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Dec 2010 Habitat World

Dec 2010 Habitat World

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Habitat World

December 2010

WHAT WILL YOU BUILD?
AT T H I S V E RY M OM E N T, in locations all around the world, Habitat volunteers, supporters

and partner families are building, renovating and repairing houses. Their work strengthens families, cultivates better communities and creates a world of hope. Help make it happen.

An American folk icon lends his voice to Habitat efforts in New York’s Hudson Valley

IN THIS ISSUE:

Foundations
From Habitat CEO Jonathan Reckford

HabitatWorld
The Publication of Habitat for Humanity International
EXECUTIVE EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR ASSISTANT EDITOR PHOTO EDITOR PRINT SUPERVISOR DESIGN

Imagine the Difference

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EZRA MILLSTEIN

Jennifer Lindsey Shala Carlson Rebekah Daniel Bob Jacob Mike Chapman Journey Group, Inc.

n this issue of Habitat World, on our website and through a series of radio and television public service announcements, we have been asking the question “What Will You Build?” We know that our efforts are about more than building, repairing and renovating houses. Habitat for Humanity builds hope, community, educational opportunities, health benefits and so much more — now to an even greater degree.

Because of the support of readers like you, Habitat was able to serve 74,960 families around the world last year. In the days ahead, we will build on that inspirational number through your continued generosity and dedication. Every day, I see the things that Habitat builds. Faith, for example. Countless volunteers, homeowners, donors and even bystanders have understood God in amazing new ways as compassionate people around the globe reach out to help neighbors. God continues to stir in my heart when I see the dreadful shelter conditions that some must endure. But I am also privileged to look into eyes that sparkle with hope and promise when families celebrate moving into a place they can call home. Recently in Zambia, I witnessed just one example of Habitat’s incredible impact. Seventeen-year-old Dorcas suddenly found herself as head of her household after her father died and her mother left home one
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day and never returned. The crude shelter in which Dorcas lived with her siblings provided little protection for the two oldest girls who were assaulted repeatedly by men who cut their way through the tarp sides of the lean-to at night. For Dorcas, a Habitat home means having a safe place with doors she can lock. In the lives of orphaned and vulnerable children, Habitat is building security and reassurance. I would also say that Habitat builds bridges. Not long ago, I visited a oncevibrant North Carolina community that had fallen into neglect and decay. To create a vision for revitalization, Habitat leaders met with residents. Soon, local officials recognized the importance of this area to the history — and future — of the entire community. Businesses and faith-based groups came forward with funding and volunteer labor. Neighborhood leaders and schools joined in. And so, in the Cherry Street community, Habitat is building a bridge between a historic past and tomorrow’s opportunities. As you turn these pages, you will see compelling photographic evidence of the many things that Habitat builds, of how our combined efforts impact more and more families and futures. I thank you for your unceasing support and ask you to think seriously about how else you can help. What will you build?

WHO WE ARE
Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit, Christian housing ministry that works both to eliminate poverty housing around the world and to make adequate housing a matter of conscience and action. Habitat welcomes to the table partners from any faith — or from no faith — who are willing to pick up a hammer to help improve the lives of families needing decent shelter.

W HAT W E D O
Habitat for Humanity organizations build, renovate and repair houses in partnership with people in need of adequate housing. Homeowners are selected locally by Habitat organizations based on their need for housing, ability to repay a no-profit loan and willingness to partner with Habitat. Loan repayments contribute to help build and repair additional houses. Because Habitat’s loans are no-profit, they are affordable for low-income partners.

S TAT E M E N T O F P U R P O S E
Habitat World magazine is the educational, informational and outreach publication of Habitat for Humanity International. Its purpose is to further Habitat’s goal of eliminating inadequate and poverty housing as a demonstration of the gospel of Jesus Christ, and to raise awareness of the issues involved in this work throughout the organization and the world community. Habitat World is free to anyone who wishes to receive it.

LET US HEAR FROM YOU
Habitat World, 121 Habitat St., Americus, GA 31709-3498, habitatworld@habitat.org, (800) HABITAT, (229) 924-6935 fax (229) 931-9629

FOR SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES
Call the number above or e-mail publicinfo@habitat.org. Habitat World can be read online at habitat.org and is available on request in Braille. Circulation: 1,043,768 Copyright ©2010

JONATHAN T.M. RECKFORD

Chief Executive Officer Habitat for Humanity International

Habitat World (ISSN: 0890–958X) is published quarterly by Habitat for Humanity® International, 121 Habitat St., Americus, GA 31709–3498. Vol. 27 No. 4. December 2010. ,

Blueprints p
Your content guide to Habitat World

DECEMBER 2010
In Kumsangir, Tajikistan, carpenter Misbuhiddin Salim helps to renovate a Habitat home. Microloans from Habitat Tajikistan allow partner families to winterize their dwellings, making them warmer and healthier places to live.

FEATURES
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THE BIG PICTURE In this special year-end issue, Habitat World shares a collection of powerful images from some of the many places around the world where Habitat makes a difference daily. • Facing challenges in Paraguay
PA G E 1 1 PA G E 1 2
ON THE COVER
In this special year-end issue, Habitat World shares a collection of powerful images from some of the many places where Habitat is making a difference. The particulars of Habitat’s work around the world differ from place to place, but the goal is always the same — the creation of decent, affordable housing. Photos by Steffan Hacker, Ezra Millstein and Mikel Flamm

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IN EVERY ISSUE
F O U N DAT I O N S : Habitat for Humanity International CEO Jonathan Reckford asks “What Will You Build?”
PA G E 2

EZRA MILLSTEIN

HA B I TAT L A S : Poets Build in South

• Struggling toward home in Seattle • Knowing home in Omaha, Neb.

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Korea; Habitat Haiti continues to make progress; a Dutch foundation supports renovation projects in Central Asia.
PA G E 4

• Rolling up sleeves outside Hong Kong • Finishing construction in Kyrgyzstan

• Learning and building in North Carolina • Seeing a difference in Downey, Calif. • Creating community in Ethiopia

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F I E L D N O T E S : Located in New York’s Hudson Valley, Habitat Greater Newburgh highlights its community-changing work with a concert headlined by the legendary Pete Seeger.
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Habitatlas
International news

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United States Olympic Committee volunteers help build it

Dutch foundation underwrites renovation projects in Kyrgyzstan

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Earthquake response efforts progress in Haiti Habitat Cameroon completes 20 houses

Armenian Housing Study offers analysis, action

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Habitat Guatemala helps build wood-fire eco-stoves

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Typhoonaffected families in Habitat Vietnam Kenya increases dedicate Habitat its impact houses

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Poetry in motion at South Korea build

Numbers on the map above correspond to numbers in the text about the specified country.

