13 3 4 2y 1 3y 5w 6 2 {11. 10d 610a 7 a 12 3c 2 b 1. 16} 24 3 {11} 9 {3. 1  8b a 33 52 7. 24 27. 6a 6 3.5 10. 30.6 3b 11. 5a 9. 2y 17. 3 29. 4w 24. 42y 25. 4d 12.4 degrees Fahrenheit. 16} 42 { 12. n 15. 26. 4 4 37 { 4} 14 1.9 F 30. 52r 22. WEATHER A thermometer comes with a guarantee that the stated temperature differs from the actual temperature by no more than 1. 4} 14.4. minimum: 48%. 1} 1} 28.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-4 Practice (Average) Solving Absolute Value Equations Evaluate each expression if a 1. Check your solutions. c 2. Write and solve an equation to find the minimum and maximum actual temperatures when the thermometer states that the temperature is 87. 34x p 7 s 3 4 3 6 9 2p 5 13 { 9.4 1. Write and solve an equation describing the minimum and maximum percent of the vote that candidate Tonwe is expected to receive. 2 2a 12. minimum: 85. x 16.5.5c b 17. maximum: 88. a poll with a margin of error of 5% is considered accurate to within plus or minus 5% of the actual value.5b a 14 4. 13. 5. 3u 19.5 degrees Fahrenheit. t 87. 3} 6 9 7 13 . 21. 15} 42 { 9.2 Solve each equation.

2 .9 on the Richter scale. Explain why the absolute value of a number can never be negative. then a ( 25) 25. Sample answer: If a is negative. Sample answer: The absolute value is the number of units it is from 0 on the number line. Helping You Remember 5. then there are no solutions. so an absolute value equation is needed. . a number from 1 to 10 that tells how strong an earthquake is • Why is an absolute value equation rather than an equation without absolute value used to find the extremes in the actual magnitude of an earthquake in relation to its measured value on the Richter scale? Sample answer: The actual magnitude can vary from the measured magnitude by up to 0. The number of units is never negative.3 unit in either direction. a is positive. • If the magnitude of an earthquake is estimated to be 6. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 23 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-4 greater than 0. then 2. Explain how a could represent a positive number. 3.6 or as high 7. How can the number line model for absolute value that is shown on page 28 of your textbook help you remember that many absolute value equations have two solutions? Sample answer: The number line shows that for every positive number. there are two numbers that have that number as their absolute value. What does the symbol mean as a solution set? Sample answer: If a solution set is .NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-4 Reading to Learn Mathematics Solving Absolute Value Equations How can an absolute value equation describe the magnitude of an earthquake? Read the introduction to Lesson 1-4 at the top of page 28 in your textbook. What does the sentence b 0 mean? Sample answer: The number b is 0 or 4. • What is a seismologist and what does magnitude of an earthquake mean? Pre-Activity a scientist who studies earthquakes. Example: If a 25. Give an example. it might actually have a magnitude as low as as 6. Reading the Lesson 1.

NAME ______________________________________________ DATE______________ PERIOD _____ 1-4 Enrichment Considering All Cases in Absolute Value Equations You have learned that absolute value equations with one set of absolute value symbols have two cases that must be considered. For an equation with two sets of absolute value symbols. Check your solution. | x 3 | 5 must be broken into x 3 5 or (x 3) 5.5 2 |5x 10 | x |x 3| x 5. Here are the equations for |x |x 2| 2| 3 3 x (x 6 6) Each of these equations also has two cases. Check your solution. |x 2| 3 |x 6 |. 2 Solve each absolute value equation. First we must write the equations 0 and where x 6 0. Consider the problem | x for the case where x 6 these two cases: 2 | 3 | x 6 |. | 3x 4| 6| |x 7| x 1. List each case and solve | x 2| | 2x 4| |x (x 3 |. By writing the equations for both cases of each equation above. The only solution to this equation is 5 . For example. How many cases would there be for an absolute value equation containing three sets of absolute value symbols? 8 6. | x 9| 4| |x 6 3| x 12. 1. four cases must be considered. |2x 4.5 2 2. you end up with the following four equations: x (x 2 3 2) x 3 6 x 6 x x 2 2 3 3 (x (x 6) 6) Solve each of these equations and check your solutions in the original equation. 2. x x (x (x 2 2 2x 2x 2) 2) 4 4 ( 2x ( 2x x (x 4) 4) 3 3) x (x 3 3) x x 2) 2) 2 2 2x 2x 4 4 4) 4) x (x x (x 3 3) 3 3) (x ( 2x ( 2x No solution © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 24 Glencoe Algebra 2 . | x 3.

5 4 3 2 1 0 ∞) 4. Then graph the solution set on a number line. and c.5d 15 75 xx 4 3 2 1 or 1 . 10 8 6 9) {dd 24} or ( ∞. c b . 18 4k 2(k 21) 5. 3(9z 4) 35z 4 3. 2) 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 {nn 8 7 6 7} or ( 7. Multiplication and Division Properties for Inequalities For any real numbers a. 2 3(m 5) 4(m 3) {kk 8 7 6 4} or ( 4. 2 2 1 0 1 2 3 ∞ 4 {yy 14 12 9} or ( ∞. 5] 3 4 5 6 7 8 7. Then graph the solution set on a number line. If c is negative and a b. 4(b 7) 6 22 6. 35 35 18 6 is ( 3 2 17 . If c is positive and a b. 7(7a 9) 84 2. 2. then ac bc and a bc and a c a bc and c These properties are also true for and . 11) 9 10 11 12 13 14 {mm 0 1 2 5} or ( ∞. 4 2x x The solution 2x 4 36 4 32 16 set is {xx Example 1 Example 2 17 3w 16}. If c is negative and a 4. c b . then ac b. 2. 3w 17 17 3w w The solution set 9 8 7 6 5 4 Solve 2x 4 36. c Solve Inequalities Addition and Subtraction Properties for Inequalities For any real numbers a. and c: 1. then a c b c and a 2. then a c b c and a c c b b c. Describe the solution set using set-builder or interval notation. 1 (2y 3 3) y 2 9. 1. If a b. 5(12 3n) 165 {aa 4 3 3} or ( ∞. 24] 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 25 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-5 . b. If c is positive and a 3. Solve 17 3w 35. 1 6].NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-5 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Inequalities The following properties can be used to solve inequalities. with c 0: 1. then ac bc and a c c b . b. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Exercises Solve each inequality. c b . 3] 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 {zz 4 3 2} or ( ∞. 5 4 3 2 1 0 ∞) {bb 6 7 8 11} or ( ∞. c. If a b. then ac b. Then graph the solution set on a number line. 4x 2 7(4x 2) 8.

They want to win at least 80% of their games. PARKING FEES The city parking lot charges $2. The friends can bowl at most 4 strings. Solve the inequality and interpret the solution. At midseason. BOWLING For Exercises 4 and 5. 482 n 80 6 or 6n 482 80 3.50) 4(1. The total number of games they will have won by the end of the season is 16 x.50 per person. Three of the friends need to rent shoes for $3. use the following information. use the following information. The chart below shows some common phrases that indicate inequalities.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-5 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Inequalities (continued) Real-World Problems with Inequalities Many real-world problems involve inequalities.8(36) 16 x 12.50.50 for the first hour and $0. He has already read 80 pages. 3(3. they have won 16 games.25(x 1) 6. Ethan is reading a 482-page book for a book report due on Monday. how many strings can they afford to bowl? 4. the Vikings must win at least 13 of the games remaining. Write an inequality to describe this situation. Four friends plan to spend Friday evening at the bowling alley. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 26 Glencoe Algebra 2 . A string (game) of bowling costs $1. Write an inequality with .8(36) x 0.50 to determine for how many hours you can park your car. Ethan must read at least 67 pages per hour in order to finish the book in less than 6 hours. Solve the inequality and interpret the solution. How many of the remaining games must they win in order to win at least 80% of all their games this season? Let x be the number of remaining games that the Vikings must win. He wants to figure out how many pages per hour he needs to read in order to finish the book in less than 6 hours.50)n 40 5.8 Since they cannot win a fractional part of a game. solve the inequality 2.25 for each additional hour. At most 17 hours PLANNING For Exercises 2 and 3.50 per person. is less than is fewer than is greater than is more than is at most is no more than is less than or equal to is at least is no less than is greater than or equal to SPORTS The Vikings play 36 games this year. Write an equation to describe this situation. Example Exercises 1. 2. If the friends pool their $40. If the most you want to pay for parking is $6.50 0. 16 x 0.

n 12 18. 3] 3 4 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3. 4x or (3. 0. 2z 9 5z {zz 3} or (3.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-5 Skills Practice Solving Inequalities Solve each inequality.4} 14. Then solve. Five less than the product of 6 and a number is no more than twice that same number. ∞) 6 7 4. 4] 12. 4(5x 7) 13 xx 3 or 4 ∞.7y 0. 1.3m 2m 4 {mm 4} or ( ∞. The difference of three times a number and 16 is at least 8. n 5 4 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 27 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-5 16. graph the solution set on a number line. n 23 17. One half of a number is more than 6 less than the same number. 3n 16 8. 1 n 2 n 6. 6n © 5 2n. ∞) 5 6 8. ∞) 1 2 3 4 6. 20 3s 7s {ss 2} or ( ∞. 1. 3s 8 5s {ss 1} or [ 1. 7 2 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 11. Describe the solution set using set-builder or interval notation. 2) 3 4 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 5. 3a 7 16 {aa 3} or ( ∞. z 4 9 2 {zz 8} or ( ∞. 3x 9 {xx 3} or [ 3. 4] 4 5 6 4 3 2 1 0 2 1 0 1 2 3 7.4. ∞) 4 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 9. ∞) 6 9 2x 1 {xx 5} or (5. 4 3 2 1 8] 2.78 5 {yy 3. n 19 42.7m 0. n 8 . 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 3 4 13. Nineteen more than a number is less than 42. ∞) 10. Then. 4b 9 7 {bb 4} or ( ∞. 7f 9 3f 1 {ff 2} or (2. ∞) 7 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Define a variable and write an inequality for each problem. 15. 16 3q 4 {qq 4} or (4. 7t 3 4 4 (t 4) 25 tt 7 2 4 or ∞.

n 20 2n. w $2550 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 28 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 0. graph the solution set on a number line. 9x 11 6x 9 xx 2 2 or .6) 5) {xx 9.1)x 12x 30 600 to find how many nights the Lincoln’s can stay at the hotel without exceeding total hotel costs of $600. ∞) 12. 8x 4 6 3 2 10 {xx 1 0 1 2 3 2} or [2.5 times that same number. 17. 5 nights 18. BANKING Jan’s account balance is $3800.8 17. 3800 750 w 500. 14s 4 9s 3 2 5 {ss 1 0 1 2 3 1} or ( ∞. 3(4w 1) 18 ww 5 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 or ∞. q 2(2 q) 0 qq 4 or 3 13.6} or ( ∞. Hotel parking is $12 per day. 4x 2 3 3. The Lincoln’s expect to spend $30 in tips during their stay. 4) Define a variable and write an inequality for each problem. Then solve. HOTELS The Lincoln’s hotel room costs $90 a night.5 {xx 1} or [ 1. 2] 4. Solve the inequality 90x 90(0. 9(2r 5) 3 7r 4 {rr 4} 10.5 4 3 19 2 2. 15. 1 4 8u 3 2 3u 1 0 10 {uu 1 2 3 4 1} or [1. ∞) 8. ∞ 3 3 6. Four times the sum of twice a number and 4[2n 5. Write and solve an inequality describing how much she can withdraw and still meet these conditions. Describe the solution set using set-builder or interval notation. An additional 10% tax is added. ∞) {nn 4} or ( ∞. 1 or ( ∞. 23 2 4u 1 0 1 11 {uu 2 3 4 5 3} or (3. n ( 3)] 20 3 is less than 5.5n. n 4. 6] ∞. 4) 5(x 8) 2 (x 6} or ( ∞. 1.5x {xx 1 0 1 2 3 4 0. 4n 5(n 3) 3(n 1) 4 {ww 3} or ( 3. $750 is for rent. ∞) 4 2. Twenty less than a number is more than twice the same number. Then. 16 4 3 8r 2 0 {rr 1 0 1 2 3 4 2} or ( ∞. Jan wants to keep a balance of at least $500. Of this.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-5 Practice (Average) Solving Inequalities Solve each inequality. 36 2(w 77) 4(2w 52) 14. 16. 5 4 7. 4 3 11. ∞) 6 3. 1) 4 5.

a. you must be willing to attend at least ten rehearsals. 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 2. Helping You Remember 3. Suppose that your classmate is having trouble remembering this rule. Then plot their additive inverses. There is space for at most 165 students in the high school band. To participate in a concert. {xx c. Plot two positive numbers. Write an inequality that compares the positive numbers and one that compares the negative numbers.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-5 Reading to Learn Mathematics Solving Inequalities How can inequalities be used to compare phone plans? Read the introduction to Lesson 1-5 at the top of page 33 in your textbook. A student may enroll in no more than six courses each semester. {xx b. 3 and 8. d. Show how you can write an inequality symbol followed by a number to describe each of the following situations. a. The order changes when you multiply by 1. There are fewer than 600 students in the senior class. 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 3} ( ∞. 5} [5. 3 and 8. Notice that 8 3. ∞) ∞) d. but 8 3. 3) ( ∞. There are several different ways to write or show inequalities. One way to remember something is to explain it to another person. A common student error in solving inequalities is forgetting to reverse the inequality symbol when multiplying or dividing both sides of an inequality by a negative number. 2] ( 1. Find your monthly cost with each plan. How could you explain this rule to your classmate? Sample answer: Draw a number line. Plan 1: Pre-Activity $67 Plan 2: $55 Plan 2 Which plan should you choose? Reading the Lesson 1. • Write an inequality comparing the number of minutes per month 400 or 400 150 included in the two phone plans. 600 6 10 165 b. 150 • Suppose that in one month you use 230 minutes of airtime on your wireless phone. for example. c. Write each of the following in interval notation. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 29 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-5 .

is a factor of. Reflexive Property Symmetric Property Transitive Property For any element a of set A. . symmetric . In each of the following. {all numbers} no. {all numbers} no. {all integers} yes © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 30 Glencoe Algebra 2 . If it is not. {all people in Roanoke. {all women in Tennessee} no. {all members of the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra} yes 13. {all numbers} no. is the square of. . reflexive 12. then b R a. reflexive. and c of set A. tell which of the properties it fails to exhibit. {all triangles in a plane} yes 3. 2. {all polygons in a plane} yes 7. and transitive. is the spouse of. reflexive. has the same color eyes as. {all nonzero integers} no. a R a. reflexive. reflexive. . symmetric 6. transitive 8. symmetric 5. {all lines in a plane} no. reflexive 4. if a R b. For all elements a and b of set A. symmetric. Write yes if the relation is an equivalence relation on the given set. 1. ⊥. .NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-5 Enrichment Equivalence Relations A relation R on a set A is an equivalence relation if it has the following properties. symmetric. Therefore. it is an equivalence relation. {all numbers} no. transitive 11. transitive 14. is the sister of. reflexive. symmetric 10. a relation and a set are given. transitive 9. is the greatest integer not greater than. {all lines in a plane} no. if a R b and b R c. Virginia} no. {all integers} no. symmetric. then a R c. is the greatest integer not greater than. For all elements a. is a multiple of. Equality on the set of all real numbers is reflexive. b.

NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-6 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Lesson 1-6 Compound Inequalities A compound inequality consists of two inequalities joined by the word and or the word or. Example: x 5 4 3 2 3 or x 1 0 1 1 2 3 4 5 The graph is the union of solution sets of two inequalities. 3y 2 3y y 8 6 4 Example 2 7 2 0 2 4 6 8 7 9 3 2 0 or or or 2 4 2y 1 2y y 8 9 8 4 6 Exercises Solve each inequality. 22 6w 2 82 8. To solve a compound inequality. And Compound Inequalities Or Compound Inequalities Example: x 5 4 3 2 4 and x 1 0 1 2 3 3 4 5 The graph is the intersection of solution sets of two inequalities. you must solve each part separately. Graph the solution set on a number line. Graph the solution set on a number line. Graph the solution set on a number line. 3a 8 23 or 1 a 4 6 7 {x 4 8 6 4 x 2 0 2 4} 4 6 8 {aa 5 or a 52} 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 3. 5k 2 13 or 8k 1 19 {x7 3 5 7 x 15} {kk 4 3 2 3 or k 1 0 1 2 3 2. 3 8 4 4 8 Example 1 2x 2x x x 6 4 5 and 2x 5 2x x 19 14 7 Solve 3y 2 7 or 2y 1 9. 2 b 3 2 10 or 3 b 4 5 4 {y29 y 54} {bb 24 12 12 or b 0 12 18} 24 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 7. 18 4x 10 50 4.5} 4 9 11 13 15 17 19 5. 1. Solve 3 2x 5 19. 10 3x 2 14 2. 4d 1 9 or 2d 5 11 {w4 0 2 4 w 6 14} 8 10 12 14 16 {all real numbers} 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 31 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 100 5y 45 225 6.

By statement 2 above. 3x 5 4 4 3 2 8 x 4 1 0 1 2 3 x 4 3 2. If a b. 10 0 1 2k 2 3 4 2 {k4 5 6 7 8 k 6} 8.5 or s 6. the following statements are true. then a b or a Use the definition of absolute value to rewrite an absolute value inequality as a compound inequality. Subtracting 2 from both sides of each inequality gives x 2 or x 6. These statements are also true for Solve x 2 4.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-6 Study Guide and Intervention (continued) Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Absolute Value Inequalities For all real numbers a and b. and . 4s 8 6 1 4 27 {ss 2 0 2 4 6 8 6. 5w 8 6 2 4 28 {w 6 2 0 2 4 6 8 w 5. then x 2 4 or x 2 4. 0. 1. 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 Example 2 Exercises Solve each inequality. a 40 9 20 30 {aa 0 20 40 39 or a 21} 4 0 5. Adding 1 to all three parts of the inequality gives 4 2x 6. then b a b. b 1. By statement 1 above. c 2 8 3  4 5 {c 4 8 12 16 20 24 c 16} 4. 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 Example 1 Solve 2x 1 5. Graph the solution set on a number line. Graph the solution set on a number line. then 5 2x 1 5.2} 8 10 12 7. if 2x 1 5. b. Dividing by 2 gives 2 x 3. Graph the solution set on a number line. if x 2 4. x 2 10 5  2 10 {xx 6 or x 26} 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 9. 100 0 3m 20 mm 26 2 or m 3 40 8 10 12 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 32 Glencoe Algebra 2 . If a 2.5} 3. 2f 4 11 2 0 2 9 {ff 4 6 1 or f 10} 6. b. 4b 4 © 11 2 0 2 17 b 4 6 3 2 b 7 10.

all numbers less than than 1 n 1 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 1 or greater 4. t 4 3 {tt 3 2 1 0 1 3 or t 2 3 4 3} 16. 10 4 3 5x 2 5 {x 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 8 or a 2 1 0 1 3 {aa 2 3 4 2 or a 13. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 n n 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 1 3 6. Then graph the solution set on a number line. 5. 8 0 3x 1 2 2 3 4 23 {x2 5 6 7 8 x 7} 14. w 4 4 3 2 10 or 1 0 1 2w 2 3 6 all real numbers 4 15.5 3} Write an absolute value inequality for each of the following. 6x 4 3 12 {x 2 2 1 0 1 2 3 x 4 2} 17. Solve each inequality. 11 4 3 4y 2 3 1 0 1 1 {y 2 2 3 4 y 1} 0} 12. all numbers greater than or equal to 2 or less than or equal to 2 n 2 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 2. 4a 4 3 11. 1. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 n n 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 7. n 4 © 5 2 0 2 7 {n 2 4 6 8 10 12 n 12} 20. 8.  7r 4 3 2 14 {rr 1 0 1 2 3 2 or r 4 2} 18. all numbers between 6 and 6 n 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 Write an absolute value inequality for each graph.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-6 Skills Practice Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Lesson 1-6 6 4 2. h 8 1 6 4 5 {hh 2 0 2 4 6 8 6 or h 4} Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 33 Glencoe Algebra 2 . all numbers less than 5 and greater than 5 n 5 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 3. p 4 2 3 2 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 19. 2c 4 1 3 2 5 or c 1 0 1 0 {cc 2 3 4 2 or c x 1} 10. Graph the solution set on a number line. 9.

3n 2 2 1 n 1 3 n 5 3 17. 20 10 0 10 20 n 10 4. 3(5x 2 0 2) 2 4 24 or 6x 6 4 4 5x 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 8 10 12 14 {xx or x 2 8} 3} 7.58} 34 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill . v 14. all numbers greater than 4 or less than 4 n 4 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 2. 15 4 5x 3 2 0 and 5x 1 0 1 2 3 6 4 14 {xx 9.42 v 14. 3. 5.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-6 Practice (Average) Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Write an absolute value inequality for each of the following. 2x 2 7 5 {x 2 x 0} 14.08 ounces. Then graph the solution set on a number line.5 fluid ounces by more than 0. including 1. r 24 6.08.5} 18.5 and 1. 2z 2 3 z 1 2 z 13. Write and solve an absolute value inequality to describe acceptable can volumes. the rainfall at Shell Beach has varied no more than 6. 3b 5 2 16.5. {v14.5 and 1. x x 1 all real numbers 15. y 8 5 7 6 2 {x 7 5 4 3 2 1 0 x 3} 5 2 11. 2w 4 3 5 ww 2 1 0 1 2 3 5 or w 2 4 5 2 10. Write and solve an absolute value inequality to describe the rainfall in the other 10% of the last 30 years. MANUFACTURING A company’s guidelines call for each can of soup produced not to vary from its stated volume of 14. all numbers between 1.5. {rr 17. 1. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 n 4 3 Solve each inequality.5 n 1.5 Write an absolute value inequality for each graph. Graph the solution set on a number line. 8 0 4 3y 20 52 {y4 y 24} 6. RAINFALL In 90% of the last 30 years.5 or r 30.5 inches from its mean value of 24 inches. 2x 4 3 3 2 15 or 3 1 0 1 2 7x 3 4 17 {xx 2} 8.5 0. x 8 3 {xx 5 or x 11} 12.

The number line graph will show a single interval between two numbers.) Which of the patients were accepted for the test? Ora 5:00 A. Juanita 11:30 P.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-6 Reading to Learn Mathematics Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Read the introduction to Lesson 1-6 at the top of page 40 in your textbook. Some of the patients are given the test and others are told that they must come back another day. a.M. Jason 1:30 A. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 35 Glencoe Algebra 2 Lesson 1-6 Pre-Activity How are compound inequalities used in medicine? . for a glucose tolerance test. Sample answer: If the absolute value quantity is followed by a or symbol. Each of them is asked when they last had something to eat or drink. 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 2. • Five patients arrive at a medical laboratory at 11:30 A. it becomes an or inequality. If the absolute value quantity is followed by a or symbol. 4x 5 2 or 4x 5 4. Graph the inequality that you wrote in part a on a number line.M. the expression inside the absolute value bars must be between two numbers. times refer to the night before. Write a compound inequality that says.M. {xx 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 1 or x 3} 3. so this becomes an and inequality.” 3 x 4 3 and x is less than or b.M. 8 3x 7 8 5 2 that does not use the absolute value 2 7 8 that does not use the absolute value Helping You Remember 5. “x is greater than equal to 4. Write a statement equivalent to 4x symbol. Many students have trouble knowing whether an absolute value inequality should be translated into an and or an or compound inequality. Each of the patients is listed below with the times when they started to fast.M. and the graph will show two disconnected intervals with arrows going in opposite directions. Also describe how to recognize the difference from a number line graph. Describe a way to remember which of these applies to an absolute value inequality. Jason and Juanita Reading the Lesson 1. Use a compound inequality and set-builder notation to describe the following graph. Write a statement equivalent to 3x symbol. (The P.M. Samir 5:00 P.

Example 2 3x 7 Solve 3x 7 11. x 7 8 x 3. Every solution for the inequality is a replacement for x that makes either x 6 or x 4 true. x 6. Then write whether the solution is a conjunction or disjunction. Every solution for 2x and x 5 true. 8 12 or x x 2 16. 10. Example 1 2x Solve 2x 10. 5 16 and x 2x 3 8. disjunction x 10. conjunction 4 x 9. 3x 2 and x 1 x 3. conjunction Glencoe Algebra 2 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill . conjunction 1 . 7 2 or x 2x 5 0. disjunction x 7. 5. x 2 1 and x 2 1 7 x x 3 1 and x 4 1. Solve each inequality. disjunction x 4. disjunction 36 x 1 and x 4. Solve each inequality. conjunction 4 8.NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ 1-6 Enrichment Conjunctions and Disjunctions An absolute value inequality may be solved as a compound sentence. 4x 24 2. 3 A compound sentence that combines two statements by the word or is a disjunction. conjunction x © 6 or x 10. 11 means 3x 7 11 or 3x 3x x 18 or 3x 6 or x 7 4 4 3 11. x 15 and x 1 1 1. conjunction x 5. 5 and x 10 is a replacement for x that makes both x A compound sentence that combines two statements by the word and is a conjunction. 5 10 means 2x 10 and 2x x Solve each inequality. 1. 2x 6 or x 5 1 6.

10. 5 A. 12x 2 D. 27 B. 4 x 3 A. 6 1) 2 (8 3)]. Evaluate A. Select the algebraic expression that represents the verbal expression: the product of nine and a number A. rationals. C. 4(2x A. 49 D. 5 and y 3. 3x 4 B. 4. 20 C. 1 y 2 8 B. 9 n B.NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Test. 10 2. {9. 19 2. 10 8. 9x 1 6. C. {2} © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 37 Glencoe Algebra 2 Assessment . 32 5 A. 21 5. {9} 11. {1} 20 B. C. rationals C. 9n C. 40 3 D. 1} D. C. 12x 11 B. For Questions 8–11. x 5 A. {2. 7. 9 n D. 4 9) 32 4 B. 16 3. C. A. 12x 1 3) 5(2x 1). The formula S n(n can be used to find the sum of the first n natural D. rationals. Name the sets of numbers to which 3 belongs. Form 1 Write the letter for the correct answer in the blank at the right of each question. C. numbers. integers. { 8} C. 2 8. B. Find the value of 4 5[14 A. solve each equation. 58 3. 8 9. 10 D. 1 4 D. 10. Evaluate (a A. 8} D. Simplify 2(x A. 11. 46 1. 8. naturals. Find the sum of the first 20 natural numbers. 16 9. 70 D. B. reals 5. 9 n 7. 210 B. 16 y)2 2y if a B. 1. reals 6. 190 4. 2b if b C. reals D.

5 C. 3 or x 6} B. {x 3 x 6} C. 15. 4n 7 31 C. 4n 7 31 D. What is the greatest number of hours Fran can park? A. 19. {m 11 m 5} C. Form 1 (continued) 12. Find Amar’s age. {w w 12 1} 2} 1 B. B. y 2y 3 2 15. B: 20. 3 A. 22 C. 20. 13. all real numbers D. Fran has $7. {x x 6} 16. 6 D. Identify the graph of the solution set of 9 3 A. {x 4 x 14} C. A parking garage charges $2 for the first hour and $1 for each additional hour. solve each inequality. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 D. {x x 2 or x 7} 5} B. {x x D. 14. y C. The sum of their ages is 39. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 18. all real numbers 2x. B. 2 17. {m m 11 or m 18. {m m D. 2x 5 9 A. {w w C. A. m 8 3 A. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 38 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 4(n 7) 31 B. 2x 1 5 or 7 x A.50 to spend for parking. Which equation could be used to solve the following problem? The sum of 4 times a number and 7 is 31. 34 D. 1 y y 9 4 9 2 B. 8w 4 A. {w w 1} 2} 12. 17 B. 4n 7 31 13. Find the number.NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Chapter 1 Test. 14. 5 or m 5} 17. {w w D. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 C. {x 2 x 7} D. Amar is five years older than his sister. 3 B. A. 7 Bonus Solve 11 7 x 5. {y 2 y 4} 16. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 19. 29 For Questions 14–18.

NAME

DATE

PERIOD SCORE

1

Chapter 1 Test, Form 2A

Write the letter for the correct answer in the blank at the right of each question. 1. Find the value of 5 A. 7
2

4 3 B. 27
5

6

1. C. 6 D. 17
5

1.

2. Evaluate 2b(4a A. 303 3c

c2) if a B. 423 d if c B. 2

5, b

3 , and c 2

11. 6 D.
303 2

C. 1 and d 5. C.

2.

3. Evaluate A. 8

7

D.

8

3.

4. The formula for the surface area of a sphere is A 4 r2, where r is the length of the radius. Find the surface area of a sphere with a radius of 14 feet. Use 22 for .
7

A. 7248

ft2

B. 7744 ft2

C. 2464 ft2
1 belongs. 3

D. 704 ft2

4.

5. Name the sets of numbers to which A. naturals, rationals C. integers, rationals 6. Simplify 1 (15x
3

B. rational, reals D. integers, rationals, reals
1 (25x 5

5.

9)

5).
32 15

A. 10x

2

B. 64 x
3

C. 5x

2 x).

D. 1 (40x
5

4)

6.

7. Name the property illustrated by 5(x y) 5(y A. Commutative Property of Multiplication B. Distributive Property C. Commutative Property of Addition D. Associative Property of Addition For Questions 8–11, solve each equation. 8. 23 A. 5 42 10 B. {1, 4} 7x 3 B. 9 10 2 B. { 5, 11} C. {11} C. 11 C. {4, 4}
2 m 3

7.

B.

12

C.

27

D. 42

8.

9. 18 3 4x A. {1, 1} 10. 5(2x 6) A. 9 11. x 3 A. { 5}

D. {4}

9.

D.

10.

D.

11.
Glencoe Algebra 2

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

39

Assessment

NAME

DATE

PERIOD

1

Chapter 1 Test, Form 2A

(continued)

12. Jamie is 4 years younger than her brother. Five years from now, the sum of their ages will be 32. Find Jamie’s present age. A. 9 B. 10 C. 13 D. 14

12.

13. One side of a triangle is four centimeters longer than the shortest side. The third side of the triangle is twice as long as the shortest side. Find the length of the longest side of the triangle if its perimeter is 40 centimeters. A. 9 cm B. 13 cm C. 24 cm D. 18 cm 13. For Questions 14–18, solve each inequality. 14. 0.38
2x 5 7

A. {x x 15. 9 7 x A. {x 2 C. {x x

4.45} 1 x 8} 2 or x

B. {x x

98.5}

C. {x x

13}

D. {x x

3.69}

14.

8} 2

B. D. {x x

2}

15.

16. 5x 4 26 or 29 3x A. {x 6 x 9} C. all real numbers 17. 2x 3 7 A. {x x 5} C. {x 2 x

B. {x x D. {x x

6 or x 9}

9} 16.

5}

B. {x 5 x 5} D. all real numbers

17.

18. 2 m 7 8 A. {m 11 m 3} C. {m m 13 or m

1}

B. all real numbers D. {m m 11 or m 4 0.9y.

3}

18.

