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Dr. Margaret Patton, Dissertation, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Committee

Dr. Margaret Patton, Dissertation, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Committee

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Dr. Margaret Patton, Dissertation, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Committee
Dr. Margaret Patton, Dissertation, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Committee

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Collins, J. (2001). Good to great: Why some companies make the leap…and
other’s don’t. New York: HarperCollins Publishers Inc.

1. Could you briefly give an overview of your relationship to the school –
years involved and primary responsibilities held?
2. What do you see as the top five factors that contributed to or caused the
upward shift in performance during the years 2004-2007 (years since
TAKS)?

3. Now let’s return to those five factors, and I’d like you to allocate a total of
100 points to those factors, according to their overall importance to school
improvement (total across all five factors equals 100 points).
4. Could you please elaborate on the top two or three factors? Can you give
me specific examples that illustrate the factor?
5. Did the school make a conscious decision to initiate a major change or
transition during this time frame?
6. If so, to the best of your recollection, when did the school begin to make
the key decisions that led to the transition?
7. If so, what sparked the decision to undertake a major transition?
8. What was the process by which the school made key decisions and
developed key strategies during the school improvement process – not
what decisions the school made, but how did it go about making them?
9. What was the role, if any, of outside consultants and advisors in making
the key decisions?
10. On a scale of 1-10, what confidence did you have in the decisions at the
time they were made, before you knew their outcome? (Ten means you
had great confidence that they were very good decisions with high
probability of success. One means you had little confidence in the
decisions; they seemed risky – a roll of the dice.)
11. If had confidence of 6 or greater, what gave you such confidence in the
decisions?
12. How did the school get commitment and alignment with its decisions?
13. Can you cite a specific example of how this took place?
14. What did you try during the transition that didn’t work?

203

15. How did the school manage the short-term pressures of
accountability/NCLB while making long-term changes and investments for
the future?
16. High performing ECM: I will be comparing schools like yours to others
that are similar but have not shown a significant shift in performance.
What is different about your school that enabled it to make this transition?
Other schools could have done what you did, but didn’t; what did you
have that they didn’t. –or- Low performing ECM: I will be comparing
schools like yours to others that are similar but have made a shift in
performance to the recognized or exemplary levels. How is your school
different?

17. Can you think of one particularly powerful example of vignette from your
experience or observation that, to you, exemplifies the essence of the
shift from good to great in your school?
18. Describe any activities or communications that goes on between your
feeder schools that assist students in the school community with
academics and/or transitions from one school to another.
19. Are there any questions we didn’t ask, but should have?

204

APPENDIX D - INTERVIEW QUESTION RESPONSE FORM
(HIGH PERFORMING ECM SCHOOLS)
Collins, J. (2001). Good to great: Why some companies make the leap…and
other’s don’t. New York: HarperCollins Publishers Inc.

1

Could you briefly give an overview of your relationship to the school – years involved and primary responsibilities held?

2

What do you see as the top five factors that contributed to or caused the upward shift in performance during the years
2004-2007 (years since TAKS)?

3

Now let’s return to those five factors, and I’d like you to allocate a total of 100 points to those factors, according to their
overall importance to school improvement (total across all five factors equals 100 points).

4

Could you please elaborate on the top two or three factors? Can you give me specific examples that illustrate the
factor?

5

Did the school make a conscious decision to initiate a major change or transition during this time frame?

6

If so, to the best of your recollection, when did the school begin to make the key decisions that led to the transition?

7

If so, what sparked the decision to undertake a major transition?

8

What was the process by which the school made key decisions and developed key strategies during the school
improvement process – not what decisions the school made, but how did it go about making them?

9

What was the role, if any, of outside consultants and advisors in making the key decisions?

10

On a scale of 1-10, what confidence did you have in the decisions at the time they were made, before you knew their
outcome? (Ten means you had great confidence that they were very good decisions with high probability of success.
One means you had little confidence in the decisions; they seemed risky – a roll of the dice.)

205

11

If had confidence of 6 or greater, what gave you such confidence in the decisions?

12

How did the school get commitment and alignment with its decisions?

13

Can you cite a specific example of how this took place?

14

What did you try during the transition that didn’t work?

15

How did the school manage the short-term pressures of accountability/NCLB while making long-term changes and
investments for the future?

16

High performing ECM: I will be comparing schools like yours to others that are similar but have not shown a significant
shift in performance. What is different about your school that enabled it to make this transition? Other schools could
have done what you did, but didn’t; what did you have that they didn’t. –or- Low performing ECM: I will be comparing
schools like yours to others that are similar but have made a shift in performance to the recognized or exemplary
levels. How is your school different?

17

Can you think of one particularly powerful example of vignette from your experience or observation that, to you,
exemplifies the essence of the shift from good to great in your school?

18

Describe any activities or communications that goes on between your feeder schools that assist students in the school
community with academics and/or transitions from one school to another.

19

Are there any questions we didn’t ask, but should have?

206

APPENDIX E - CODING MATRIX (HIGH-PERFORMING SCHOOLS)

Responses

Freq.

Significant Quotes

Category 1:
Leadership

Disciplined People

Category 2:
Recruiting and
Retaining Staff

Category 3: Strategic
Plan/Procedures

Coding Category 4:
Vision, Core Values,
and Purpose

Coding Category 5:
Continuous Learning

Coding Category 6:
Collaborative
Environment

Disciplined Thought

Coding Category 7:
Curriculum and
Instruction
Precedence

207

Coding Category 8:
Student Focus

Coding Category 9:
Assessment/Data-
driven Decisions

Coding Category10:
High Expectations

Coding Category 11:
Accountability

Coding Category 12:
Resiliency

Coding Category 13:
Autonomy

Disciplined Action

Coding Category 14:
External Support

Coding Category 15:
Resources

208

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