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Habitat Kenya exponentially increases number of families served
partner homeowner has utilized a small first loan and established a good record of repayment, additional phases of lending can follow. One participant in this new approach is retired teacher Kipkiror Tesot, who lives with his wife and children in Bomet. The family inhabited a two-room mud house with iron sheeting for a roof and a small, detached kitchen. “It used to be such a hard task for us to continually repair the walls of the house after the rainy season,” he says. “It was such a relief when I learned about Habitat.” Kipkiror’s first loan of 20,000 kes (US$267) enabled him to lay the foundation of a new house. Through the sale of farm produce, he repaid that amount in only 12 months, and a second loan allowed him to complete his home. “My life has changed dramatically,” he says. “I never had hope that I would live in a decent house of my own.” Habitat Kenya partner families use their loans for home improvements, incremental building projects, the construction of auxiliary buildings like latrines and the completion of houses. Habitat Kenya currently has six branches and is in the process of rolling out a seventh.

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n the last fiscal year, Habitat for Humanity Kenya served more than 1,500 families — an increase of 240 percent from the previous year. This tremendous change is a result of a shift in focus: partnering with organized community self-help groups to make small loans that are repayable in a short period of time. These village savings groups, usually 15 to 30 members each, already function as informal, efficient savings mechanisms in communities. A Habitat officer meets with them, offering training and information on housing microfinance loans. Once a
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Habitat World is also published online at

with additional coverage of Habitat’s work.

HABITAT.ORG/HW

first of its kind in Habitat history — put members of the Korean Poets Association to work on eight units of a two-story residential building project. Association president and professor emeritus at Hanyang University, Geon-Cheong Lee led the build. “The Korean verb jitda — “construct” or “make” — applies to both writing a poem and building a home,” says I-Yong Kwon, adviser to Habitat Korea and a Korean Poets Association chairperson. “Hence, one can jitda a poem or jitda a house or jitda a meal. They are all essential to human life.” After completing the build, the poet volunteers took part in Yangpyeong’s Festival of Hope, gathering at a local riverside park to recite poetry focusing on home and family. UNITED STATES Once again this year, the United States Olympic Committee selected Habitat to be a part of its “Team for Tomorrow” program. As a result, 41 Olympic and Paralympic athletes, Olympic hopefuls, and friends and family members have volunteered on Habitat build sites throughout the United States. Affiliates that have hosted USOC volunteers this year, both through group build days and individual efforts, include Habitat Washington D.C., Salt Lake Valley Habitat, Anchorage Habitat, Twin Cities Habitat (Minn.), New Orleans Habitat, Habitat Grayson County (Texas), Habitat Grand County (Colo.), Coastal Habitat (N.J.) and Adirondack Habitat (N.Y.). Three-time Olympian Julie Chu volunteered in D.C. “I believe a good home is the foundation for a good life,” she says. “Being able to contribute to a house that will be someone’s home is an incredible opportunity.” Team for Tomorrow is an ongoing relief effort that consists of financial donations, volunteerism, disaster services, advocacy and other contributions to communities.

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STEFFAN HACKER

Kipkiror Tesot was able to complete construction on his family’s home after receiving a series a small loans from Habitat Kenya’s housing microfinance program. The loans allowed him to build his home in stages with materials he had been saving for more than 10 years.

ARMENIA Habitat Armenia recently has completed its Armenian Housing Study, which analyzes the country’s housing issues and identifies vulnerable groups affected by current policy. Through this report, Habitat Armenia aims to enhance its understanding of the current housing environment, allowing the national organization to scale up existing projects and develop new housing solutions. The study’s findings demonstrate the many housing challenges that Armenia faces — the aftermath of a devastating 1988 earthquake that demolished more than 17 percent of available housing stock, econom-

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ic collapse, armed conflict, deteriorating condominiums. In addition to analysis, the study includes recommendations on how Habitat, government and other organizations can begin to address primary needs and form plans to solve long-term problems. To date, Habitat Armenia has partnered with nearly 600 families in the country. SOUTH KOREA In August, nearly 30 Korean poets contributed both literary skills and labor to a Habitat build in Yangpyeong. The Poets Build — thought to be the

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Habitatlas
VIETNAM In Hiep Duc, Habitat Vietnam has dedicated five houses with partner families affected by Typhoon Ketsana. Phan Van Hai is among those who now have a solid and secure home. Hai, his wife Huong and their three sons previously lived in a thatched bamboo house. In September 2009, the force of Typhoon Ketsana tore off half the roof of their house and destroyed its walls. Now in his Habitat house, Hai says, he has fewer worries. Another 15 new houses will be built and 184 existing homes renovated over a two-year period. The project also includes training local residents in communitybased disaster risk management and local construction workers in the construction and renovation of disaster-resistant houses. Project partners include ExxonMobil, the United Nations Development Program, Holcim, Schneider Electric, Hiep Duc People’s Committee and Habitat San Francisco.

Habitat World is also published online at

with additional coverage of Habitat’s work.

HABITAT.ORG/HW

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emergency shelter kits and house assessments and repairs to upgradeable transitional shelters and core houses. Habitat Resource Centers also are offering structural assessments, construction assistance, financial literacy education, production of construction materials, and vocational training opportunities. A key part of Habitat’s response strategy is to employ Haitians whose livelihoods have been impacted by the earthquake. Habitat has hired construction supervisors and workers in the cities of Cabaret and Leogane, with similar plans in Jacmel, Carrefour, Port-auPrince and Croix-des-Bouquets. THE NETHERLANDS A Dutch foundation is lending its support to Habitat renovation projects in Kyrgyzstan. Op Eigen Wieken is the foundation of a small independent housing association and supports housing and community infrastructure projects around the world. Its support of Habitat’s work in Central Asia will total 240,000 euros (US$305,000) over four years. Habitat Kyrgyzstan has partnered with condominium associations in Bishkek since 2006. To date, through its condominium renovation work, Habitat Kyrgyzstan has served more than 1,800 families. Stichting Op Eigen Wieken is supporting Habitat projects around Bishkek and in Tokmok, an industrial center in the eastern Chui region. The Tokmok project focuses mainly on repairing roofs and sewage systems in the condominium buildings and will run for four years. In the first year, it aims to

HABITAT SOUTH KOREA

A group of poets put down their pens and picked up hammers to help Habitat South Korea build in Yangpyeong.

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rehabilitate at least three buildings and improve living conditions for almost 600 residents. CAMEROON Ndam Lawrence Monah, his wife Justine Folefeh Bezafut and their two children never used to know how long they would be able to stay in one place. But after years of battling increasing rents and then sharing a home with a relative, the family now finally has a place to call their own. “I’ve always wanted to own my own home, but our finances never allowed us to build our own. Renting was like throwing money into a bottomless pit,” says Ndam, a doctoral student at the University of Buea. “I am so thankful for this opportunity to own a home and pray that Habitat’s work can

HAITI Rose Flore Charles and 6 her two children moved into one of Habitat’s first transitional shelters in Leogane in June. They had spent six months living in a shack cobbled together out of scraps. “Sleeping in the old shelter, the rain always got in,” Charles says. “I’m thirsty for this house. This is not just a transitional shelter for me. It is a home.” Charles represents the 50,000 Haitian families that Habitat has committed to serving in the aftermath of the January 2010 earthquake. Habitat’s response includes a variety of housing solutions, from