19. Identify the graph of the solution set of 2.3 A. B.
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

C.
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

D.
4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4

19.

20. One number is four times a second number. If you take one-half of the second number and increase it by the first number, the result is at least 45. Find the least possible value for the second number. A. 10 B. 9 C. 11 D. 12 Bonus Carlos expects the grade on his next Algebra test to be between 75 and 85. Using g to represent Carlos’ test grade, write an absolute value inequality to describe this situation. B:

20.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

40

Glencoe Algebra 2

NAME

DATE

PERIOD SCORE

1

Chapter 1 Test, Form 2B

Write the letter for the correct answer in the blank at the right of each question. 1. Find the value of 5 A.
23 4

8 2 B.
11 2

4

11. C. 3 D. 2 1.

2. Evaluate (a A. 29 3. Evaluate A. 20 a

y)2

2y3 if a B. 43

2 and y

3. C. 79 6. C.

D.

53

2.

3b if a 2 and b B. 16
180(n n 2)

20

D.

36

3.

4. The formula A

relates the measure A of an interior angle of

a regular polygon to the number of sides n. If an interior angle measures 120 , find the number of sides. A. 5 B. 6 C. 8 D. 10 5. Name the sets of numbers to which A. integers C. integers, rationals 6. Simplify 1 (6x
3

4.

28 belongs. B. naturals, integers, reals D. integers, rationals, reals

5.

3)

4(3x B. 9x

2). 9 C. 10x (9 1 1) 7. D. 10x 7 6.

A.

10x

9

7. Name the property illustrated by 7 (9 1) A. Distributive Property B. Commutative Property of Multiplication C. Associative Property of Multiplication D. Commutative Property of Addition For Questions 8–11, solve each equation. 8. 2
5y 3 14 15

7.

A. 28 9. 3 x 5 A. {9} 10. 3(5x A. 1
2

B. 35
3

C. 3

35

D. 15
28

8.

12 B. {1} 3x 3 B. 2 6 15 B. { 1} C. {17, 1} D. 11.
Glencoe Algebra 2

C. {1, 9}

D.

9.

1)

C.

2

D.

1 2

10.

11. y 8 A. {17}

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

41

Assessment

8 m B. A. Yoshi is 12 years older than his sister. B: 42 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 15. all real numbers 17. 82 3 D. x x x 15 2 C. 3 1 2 z z 3} 1 2 15. Find the least possible value for the second number. Six years from now.1 0. z 16.NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Chapter 1 Test. 13 m C. Identify the graph of the solution set of 8. 16 13. 30 B. If you take one-half of the first number and increase it by the second number. {r r 13} D. 4 D. 20.5 A. D. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 19. 10 m 13. {m 2 m 6} C. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 D. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 C. 10 B. 2x 5 3 9 B. the result is at least 41. {r r 13} C. 18 C. 7} B. One number is two less than a second number. {w w D. A. z 4x 7 5 B. 15 20. {m m 1 or m 18. A. The length of the third side is three meters less than the sum of the lengths of the other two sides. {m m 2 or m 6} D. {z 3 C. w 5 C. 3 m 4 6 A. 10 12 z 2} z 1 2 B. 2 w 3} 3 B. Find Yoshi’s present age.6y. {r r 13} 14. 3(r 11) 15 A. A. 3w 7 3 16. For Questions 14–18. x 7 D. solve each inequality. all real numbers 17. all real numbers 6. 28 C. 10 or 33 15 or x 2 A. {r r 13} 2 4z A. B. Bonus Solve x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill x 0. Two sides of a triangle are equal in length. {z D. 55 m 3 12. 19. Form 2B (continued) 12. Find the length of the longest side of the triangle if its perimeter is 29 meters. 14. {w 3 w 3} 18. the sum of their ages will be 32.

82 7. 8. name each property illustrated by each equation. 11. 16. Simplify 1 (12v 12. 10. 2. 5x 15. 13. 5 21 5 11 1 ab 4 9. 14. evaluate each expression if a and b 8. 4. and t = 30 months. 25 For Questions 9 and 10. 3 b 5. Form 2C 82 4 1.5 3. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 43 Glencoe Algebra 2 Assessment . 4. r = 8. Use I = prt. 8) 2(6v 1). Solve each equation. 15. b 2. the formula for simple interest over t years. 5. ten less than the cube of a number. 5 6 6. 1.NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Test. 6. Find the value of 6 2 2. 4 x 18 2 3 2 3x 7 24 24 13. Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs.5%. and c 3. 3. 2x 16. 7. 1. Evaluate 3a 2b c2 if a For Questions 3 and 4. b 2a 6 a 2. to find I when p = $2500. 1. 4x 14. Write an algebraic expression to represent the verbal expression 12. 10. 9. ab 0 11. 8. 2.

The Braves play 162 games in a season.00 for adults. Then. The sum of twice a number and 6 is 28. 2x 3 5 24. Then solve the resulting inequality. To win at least 60% of all games. write an equation. Form 2C (continued) Define a variable. they have won 56 and lost 40. 19. 4(x 3) x(3 k) 25. 7v 6 22 or 11 v 19 22. 17. 2(x 3) 54 20. She ordered 8 more children’s tickets than adults’ tickets. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 24. What is the number? 17.50 for children and $12. solve each inequality. Define a variable and write an inequality. B: © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 44 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 3t 5 31 19. and solve the problem. 18. So far. x 2 4 23. Describe the solution set using set builder or interval notation. 20. graph the solution set on a number line.NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Chapter 1 Test. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 23. How many of each type of ticket did she order? For Questions 19–24. Lana ordered concert tickets that cost $7. 5 6n 17 13 21. how many more games must they win? Bonus Find the value of k so that the equation below has the solution set { 5}. 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 25. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 22. Her total bill was $138. 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 21. 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 18.

3. 14. 16. 9. b 2 1. Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs.5 3. Solve each equation. 7. 3. 7x 15. and t = 18 months. Form 2D 62 9 3. Use I prt. 10. b For Questions 3 and 4. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 45 Glencoe Algebra 2 Assessment . 13. 5. 4.5 6. Find the value of 4 2. 15. r = 6%. 2. 11. Simplify 1 (10x 12. 8. 1xyz ( 3ab) xyz 5 0 9. Write an algebraic expression to represent the verbal expression 12. x 4 3 10 3 5 12 4x 9 2 11 13. to find I when p = $2000. 7. 3. five times the sum of seven and a number. For Questions 9 and 10. Evaluate 5a b2 3c 1. the formula for simple interest over t years. 6. 11. name the property illustrated by each equation. 5n 14. and c 2. 5. b 3 2a a 4.NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Test. 15) 4(2x 5). evaluate each expression if a and b 10. 6w 16. 7 9 16 2. 8. 3ab 10. if a 4.

Find the number. graph the solution set on a number line. 19. Then solve the resulting inequality. The bank contains only nickels and dimes. Define a variable and write an inequality. Describe the solution set using set builder or interval notation. 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 22. 10t 14 6 18. 2x 1 9 24. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 20. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 23. 8 4 0 4 8 25. x 5 3 23. B: © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 46 Glencoe Algebra 2 . The sum of 3 times a number and 1 is 25. 0 2 4 6 8 10 24. write an equation. 7 9x 2 11 21. Form 2D (continued) Define a variable. What is the fewest number of dimes that could be in the bank? Bonus Find the value of k so that the equation below has the solution set { 3}. For Questions 19–24. 3(4x 2) 7x 19 20. solve each inequality. The 25 coins in Danielle’s piggy bank have a value of at least $1.NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Chapter 1 Test. 18.44. and solve the problem. 17. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 21. 19. The length of a rectangular garden is 7 feet longer than its width. 17. 3(2x 1) x(2 k) 25. Find the width and length of the garden. The perimeter of the garden is 38 feet. Then. 5n 7 2 or 17 2n 11 22.

0 d. For Questions 8–11. Simplify 3 (16x 8 8) 2 (15y 3 12). a. Define a variable. b). Find the volume of a cylinder with a radius of 1. 7. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 12. Find the length and width. Determine whether the statement is sometimes. A 11. Find the value of 8 2. 9. and solve the problem. for a 7 3 10. e. 2. c. Form 3 2 32 3v3 if n 6 14. e. solve each equation. then a 2b is negative. 5. 3. Evaluate (n v)2 5 and v 3. where r is the radius of the base and h is the height of the cylinder. Write a verbal expression to represent the algebraic expression 4(n3 2n). 11. Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs. If a and b are real numbers. 1. 47 Glencoe Algebra 2 Assessment . 8 12.14 for π.NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Test. y 9. 2. or never true. 7. 6. write an equation. 15 c. 2 3x 10. 1.2 inches and a height of 3 inches. 4. 4 b. 6(n 8) 5 1 h(a 2 4(12 14 5n) 14n 8. 3 4 4. The perimeter is 10 meters more than twice its length. d. 2 6. The width of a rectangle is 3 meters more than one-fourth its length. Use 3. The formula for the volume of a cylinder is V r2h. Explain your reasoning. b. 5. always. 8. a.

The perimeter of the triangle shown is 28 inches. 5x 2 18 or 2x 1 21 16. 20.NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Chapter 1 Test. In case of emergency. 3w 7 2 19. the jet flies at 600 mph. graph the solution set on a number line. 15. In still air. Describe the solution set using set builder or interval notation. 2 10 inches 13. and h represents the height. 17. Brooks plans to invest part of $5000 in a stock that pays 8% interest annually. 14. Define a variable and write an inequality. Form 3 (continued) 13. where b represents the base length. a distance of 2400 miles. 3(5y 4) 17 15. Brooks wants to make at least $350 on the investment for the first year. Write an equation for the area A of this triangle in terms of its base length b. What is the least amount that should be invested in the stock? Bonus A jet is flying from Hawaii to San Francisco. x 3 5 18. Mr. 2. 18. solve each inequality. The formula for the area of a triangle is A 1 bh. 33 4 3w 9 12 17. 19.8 4x 5 3 14. Then. but there is now a 40-mph tailwind. how many hours after takeoff will it be faster for the jet to go on to San Francisco rather than to return to Hawaii? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 20. Then solve the resulting inequality. B: 48 Glencoe Algebra 2 . Mr. b inches For Questions 14–19. 16. The rest will be invested in a savings account that pays 6% interest annually.

find a value of k. b. b. concise solution to each problem. c. Find a value of k for which the inequality has no solution. Solve your problem and explain the meaning of your answer. Write a word problem for the inequality 2 1 x 4 1 x 4 10. Compare your solution to the solution above. Does the graph have meaning for your word problem? Why or why not? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 49 Glencoe Algebra 2 Assessment . You may show your solution in more than one way or investigate beyond the requirements of the problem. 3. that satisfies each condition. Write your own solution of the equation 6(7 x) 3 9x as you would write it on a test. Given 3x 5 8x 3x 5 ( 3x) 8x ( 3x) ___________________ ___________________ 3x [( 3x) 5] 8x ( 3x) [3x ( 3x)] 5 8x ( 3x) ___________________ ___________________ 0 5 8x ( 3x) 5 8x ( 3x) ___________________ ___________________ 5 [8 ( 3)]x 5 5 x Substitution 1 5 1 5 5 5 1 1 x 1 (5x) 5 1 5 ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ 5 x 1 x x 1 b. c. 1. a. a. Find a value of k for which a solution exists but for which the solution set does not include 5. Did you use all of the same properties as you listed above to solve your equation? Explain. State the property of real numbers or the property of equality that justifies each step in the solution of the equation given.NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Open-Ended Assessment Demonstrate your knowledge by giving a clear. In each case. a. Given the inequality x 3 k. explain your choice. Graph the solution of the inequality 2 10. if possible. Be sure to include all relevant drawings and justify your answers. 2. Find a value of k for which the inequality has exactly one solution.

3x 3x is an example of the . Trichotomy Property © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 50 Glencoe Algebra 2 . The of addition says that adding 0 to any number does not change its value. The graph of a compound inequality containing the word and is the of the graphs of the two separate inequalities. This is an example of the 9. irrational number 12. 8.NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Vocabulary Test/Review Division Property empty set equation formula Identity Property intersection interval notation Inverse Property irrational numbers Multiplication Property open sentence order of operations rational numbers real numbers Reflexive Property set-builder notation absolute value Addition Property algebraic expression Associative Property Commutative Property compound inequality counterexample Distributive Property solution Substitution Property Subtraction Property Symmetric Property Transitive Property Trichotomy Property union variable Choose from the terms above to complete each sentence. The property that allows you to switch the two sides of an equation is the 4. 6. 1. In your own words— Define each term. 7. then 2y 6 . The of a number is the number of units between that number and 0 on a number line. If 2y 6 3 and 3 4y 21. Two inequalities combined by the word and or the word or form a 10. . with the integer in the denominator not being 0. 4y 21. 2. 5.3} describes a set by using . The are the numbers that can be written as ratios of two integers. 11. 3. The of Multiplication says that you can reverse the order of two factors without changing the value of their product. {x x 6.

5. Check your solution. 10 3 C. Find the perimeter of a rectangle with a length of 19. 3. 4. 1. what is the 3 5? B. . write an equation. 1. Evaluate 3n2 2an if a 4. On her first day she ran 3 miles. 5. and w represents the width of the rectangle. 1. Simplify 1 (6v 3 5 belongs. and solve the problem. for how many days has Carla been running 7 miles? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 51 Glencoe Algebra 2 Assessment 3. The formula for the perimeter P of a rectangle is P 2( w).NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Quiz (Lessons 1–1 and 1–2) 62 4 3. 4. Carla has run 7 miles each day. NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Quiz (Lesson 1–3) Write the letter for the correct answer in the blank at the right of the question. 5 3 3 4 . and on her second day she ran 5 miles. Carla began a running program to prepare for track team try-outs. 2.2 meters and a width of 4. 4. 13 3 D. If her log book shows that Carla has run a total of 99 miles.7 meters. Solve y 5. Find the value of 40 2. where represents the length. Standardized Test Practice If 7n value of 7n A. 5 21 1. 3. 2. 3 and n 4. 3. 8 7w 3w mx 9 b for x. Since then. Name the sets of numbers to which 5. 1) 3 (8v 4 2). 3 4 2x 3 5x 6 1 2 2. solve each equation. Define a variable. For Questions 2 and 3.

4x 9 2 5. 6 5m 1 39 2. 5 4. The Boston Celtics play an 82-game schedule. Then solve. Evaluate a 1. 4 3x 2x 1 x 20 5 2. 1 8 3. how many more games must they win to win at least 70% of all 82 games? 5. 2x 7 5 4. and graph its solution set on a 4. 1 5 0 1 5 2 5 3 5 4 5 1 6 5 5. Define a variable and write an inequality. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 5. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 52 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 4 1. 11 3 4. Then. x 7 4 3. 3. 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 2. 2x 6. NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Quiz (Lesson 1–6) Solve each inequality. 3. 3x 5 4 or 9 2x 5 1. If they have won 41 of their first 50 games. 1. 2. Describe the solution set using set builder or interval notation. solve each equation. Solve 7 3x number line. For Questions 2 and 3. graph the solution set on a number line.NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Quiz (Lessons 1–4 and 1–5) 8b if a 3 and b 1 .

