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Mormon Pioneer Trail, Historic Resource Study - Interactive ebook

Mormon Pioneer Trail, Historic Resource Study - Interactive ebook

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Publicado porSyncOrSwim
A great great grandson of Heber C. Kimball, historian Stanley B. Kimball, PhD was hired by the US National Park Service to write a concise yet thorough overview of the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail. Kimball compiled a goldmine of information about the Mormon Trail and the experiences of the 70,000 people who traveled it to the Utah Territory in the 1800s. Includes maps, photos and an interactive fly out table of contents. You can also find this book online at http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/mopi/hrs.htm. This work is in the public domain.

• The PDF download includes an interactive table of contents and an advanced search feature
A great great grandson of Heber C. Kimball, historian Stanley B. Kimball, PhD was hired by the US National Park Service to write a concise yet thorough overview of the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail. Kimball compiled a goldmine of information about the Mormon Trail and the experiences of the 70,000 people who traveled it to the Utah Territory in the 1800s. Includes maps, photos and an interactive fly out table of contents. You can also find this book online at http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/mopi/hrs.htm. This work is in the public domain.

• The PDF download includes an interactive table of contents and an advanced search feature

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Published by: SyncOrSwim on Jan 06, 2011
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11/15/2013

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On April 5, 1847, the first wagons started west and after a few days the main body of
pioneers were at their staging ground on the Platte River, 47 miles west, near what is now
Fremont, Nebraska. This site was later dubbed the Liberty Pole staging ground because later
Mormon emigrants erected a forty-foot-tall cottonwood pole, flying a white flag, here. [11]
(See Historic Site 23.) This staging ground on the Platte, similar to the earlier staging ground
at Sugar Creek in 1846 in Iowa, was necessary since leaders like Young and Kimball had to
go back and forth between Winter Quarters and the Platte in order to get

the "drag tails" under way, and the whole migration organized and ready to go. [12] On April
14th, Young and Kimball left Winter Quarters and joined the main camp at the Liberty Pole
Camp.

At the Platte River camp the group consisted of 148 people, 72 wagons, 93 horses, 66 oxen,
52 mules, 19 cows, 17 dogs, and some chickens. There they organized paramilitary fashion
into two large divisions, each of which was split into units of 50s and 10s, each with its
respective leaders. Young led the first division, Kimball the second; Stephen Markham and
Albert P. Rockwood were appointed captains of the hundred, with Addison Everett, Tarlton
Lewis, James Case, John Pack, and Addison Roundy captains of the 50s. [13]

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