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WHERE WE WORK
Habitat for Humanity started in the United States in 1976, and today its work reaches around the world. Currently, Habitat is at work in all 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Territory of Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands and other countries around the globe, including: Afghanistan | Argentina | Armenia | Australia Bangladesh | Bermuda | Bolivia | Botswana | Brazil | Bulgaria | Cambodia | Cameroon | Canada | Chile | China | Colombia | Costa Rica | Cote d’Ivoire | Dominican Republic | Egypt El Salvador | Ethiopia | Fiji | France | Germany | Ghana | Great Britain | Guatemala | Guyana | Haiti | Honduras | Hungary | India | Indonesia | Jamaica | Japan | Jordan | Kenya | Kyrgyzstan Laos | Lebanon | Lesotho | Macedonia | Madagascar | Malawi | Malaysia | Mexico | Mongolia | Mozambique | Myanmar | Nepal | Netherlands | New Zealand | Nicaragua | Northern Ireland Paraguay | Peru | Philippines | Poland | Portugal | Republic of Ireland | Romania | Russia | Senegal | Singapore | Slovakia | South Africa | South Korea | Sri Lanka | Tajikistan | Tanzania | Thailand Timor-Leste | Trinidad and Tobago | Turkey | Uganda | Ukraine | Vietnam | Zambia

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Windows on the Work
GLIMPSES INSIDE HABITAT HAPPENINGS

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expand across our country to help others.” Twenty new Habitat homes in Buea were made possible by a two-year CISCO foundation grant. In the first year, the legal route to acquire land was completed. Building started in April 2009, and by March of this year, only the final connections for water and electricity were left to be completed. GUATEMALA Wood-fire kitchens have been ubiquitous throughout the western highlands of Guatemala for as long as most families can remember. And while they do have certain advantages — heat during cold nights at high altitudes and affordability — wood fires typically are built inside or next to the home, often in poorly ventilated areas. Asthma and respiratory conditions are disproportionately high among families using open fires. Families deeply accustomed to cooking this way seek a solution that protects their families and homes, but also preserves the warmth, the flavor of food and the long-term affordability that open fires provide. Habitat Guatemala is helping by partnering with families to build wood-fire eco-stoves that are safe, well-ventilated and burn efficiently. One family from each Guatemalan affiliate has received one of these stoves at half the usual loan amount and with one condition — that they open their home to those who might be doubtful so that they can see how it works and ask questions. The approach has been key to encouraging communities to embrace the Habitat alternative.

Building begins in Hawk Point, Mo.
In July, Lincoln County Habitat broke ground on its very first house. The affiliate officially joined the Habitat family in July 2009 and spent an eventful year fundraising and laying groundwork in the community, cementing partnerships with the local Kiwanis Club and Chamber of Commerce along the way. The first day of construction drew 30 volunteers. Partner family Stacy Wood and her four children moved in at the end of September.

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AmeriCorps members reunite in Charlotte, N.C.
Last year, more than 100 current and former Habitat Charlotte AmeriCorps members came together with the idea of raising the $70,000 required for a local house sponsorship. This summer — after nine months of gathering largely small, individual donations — the Habitat AmeriCorps alumni met their goal, and some 40 volunteers from across the country worked alongside homeowner Phor Kpuih to complete the Habitat house in a weeklong blitz.

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ReStore offers tool lending library in Orem, Utah
Thanks to donations from Provo’s Community Development Block Program and Lowe’s, Habitat Utah County has established a tool lending library as part of its Habitat ReStore outlet. Locals are free to check out tools — items include everything from a chain saw and post setter to a paint sprayer and carpet stretcher — for up to a week, with no deposit or rental fees. Customers include Habitat homeowners as well as other community residents.

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World Habitat Day events spanned a week in October
Since 1986, the United Nations has designated the first Monday in October as World Habitat Day. In 2010, Habitat for Humanity International expanded its World Habitat Day observances to include a full week of events. The 27th Carter Work Project — held Oct. 4-8 — spearheaded the World Habitat Day events. Eightysix houses were built, rehabilitated or repaired in six communities: Washington, D.C.; Baltimore and Annapolis, Md.; Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn.; and Birmingham, Ala.

Want to open a window on Habitat’s work in your community? E-mail news suggestions to habitatworld@habitat.org.

HFHI WORLDWIDE AREA OFFICES
Africa/Middle East PO Box 11179, Hatfield, Pretoria 0028, South Africa. Tel. 27-12-430-9200, AME@habitat.org Asia/Pacific Q. House, 38 Convent Road, 8th Floor, Silom, Bangrak, Bangkok 10500, Thailand. Tel. 66-0-2632-0415, ap_info@habitat.org Europe/Central Asia Zochova 6-8, 811 03 Bratislava, Slovakia, ECA@habitat.org Latin America/Caribbean PO Box 1513-1200 Pavas, San José, Costa Rica. Tel. (506) 296-8120, LAC@habitat.org United States 121 Habitat St., Americus, GA 31709. Tel. (800) 422-4828, (229) 924-6935, publicinfo@habitat.org Office of Government Relations and Advocacy 1000 Vermont Ave. N.W., Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20005. Tel. (202) 628-9171 Canada 40 Albert St., Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3S2. Tel. (519) 885-4565, habitat@habitat.ca

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B E L OW /// Thirteen-year-old Naomi Wangui stands in front of her family’s Habitat house in Naivasha, Kenya. The development is the result of a collaboration between Habitat Kenya and local partners, including Panda Flowers Farm where Naomi’s mother Edith works. Edith joined fellow employees there to help purchase the land where the new Habitat community sits.

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BU I L D

WHAT WILL YOU BUILD?
I N E V E RY E DI T ION , Habitat World provides a picture for our readers, a mosaic of words and images that bring to life an array of life-changing events. Snapshots of work occurring on Habitat build sites and projects around the world sit alongside images of volunteers and partner families in close collaboration, often contrasting a world of hopelessness with a vision of a world of hope — a world where decent and affordable housing provides a cornerstone for stability, security and opportunity. Every day, Habitat endeavors to build that world; every quarter, Habitat World endeavors to show it to you. In this special year-end issue, as we approach the end of the first decade of a new century, we share a collection of powerful images from some of the many places where Habitat is making a difference. And we ask you to help us build a bigger, more beautiful Habitat mosaic. As you turn these pages, picture more families having healthier housing, more young students getting stronger starts. Picture neighborhoods becoming safer and brighter, communities growing closer and better. Picture change. Most of all, picture yourself helping it happen and help build it!
STEFFAN HACKER

TO SEE MORE PHOTOS and to view slideshows focusing on topics such as housing microfinance and rehabilitation projects, visit www.habitat.org/hw.
DECEMBER 2010 HA B I TAT. O R G

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Housing need exists all around you.
It’s families living in dilapidated or makeshift shelters, with patchwork walls and poorly sealed windows and doors. Children growing up in cramped spaces that let in the cold and keep out the light. Mothers, fathers, grandparents, cousins crowding too much life into too few rooms. It’s living in a rundown apartment whose rent increases are as unpredictable as the streets all around. Or tenuously settling on land you don’t own in order to be close to available work. Or watching a disaster devastate your community. It’s not being able to keep your house warm, not having regular access to clean water, not knowing “home” as a place of safety and joy. It’s everywhere — in small towns, smaller villages, big cities, your city. To fully understand the housing need that exists in communities around the world is to fully appreciate the urgency of Habitat’s work.
EZRA MILLSTEIN

What Will You Build?
AWARENESS /// Learn more about poverty housing and why your support of Habitat is so important at habitat.org/ how/why. MOMENTUM /// Take action now. Visit habitat.org/gov to become an advocate. HOPE /// Your dollars can make a difference. Make a donation through habitat.org/ hwdonate.