0 3(y B. Solve 6(x A. write the letter for the correct answer in the blank at the right of each question. 5) x 5. reals D. reals C. y 8 10) C. . Adults’ tickets to a play cost $5 and students’ tickets cost $2. C. If 295 tickets were sold and a total of $950 was collected. 1.NAME DATE PERIOD SCORE 1 Chapter 1 Mid-Chapter Test (Lessons 1–1 through 1–5) Part I For Questions 1–5. 8. and solve the problem.5. B. n 3. 11 B. Find the value of 17 [6 (23 1)]. Solve h np2 if m 0. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 53 Glencoe Algebra 2 Assessment 2. Additive Inverse C. whole numbers. 8. rationals B. Part II 6. B. Additive Identity D. y 13 5. integers. Simplify 1 (8y A. 2 2 3. find the value of C if F is 68. and p 2. b for b. Name the property illustrated by A. 85 1. Evaluate m 10. 22 7 belongs. integers. ab ab 0. 10. Given the formula C 5(F 9 32) 6. Write an algebraic expression to represent the verbal expression the difference of three times a number x and 7. 7. Name the sets of numbers to which A. y 9 D. write an equation. 5 4. integers. Multiplicative Inverse 4. integers. Define a variable. 5. 2. 2 C. 41 6 2. 7. Find the value of (9 2)8 A. Multiplicative Identity 3. 7 D. 11. 7y 1). D. reals . how many students’ tickets were sold? 9. rationals. 9. 2a 11.

7)2. 12x 51 3(x 7) 10. 7. 8. 4(t 5) 5 t (Lesson 1–5) 12. (Prerequisite Skill) 1. Then solve. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 Define a variable. 25. find the value of each expression.NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Chapter 1 Cumulative Review (Chapter 1) 71 5 1 5 1. (Lesson 1–2) 8. Forty-eight decreased by three times a number is thirty-six. 17. (Lesson 1–3) Define a variable and write an inequality. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 14. 7. Simplify 2. 2y 1 4 13 (Lesson 1–3) (Lesson 1–4) 9. 3. Use the formula F (Lesson 1–1) 9 C 5 32 to find the value of F if C 6. (Lesson 1–2) 6. 19 [(6 24) 7 22] (Lesson 1–1) (Lesson 1–1) 5. How many more games must they win in order to win at least 65% of all games for the season? (Lesson 1–5) 16. Find the number. Solve each inequality. Name the sets of numbers to which the number 13 belongs. Simplify 1 (16x 4 12) 1 (9x 3 3). and solve the problem. 11. 4. 5. 3. Graph the solution set. 10. The Cincinnati Reds play 162 games in a season. 17. 9. (Lesson 1–3) Solve each equation. 12. Evaluate ( 0. x 3 4 (Lesson 1–6) 14. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 54 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 13. 4 6 3 12 4. write an equation. So far they have won 57 games. 3x 5 10 or 12 x 20 (Lesson 1–6) 13. 16. 5(m 5) 3(10 2m) m (Lesson 1–3) 11. 2. (Prerequisite Skill) For Questions 3 and 4. Write an algebraic expression to represent the verbal expression the square of a number increased by the cube of the same number.

9 is 18% of what number? E. the length of XY is 1 of the perimeter of ABC. E F G H 5. E F G H B. The radius of a circle is tripled. 3 5 1. 2x 4 D. 97 8. area is tripled F. Which number is least? A. 5 9 3. 36 G. What happens to the area of the circle? E. 5 16 C. If x A. A B C D b is defined as ba. A B C D G. 1. 1. 3 x 9. E F G H 0. If a E. 3 11. 2x 7 C. 5? D. 24 C. 19 49 D. 2x 8 2.NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Standardized Test Practice (Chapter 1) Part 1: Multiple Choice Instructions: Fill in the appropriate oval for the best answer. What is the length of XY ? X A. Which number is not prime? E. 50 3. In the figure shown. which of the following could be that number? A. which of the following is negative? x B. 79 9. x3 D. x2 C. 9 24 40 Z D. 101 6. Which represents a rational number? E. 2 C. what is the next consecutive even integer? A. 6 10. A B C D © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 55 Glencoe Algebra 2 Assessment . 2 C. 0 D. A B C D 50 3 Y H. 6 5. 73 F. 96 8. 17 F. 32 7.62 H. 4 6. 2x 5 B. A B C D G. 3 B. area is multiplied by 1 3 4. E F G H 11. area is multiplied by 6 G. 8 G. 91 H. area is multiplied by 9 H. 16 B. If 2x 6 is an even integer. Which number is not a solution of 2x 3 A. 200 F. 1 3? H. what is the value of 2 F. 10. 50% 2. 7 B. If 6 more than the product of a number and 2 is greater than 10. A B C D 4. E F G H 7.

(0.05)2 4b 2 6 Column B 0.NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Standardized Test Practice Part 2: Grid In (continued) Instructions: Enter your answer by writing each digit of the answer in a column box and then shading in the appropriate oval that corresponds to that entry.0025 16. 18. What is the value of x? C D 13. 9. Simplify 19 Part 3: Quantitative Comparison Instructions: Compare the quantities in columns A and B. or D if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given. 3g g 19. The average of 8. A B C D © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 56 Glencoe Algebra 2 . If 3 10 x . 2 1 0 1 2 3 13. 19 19 14. 2 1 0 1 2 3 14. 2 1 0 1 2 3 15. A B C D 17. Shade in A if the quantity in column A is greater. BC CD BC AB AB 3 BC 6 A B CD 5 What is the length of the shortest path from A to D? 12. 18. 12. 12. A B C D 2x˚ A B C D x˚ (x + 20)˚ x 20 2x 19. 6.3 19 19 . 2b 3 17. B if the quantity in column B is greater. 2 1 0 1 2 3 15. what is the value of x? 0. C if the quantities are equal. Column A 16. and 4x is x.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / .) Part 1 Multiple Choice Select the best answer from the choices given and fill in the corresponding oval. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Part 3 Quantitative Comparison Select the best answer from the choices given and fill in the corresponding oval. 12 . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 19 20 A B C D 21 22 A B C D 23 A B C D A B C D A B C D © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A1 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers 11 13 15 17 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . For Questions 13–18. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 14 16 18 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . also enter your answer by writing each number or symbol in a box. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 1 2 3 A B C D 4 5 6 A B C D 7 8 A B C D 9 10 A B C D A B C D A B C D A B C D A B C D A B C D A B C D Part 2 Short Response/Grid In Solve the problem and write your answer in the blank. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . Then fill in the corresponding oval for that number or symbol. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 .NAME DATE PERIOD 1 Standardized Test Practice Student Record Sheet (Use with pages 52–53 of the Student Edition.

8 6b c) 5c b d a 21.5 5) 3 (9) 3( 4. 3x2 x(y 5) 3 (3)2 3(0. Order of Operations Order of Operations 1. Example (6 x(y 5) 2 Substitute n r (172)(25) 500 43.Lesson 1-1 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-1 Study Guide and Intervention (continued) 1-1 Study Guide and Intervention Expressions and Formulas Expressions and Formulas Formulas Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A formula is a mathematical sentence that uses variables to express the relationship between certain quantities.3 22.) 50. Sarah counts the number of breaths needed for her to blow up a beach ball. If you know the value of every variable except one in a formula. The BMR of an 80-year-old man is given by the formula BMR 12w (0.14 for . (5 8. 52 1 4 For Exercises 1–3. Evaluate 3x2 3 and y 0.2 54. 6 9 8 3 2 23)2 2 34.5 172 and p 25 into the formula r 8. you can use the formula r [18 Replace each variable with the given value. b 8b c)2 4a 81. 5(6c 20. Do all multiplications and divisions from left to right.5 13. Sarah takes 40 breaths to blow up the beach ball.1 d 8. 14 (6 2) 17 Exercises 5. where r is the 500 Example 1 4)] if x 2.000 500 To calculate the number of reams of paper needed to print n copies np .5) 27 13. a c 6.02)(6)12w.86 cm 2. a b c 7.6 reams of paper. ab d 49.4 6 3. How many centimeters are there in 9 inches? 22. use the following information. cd 26. Do all additions and subtractions from left to right.015 cm3 Evaluate each expression if a 17. 11 (3 2)2 You cannot buy 8. 2 (4 2)3 6 4 1.2.6 (6 4)] 2 [18 10] 8 2 4 number of reams needed. b b 4.7 4. The volume of a sphere is given by the formula V 4 3 r . ac bd 31. d 24 3. Her beach ball has a radius of 9 inches. 8(42 8 32) 240 8. How many reams of paper must you buy to print 172 copies of a 25-page booklet? np . You will need to buy 9 reams to print 172 copies. 2. A person’s basal metabolic rate (or BMR) is the number of calories needed to support his or her bodily functions for one day. 16 23 4 1 22 6 7 12. 12 6 3 2(4) 6 13. 4. c2 b 1 d 4 sphere and r is its radius. (7 11. Simplify the expressions inside grouping symbols. 3 c 4 d c d b 21 24.25 62 40 22 4 5 38 52 144 6. What is the BMR of an 80-year-old man who weighs 170 pounds? 1795 calories 25. d(a 4 15 27. A2 14 3. 2 16. 1. 20 (8 20 2) 15. Evaluate [18 Example 2 of a booklet that is p pages long. 9(32 18 6 11 4 15 6) 135 32)2 9. 6(7) (Lesson 1-1) 10. (b 23.54I. 500 Exercises Answers Find the value of each expression. What is the volume of the beach ball in cubic centimeters? (Use 3. 6 4 4 6 2 1 4. First she converts the radius to centimeters using the formula C 2.45 Glencoe Algebra 2 1 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 Glencoe Algebra 2 . where w is the man’s weight in pounds. 3. c 10d) 215 18. where V is the volume of the 3 7. Evaluate all powers. where C is a length in centimeters and I is the same length in inches. For a science experiment.5. you can use substitution and the order of operations to find the value of the unknown variable. and d 1 . 14 14. What is the average volume of air per breath? about 1250 cm3 19. She will then find the volume of the beach ball in cubic centimeters and divide by the number of breaths to find the average volume of air per breath. 2.

(3 8)2(4) 3(2 12 2) 3 97 7 (3)(8) 3) 2(4 5( 3)] ( 1)2 (5)(10) 18 8)] 16 1 5. 2ab2 (d 3 c) 67 32 gives the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit for a given temperature in degrees Celsius. 3 Answers A3 3 4 19. 2(3r rv3 s2 w) 7 18.b 4 8. 5 5. 2. 6 2 (5 {5 42] [34 (17 11)]} 41 3) 52(3) 85 6. t 12. (c 16. What is Faith’s predicted profit this season if her orchard produces 300 bushels of apples? $4860 Glencoe Algebra 2 © for a given temperature in degrees Fahrenheit. ac4 d 13. What will the height of the object be after 6 seconds? 144 ft 19. 5s t t 2s 0 Evaluate each expression if a 12. and e 1 . 4(12 7) 11 1. (4s)2 144 b2de c e2 70 22 141 23.01x2 240 to predict her profit P in dollars this season if her trees produce x bushels of apples. 9bc 1 e 11. 2 9. TEMPERATURE The formula F 9 C 5 (Lesson 1-1) 15. w[t (t r)] 25 2 0 2v 2w r 22. 12. TEMPERATURE The formula K C 273 gives the temperature in kelvins (K) for a given temperature in degrees Celsius. What is the temperature in kelvins when the temperature is 55 degrees Celsius? 328 K 22. TEMPERATURE The formula C 5 (F 9 32) gives the temperature in degrees Celsius 25. 9 3. 11. 18 2 3 27 20 3 4. 6r d 45 d2 12 de)e2 17. 1 4. and w 1 .Lesson 1-1 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-1 Skills Practice (Average) 1-1 Practice Expressions and Formulas Expressions and Formulas Find the value of each expression. 4 6(7 5) Find the value of each expression. she has developed the formula P 20x 0. 18 9. (b 3v 16. w(s r) 2 8 12 1 (c d) 2 ] 206 18. PHYSICS The formula h 120t 16t2 gives the height h in feet of an object t seconds after it is shot upward from Earth’s surface with an initial velocity of 120 feet per second. AGRICULTURE Faith owns an organic apple orchard. From her experience the last few seasons. ( 2)3 8. c 14. s2r wt ab c 1. 7. 1 [ 5 4 ( 8)2 5 9 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 3(4) 2 1 13 1. [4(5 10. ac3 20. 14. 8(13 6 37) 1 [6 2 1 [ 9 3 10(3)] 7 8. 3(4 2. What is the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit when the temperature is 40 degrees Celsius? 40 F 24. 9r2 20. 17. s 2r 16v 1 3 . (168 7)32 43 152 5 4( 9) 53 Evaluate each expression if r 10. b[a 21. 7s (s2 1)t 105 22 21. v 0. d d)b d(b c) ac 3. [3(5) 128 22]5 3 85 5 32 7. ab2 15. 12 [20 42) 16 2(62 3 22)] 88 3. 2. 20 6. s 4rs 84 3. 2st 13. What is the temperature in degrees Celsius when the temperature is 68 degrees Fahrenheit? 20 C Glencoe Algebra 2 3 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 4 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers .

Then use grouping symbols to show how the instructions can be put in the form of a mathematical expression. Helping You Remember 35 m2 12. 23 m 1. with a drop factor of 20 drops per milliliter. – 210 g – 5. Why? 1. – • Nurses use the formula F the quantity that each of the variables in this formula represents and the units in which each is measured. 0. The measurement 0. The significant digits of an approximate number are those which indicate the results of a measurement.1 mm 1820 yd 150 m2 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 6 Glencoe Algebra 2 .68 g 37 210 has 3 significant digits. There is a customary order for grouping symbols. Why is it important for everyone to use the same order of operations for evaluating expressions? Sample answer: If everyone did not use the same order of operations. Add the result to 10. 30. measured to the nearest gram. 11. The measurement 200 g has one significant digit. Underlined zeros in whole numbers are significant. For example.000 km – 4 6.70 cm 3. Name Glencoe/McGraw-Hill All measurements are approximations. [(3 22) 8] 4 (3 b. a computation involving multiplication or division of measurements cannot be more accurate than the least accurate measurement in the computation. The measurement 104. 4.000 km – 1 7. Braces are used outside of brackets. volume of solution and is measured in milliliters Answers t represents time and is measured in • Write the expression that a nurse would use to calculate the flow rate of an IV if a doctor orders 1350 milliliters of IV saline to be given over 8 hours. the result of computation involving multiplication or division of measurements should be rounded to the number of significant digits in the least accurate measurement. different people might get different answers. the mass of an object. 38. 9. (Lesson 1-1) a. Brackets are used outside of parentheses. [(13 5)(9 21) 10] 2 g 3 5 2 3 Solve. 2. Identify the innermost expression(s) in each of the following expressions. 370. drop factor and is measured in drops minutes . to control the flow rate for IVs. is 200 g. and 1. 0. Do not find the value 20 of this expression.5 63 cm 14. measured to the – nearest 100 g. 7. Round the result to 3 significant digits. 908 yd 0. Nonzero digits and zeros between significant digits are significant.5 cm 25 23 13. addition and subtraction) 5 Glencoe Algebra 2 © 121.d represents the per milliliter. 2.000 km has 5 significant digits.000 ft – 520 ft 11. (parentheses. 1350 In general.071 m has 4 significant digits. A4 8 60 Reading the Lesson Example mass of 1 quarter The mass of 37 quarters is 210 g. {14 [8 (3 12)2]} Write the number of significant digits for each measurement. The mass of the same object. Sample answer: Please excuse my dear Aunt Sally.0 m 4. For example. 370. Read the following instructions. 1. flow rate and is measured in drops V represents the . Find the mass of one quarter. Zeros at the end of a decimal fraction are significant.54 m 3.050 mm has 2 significant digits.20 m 2. 1. Then divide what you get by 2. 3. F represents the per minute. is 210 grams. Think of a phrase or sentence to help you remember the order of operations. 5 and 0. 8314. 9. multiplication and division. 0.6 m 4. 9 (63 100) (3 [5(8 6) 2(10 22) 7)] (8 7) 6) and (10 12) c.0605 mg 2. Thus. 9.20 10 2 Multiply the difference of 13 and 5 by the sum of 9 and 21. The measurement 210 g has 3 significant digits.01 mm 11 10. 12. 3. the measurement 9. – 37 does not represent a measurement.7 104 g 3 8. exponents. 0. Lesson 1-1 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-1 Reading to Learn Mathematics Significant Digits 1-1 Enrichment Expressions and Formulas Pre-Activity V t d How are formulas used by nurses? Read the introduction to Lesson 1-1 at the top of page 6 in your textbook. 0.01 mm 4. 6 5. 1. and 0. Round each result to the correct number of significant digits.

