P. 1
Samba

Samba

|Views: 167|Likes:
Publicado porNurul Istiqomah

More info:

Published by: Nurul Istiqomah on Dec 14, 2010
Direitos Autorais:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/21/2014

pdf

text

original

It’s true thatby running an Intel or Alpha server that’s running Samba on Linux you can
greatly reduce the cost of software licensing. Not only is this the case when considering
the initial savings for the server software—Linux is free,NT Server is not—it’s also true
because you don’t require client access licenses for a Samba server. With Windows NT,
Microsoft requires the purchase of a client license for every workstation connecting to a
server,whereas with a Linux server running Samba,this is not required (depending on
the type of licensing you use).

It’s also true that Linux running in text-based console mode on an Intel system will use
less memory and resources than NT Server running on the same machine. This implies
that the hardware cost for running a Samba/Linux server is lower than for NT.

There’s a definite caveat for strong Microsoft shops that do not already run UNIX in
their environment,in that there will be obvious retraining costs and a notable learning
curve for administrators. You will need to seriously consider whether the benefits from
diverging into a new platform can justify the cost of doing so.

With that said,the relative costs of training in a new area are no different from training
in the Microsoft world; some courses and certification are at least comparable in price to
the equivalent MCSE qualifications.

Enterprise Samba

PARTIII

716

29 8628 CH25 3/17/00 1:14 PM Page 716

In addition,expanding your IT staff’s knowledge of non-Microsoft platforms could perhaps
be important in the future,considering the multitude of emerging technologies. Maintaining
a degree of vendor independence is quite often advantageous for any company.

Reliability

Althoughit’s widely agreed upon in both UNIX and Microsoft camps that NT is more
unreliable than Linux,it’s hard to prove. From personal experience,I have found Linux to
be a far more reliable and stable platform for serving than Windows NT. Now this is obvi-
ously one person’s opinion,and many people will have completely opposite experiences.

Examples in This Chapter

To illustrate the process of replacing an NT server with Samba,from this point forward
in this chapter,we’ll be using a simple Windows NT–oriented network for an NT domain
called MYDOMAIN. This domain contains a Windows NT primary domain controller (PDC),
a Windows NT fileserver,and a Windows NT Workstation client. We’ll be adding a
Samba server to replace the existing file server. Table 25.1 shows the configuration for
the network.

TABLE 25.1Network Configuration for MYDOMAIN

Name

Function

IP Address

NT4PDC_1

PDC

192.168.100.5

NT4SRV_1

Old file server (NT)

192.168.100.4

NT4WKS_1

Client workstation

192.168.100.7

PERSEUS

New file server (Linux)

192.168.100.2

Four departmental groups are set up for the accounts,sales,managerial,and IT support
departments as well as four users,each a member of one of the groups. Table 25.2 shows
the usernames and group memberships.

TABLE 25.2Usernames and Groups for MYDOMAIN

User

Groups

username1

Domain Users and accounts

username2

Domain Users and sales

username3

Domain Users and itsupport

username4

Domain Users and managerial

Replacing an NTFile Server with Samba

CHAPTER25

717

25

R

E
P
L
A
C
I
N
G
A
N

N
T

F

I
L
E

S

E
R
V
E
R
W
I
T
H

S

A
M
B
A

29 8628 CH25 3/17/00 1:14 PM Page 717

On NT4SRV_1,there are four user shares set up for each of the four users,and four shares
for each of the four groups. There’s also one public share for all users as well as one
shared printer. Table 25.3 shows the available shares and user/group permissions.

TABLE 25.3Shares for MYDOMAIN

Sharename

NT Group/User Required To Access

accounts

Accounts

sales

Sales

itsupport

ITsupport

managers

Managerial

public

Domain Users

username?$

Username?

printer1

Domain Guests

The public share has read-only access for all users except for Domain Admins,who also
have write access.

There’s a standard netlogonshare on NT4PDC_1with login scripts for each departmental
group to establish the department-specific connections. For example,here are the con-
nections of the accounts department’s login script accounts.bat,located in

\\nt4pdc_1\netlogon:

net use g: \\nt4srv_1\accounts /persistent:no /yes
net use p: \\nt4srv_1\public /persistent:no /yes
net use lpt1: \\nt4srv_1\printer1 /persistent:no /yes

All users in the entire domain have their home shares mapped to drive Z:automatically.

For every command-line example in this chapter,it’s assumed that the user is logged in
as a Domain Admin on any Windows NT machine and as rootor a user with equivalent
rights on the Samba server.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Descarregar
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->