STEFFAN HACKER

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STEFFAN HACKER

EZRA MILLSTEIN

C L O C K W I SE F R OM L E F T /// Disasters and unrest can create housing catastrophes around the globe, often resulting in tent cities like this one in Carrefour, Haiti. /// Families who live in substandard housing face days of frustration and fear. Sixteen-year-old Lubabalo Ngqomashe and his younger brother prepare for another morning in the Cape Town, South Africa, shack that their family calls home. /// And yet, life goes on. In Nairobi, Kenya, a student returns home from school to Kibera, the largest slum in all of Africa. /// When housing is unsafe, often the young and most vulnerable suffer most. Ian Gonzalez wades through floodwaters that have crept into his uncle’s house in Calauan, Philippines.

AMI CABRERA

Paraguay

SMALL STEPS
In the flatlands of Paraguay, Don Albino Rolon Lugo wakes at dawn to tend his meager crops. The 63-year-old widower works the family land and supports his mother Carmen, his daughter-in-law and his 2-year-old grandchild. Each day, he wakes with the sun to visit a densely planted field of yucca, peanuts, corn and beans. At the end of each winter, he prepares the land for replanting, taking care to cover new seeds with grass and twigs so they will survive the arduous winter. Don Albino has lived in Finagrain since the day he was born. His sisters — and so many others — have left the community to seek job opportunities and better lives elsewhere. The nearest urban area is a mere 12 miles away, but it can feel much more isolated. “With no public transportation service that extends to the community, it’s extremely difficult to commute without a car,” says community leader Alberto Cardozo. “This is just one of the many things that would help families in Finagrain improve their quality of life without having to move to the city.” Don Albino’s house, like most shelters in the community, is patched together with scraps of wood. The floor is dusty and unfinished, the roof frequently repaired. The family’s bathroom is an improvised latrine, a deeply dug hole only a few steps from the home that is surrounded by scraps of wood. The earth around the latrine, Don Albino says, often becomes unstable, and he is forced to move its location. Many families in Finagrain face this same challenge. “In this community alone, at least 100 families are regularly affected by hygiene-related health problems and urgently need to improve their sanitation conditions,” says Cardozo. To meet this particular need along the path to adequate housing, Habitat Paraguay has joined forces with other organizations to launch a “Healthy Latrine” project, which partners with 46 families in its first phase to construct new bathrooms with sturdy clay bricks, cement toilets and sheet metal roofs.
DECEMBER 2010 HA B I TAT. O R G

fact
The National Low Income Housing Coalition has determined that 95 million Americans live in overcrowded or severely inadequate conditions, or pay too much for housing. That’s nearly onethird of the U.S. population.

TAHILA MENTZ

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United States

UPHILL CLIMB
Christine VanderWerf (left) grew up in Missouri and ran away from home at 16. Soon after, she found herself pregnant, alone and without the support she believed necessary to raise a child. Making the decision to give the baby up for adoption in part because she could not provide a home, Christine moved to Alaska. Once there, she began a relationship, but it was troubled. The couple moved to Seattle and had a baby, spending a few years “functioning somewhat,” she says. But as their son grew, the marriage fell apart, and, says Christine, her substance abuse grew as well. “I experienced some levels of homelessness and transitional housing, and having no future,” she says. Wrapping herself in a blanket of support services, Christine began the uphill climb to stability. With plenty of resolve but also a spotty job history and a record, housing was a particular challenge. A room in a transitional housing facility, surrounded by people who encouraged her success, was a turning point, and she then built confidence living on her own in a studio apartment. Next came several years in a Seattle Housing Authority apartment. This apartment was a definite improvement over homelessness, but it was not without its own challenges; after problems caused by its age and deterioration, the building was slated for redevelopment. Steady employment brought a measure of financial security, and Christine applied to become a homeowner with Habitat Seattle/South King County. Nearly two decades of piecemeal, temporary housing arrangements came to an end this fall.
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HABITAT SEATTLE

C L O C K W I SE F R O M R I G H T /// Housing need exists in communities everywhere, from Australia to Alaska. Outside Anchorage, a woman and her dog live in a drafty trailer. /// In some communities, those hardest hit by the U.S. foreclosure crisis, and many abroad, repairing and rehabilitating homes is as vital a need as new construction. /// In other places, the need can seem more pronounced. In Manila, Philippines, a young boy walks on top of the garbage-choked Pasig River, searching for anything of value that he can sell.

EZRA MILLSTEIN

STEFFAN HACKER

fact
More than 10 million people worldwide die each year from conditions related to substandard housing, unsafe water and poor sanitation, according to a United Nations’ Global Report on Human Settlement. That’s more than 1,100 each hour … nearly 20 per minute.

EZRA MILLSTEIN

EZRA MILLSTEIN

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BU I L D

With your help, Habitat’s response spans a spectrum of solutions.
It’s a volunteer vigorously swinging a hammer, helping to build or rehabilitate a home. It’s a partner family investing sweat equity by working onsite or helping to staff a Habitat ReStore outlet. It’s an advocate supporting the policies and systems and helping to raise the awareness that will make affordable housing a public priority. It’s a Habitat Resource Center producing construction materials and creating employment opportunities. It’s a financial literacy program helping families craft budgets and savings plans. It’s people from all walks of life coming together to do their part in the fight to eliminate substandard housing. It’s fun, it’s meaningful, and it’s happening in your community.

What Will You Build?
HOMES /// Find your local affiliate at habitat.org/local or your campus chapter at habitatyouthprograms.org/ campuschapters. CONNECTIONS /// Join a Global Village team. Learn about upcoming build destinations at habitat.org/gv. KNOWLEDGE /// Subscribe to Habitat e-newsletters. Sign up at habitat.org/cd/email/ subscribe.aspx.