12y 12)y Commutative Property ( ) Distributive Property Simplify. then a ba ca 1 1 a a. R 62. R 2. …} whole numbers {0. 2(15 45c) 1 p 4 5 (12 6 4 r 5 18c) 12. 34 2 Q. R 13. Q.5) 12. 5. 8. 6.2s 5) (10 4. a.1x 15y Answers b. R 8.1s) 6(1. W. p 4 1 r 5 16 3 r 5 1 p 2 9. and integers.7x 20. 8. R 81 Z. 5 2 0. W. Z. 2. Z. 2. R 10. 25 Exercises Simplify each expression. 73 N. 1.7x 3 12. 5. Z. 8(2. 50(3a 2n b) 20(b 2a) 18.17 Q. R 77 10. R 3. 1 (4j 5 A5 20a 4. 11 3 rationals (Q). 3. R Q. W. 80g 7. R 2j Glencoe Algebra 2 © 7 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 190a 8 70b Glencoe Algebra 2 Glencoe Algebra 2 7 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Answers .4e 13. 12 a 3 13t b 4 k 2 j 5 6. Z. where m and n are integers and n n is not equal to 0} I irrational numbers {all nonterminating. The set of rational numbers includes several subsets: natural numbers. integers (Z). R 15. 10(6g 4.6(e 4. R 7. 2.2r 10. Example 9x 3y 12y 0. Z. R 4.9x. 33. 9. 3.9j 9. 7. 192. 26. 8(3a b) 4(2b a) 2.1 Q. 3.5m(12 5. Q. R 25 5 naturals (N). b.9x Example Simplify 9x Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs. Addition Multiplication R real numbers {all rationals and irrationals} Q rational numbers {all numbers that can be represented in the form . (7 2. …} W 1. 1.2 Q. …} If a is not zero. 7.2k 5f ) 11. 8 13 120h I. 5. 0. R 140g 16. Q. reals (R) 2k 6j 3k) Exercises 51s 3h) 4(5g h) 5. 6 7 Q. 6. and c m 1-2 Study Guide and Intervention (continued) Properties of Real Numbers Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Property Commutative Associative Identity Inverse Distributive a(b c) ab ac and (b c)a a ( a) 0 ( a) a a 0 a 0 a a 1 a (a b) c a (b c) (a b) c a b b a a b b a a (b c) 1 a 1 a Real Numbers All real numbers can be classified as either rational or irrational. nonrepeating decimals} N natural numbers {1.2(7x 39.1x)3 2(3. 4. whole numbers. wholes (W). R 17.5r 2.3 Q. Q. 15 3 N.9k 4. 0 W. 3y 12y 3y (3 0. 4. 11. 3.4s) Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs.0005 Q.4r 3. (Lesson 1-2) 1. 40s 18t 5t 11s 3. Z integers {…. 2. reals (R) 9x ( 0. 11.7k 10.3x) 5.75m 14.5j 3b 8.Lesson 1-2 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-2 Study Guide and Intervention Properties of Real Numbers Properties of Real Numbers Real Number Properties For any real numbers a. rationals (Q). Q.9))x 8. 1 6. R 17. I. R 19. W. 4(20 26h 4p) 3 (4 4 4a 16p) 8. Q. 40 2 (18 3 105c 6n 12 3n) 15.9x) (9 ( 0.5x 6) 16.02 Q. 2. R 42 I.000 N. 0. Q. 894. 14. 4(10g 39f 80h) 20(10h 5g) 8. R 36 9 Q.4j 8. 25 5 N. 9(7e 4p 4f) 0. 1. 1 Z. 14( j 9 2) 3j(4 7) 20 18. 1.

5. R 6. Q. Explain your reasoning. 1. Name the property illustrated by each equation. 2(4 3y 7y 10s) 2x 2x (3 3y 3x 6y) 8x 4(7s y) 4(5 2r) x 24.5 16 11 20. 2(r w) 2r 2w Comm. 3 x x 3 Comm.6.8 Q. Iden. W. R Name the property illustrated by each equation. R 5. 11 11 . W. 3x 2y (2r 3r) 4r Assoc. 3x z 4a (5x 3y 2z) 3a2 1 y x 5 2x 3 5x 2 13h 8z 24. 4c 28. Z. Iden. Z. ( ) Mult.625 55. 15 15.6[25(0. Iden. Q. 8x 27. 34 N. 4 4 15 15 (4c 15) 12y 2c) 1 (8 2 1 (2x 4 4c 4a) 4a 12y) 17. 7b (12b 10b) 7b 19. 20. Iden. Write a simplified expression for the sum of the distances traveled by the two cars. 7x (9x 8) (7x 9x) 8 25 36 12 3 I. Inv. R Q. Z. Q. 6(2 v) 4(2v 1) 8 2v 9 10d) 10d false. 16 16 Mult. NUMBER THEORY Use the properties of real numbers to tell whether the following statement is true or false: If a b. 1. 23. 16 Z. 15x(1) 15x Assoc. R Glencoe/McGraw-Hill N. 0. Q. 525 Z. 5 6 0. 5(x y) 5x 5y Add. 6425 7 3. (15d 3 z 0 12 2a2 3x 3a 2z 3 Glencoe Algebra 2 © 8x 6y 13y 31.6(25)]0. ( ) 17. 5y 5y 1 Distributive Add. W. R 7. Answers 1 11. I. Q.8 33. R W. a2 1 23. 0. 1. 16.A6 Mult. ( ) 16. Q. 1 1. 7n Comm. 8. R 8. Q. R 4.25 18. 13. 2r (3r 4r) Add. 14. (6 6)y 0y 9. 2c 1 (10a 5 5 3 30. 13. 4n 0 4n Distributive 4y 1y 12. R Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs. 4 4 . Q. x y a 3y 3) 1 (8 2 19. 0. 11a 13b 7a 3b 4a y 5r y) 16b 3 58s 26. 3(2x)y (3 2)(xy) 14. 9 Z. 3(m z) 5(2m z) 13m 32. it follows that a 1 a b 1 . (3g 3h) 5g 10h 2g 22. Ian drives his car at 50 miles per hour for (t 2) hours. 0 2. b 25.5)] [0. (110t 100) mi 21. R 6. 2 4. TRAVEL Olivia drives her car at 60 miles per hour for t hours. 2x 1 26. 1. R N. 6 6 35 Assoc.25. Assoc.4 Lesson 1-2 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-2 Skills Practice (Average) 1-2 Practice Properties of Real Numbers Properties of Real Numbers Name the sets of numbers to which each number belongs. 2. 3a 0 3a 11. 5x (4y 3x) 5x (3x 4y) 10. Inv. R 3. 18. ( ) 10. Name the additive inverse and multiplicative inverse for each number. R 31. 5 22. Z. 5x 25.875 Q. (10b 12b) 21.5 0. 5 5 5 4 1 Simplify each expression. 0. counterexample: 5 1 5 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 4 1 4 10 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe Algebra 2 . 35 Z. ( ) 2n (7 2)n 7. x 6 5 15.4. ( ) Comm. ( ) Mult. 9. 1 4 Distributive 3 2 x y 15. 5(3x y) 5(3x 1y) 12. 30 I. 3 3 4 Simplify each expression. 2.6 1. 3(r 29. Inv. ( ) (Lesson 1-2) Name the additive inverse and multiplicative inverse for each number.

multiplication no 8. • Why are all of the amounts listed on the register slip at the top of page 11 followed by negative signs? Sample answer: The amount of each coupon is subtracted from the total amount of purchases so that you save money by using coupons. and 2 is in the set. Helping You Remember 2. { 1. (2) the Associative Property. 3.5757… is a repeating Is there some number. in the set such that i a a a for all a? 0 1 1 1 0. a.010010001… is a non-repeating decimal because. One of the equations uses the Associative Property of Multiplication and one uses the Commutative Property of Multiplication. Associative Property: ( 1)[( 1)( 1)] ( 1)(1) 1. (3) a member which is an identity. x4. i. Sample answer: Add all the individual coupon amounts or add the amounts for the scanned coupons and multiply the sum by 2. multiplication no 4. The numbers 2. multiplication no 5. a . {rational numbers}. such that a a a a i? The integer inverse of 3 is 3 since 3 3 0. The identity for addition is 0. An association is a group of people who are connected or united. • Describe two ways of calculating the amount of money you saved by using coupons if your register slip is the one shown on page 11. So the second equation uses the Commutative Property of Multiplication. The set is not a group with respect to addition because only three of the four properties hold.decimal because there is a block of digits. {irrational numbers}. 1 is the inverse of 1 since (1)(1) 1.57 and 0. Sample answer: 2. The second equation uses the quantities in different orders on the two sides of the equation. Example 1 Does the set {0. . 0 2 2. and so on. . The set { 1. and 0 is the identity for addition. 2. …}. and so on. So this number is an irrational number. 1} is a group with respect to multiplication because all four properties hold. Therefore. and the commutative property says you can switch the order when two numbers that are being added or multiplied. b. addition no 2 2 2 (Lesson 1-2) 3. x3.57 2. there is no inverse for 3. {integers}. Tell whether the set forms a group with respect to the given operation. does a (b 0 (1 2) (0 1) 2. A7 18) 63 45 75 30 45 75. Each member has an inverse. and 1 is the identity. Refer to the Key Concepts box on page 11. 11 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 12 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers . and (4) an inverse for each member of the set. 1(1) 1 The identity for multiplication is 1. addition yes 1 2 3 … . (a b) c a (b c). 1} a group with respect to multiplication? Closure Property: ( 1)( 1) 1. How can the meanings of the words commuter and association help you to remember the difference between the commutative and associative properties? Sample answer: 6. and so on The set is associative for multiplication. that repeats forever. is a b in the set? 0 1 1. {multiples of 5}. 2. but they are grouped differently on the two sides of the equation. so this number is rational. x2. addition no Glencoe Algebra 2 © 4. have an inverse. Write the Associative Property of Addition in symbols. and c are used in the same order. Consider the equations (a b) c a (b c) and (a b) c c (a b). 1( 1) 1. and 1 is the identity. …} addition no 7. Lesson 1-2 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-2 Reading to Learn Mathematics Properties of a Group 1-2 Enrichment Properties of Real Numbers A set of numbers forms a group with respect to an operation if for that operation the set has (1) the Closure Property.” Explain why one of these numbers is rational and the other is irrational. although the digits follow a pattern. and the associative property says that you can switch the grouping when three numbers are added or multiplied. The number 0. b) c? 3. 1 is the inverse of 1 since ( 1)( 1) 1. there is no block of digits that repeats. 3. Then illustrate this property by finding the sum 12 18 45 in two different ways. …} form a group with respect to addition? Closure Property: For all numbers in the set. 57. 1 (2 3) The set is associative for addition. But the set does not contain 3. The quantities a. How can you tell which property is being used in each equation? The first equation uses the Associative Property of Multiplication. Sample answer: (12 12 (18 45) 12 Example 2 Is the set { 1. Does each number. 2. Identity: Inverse: 3. The set has closure for addition. i Reading the Lesson Answers 1. Pre-Activity How is the Distributive Property useful in calculating store savings? Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Associative Property: For all numbers in the set.010010001… both involve decimals that “go on forever. . and 1 is in the set. 0 2 2 2 0. Identity: c) (1 (a 2) Inverse: Read the introduction to Lesson 1-2 at the top of page 11 in your textbook. addition yes Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A commuter is someone who travels back and forth to work or another place. ( 1)(1) 1. (1)( 1) 1. 1. {integers}. 1. {x. (1)(1) 1 The set has closure for multiplication. and so on.

Lesson 1-3

©
____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____

NAME ______________________________________________ DATE

1-3

Study Guide and Intervention
(continued)

1-3

Study Guide and Intervention
Solving Equations
You can solve equations by using addition, subtraction,

Solving Equations
Properties of Equality
multiplication, or division.
Addition and Subtraction Properties of Equality Multiplication and Division Properties of Equality
c c

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
Operation addition subtraction multiplication division For any real numbers a, b, and c, if a b, a b then a c b c and, if c is not zero, . For any real numbers a, b, and c, if a b, then a c b c and a c b c.

Verbal Expressions to Algebraic Expressions

The chart suggests some ways to help you translate word expressions into algebraic expressions. Any letter can be used to represent a number that is not known.

Word Expression

and, plus, sum, increased by, more than

minus, difference, decreased by, less than

times, product, of (as in

1 of a number) 2

divided by, quotient

Example 1
Solve 100 100 4x 8x 140. Write a verbal sentence to represent 6(n 2) 14. Six times the difference of a number and two is equal to 14.

Example 2
4x 5y 5y 4x 5y y y

Solve 4x 100 100 100 4x 4x

5y

100 for y.

Write an algebraic expression to represent 18 less than the quotient of a number and 3.

Example 1

Example 2

100

100 8x 8x 100 8x x

140 140 40 5

n 3

18

1 (100 4x) 5 4 20 x 5

Exercises
25
1. 3s 4. 7. 0.2b 10. 120 13. 4n
2 m 3 1 3 2 4

Exercises
Solve each equation. Check your solution. 45 15 2. 17 5. 7 8. 3x
3 y 4

Answers

Write an algebraic expression to represent each verbal expression.

A8
3) 7 9n
6 n
10 50 60 80 20 53 2n 5

1. the sum of six times a number and 25 6n

9
1 x 2

a 3 8 17 11.
5 n 2

8

3. 5t 6. 5x 98 13 15 n 28 8 9. 5(4 12. 4.5

1

6t 2(z k) 2p

5 4 7) 10k 8.7 2.1

2. four times the sum of a number and 3 4(n

3 4

3. 7 less than fifteen times a number 15n

(Lesson 1-3)

4. the difference of nine times a number and the quotient of 6 and the same number

5. the sum of 100 and four times a number 100

4n n) 5n

6. the product of 3 and the sum of 11 and a number 3(11

1 2

14. 100

20

5r

16

15. 2x Solve each equation or formula for the specified variable. 16. a 18. h 20. 2xy 22. 3(2j
m 24. n

75

102

x 9

7. four times the square of a number increased by five times the same number 4n 2

8. 23 more than the product of 7 and a number 7n

23

3b 12g x k) 5m

c, for b b 1, for g g 7, for x x 108, for j j

a 3 h

c 1 12 7 2y 1

17. 19. 21.

s 2t 3pq r d 2

10, for t t 12, for p p
f 4

s 20 4r q
6, for f f

Write a verbal sentence to represent each equation. Sample answers are given.

9. 3n

35

79 The difference of three times a number and 35 is equal to 79.

24 18
20, for m m

2d
k 2 20n 5n 1
23. 3.5s 25. 4x 42 3y 14t, for s s 10, for y y

10. 2(n3

3n2)

4n Twice the sum of the cube of a number and three times the

square of the number is equal to four times the number.

4t
4 x 3
Glencoe Algebra 2
©

12
10 3
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

11.

5n

n

3

n

8 The quotient of five times a number and the sum of the

number and 3 is equal to the difference of the number and 8.
13

Glencoe Algebra 2

©

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

14

Glencoe Algebra 2

Lesson 1-3

©
____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____

NAME ______________________________________________ DATE

1-3

Skills Practice
(Average)

1-3

Practice
Solving Equations

Solving Equations
2. 8 less than 5 times a number 1. 2 more than the quotient of a number and 5

Write an algebraic expression to represent each verbal expression.

