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Samba

Samba

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02/21/2014

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by Mike Harris

07 8628 CH05 3/17/00 1:09 PM Page 111

Once you’ve decided to use the power and flexibility of Samba in your network,the
next question is where to get it and how to install it on your existing system. This chapter
aims to guide you through the process of procuring and installing Samba on your net-
work server or workstation. I’ll try to cover as many different approaches as possible
without overwhelming you with information.

There are a myriad of different versions of UNIX and Linux available out there. If this
chapter attempted to explain installation specific details for every variant,it would most
likely be the size of this entire book! What you’ll find are the details needed to install
Samba in a generic fashion with specific explanations for three popular UNIX/Linux
variants (namely Red Hat Linux,Caldera OpenLinux,and Debian GNU/Linux) along
with guidelines as to several other operating systems to aid you. If you have one of these
three systems,you’ll be halfway home already. If not,don’t worry; this chapter should
contain sufficient information to get you started as well as pointers to different resources
that should help you along the way.

Samba is a very neatly packaged product; the source code configuration script is profes-
sional and complete and can successfully identify system-specific information in many
cases. A word of advice:Before you start,make sure you have the latest versions of your
system’s libraries and development tools. The GNU suite of tools are very good,and
most people usually find success with them.

This chapter assumes that you understand the use of the basic UNIX commands (ls,man,

mkdir,cp,cdand su),have knowledge of the use of the system’s development tools (such
as the compiler ccor gccand a makeutility),and know how to use one of the system’s
text editors (such as vior emacs). Every example will give command-line instructions for
reference. Note that some of the command-line parameters for the utilities vary on differ-
ent systems; therefore,I suggest you refer to the manual pages for the command if your
system is not explicitly covered here. For example,to find out more about your system’s

tarutility,type the following:

% man tar

Examples in This Chapter

This chapter uses the example of a very small local area network that consists of two
machines. The first machine (PERSEUS) is a server system running a version of Linux;
this will be the Samba server. The second machine (WIN98_2) is running Windows 98 and
will be used to test whether the Samba machine is working correctly. The two machines
are members of the workgroup MYGROUPand are on the same Class C IP network. Table
5.1 summarizes the IP setup.

Introduction to Samba

PARTI

112

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TABLE 5.1The Network Setup Used in This Chapter

Machine

IP Address

WIN98_2(Windows 98 client)

192.168.100.10

PERSEUS(Samba Server)

192.168.100.2

A single user account is created on both the Windows 98 client and the Samba server.
The username is username,and the password is identical for both systems.

The Windows 98 machine is configured with share-level access control and has the
following networking components:

•Client for Microsoft Networks

•TCP/IP bound to the Ethernet card

•File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks

Figure 5.1 shows a snapshot of the Network control panel for this machine.

Installing Samba

CHAPTER5

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FIGURE5.1

The network con-
figuration for the
Windows 98
machine.

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