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EZRA MILLSTEIN

STEFFAN HACKER

United States

KNOWING HOME
Habitat homeowner Ray Montgomery spent about four months mowing the grass once (and sometimes twice) a week at the house he would purchase in Omaha. He spent Saturdays on the construction site, bolstered by the support of a close friend who gave up watching much of an entire season of college football to help with his sweat equity hours. He took classes to learn about home equity and volunteered at the Habitat ReStore outlet. He bolstered his credit report. Overall, the financial and educational preparation Ray went through before closing on his house positioned him to responsibly manage the biggest investment he has ever made in his own — and his almost 2-year-old-daughter’s — futures. “I learned how to save some money,” he says. “I learned how to pay attention to my credit. I learned some home maintenance skills — that was the best.” Now that he and his daughter are in their Habitat house, there are more bests to come.“I’m so satisfied that my daughter knows where to go for everything that’s hers,” he says. “She knows where to watch her movies, where her blocks are; she knows where her binkies are, even though I’m trying to hide them from her. It puts a smile on my face to know that she knows she’s safe. She’s in a place where nothing can harm her unless she’s being hard-headed. She knows that’s home.”
STEFFAN HACKER

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT

///

Increasingly, the work of Habitat affiliates and national programs includes rehabilitations, such as this Habitat Coastal Fairfield County project in the historic district of Bridgeport, Conn. Project manager Frank Bakos installs windows in the 1890s building which is being converted into 16 condominiums. /// There are many ways to partner with Habitat around the world. Here, 62 students graduate from a Habitat Haiti construction training program at Regina Assumpta College. /// And then, there are traditional new constructions, green shoots of hope in communities like Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

STEFFAN HACKER

EZRA MILLSTEIN

DECEMBER 2010

HA B I TAT. O R G

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HABITAT OMAHA

China

‘SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE’
Henry Ingrouille’s first Habitat experience was as a 2009 Carter Work Project volunteer. Over five days, the managing director of Morgan Stanley’s operations division in Hong Kong joined 200 international and local volunteers to help build the walls of firstfloor housing units in a few multi-story residential buildings in Qionglai. His experience in China paved the way for his next volunteer stint, a Habitat build in the fishing village of Tai O. “I loved the idea of doing something a little closer to home to make a difference to a very special part of our own backyard in Hong Kong,” he says. In Tai O, Habitat volunteers helped carry out repair work on stilt houses above the sea, everything from replacing decking to rebuilding outhouses. Originally from the United Kingdom, Henry looks forward to volunteering more. “I love the way it connects people,” he says. “Personally I prefer the hands-on, roll-your-sleeves-up-to-work lifting and shifting, just because it’s so far from what I do every day. But the beauty of Habitat for Humanity is that there are so many different things that need to be done that there’s something for everyone. It really doesn’t matter what your skillset is. You can still help out.”

facts
Nearly 77,000 volunteer advocates regularly receive Habitat news and action alerts asking them to contact their elected officials in support of policies that help place families in safe, decent and affordable homes.

HABITAT AP

77K

Habitat is hard at work in nearly 80 countries around the world, in all 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico. Find your local affiliate at habitat.org/cd/local.

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C L O C K W I SE F R OM A B OV E /// Volunteers are a Habitat cornerstone, joining partner families to build homes and change communities. Jennifer Blachford helps to build a new Habitat house in Hanapepe, Hawaii. /// As part of Habitat’s ethic of reusing and recycling, ReStore outlets accept donated goods — from lumber and materials to furniture and doorknobs — which are sold to the general public at a discount. Proceeds help local Habitat affiliates fund construction, and the stores provide volunteer and sweat equity opportunities. /// Building homes is central to Habitat’s mission, but there are other pieces to the puzzle as well. Advocacy efforts, which include the annual Habitat on the Hill, aim to help change the issues that so often surround housing need and solutions.
STEFFAN HACKER

EZRA MILLSTEIN

STEFFAN HACKER

DECEMBER 2010

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Kyrgyzstan

A FINE FINISH
For nearly 39 years, Uralieva Ainagul lived in a house that had been built by her husband, Juma, when the young couple had just been starting out in Barskoon, Kyrgyzstan. A widow, Uralieva was now sharing the space with her son Zamir and his family of five. The oncenew house, built without a foundation, was often damp, making mold and fungus a constant challenge. A farmer by trade who grows wheat, apples, apricots and potatoes and keeps sheep and cows, Zamir decided to demolish the unhealthy house and build a new, sturdier house on the same spot. Building as he saved enough money for tasks, he managed to lay a foundation for the new house and to build the main walls and roof of the structure. During this time, the family has crowded together in a temporary one-room shelter. “It is not easy,” wife Astra says. “When relatives or neighbors come to visit us, there’s no place for our children.” Not for long. With a loan from Habitat Kyrgyzstan — 25,000 soms or approximately US$4,800 — Zamir has acquired the funds necessary to complete the house in short order: a finished ceiling, heating and electricity, plastered and painted walls, windows and doors. There will be plenty of room for 9-year-old Ilgiz, 3-year-old Ilim and their 6-year-old sister Ilnaz to have their own space. “Our children ask me often when we will finish the house, when we will move into our new house,” he says. “Of course, life will change, especially for our children. I understand that it is very difficult to live in a one-room house and see how their friends live. We are very grateful for Habitat’s help, as it will change our life for the better.”

TAHILA MINTZ

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TAHILA MINTZ

EZRA MILLSTEIN

C L O C K W I SE F R OM L E F T /// Habitat’s construction techniques and housing solutions take different forms in different locations around the world. Here, a construction worker welds rebar on a series of multi-story, urban-housing Habitat units in Qionglai City, China. /// Sri Lankan villagers look over information on the Save and Build concept. In some communities, small groups save money and build houses in stages. As they save funds for construction, they also collect and make building materials. /// Habitat Charlotte (N.C.) AmeriCorps member Thomas Heaslip works on a rehab project as part

of the 2010 Habitat for Humanity AmeriCorps Build-a-Thon. During the annual event, hundreds of AmeriCorps National Direct and VISTA members gather to build. /// International School of Brussels student Sabina Curtis volunteers on a build in Hajduboszormeny, Hungary.

STEFFAN HACKER STEFFAN HACKER

United States
MIKEL FLAMM

‘HERE TO HELP’
Eighteen-year-old Sami Wallace (center) initially became introduced to Habitat at a Global Village Youth Leadership Conference in Chicago in 2009. Throughout her senior year of high school in North Carolina, she helped landscape Habitat houses, traveled to Raleigh to advocate for affordable housing and helped put together an advocacy day at her school. “I became really passionate about affordable housing,” she says. “I love going on trips far away, and I saw [the Learn and Build trip] on an email. I thought, ‘Hmmm … 15 people I don’t know, a week in a place I’ve never been — I think I could do that.’” The Learn and Build trips are one-week service opportunities for students to meet new people, gain experience on a build site and participate in educational activities geared toward learning more about housing issues. “It was really weird for 15 people to get along that well,” Wallace says. “But we saw a home dedication, and it was like, ‘This is what we all want.’ We’re just here to help people.” Wallace began her studies at Milwaukee School of Engineering this past fall in architectural design and construction management. Wallace has already speculated that designing a green Habitat house would make a worthwhile senior project. After her experience volunteering, she is confident that learning the skills to accomplish the task is mostly a matter of time and dedication. “We all came away with skills we didn’t expect to have,” she says. “I don’t think anyone would look at me and say, ‘That girl can side a house.’”
DECEMBER 2010 HA B I TAT. O R G

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BU I L D

Your support and involvement help make a dramatic difference.
It’s stronger families, freed from the worry and want of unacceptable living conditions. It’s a better place to study, a healthier spot to sleep, enough room to grow and dream. It’s better communities, neighbors helping neighbors, new lights shining in windows once darkened by blight. It’s a street reclaimed from abandonment or floodwaters, a block rebuilt after an earthquake or an economic tremor. It’s a house built in joy and dedicated with love. It’s a world of hope where everyone has a simple, decent place to live. It’s waiting for you to get involved.