Write an algebraic expression to represent each verbal expression. 2. the sum of two consecutive integers

1. 4 times a number, increased by 7

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
5n
4. the product of 3 and a number, divided by 9 3. 5 times the sum of a number and 1

4n
3n 9

7 5(m 1) 2y 2

8

y 5

2

n

(n 1

1)

3. 6 times the sum of a number and 5

4. 1 less than twice the square of a number

6(n n) 11n2 The difference of 5 and twice a number is 4.
7. 3c 2(c 1) 5. 5 2x 4

5)

5. 3 times the difference of 4 and a number 3(4

Write a verbal expression to represent each equation. 5–8. Sample answers 6. 3y 4y3

are given.

6. the product of

11 and the square of a number

Write a verbal expression to represent each equation. 7–10. Sample answers 8. 8 3x 5

Three times a number is 4 times the cube of the number.
8.
m 5

7. n

8

16

are given.

3(2m

1) The quotient

The difference of a number and 8 is 16.
10. 9. If t 11. If h 12 13
y 3

The sum of 8 and 3 times a number is 5.
2 2y 52, then 52 22, then h

Three times a number is twice the difference of the number and 1.

of a number and 5 is 3 times the sum of twice the number and 1.

9. b2

3

b

Name the property illustrated by each statement. t 10. 13. 10. If 8(2q 12. If 4m 1) 4, then 2(2q 1) 1.

Answers

Three added to the square of a number is the number.

A number divided by 3 is the difference of 2 and twice the number.

Symmetric ( ) Subtraction ( )

Division ( )
15, then 12m 45.

A9
10. 12. If d 1 f, then d f 1.

Name the property illustrated by each statement.

Multiplication ( )

11. If a

0.5b, and 0.5b

10, then a

Solve each equation. Check your solution. 13. 14
3 15. 4

Transitive ( )
14. If (8 7)r 30, then 15r 30.

Subtraction ( ) Substitution ( )

8
1 n 2

6r

1
5 1 8 4

14. 9
5 16. s 6

4n
3 4

59
11 1 12 5

17

13. If

7x

14, then 14

7x.

(Lesson 1-3)

Symmetric ( )

17.

1.6r 19. 5(6

5 4v) v

7.8 8 21

18. 6x

5

7

9x

Solve each equation. Check your solution. 16. x 18. 20. 4v 22. 2.2n 0.8n 5 4n 5 20 6 34 5 23. h vt 3b 7 15 2b 4 5x 2

4 5 3 7
21. E mc2, for m m gt2, for v v 20. 6y 5 3(2y Solve each equation or formula for the specified variable. 22. c
2d 3 1

15. 4m

2

18 4

1 2 22 5

1)

1 6
, for d d

17. 3t

2t

5 5

3c 2 gt 2 t
24. E
1 2 Iw 2

1 E c2 h
U, for I I Define a variable, write an equation, and solve the problem. 25. GEOMETRY The length of a rectangle is twice the width. Find the width if the perimeter is 60 centimeters. w width; 2(2w) 2w 60; 10 cm

19.

5x

3x

24 3

21. a

2a 5

3 5

2(E U ) w2

Solve each equation or formula for the specified variable. 24. y
1 x 4

23. I

prt, for p p

I rt

12, for x x

4y
2 rh, for h h

48
A 2 r2 2 r
Glencoe Algebra 2

25. A

x

y

2

, for y y 26. A

2A
15

x

2 r2

26. GOLF Luis and three friends went golfing. Two of the friends rented clubs for $6 each. The total cost of the rented clubs and the green fees for each person was $76. What was the cost of the green fees for each person? g green fees per person; 6(2) 4g 76; $16
©

Glencoe Algebra 2

©

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

16

Glencoe Algebra 2

Answers

Lesson 1-3

©
____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____

NAME ______________________________________________ DATE

1-3

Reading to Learn Mathematics
Venn Diagrams
Relationships among sets can be shown using Venn diagrams. Study the diagrams below. The circles represent sets A and B, which are subsets of set S.

1-3

Enrichment

Solving Equations

Pre-Activity

How can you find the most effective level of intensity for your workout?

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
A) I 6
S S

Read the introduction to Lesson 1-3 at the top of page 20 in your textbook.

• To find your target heart rate, what two pieces of information must you supply? age (A) and desired intensity level (I )
A B A B A

• Write an equation that shows how to calculate your target heart rate.

P

(220

or P

(220

A) I

6

Reading the Lesson

S

1. a. How are algebraic expressions and equations alike?

Sample answer: Both contain variables, constants, and operation signs.

The union of A and B consists of all elements in either A or B. The intersection of A and B consists of all elements in both A and B. The complement of A consists of all elements not in A. You can combine the operations of union, intersection, and finding the complement.

b. How are algebraic expressions and equations different?

Answers

Sample answer: Equations contain equal signs; expressions do not.

Example

Shade the region (A

∩ B) .
A B

(A B) means the complement of the intersection of A and B. First find the intersection of A and B. Then find its complement.

A10
1. A 3. A 5. (A B B B) 7. (A 9. A B) (B C C)

c. How are algebraic expressions and equations related?

Sample answer: An equation is a statement that says that two algebraic expressions are equal.
S

(Lesson 1-3)

Read the following problem and then write an equation that you could use to solve it. Do not actually solve the equation. In your equation, let m be the number of miles driven.

Draw a Venn diagram and shade the region indicated. See students’ diagrams. 2. A 4. A 6. A B B B Draw a Venn diagram and three overlapping circles. Then shade the region indicated. See students’ diagrams. 8. (A 10. (A 11. Is the union operation associative? yes 12. Is the intersection operation associative? yes B) B) C C

2. When Louisa rented a moving truck, she agreed to pay $28 per day plus $0.42 per mile. If she kept the truck for 3 days and the rental charges (without tax) were $153.72, how many miles did Louisa drive the truck? 3(28) 0.42m 153.72

Helping You Remember

3. How can the words reflection and symmetry help you remember and distinguish between the reflexive and symmetric properties of equality? Think about how these words are used in everyday life or in geometry.

Sample answer: When you look at your reflection, you are looking at yourself. The reflexive property says that every number is equal to itself. In geometry, symmetry with respect to a line means that the parts of a figure on the two sides of a line are identical. The symmetric property of equality allows you to interchange the two sides of an equation. The equal sign is like the line of symmetry.

Glencoe Algebra 2
17

©

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Glencoe Algebra 2

©

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

18

Glencoe Algebra 2

12} 10 {6. The symbol x is used to represent the absolute value of a number x. Use the definition of absolute value to solve equations containing absolute value expressions.1 2 1 7 10. 16 3x 4x 12 {4} Glencoe Algebra 2 19 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 20 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers . if a is positive or zero. Case 2 2x 2x 3 Example 1 Evaluate 2x 4 and y 3. z 35yz 6. 2x 5y 6 18. 6 1 2 2x 3x 1 1 2 Glencoe Algebra 2 © 16.Lesson 1-4 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-4 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Absolute Value Equations Absolute Value Equations For any real numbers a and b. 1. 7yz 30 xw 2 13. and a a. 30} 14 a (Lesson 1-4) 7. zz xx 32 20. m 2 3n { 2} p 1 4 23. 15 8. wz xy 23 5. w 4x 12 39 10. 14 2w xy 4 y 17. 5z 2 9} 24.  4  2x  4  2 6  4  12 4 12 8 a 3 3 2x x b 17 17 14 7 3 CHECK CHECK 2( 7) Answers Exercises 4. x 5. x 5 2w 1 8. 22} 5 9 24 45 { 40. Check your solutions. x 15 3. xyz wxz 54 10} 8w 31 13. Check your solutions. 12 10y 10x 3 1 21. 19. 10 and 1. 6y 14. a a. the absolute value of a is the opposite of a. 50} 16 8 11 1  3 x 3 2. 4b 3 15 2b {2. y 1 . 8 4 3 2k 5a 5 12 0 { 1. 3. where b 0. 6 Evaluate each expression if w 3 17 3 17 3 17 17 17 17 17 ✓ There are two solutions. t 4. and z 2 3  14 3  17 17 7. 40 1 4x 2x 23x 11 { 2. 17 17 17 17 ✓ A11 6. xz xz 22. 3wx z yz 6 1 4x 4 9 11 . x z  7 2. 5n 9. yz 4w w 17 3 23. if a 0. If a is negative. 6. Evaluate  4 Example 2 if x 6. wz 4 1 8y 2 20 24 15. Always check your answers by substituting them into the original equation. x y z 37 { 52. the absolute value of a is a. 5w 2z 2y 34 42z y 12. 9} 2m {3} 45 { 15. 1 4p 3 4. z 40 8y 27 15. Solve 2x 3 17. 16. 2x 8 4 7 41 2 9. • Symbols For any real number a. 5 w z 15 2. 3x 12. 1-4 Study Guide and Intervention (continued) Solving Absolute Value Equations Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Example  2x 3y Case 1 3 a 2x 3 2x 3 3 2x x 2x 2(10) 20 b 17 17 20 10 if x 2x 3y 2( 4) 3(3)  8 9  17 17 Absolute Value Expressions The absolute value of a number is the number of units it is from 0 on a number line. Sometimes computed solutions are not actual solutions. 11. 7 x 3x 11 Exercises Solve each equation. 5b 7. if a b then a b or a b. 5f 3f 4 20 {12} 14. if a 0. 10 11. • Words Absolute Value For any real number a.

75. 5a 16. 56a 2 15 5 1 . 10 { 2. 11} 1} 28. 2y 17. 27. Write and solve an equation to find the minimum and maximum actual temperatures when the thermometer states that the temperature is 87. k 10 9 25. Evaluate each expression if a Evaluate each expression if w Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 15 132 6. 21.5. 65 13 3 4 2y 37 { 38} 27 3y 6 14 1.5b 2 b a 14 12. and z 10. 23w 12 { 2. OPINION POLLS Public opinion polls reported in newspapers are usually given with a margin of error. 17c 1. 5w 2 3. 24w 3. 16} 29 { 13. 52r 22. a poll with a margin of error of 5% is considered accurate to within plus or minus 5% of the actual value. 5. 2} 22.6 14. 47 y 1 11 {4.  9y 27 3. 3n 4d 5 13 { 2. c 5. 9y z 17 170 52 5. 10. 5a 7 6. x 16.6 3b 5 114 5 a 12 3c 4 23  0. y 3 2 { 5. n 4 3 6 9 2p 5 s 3 24 3 {11} 9 {3.5 degrees Fahrenheit. Write and solve an equation describing the minimum and maximum percent of the vote that candidate Tonwe is expected to receive. 2g 20. x 21 Glencoe Algebra 2 © 51 3 or 48 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill x 54 22 Glencoe Algebra 2 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill . 4d 21 7. Check your solutions. 3 13.25 30. 9. 3} 6 9 1. 3 2 {11. 6a 6 2. 7x 3x 2 18 { 4.4. 8d 26. y 3. 6 6 30. b 2. WEATHER A thermometer comes with a guarantee that the stated temperature differs from the actual temperature by no more than 1. 16} 13 { 9.5 10.Lesson 1-4 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-4 Skills Practice (Average) 1-4 Practice Solving Absolute Value Equations 1. and d 1. 42y 6 25. 2b 4. 10} Solve each equation. 3.2 Answers 11.5c 8x 3y 5x 2y 610a 17z 10d 1.9 x 88. x 2. 1 8. 3 52d 3 4 19. 2x x 9 { 3. 2} 2 1 2 1 5 .9 23. 2b 4 12 3b 1 7c 5 2d  8b a 33 2a 12. p 7 14 29. 3u 19. 7x 18.  3x 12. Check your solutions.2 9. 7. 5x 20. 2 6 24. 44 y 45 1 24  2x 19. 5w 24.4. 2 8. 3 3 2 3 17. For example. 1} (Lesson 1-4) 15. 4w 1 42 { 12. 4} 7 3s { 8} 5 0 { 2. 3k 6 2 4 8 . 13.4 degrees Fahrenheit. 1} 34x 1 6w 1. 4} x 87. A poll with a stated margin of error of 3% predicts that candidate Tonwe will receive 51% of an upcoming vote. 10 1 c { 9. 11.4 1 7 2y 4 4 w A12 14. 8 p 23. 4. 17} 15.4 1. 15} 42 { 9. 3} 0 { 3} 26. 5 32 2w 7 { 3. 6. 25 5z 8. a b Solve each equation. or 85. Solving Absolute Value Equations 0. 24 18. 10z 31 131 17. 2} 21.

is . a number from 1 to 10 that tells how strong an earthquake is • Why is an absolute value equation rather than an equation without absolute value used to find the extremes in the actual magnitude of an earthquake in relation to its measured value on the Richter scale? Sample answer: The actual magnitude can vary from the measured magnitude by up to 0. | x 4| 6 2 2.6 or as high (x 2) 3 x 6 x 2 3 x 6 x x 2 |x |x • If the magnitude of an earthquake is estimated to be 6. so an absolute value equation is needed. 25. Lesson 1-4 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-4 Reading to Learn Mathematics Considering All Cases in Absolute Value Equations 1-4 Enrichment Solving Absolute Value Equations Pre-Activity How can an absolute value equation describe the magnitude of an earthquake? Glencoe/McGraw-Hill You have learned that absolute value equations with one set of absolute value symbols have two cases that must be considered. you end up with the following four equations: 3 2 3 (x (x 6) 6) scale. Sample answer: (Lesson 1-4) The absolute value is the number of units it is from 0 on the number line. How many cases would there be for an absolute value equation containing three sets of absolute value symbols? 8 6. then a ( 25) 25. What does the symbol mean as a solution set? Sample answer: If a solution set 2) 2) 2 2 2x 2x ( 2x ( 2x 4 4 4) 4) x (x x (x 3 3) 3 3) Helping You Remember 5. | 3x 1.9 on the Richter Each of these equations also has two cases. Sample answer: If a is negative. | 2x x x (x (x 2 2 2x 2x 2) 2) 4 4 ( 2x ( 2x No solution x (x 4) 4) 3 3) x (x 3 3) 4| |x (x (x x x 3 |. Explain why the absolute value of a number can never be negative. four cases must be considered. • What is a seismologist and what does magnitude of an earthquake mean? a scientist who studies earthquakes. What does the sentence b greater than 0. Explain how a could represent a positive number. there are two numbers that have that number as their absolute value. Check your solution. The only solution to this equation is 5 .2 Solve each of these equations and check your solutions in the original equation. 2 A13 a is positive. List each case and solve | x 2| 3. then Solve each absolute value equation. First we must write the equations 0 and where x 6 0. Example: If a 1. Here are the equations for Read the introduction to Lesson 1-4 at the top of page 28 in your textbook. Answers Reading the Lesson |x 3 2| |x 6 |. | x 3. By writing the equations for both cases of each equation above. The number of units is never negative.5 2. it might actually have a magnitude as low as . How can the number line model for absolute value that is shown on page 28 of your textbook help you remember that many absolute value equations have two solutions? Sample answer: The number line shows that for every positive number. 4| 6| |x 7| x 1. |2x 9| |x |5x 10 | x 3| x 12. 6. as 7. 4. Check your solution. 2 4. 0 mean? Sample answer: The number b is 0 or |x 3| x 2.5 5. For an equation with two sets of absolute value symbols. For example. | x 3 | 5 must be broken into x 3 5 or (x 3) 5. then there are no solutions.3 unit in either direction. Consider the problem | x for the case where x 6 these two cases: 2| 3 3 (x 6) x 6 2| 2 | 3 | x 6 |. 23 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 24 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers . Give an example.