What Will You Build?
COMMUNITY /// Join the online conversation and connect with Habitat supporters around the world. Find links to Habitat’s social media sites at habitat.org/ getinv/socialmedia.aspx. RENEWAL /// Keep up to date on Habitat’s successes in disaster-affected communities through habitat.org/disaster. OPPORTUNITY /// Make sure more families have a chance for the positive change that comes with owning a simple, decent house. Give today at habitat.org/hwdonate.

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ASHLEY BEIREIS

United States

EZRA MILLSTEIN

MIKEL FLAMM

SEEING A DIFFERENCE
Betty Monroy was working three jobs to afford the rent in Downey, Calif.. She was determined to stay in the Los Angeles County city so that two of her children, diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, could remain in a school with a highly rated special education program. But even with her multiple jobs, the housing she could afford suffered from termites and mold. Then she partnered with Habitat Greater Los Angeles. And as the mother of three began to help build her Habitat home, she saw more than a house grow before her eyes. “When we were building the house, my oldest son was the only one old enough to build,” she says. “He’s the one that has the most problems with social skills, and when we first started coming, there were all these volunteers. They all wanted to say hi to him, and that was like torture. He would just avoid the volunteers at all costs. “As time went by and he started getting invested in it, he changed and started accepting people talking to him. Not only that, but he would guide them on tours of the house and show off the things he’d been building. Toward the end, he was very talkative and very proud of his house. He’s really come out of his shell quite a bit. “Whenever there’s an opportunity to build, I try to take him,” she continues. “He understands about paying it forward, and he enjoys it, and he goes and builds.” Betty’s Habitat house is built to gold-level LEED standards for energy efficiency. The savings mean she can once again afford to offer her kids fresh fruits and vegetables, a luxury she had foregone in the old house. “Every day is a blessing, and every day we thank God, thanks to Habitat,” she says. “It’s an amazing thing.”
DECEMBER 2010 HA B I TAT. O R G

C L O C K W I SE F R OM B O T T OM L E F T /// Habitat’s creation of stronger communities can be seen in Chiang Mai, Thailand, one of five 2009 Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Work Project sites. Eighty-two families have settled into their homes in Nong Kon Kru village. Some have planted trees and vegetables gardens. Others have built additional rooms. Outside, neighbor children play games in front of their Habitat houses. /// In Gunsan, South Korea, Habitat home partners, the Moon family, stand in the courtyard outside their apartment building. /// In many instances, Habitat houses provide more than simply shelter. CWP homeowner Wanida Sotkrang has set up a new sewing business in her house in Chiang Mai. /// Souhail Said’s home was destroyed during fighting in Magdal Zoon, Lebanon. She and her daughter Zeinab have been able to rebuild their home — and their lives — through Habitat Lebanon’s small loans program and with the organization’s technical assistance.

MIKEL FLAMM

STEFFAN HACKER

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Ethiopia

OPENING DOORS
Liben Tilahun, his wife Belaynesh Yesuf and four of their children once inhabited a shelter made of plastic sheeting in a cemetery on the outskirts of town. The couple lived as so many of those affected by leprosy do — on the sideline of society, cured but culturally shunned, surviving on a meager income from begging and discarded food. “Although I will turn 62 soon, I sometimes think that it is only my fifth birthday that I am celebrating,” says Liben, smiling. “We moved into this Habitat home five years ago, and I really believe we only started truly living then.” In Karagutu, Dessie, where Liben and family now live, Habitat has built a community where ex-leprosy patients and other Ethiopians live as neighbors, their children attending school together. Local municipal authorities granted Habitat the land to build and provide services to the community, enhancing Habitat’s efforts to help lift the societal stigma. Since moving into their Habitat house, the family has been healthier, leaving behind nagging respiratory ailments. They’ve received mosquito nets from Habitat and its partners to help protect their health, and the family’s proof of residence in the community entitles them to treatment at the local clinic. Liben now works as a guard at the Dessie Habitat affiliate, grows crops and rears sheep. He dreams of a better future for his children and grandchildren — and so do they. Eighteen-year-old son Abdu goes to the school nearby and says he wants to one day become a doctor. For the family, the house has given them a chance to rejoin the community that once was closed to them. Liben’s neighbors have even given him a signifier of respect: they call him Aba Shehu, a nickname that means he is seen as a natural leader.
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EZRA MILLSTEIN

TAHILA MINTZ

facts
Every 8 minutes around the world, a Habitat partner family moves into decent shelter they can afford.

A study by Emory University found that children younger than 5 who were living in Habitat homes in Malawi were 44 percent less likely to contract respiratory problems, gastrointestinal diseases or malaria than their counterparts living in traditional housing.

STEFFAN HACKER

C L O C K W I SE F R O M T O P L E F T /// Less-crowded homes and more stability can help young students fulfill their potential. Five year-old Laila Martin does her homework in the living room of her Habitat home in New Orleans. /// In Habitat Santa Fe’s Casas del Corazon neighborhood, 9-year-old Yadeni Molinar sits in front of her family’s Habitat house. /// Habitat’s response to disasters can help families move forward. Zaitunbi Mardonova stands on the porch of her house in Shulonak, Tajikistan. The house was damaged by a 2008 earthquake, but is now being reinforced against earthquakes thanks to a microloan through Habitat Tajikistan.

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EZRA MILLSTEIN

CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT / / / In some communities, Habitat improvements include the introduction of access to clean water. A young boy uses a water pump installed by Habitat Tajikistan. /// In all communities, Habitat improvements include a renewed sense of security — and hope for a brighter future. Habitat homeowner Sharon Stiger lives in Diamondhead, Miss. “It’s definitely nice to be able to say, ‘I’m going home’ and have a home to go to,” she says. /// In Huite, Guatemala, 3-year-

old Alison Teresa stands in the living room of her family’s nearly completed home, as they begin a life anchored by the stability of affordable housing.

EZRA MILLSTEIN

fact
In decent housing, walls are strong (fig. 1) and roofs are secure (fig. 2)— and the families inside focus more on thriving than surviving (fig. 3).
fig. 2

fig. 1

fig. 3
EZRA MILLSTEIN

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FieldNotes
Perspectives from around Habitat’s world

Habitat World is also published online at

with additional coverage of Habitat’s work.

HABITAT.ORG/HW

AFFILIATE SPOTLIGHT

Renewing Newburgh
A Habitat affiliate in New York’s Hudson Valley highlights its work with a well-received concert headlined by the legendary Pete Seeger. B Y S H A L A C A R L S O N , P H O T O S B Y H I L A R Y D U F F Y

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n a hot Saturday afternoon, the sun sparkles on the Hudson River. Across the ever-changing expanse of water and light, forested hills climb from the riverbank then roll up to the sparsely clouded sky. Here and there, rooftops and a tall steeple peek above the trees, creating the dim outline of a neighboring town. —Continued on page 26
DECEMBER 2010 HA B I TAT. O R G

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FieldNotes
Perspectives from around Habitat’s world —Continued from page 25

Habitat World is also published online at

with additional coverage of Habitat’s work.

HABITAT.ORG/HW

Facing this view, quartered in a sturdy house of gray fieldstone, General George Washington rallied his troops during the last years of the American Revolutionary War. On this day in the summer of 2010, a different kind of national hero is here to inspire a different sort of troop. Folk icon and area resident Pete Seeger — along with a slate of performers that includes his grandson Tao and various musician friends of theirs — is headlining “If I Had a Hammer: Concert for a House,” an afternoon performance benefiting Habitat for Humanity Greater Newburgh. From this spot, first settled in the 1700s, Washington and his men ultimately prevailed in their fight. Today, with all that history in between, the same sun shines on the idea that, with leadership and support, a modern-day infantry of a different order can advance the cause of affordable housing and community revitalization. Nearly 1,300 Habitat supporters, volunteers and Seeger fans sit on the sloping lawn of Washington’s Headquarters, singing along to familiar favorites and celebrating all that Habitat Greater Newburgh has accomplished against significant odds. But the day is also a call to action, a reminder of just how much work remains to be done in this struggling but committed community.

“NOW WE HAVE THIS WONDERFUL NEIGHBORHOOD. IT’S BEEN A TOTAL CHANGE.”
— DEIRDRE GLENN, OUTGOING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
ing challenges: an active drug trade, the presence of national gangs, streets of boarded-up or burned-out buildings and houses. From the midst of this blight, overcrowding and atrophy, Habitat Greater Newburgh has begun slowly and steadily reclaiming territory, using an approach that aims to lift up whole streets and sections of town. The affiliate began in 1999 by acquiring and renovating three houses. It has proceeded to do the same with dozens of decaying and abandoned structures, rehabilitating them when they are structurally sound and, when they are not salvageable, demolishing them and replacing them with new construction. Areas of activity are clustered together, as bright new Habitat rowhouses and single-family structures spark a sense of renewal, an undeniable feeling that — with enough financial and moral support — Newburgh can revitalize. Outgoing executive director Deirdre Glenn grew up here. Her path wound through Pittsburgh and Dublin, Ireland, before eventually returning her to a very changed town. In 1999, coming home to stay, she no longer recognized the streets where she had ridden her bike as a young girl. “This neighborhood was so depressing and, at times, even frightening,” she recalls. “The house next door had so many people living in it, you didn’t know who they were. The house on the corner, the beautiful blue house on the corner, was abandoned, not properly boarded up. Kids were breaking in, doing drugs. Mattresses piled up all through the house and so on.” Then, one morning, Glenn noticed a different kind of activity. “Early each Saturday morning, numbers of people arrived in the neighborhood and set to work on a few houses,” she says. Curious, she wandered over and discovered Habitat Greater Newburgh.“I got very involved as a volunteer. You couldn’t help but get involved. Because people were doing something, and it felt good to be doing something.” Two Habitat houses were built in short order, on opposite corners of the same block. And then a minor miracle began to fill the spaces in between — young couples looking to own began buying houses on the block and redoing them, finding encouragement in the efforts of the Habitat volunteers. One couple, Glenn recalls, fell through the floor of the house they were considering buying. But just next door, Habitat volunteers were hard at work and seeing their successes convinced the couple to take a chance. House by house, things began to get better.
—Continued on page 28

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n 1952, Look magazine named Newburgh, N.Y., an “all-American city.” Today, Newburgh is an all-too-American story — a factory town without factories, its staggering unemployment rate and highschool dropout rate jockeying for numerical primacy. The two census tracts that make up the city’s east end were ranked in the 2000 census as the fourth most distressed urban area in the United States. As businesses and residents have relocated elsewhere through the years, troubles have moved in. For a town whose population falls just under 30,000, this city 60 miles north of Manhattan must stubbornly weather a storm of surprisHA B I TAT WO R L D HA B I TAT. O R G

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PETE SEEGER BUILDS A HOUSE
Folk icon Pete Seeger performs at Habitat Greater Newburgh’s July benefit concert, which raised much needed funds and awareness for the affiliate’s efforts.

“YOU’D BE SURPRISED HOW MUCH YOU CAN DO WITH JUST A LITTLE.”

ON JULY 4, musician and activist Pete Seeger lifted his voice in support of Habitat’s efforts right in his own backyard. “If I Had a Hammer: Concert for a House” was held just across the Hudson River from Seeger’s homestead in Beacon, N.Y, a wooded spot where Seeger and his wife Toshi built their own house all on their own more than 30 years ago. Asked why he decided to undertake the construction project, when he admittedly had enthusiasm but little building experience, he replies with trademark simplicity: “Didn’t have any money. ” Seeger started in the only place that made sense to him. “The main thing I learned is there’s a thing called a library, he says. “I ” went down to the New York Public Library, looked up L -O-G C-A-BI-N, and it saved me from making some very bad mistakes. ” Following the instructions he gleaned from the books he found, Seeger and Toshi — “she really was a complete hero, he says — did ” the lion’s share of the building themselves, benefiting from a reuserecycle ethic and the generous expertise of others in a way that will sound very familiar to Habitat stalwarts. For example, the couple was moving from New York City’s Greenwich Village, and Seeger spied a house demolition taking place across the street from their old residence. “The windows and doors were just sitting on the sidewalk for anybody to take who wanted them, he recalls. “We had a Jeep station wagon, ” and I tied them on the roof. So I got the windows and doors for our cabin. ” And when it came time to begin construction, Seeger says, “we didn’t know how to use trowels. We were using pancake turners. We had a neighbor who was a mason, showed us how to mix cement and what kind of cement. ” The Seegers eventually finished the cabin and have lived comfortably there with their growing family for many years. It’s an experience he remembers fondly, a memory that fuels his ongoing interest in Habitat as “an idea that grew into a movement. The ” biggest lesson learned from his own construction experience? “You’d be surprised how much you can do with just a little. ”

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FieldNotes
Perspectives from around Habitat’s world
Habitat Greater Newburgh seeks to acquire abandoned, deteriorating properties like the ones below. The affiliate either demolishes them and builds new houses in their place or rehabilitates them, turning them into sturdy and affordable housing.

—Continued from page 26

“Now we have this wonderful neighborhood,” Glenn says. “It’s been a total change.” abitat homeowner Pedro Cruz has seen the same kind of change over on Hasbrouck Street as well. He is one of two Habitat partner families on the street and says the difference is already beginning to show. The new Habitat construction has replaced a building that was falling apart, and the same seeds of change from Glenn’s neighborhood are taking root here. “The street is improving,” he says. “You see a lot of people now that are putting up siding, doing something to their houses. That’s one way to put a good neighborhood together.” The change has been no less significant for his family. Cruz, his wife Juana and their five children lived in a small apartment until this past summer when their Habitat house was completed. In the apartment, Cruz’s three daughters and two sons — from 9 months to age 13 — would sleep together in one room. In the new house, there’s room to grow. “The girl in the middle, she was kinda scared in the beginning,” he says.
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H

“Now that she has her own room, she has a lot of space for herself, but it’s scary.” When the family first moved in, before they had beds in place, Cruz would carefully tuck her in for the night in the middle of the room. “The next morning,” he laughs, “I would find her always in the corner. She’s got all kinds of space, but she was used to crowding into the room, and so she always likes to sleep in one corner. But she’s getting used to it. “It’s a big change for us,” he adds. “But it’s something you have, and nobody is going to take it. There’s a joy in that, that you have in your heart.” Cruz, who works at a local concrete plant, continues to regularly volunteer on Habitat projects and helped on the day of the Seeger concert. He volunteers, he says, because there aren’t enough words to say thank you for the house he helped build and the community he’s helping to change. “Too much has been done. It’s the least I can do.”