If c is negative and a b. The total number of games they will have won by the end of the season is 16 x. If a b. Ethan must read at least 67 pages 4. He wants to figure out how many pages per hour he needs to read in order to finish the book in less than 6 hours.50) xx 1 or 1 . 4(b 7) 6 22 6. how many strings can they afford to bowl? 4. At midseason. Then graph the solution set on a number line. If the friends pool their $40.5d 15 75 Four friends plan to spend Friday evening at the bowling alley. 18 4k 2(k 21) 5. 2x 4 36 4 32 16 set is {xx Let x be the number of remaining games that the Vikings must win. 11) 5} or ( ∞.8(36) 16 x 12. c b . c b . c. 4x 2 7(4x 2) 1 8. If c is negative and a 4. solve the inequality 2. PARKING FEES The city parking lot charges $2.50 0. A14 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Exercises Solve each inequality. Then graph the solution set on a number line. 482 80 3. 24} or ( ∞. If the most you want to pay for parking is $6.50 to determine for how many hours you can park your car. then ac b. 3(9z 4) 35z 4 3.25 for each additional hour. and c. Three of the friends need to rent shoes for $3. 2) ∞) Ethan is reading a 482-page book for a book report due on Monday. 2} or ( ∞. 16}. use the following information. the Vikings must win at least 13 of the games remaining. BOWLING For Exercises 4 and 5. Solve the inequality and interpret the solution. How many of the remaining games must they win in order to win at least 80% of all their games this season? Solve 2x 4 36. b. Describe the solution set using set-builder or interval notation. 5(12 3n) 165 At most 17 hours PLANNING For Exercises 2 and 3. They want to win at least 80% of their games. If a b. 7(7a 9) 84 {aa 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 3} or ( ∞. Many real-world problems involve inequalities. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 482 n 80 6 or 6n per hour in order to finish the book in less than 6 hours. 40 5.25(x 1) 6. then ac bc and a b . 2. Write an equation to describe this situation.8(36) x 0. then a c b c and a 2. 2. If c is positive and a 3. b. c Solve Inequalities The following properties can be used to solve inequalities. 2 2 ∞ {yy 9) {dd 9} or ( ∞. He has already read 80 pages. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill c c is less than is fewer than is greater than is more than 2. Write an inequality with . 6]. 3] {zz {nn 7} or ( 7. use the following information. (2y 3 3) y 2 9. Then graph the solution set on a number line.50)n 4 strings. 24] 4(1. 16 x 0. Write an inequality to describe this situation. (Lesson 1-5) 1.50 per person. 3w 17 3w w The solution set 35 35 18 6 is ( Exercises 1.4 14 12 10 8 6 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 Lesson 1-5 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-5 Study Guide and Intervention (continued) 1-5 Study Guide and Intervention Solving Inequalities Solving Inequalities Real-World Problems with Inequalities Multiplication and Division Properties for Inequalities For any real numbers a. Solve the inequality and interpret the solution. 5] 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7. then ac c bc and a c Addition and Subtraction Properties for Inequalities b b b. The friends can bowl at most 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Glencoe Algebra 2 25 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 26 Glencoe Algebra 2 .50. with c 0: 1. bc and a c is at most is no more than is less than or equal to is at least is no less than is greater than or equal to These properties are also true for Solve 17 3w 35. 2. they have won 16 games. then a c b c and a c.50 per person. 2 3(m 5) 4(m 3) {kk 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 4} or ( 4. 17 17 3w 17 and . Example SPORTS The Vikings play 36 games this year. Example 1 Example 2 Answers 4 2x x The solution . The chart below shows some common phrases that indicate inequalities. ∞) {bb {mm 11} or ( ∞. c For any real numbers a. If c is positive and a b.8 Since they cannot win a fractional part of a game. A string (game) of bowling costs $1.50 for the first hour and $0. and c: 1. then ac bc and a c b . 3(3.

16 {aa 3} or ( ∞. Jan wants to keep a balance of at least $500. 6] 1} or [ 1. 1. 4 3 11. Solve each inequality. Define a variable and write an inequality for each problem. Then solve. 8x 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 2 1 0 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8] 2. 9x 11 6x 9 xx 2} or ( ∞. 3x 4 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 9 {xx 6. An additional 10% tax is added. 4) 1 2 3 4 5 6 13. n Lesson 1-5 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-5 Skills Practice (Average) 1-5 Practice Solving Inequalities Solving Inequalities Solve each inequality. graph the solution set on a number line. 7f 3 2 3 3} or (3. Of this. 2 7 2 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 4 or 3 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 ∞. ∞) 7s {ss 5. Four times the sum of twice a number and 3 is less than 5. 5 4 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 28 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers .1)x 12x 30 600 to find how many nights the Lincoln’s can stay at the hotel without exceeding total hotel costs of $600. 36 2(w 77) 4(2w 52) 14. n ( 3)] 20 16.6} or ( ∞.7y 0. Describe the solution set using set-builder or interval notation.4. 20 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 16 8r 0 {rr 2} or ( ∞. 14s 4 9s 3 2 5 {ss 1 0 1 2 3 1} or ( ∞. 4n 5(n 3) 3(n 1) 4 (Lesson 1-5) 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 {ww 4 3 2 3} or ( 3. 3(4w 1) 18 ww 5 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5. Write and solve an inequality describing how much she can withdraw and still meet these conditions. 1 8u 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4} or ( ∞. ∞ 3 3 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 6. 0. ∞) 1 11 {uu 2 3 4 5 3} or (3. ∞) 0. Then. The difference of three times a number and 16 is at least 8. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 3 or 4 3 4 13. 2z 9. Twenty less than a number is more than twice the same number. ∞) 12.5n. Then. n 4.8 16.5 times that same number. ∞) 9 3f 1 {ff 7r 4 2} or (2. 1. 4x or (3. 4) 3. Hotel parking is $12 per day. 16 3q 4 {qq 3s 4} or (4.3m 2m 4 {mm 12. 23 4u 2} or [2. BANKING Jan’s account balance is $3800. ∞) 7 {bb 7.4} 14. w $2550 Glencoe Algebra 2 © 18.6) 4 {rr 5 6 5(x 0 1 2 8) 3 4 2 5 6 (x 7 8 Answers 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 4} 10. 9(2r 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 9 5) 1 0 1 5z {zz 8. n 19 16 1 n 2 42. ∞) 1 0 1 2 3 4 {nn 2 1 0 4} or ( ∞. n 23 8. ∞) 10. Solve the inequality 90x 90(0. Then solve. 19 2 5 4 2. ∞) 6 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 3. 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 n 20 4[2n 2n. HOTELS The Lincoln’s hotel room costs $90 a night. 4x 2 4 3s 8 5s {ss 4) 3 1} or [ 1. $750 is for rent. 1) 4 3. 4b 9 3} or [ 3. 17.78 5 {yy 9 2x 3.5 4 3 ∞. 4(5x 7) 13 xx 4} or ( ∞. z 4 2 {zz 8} or ( ∞. ∞) 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 {xx 5} or (5. 4] ∞. Five less than the product of 6 and a number is no more than twice that same number. n 12 5. The Lincoln’s expect to spend $30 in tips during their stay. 3800 750 w 500. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 9. Nineteen more than a number is less than 42. graph the solution set on a number line.7m 0. One half of a number is more than 6 less than the same number. 3] 6 10 {xx 2. 5 nights 18. 4] 3u 10 {uu 4 or 1} or [1.5x {xx 1 0 1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 7. 3n 17. 15. 4. q 2(2 q) 0 qq A15 (t 11. Describe the solution set using set-builder or interval notation. 2) 2 2 or . 1 or ( ∞. n n 8 6. ∞) Define a variable and write an inequality for each problem.6n 27 5 2n. 0. 3a 7 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 1. 15. 17.5 {xx 5) {xx 6} or ( ∞. 2] 4. 7t 25 tt 7 2 or ∞. ∞) 8.

is the square of. reflexive. One way to remember something is to explain it to another person. is the sister of. {all women in Tennessee} no. reflexive. no. and c of set A. transitive 8. How could you explain this rule to your classmate? Sample answer: Draw a number line. . Plot two positive numbers. . {all numbers} no. reflexive 4. then a R c. transitive 9. is the spouse of. A common student error in solving inequalities is forgetting to reverse the inequality symbol when multiplying or dividing both sides of an inequality by a negative number. {all numbers} d. for example. is a factor of. if a R b. Then plot their additive inverses. The order changes when you multiply by 1. If it is not. symmetric 10. reflexive 12. 150 • Suppose that in one month you use 230 minutes of airtime on your wireless phone. {xx 5} [5. ⊥. {all nonzero integers} no. transitive 11. but 8 3. Show how you can write an inequality symbol followed by a number to describe each of the following situations. symmetric . Write an inequality that compares the positive numbers and one that compares the negative numbers. {all lines in a plane} no. 3 and 8. {all integers} yes Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe Algebra 2 29 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 30 Glencoe Algebra 2 . For all elements a. {all lines in a plane} no. Reflexive Property Symmetric Property Transitive Property For all elements a and b of set A. 3 and 8. There are several different ways to write or show inequalities. {all triangles in a plane} yes 1. reflexive. {all polygons in a plane} yes a. 1. if a R b and b R c. {all people in Roanoke. Find your monthly cost with each plan. symmetric. is a multiple of. 600 6 10 (Lesson 1-5) b. Suppose that your classmate is having trouble remembering this rule. {all numbers} no. symmetric 6. is the greatest integer not greater than. 2] 3 4 5 c. c.Lesson 1-5 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-5 Reading to Learn Mathematics Equivalence Relations A relation R on a set A is an equivalence relation if it has the following properties. {all integers} no. For any element a of set A. ∞) 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 2. . {all numbers} no. 3) b. 3} ( ∞. symmetric A16 ( 1. 165 Helping You Remember 3. Write each of the following in interval notation. reflexive. is the greatest integer not greater than. 4 5 d. Plan 1: $67 Plan 2 $55 Which plan should you choose? Equality on the set of all real numbers is reflexive. tell which of the properties it fails to exhibit. b. you must be willing to attend at least ten rehearsals. {all members of the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra} yes 13. ∞) ( ∞. a. To participate in a concert. There is space for at most 165 students in the high school band. 5. symmetric. and transitive. There are fewer than 600 students in the senior class. A student may enroll in no more than six courses each semester. 1-5 Enrichment Solving Inequalities Pre-Activity How can inequalities be used to compare phone plans? Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Plan 2: Read the introduction to Lesson 1-5 at the top of page 33 in your textbook. a R a. • Write an inequality comparing the number of minutes per month 400 or 400 150 included in the two phone plans. has the same color eyes as. it is an equivalence relation. 7. symmetric. Notice that 8 3. Virginia} no. Reading the Lesson In each of the following. Answers 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3. Therefore. reflexive. . {xx 2. a relation and a set are given. transitive 14. Write yes if the relation is an equivalence relation on the given set. then b R a.

5} 11 2 0 2 9 {ff 4 6 1 or f 8 10 12 10} 6. To solve a compound inequality. 3x 5 4 Answers 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 A17 4 3 Exercises 8 x 4 2 1 0 1 2 3 x 4 3 2. 5w 8 6 2 4 28 {w 6 2 0 2 4 6 8 w 5. Graph the solution set on a number line. Compound Inequalities A compound inequality consists of two inequalities joined by the word and or the word or. Graph the solution set on a number line. then b a b. By statement 2 above. 22 6w 2 82 8. 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 Example 2 Solve 2x 1 5. then a b or a b. then 5 2x 1 5. 1 2 3 4 5 5 4 3 2 1 0 Lesson 1-6 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-6 Study Guide and Intervention Absolute Value Inequalities For all real numbers a and b. 0. 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 Solve 3 2x 5 19. if x 2 4. 100 5y 45 225 2 6. Graph the solution set on a number line.And Compound Inequalities b. If a These statements are also true for The graph is the union of solution sets of two inequalities. and . 3 4 5 1-6 Study Guide and Intervention (continued) Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Use the definition of absolute value to rewrite an absolute value inequality as a compound inequality. 18 4x 10 50 4. b 3 2 3 10 or b 4 5 4 {y29 24 12 0 12 24 y 54} {bb 12 or b 18} 7. then x 2 4 or x 2 4. the following statements are true. Graph the solution set on a number line. you must solve each part separately.5 or s 6. Graph the solution set on a number line. 5k 2 13 or 8k 1 19 5. Dividing by 2 gives 2 x 3. b 1. If a 2. By statement 1 above. 4s 8 6 1 4 27 {ss 2 0 2 4 6 8 6. Graph the solution set on a number line. 1. c 2 8 {x 4 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 x 4} {aa 5 or a 52} 3  4 0 4 5 {c 4 8 12 16 20 24 c 16} 4. b. 100 0 3m 20 mm 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 26 2 or m 3 40 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Glencoe Algebra 2 31 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 32 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers . 3 The graph is the intersection of solution sets of two inequalities. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1 1 2 Example: x 4 and x Example: x 3 or x Or Compound Inequalities 5 4 3 2 1 0 Example 1 Solve x 2 4. if 2x 1 5. 3a 8 23 or 1 a 4 1. 4d 1 9 or 2d 5 11 9. 19 14 7 3y 2 3y y 7 9 3 or or or 2y 1 2y y 9 8 4 Example 1 Solve 3y 2 7 or 2y 1 9.5} Solve each inequality. Adding 1 to all three parts of the inequality gives 4 2x 6. Subtracting 2 from both sides of each inequality gives x 2 or x 6. 10 0 1 2k 2 3 4 2 {k4 5 6 7 8 k 6} 8. 10 3x 2 14 6 7 3. a 40 9 20 30 {aa 0 20 40 39 or a 21} (Lesson 1-6) 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 3. 2f 4 {x7 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 x 15} {kk 3 or k 2.2} 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 5. x 2 10 5  5 0 2 10 {xx 5 10 15 20 25 30 6 or x 26} 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 7. 2. 4b 11 17 b {w4 4 3 2 w 14} {all real numbers} 1 0 1 2 3 4 3 2 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 b 7 10. Example 2 3 8 4 2x 2x x 5 and 2x 5 2x x 4 x 7 Exercises Solve each inequality.

all numbers less than than 1 n 1 1 or greater 4.5 © 0.5 and 1. p 17. 2x 3 15 or 3 7x 17 {xx 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 {xx or x 2} 8.Lesson 1-6 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-6 Skills Practice (Average) 1-6 Practice Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Write an absolute value inequality for each of the following. 6x 12 {x 2 x 2} 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 17. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 n 1 3 8. 3. the rainfall at Shell Beach has varied no more than 6. 2c 1 5 or c 0 {cc 4y 11. Write and solve an absolute value inequality to describe acceptable can volumes. 1.  7r 14 {rr 2 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 2 or r 2 2} 18. x 8 0 2 4 2 or c 3 1 {y 2 y 1} 0} 1} 12.5 Write an absolute value inequality for each graph. 5.58} 34 Glencoe Algebra 2 Glencoe Algebra 2 33 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill .5} 18. n 5 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 7 {n 2 1 n 12} 20. y 8 5 7 6 2 {x 7 5 4 3 2 1 0 x 3} 9. MANUFACTURING A company’s guidelines call for each can of soup produced not to vary from its stated volume of 14. t 3 {tt 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 3 or t 3} 16. all numbers greater than 4 or less than 8 4 6 3 Write an absolute value inequality for each of the following.08 ounces. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 20 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 10 20 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 3. r 4} 24 6. 2x 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 2 3 2 7 1 0 1 5 {x 2 2 3 4 x 0} 14.42 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill v 14. Then graph the solution set on a number line. Write and solve an absolute value inequality to describe the rainfall in the other 10% of the last 30 years. 3b 5 4 3 2 1 0 2 1 2 3 4 16. 9. 2z 4 3 2 2 1 3 z 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 z 5 2 11. Graph the solution set on a number line. 4a 8 or a 3 {aa 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 3 {xx 6 5 or x 8 10 12 14 16 11} 12. x 4 x 3 2 1 all real numbers 1 0 1 2 3 4 13. n n 0 and 5x 1 0 1 2 3 6 4 14 {xx 3} Answers 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 Solve each inequality. 4 n 4 4 2 2 0 1 0 2 1 4 2 6 3 8 4 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2.08. 11 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 or w 2 3 4 5 2 10. h 5 {hh 6 or h 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 v Glencoe Algebra 2 14. Graph the solution set on a number line. all numbers greater than or equal to 2 or less than or equal to 2 n 2 2.5 inches from its mean value of 24 inches. 15 4 2 8} 5x 3 2 7. 6.5. including 1. RAINFALL In 90% of the last 30 years.5 fluid ounces by more than 0.5 n 1. 8 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 Write an absolute value inequality for each graph. 2w 5 ww 3 2 1 0 1 2 A18 10.5 7.5 or r 30. all numbers less than 5 and greater than 5 n 5 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 1. all numbers between 6 and 6 n 6 n 10 n 4 4 3 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 Solve each inequality.5. 3(5x 2 0 2) 2 4 24 or 6x 6 4 8 10 12 14 4 5x 5. 8 3x 2 23 {x2 14. all numbers between 1. 3n 4 3 2 2 2 1 0 1 1 n 2 3 4 1 3 n 5 3 15. 4. w 4 10 or 2w x numbers 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 7} 6 all real 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 15. 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 19. 10 5x 5 {x 2 x 3} 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 (Lesson 1-6) 2 or a 13.5 and 1. 3y 20 52 {y4 y 24} 6. 4 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 n 4 2. {rr 17. {v14. Then graph the solution set on a number line.