T

he Newburgh affiliate has plans to do even more, adding to its roster of 43 houses built or rehabilitated and the nearly $8.3 million they have added

to local tax rolls. The affiliate currently has 10 projects under way. Just on the same street as the Habitat office — a lovingly restored 1850s building itself — staffers point to at least three properties they would love to acquire: a burned-out shell of a house sitting next to a historic church, a dilapidated and abandoned wooden structure that’s collapsing in on itself, and a short run of rowhouses that are boarded up but still appear partially inhabited. And there are so many more in this historic town. As Glenn retires and a new executive director takes the helm this year, Habitat Greater Newburgh enjoys a devoted volunteer base and steady partnerships with area churches, local unions, and regional and local development and government groups. A popular ReStore contributes significantly to the affiliate’s coffers. But it’s impossible to walk the streets here and not be struck by how much more there is to do. According to current city data, nearly 1,800 Newburgh families are eligible to apply for a Habitat house. As part of its answer to all of this, Habitat Greater Newburgh is participating in the initial phase of Habitat for Humanity International’s Neighborhood Revitalization

Habitat World is also published online at

with additional coverage of Habitat’s work.

HABITAT.ORG/HW

Build More.

HABITAT GREATER NEWBURGH AIMS TO LIFT UP WHOLE SECTIONS OF TOWN.
Initiative, an effort focused on improving housing conditions while partnering with other community organizations to provide services to enhance the quality of life across struggling neighborhoods. Another part of Habitat Greater Newburgh’s answer is the Seeger-headlined Concert for a House. The show is a success, raising more than $30,000. But perhaps its biggest triumph is the attention and goodwill it generates in the community. Volunteers, partner families and local residents sit side by side, singing songs and enjoying what is fundamentally one extended family picnic. These city blocks have seen more than their fair share of abandonment, but not today. “Today,” one supporter tells Glenn, “Habitat repopulated downtown Newburgh.” t’s a July holiday weekend so the day after the benefit concert, Glenn and her neighbors on Bay View Terrace host a porch party. A young boy navigates the sidewalk on a tricycle, his sister patiently pushing him along. People move from house to house, greeting friends like family and visitors like honored guests. Tonight, the residents of this neighborhood that almost was no more will crowd together on brick steps and roomy verandas and the green lawns that stretch down toward the river and watch as fire lights the sky. It’s a fire that Habitat helps keep alive in this Hudson Valley town. To watch a video about the ongoing work in Newburgh, find Habitat Greater Newburgh on Facebook. To view an audio slideshow of the Concert for a House, visit www.habitat.org/hw.

Habitat for Humanity’s matching gift program multiplies your impact.
Many companies are willing to match your charitable gift. Talk to your employer today to see if you can double your support of our mission and help us build more. More walls, more rooms, more hope. Just a quick conversation could make a huge difference in the lives of families in need of housing. What will you build?

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For more information, visit

habitat.org/matching

FieldNotes
Perspectives from around Habitat’s world

Habitat World is also published online at

with additional coverage of Habitat’s work.

HABITAT.ORG/HW

If I Had a Hammer Now in Paperback
New content added to stories of Habitat’s work

H  

abitat World first shared the news of author David Rubel’s compelling book If I Had a Hammer: Stories of Building Homes and Hope with Habitat for Humanity in our September 2009 issue. Written with young readers in mind, the book shares inspiring stories of Habitat homeowners around the world as well as those of the volunteers who build alongside them. This summer, Candlewick Press published a paperback edition of If I Had a Hammer, now available through booksellers and the online store of habitat.org. An additional chapter offers an account of the building of a neighborhood in Thailand during the 2009 Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project. The new stories join previous tales of Habitat’s work over a quarter-century, all illustrated with color photos and introduced by a foreword written by one of Habitat’s most devoted volunteers, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. For more information, visit habitat.org/partnerships/media_entertainment/ hammer.aspx.

KEEP HABITAT WITH YOU ALL YEAR
If you’ve enjoyed the range of photos in this special-year end issue of Habitat World, be sure to visit our online store and purchase an official 2011 Habitat for Humanity wall calendar. Filled with photos and stories from around Habitat’s world, the calendar is a great reminder of the real change that your support makes possible, an excellent way to share with others what Habitat means to you — and one of many ways to show your support of Habitat all year long. Each month includes a special link to online content where you can learn more about Habitat’s work — and what you can do to help build houses and hope every day To order your calendar, visit the online store at habitat.org or call 800-422-5914 today.

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with a local family warms the heart — and a Habitat for Humanity sweatshirt can warm the rest of you, too.

Building in partnership

SHOP ONLINE OR CALL OUR STORE
HA B I TAT. OR G • 8 0 0 - 4 2 2 - 5 9 1 4

121 Habitat Street, Americus, GA 31709-3498

NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID HABITAT FOR HUMANITY INTERNATIONAL

You can send Gifts from the Heart in several ways:

Donate securely online at www.habitat.org/hw/gfth Call toll-free at (800) HABITAT Complete the gift form and fax it to: (229) 410-7465 Complete the gift form and mail it to: Gifts from the Heart Habitat for Humanity International 121 Habitat Street Americus, GA 31709
To: (Honoree Information – Card Recipient)
(Enclose another sheet with additional names if necessary)

GIVE A GIFT OF HELP AND HOPE.
Recognize the special people in your life in an especially meaningful way. Make donations in their names through Habitat for Humanity’s Gifts from the Heart program. Show how much you care. Habitat provides help and hope to families in need of decent and affordable shelter. Your Gifts from the Heart donation will help build a home — a gift that will keep giving for years to come.
» online donation at habitat.org/hw/gfth by Dec. 14 » mail-in donation or faxed form with credit-card donation by Dec. 8

In order to have your beautiful Gifts from the Heart card mailed by Dec. 17, we must receive your:

Name __________________________________________ Address ________________________________________ City ___________________________________________ State __________________________ ZIP ____________

From: (Donor Information)
Name _________________________________________ Address _______________________________________ City __________________________________________ State __________________________ ZIP ____________ Phone Number ___________________________________ E-mail _________________________________________

Gifts from the Heart qualify as tax-deductible contributions. A minimum of $10 is required for each card.

Gift Type: (Please select one)
T In honor of  T Holiday T Birthday T Anniversary T Wedding

T In memory of________________________________________
(Decedent’s name)

T Other______________________________________________

Payment Options:
Enclosed is my check for $_________
(Please make check payable to Habitat for Humanity International.)

Please charge my gift of $_________  T MasterCard T American Express T Visa T Discover

Acct. No. _______________________________________ Exp. Date _______________________________________ Signature _______________________________________
Under the direction of the Board of Directors, HFHI retains complete control over the use and distribution of donated funds in furtherance of its mission. DHQMW1012M1001

INTERNATIONAL HEADQUARTERS 121 Habitat Street Americus, GA 31709-3498

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