5 2 that does not use the absolute value Solve each inequality. disjunction x 4. Samir 5:00 P. Use a compound inequality and set-builder notation to describe the following graph. disjunction x x 7.M. a. 3 A19 {xx 5 1 or x 3} 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 A compound sentence that combines two statements by the word or is a disjunction. the expression inside the absolute value bars must be between two numbers. Jason and Juanita 10 is a replacement for x that makes both x Reading the Lesson 3 and x is less than or 3x Solve each inequality. “x is greater than equal to 4. Read the introduction to Lesson 1-6 at the top of page 40 in your textbook. 10. Sample answer: If the absolute value 0. 3x 2 and x 1 x 3. 4 5 Answers 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 2. Each of the patients is listed below with the times when they started to fast. it becomes an or inequality. Describe a way to remember which of these applies to an absolute value inequality. Each of them is asked when they last had something to eat or drink. • Five patients arrive at a medical laboratory at 11:30 A. Also describe how to recognize the difference from a number line graph. 1-6 Enrichment Solving Compound and Absolute Value Inequalities Pre-Activity How are compound inequalities used in medicine? Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Example 1 Solve 2x 10 and 2x x 5 and x 5. 7 2 or x 2x 5 5. Jason 1:30 A. Every solution for the inequality is a replacement for x that makes either x 6 or x 4 true. 5 10. 10 means 2x Juanita 11:30 P. 8. 4x 5 2 or 4x 5 2 7 8 that does not use the absolute value 4. 1.M. 11 means 3x 7 11 or 3x 18 or 3x 6 or x 7 4 4 3 11. 7 A compound sentence that combines two statements by the word and is a conjunction. disjunction x 10.” 3 x 4 Example 2 3x x Solve 3x 7 11. so this becomes an and inequality. x 7 8 (Lesson 1-6) 3. If the absolute value quantity is followed by a or symbol. 2x 6 or x 5 1 6. for a glucose tolerance test.) Which of the patients were accepted for the test? Ora 5:00 A. 8 3x 7 8 x 3. 8 12 or x x 2 16.M. conjunction 4 8. 2x Solve each inequality. Write a compound inequality that says. conjunction x 35 Glencoe Algebra 2 © 6 or x Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 10.M. conjunction Helping You Remember x 5. Write a statement equivalent to 4x symbol. b. (The P. Many students have trouble knowing whether an absolute value inequality should be translated into an and or an or compound inequality.M. 5 16 and x 2x 3 quantity is followed by a or symbol. The number line graph will show a single interval between two numbers. 1.M. Graph the inequality that you wrote in part a on a number line. Every solution for 2x and x 5 true. x x 3 1 and x 4 1. x 15 and x 1 1 1.Lesson 1-6 © ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE ____________ PERIOD _____ NAME ______________________________________________ DATE 1-6 Reading to Learn Mathematics Conjunctions and Disjunctions An absolute value inequality may be solved as a compound sentence. conjunction x 6. 2 1 and x 2 1 7 1 . Some of the patients are given the test and others are told that they must come back another day. Write a statement equivalent to 3x symbol. and the graph will show two disconnected intervals with arrows going in opposite directions. Then write whether the solution is a conjunction or disjunction. disjunction 36 x 1 and x 4. times refer to the night before. conjunction 4 x 9. 4x 24 2. conjunction Glencoe Algebra 2 Glencoe Algebra 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Answers .

11. C 10. B: 9. C B B D 10. B D 6. B 17. B 7. C . B 2. 3. B B D C 2. A 15. A 5. 8. Page 38 12. A C 9. Form 2A Page 39 1. A 4. 11. (continued on the next page) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A21 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers 5. 14. A D D 3. A 8. C 6. 13.Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Form 1 Page 37 1. A 7. B 4. C C 20. 16. D 19. C 18.

A 13. B 18. Page 42 12. A 8. 15. A 20. C D 16. A 16. C 17. Form 2B Page 41 1. A 19. A D D 2. D 7. C A 10. A 4. D 9. A 19. A B 15. C 17. B 5. B 18. B {x x 0} B: |g 80| 5 11. 14. D 3.Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Form 2A (continued) Page 40 12. B C 14. C 6. C B: © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A22 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 13. 20.

Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Form 2C Page 43 1. 4. 24] 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 6. 5. Additive Identity 11. Q. 12. 8} B: 7 5 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A23 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers Q. Page 44 20 7 9 17. ) 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 9. 21. {t t 12} or (12.00a 7. 13 3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 all real numbers or ( . ) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20. Multiplicative Inverse 10. 2. 5] N. 23. ) 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 24. 2 or x 6} or 2) (6. {n 2 n 5} or (2. 6 28. Z. 11 number of adult tickets. at least 42 games 13. {x x ( . 2} { 4. 7. a 2n the number.25 19. 12. 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 g number of additional games to be won. 15. 14. R . {x x 24} or ( . 9 2 11 { 5. W.5 $531. R 22. R Q.50(a 8) 138. 4 adults’ tickets and 12 children’s tickets 3. 16. {x 4 x 1} or [ 4. g 56 162 0. 8.60. n 18. 1] 15v n3 10 25.

at least 4 dimes d 3 7 { 2. {t t 2} or ( . 3} or ) 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 9. R 20. 8 18. Multiplicative Identity 11. 7} © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A24 Glencoe Algebra 2 . 2) (8. ) 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 21. 8. {x 5 4 x 4} or [ 5.Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Form 2D Page 45 1. 1} B: 5 {1.5 $180 19. 4. {x 1 3 2 1 x 1} or ( 1. 0. W.05(25 d) 1. the number of dimes. Z. 1 25.44.10d 0. 2. {x x 5} or [5. 7. n 3n number. 1 or n . 2) 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 6. 14. 15. w width. length: 13 ft 3 1. 4] 0 4 8 25. 5. R Q. {x x 2 or x 8} or ( . 16. 13. Page 46 5 11 6 17. 12. Q. 23. Additive Inverse 10. 1) [3. R Q. width: 6 ft. N. ) 0 2 4 6 8 10 10x 5(7 23 n) 8 24. 2[(w 7) w] 38. 1) 0 1 2 3 4 {n n ( 22. 3.

Q. 0. W. 6x 10y 5 17. ) 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 14 6.4 3 19. W. 7. 1 3 . 2. 1 2 3 1 3 0 1 3 2 3 1 3 4 16.5648 in3 14. Q. 13. amount invested in stock. 2 or x 8} 2] (8.Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Form 3 Page 47 1. 11. Z. length: 8 meters width: 5 meters B: more than 1. 4 4 9 19 2 4 3 13 7 15 17 4 4 4 2 4 5. since 2b. 2 4 w four times the sum of the cube of a number and twice the same number 1 4 w 1 . R 15. Z. 2 . yy 1 or 3 . R b.75 h © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A25 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers Z. R d. a. 20. {x x or ( . 8. Q. 4 or x 10} 4] (10. Q.1 4 1 or 1 4 1 4 0 2 4 3 4 1 5 4 18. R c.08a 0. the when a value of the expression is zero. Page 48 3 13. A 1 b(18 2 b) 25 3.06(5000 a) 3. e. at least $2500 a 12. 3 3 10. w 5 3 5 3 w 3 or 5 . 2 1 4 3 2 10. Sometimes. R I. a 2A h b 4 3 2 7 3 8 3 3 10 11 3 3 length. N. xx 17 or 17 . 4. all real numbers {x x or ( . ) 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 9.

solving equations and inequalities including those with absolute value. or no solution is given 0 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A26 Glencoe Algebra 2 . • Computations are correct. properties of real numbers. • Uses appropriate strategies to solve problems. • Written explanations are satisfactory. properties of real numbers. • Computations are mostly correct. Open-Ended Assessment Scoring Rubric Score 4 General Description Superior A correct solution that is supported by welldeveloped. simplifying and evaluating expressions. but may contain minor flaws in reasoning or computation 2 Nearly Satisfactory A partially correct interpretation and/or solution to the problem 1 Nearly Unsatisfactory A correct solution with no supporting evidence or explanation Unsatisfactory An incorrect solution indicating no mathematical understanding of the concept or task. properties of real numbers. and graphing inequalities. simplifying and evaluating expressions. • May not use appropriate strategies to solve problems. • Computations are incorrect. • No answer may be given. solving equations and inequalities including those with absolute value. • Written explanations are exemplary. • Shows an understanding of the concepts of order of operations. and graphing inequalities. • Satisfies minimal requirements of some of the problems. and graphing inequalities. • Does not satisfy requirements of problems. • Shows little or no understanding of most of the concepts of order of operations. • Computations are mostly correct. solving equations and inequalities including those with absolute value. simplifying and evaluating expressions. 3 Satisfactory A generally correct solution. • Goes beyond requirements of some or all problems.Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Page 49. simplifying and evaluating expressions. • Uses appropriate strategies to solve problems. • Does not use appropriate strategies to solve problems. • Final computation is correct. • Satisfies the requirements of most of the problems. solving equations and inequalities including those with absolute value. • Written explanations are unsatisfactory. • Written explanations are effective. properties of real numbers. accurate explanations Specific Criteria • Shows thorough understanding of the concepts of order of operations. and graphing inequalities. • Satisfies all requirements of problems. • No written explanations or work is shown to substantiate the final computation. • Shows an understanding of most of the concepts of order of operations.

GIVEN Addition Property of Equality Commutative Property of Addition Associative Property of Addition Inverse Property of Addition Identity Property of Addition Distributive Property SUBSTITUTION Multiplication Property of Equality Associative Property of Multiplication Inverse Property of Multiplication Identity Property of Multiplication Symmetric Property of Equality 1b. Sample word problem: Anoki is packing a box to ship to a science fair. Students may select any value for k between 0 and 2. The only possible value of k is zero. 32 are possible for the number of rocks. the following sample answers may be used as guidance in evaluating open-ended assessment items. Students should indicate that the only number that is zero units away from 3 on the number line is 3 itself. 1a. How many rocks can he include if each rock weighs one-fourth of a pound? 3b. The box must weigh no more than 10 pounds. He will put in an exhibit frame that weighs two pounds. 3a. 2c. use all of the same properties but that they applied many of them mentally. 2a. Students should graph {x x 32} and indicate that the graph includes negative numbers and numbers that are not integers. They should understand that they did. in fact.Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Page 49. They should indicate that the solution of this inequality will not contain 5 if the distance from 3 on the number line is less than 2 units. For the sample problem. Students may select any negative number for k. Only 0. {x x 32} and x is a whole number. 2. 1. 3c. Their explanations should include the fact that an absolute value may never be less than zero. this would mean that no more than 32 rocks can be packed. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A27 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers . Open-Ended Assessment Sample Answers In addition to the scoring rubric found on page A26. Sample student solution: 6(7 x) 3 9x 42 6x 3 9x 45 6x 6x 9x 6x 45 15 15x 15 3 x Students should note that their solutions are considerably briefer though the answers are the same. 2b. These numbers have no meaning in this context. … .

or the first one is larger than the second. Identity Property 2. 3. 11 or x 3} 11) U ( 3. {x x 2 or x 3} or ( . absolute value 11. 2. they are equal. d x 1 6 1 10 y b m {m 2. ) 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Trichotomy Property says that if you compare two real numbers you will find that either the first one is smaller than the second. ) 3 5. 13 days 4. Transitive Property 9. 41 g 0. integers. 3. 1 5 xx 0 1 5 2 5 3 5 1 5 4 5 1 6 5 Property 8. Commutative 4. This Quiz (Lesson 1–3) means that an Page 51 irrational number cannot be written as a ratio of two B 1. number of additional games to be won.2 3 2. Quiz (Lessons 1–4 and 1–5) Page 52 1. R 8v 7 6 4.8 m 5 4 . Sample answer: An irrational number is a real number that is not rational. compound g 5. 13 72 47. 3. Reflexive Property 5. set-builder notation 7. 6] 4 5 6 7 5. I. 8 7d 99.Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Vocabulary Test/Review Page 50 1. all real numbers or ( . intersection 6. 2. Sample answer: The Quiz (Lesson 1–6) Page 52 1. Symmetric Property 4. 4. rational numbers 3. 5. 1 1 m 8} or ( 1. ) 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A28 Glencoe Algebra 2 . or ( 11 . 12. Quiz (Lessons 1–1 and 1–2) Page 51 1. number of days running 7 miles. 82 at least 17 games inequality 10. 8) 8 {x x 3. {x 1 0 1 x 2 3 6} or [1. 2) (3.70.

11. 6.Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Mid-Chapter Test Page 53 1. A 9. 5(295 t) 2t 950. Z. 4. 3. W. Q. ) 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 n the number. ) 11.65. 175 students’ tickets 12. 5} 2 2. R 7x n2 8 { 4. B 5. 3x 20 7 10. 4. 7 or x 1} 7) (1. {x x or ( . 5. 48 3n 36. all real numbers ( 9. t the number of students’ tickets sold. 7. 11. {t t 5} or [5. D 36 0. ) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 13. 2. g 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 14. 10. at least 49 games 17. 8. . Cumulative Review Page 54 1. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A29 Glencoe Algebra 2 Answers n3 .49 20 17 77 N. 3. 57 g 162 0.5 b 2ah 14 16. A C 6. 7. 4 number of additional games to be won. 8.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 1 0 . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . A B C D Standardized Test Practice Page 56 12. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . A B C D 19. 1 9 / 3 . E F G H 3. A B C D 6. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / .Chapter 1 Assessment Answer Key Page 55 1. A B C D A B C D 17. 4. A B C D 8. / . E F G H . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 13. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 5. 3 5 . 9. A B C D © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A30 Glencoe Algebra 2 . E F G H 16. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 15. E F G H A B C D 18. 0 9 . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . A B C D 14. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / . A B C D 11. 10. E F G H 7.

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