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Project report on

“Effectiveness of Employee Safety and Welfare Measures

in Ashok Leyland, Ennore”

Presented by

V.GANESHKUMAR

(9908115029

Under the guidance of

Dr.Rajaram.S

Asst, Prof

Department of Business Administration

Kalasalingam University

In partial fulfillment of the requirements


For the award of the degree

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

KALASALINGAM UNIVERSITY
JUNE 2009

KALASALINGAM UNIVERSITY
1
KRSIHNANKOIL-626190

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the project “A Study on Effectiveness of Employee Safety and
Welfare Measures in Ashok Leyland, Ennore”is a bonafide work of
mine.V.GANESHKUMAR (9908115029) carried out in partial fulfillment for the
award of the degree of MBA in Kalasalingam University under my guidance. This
work is original and not submitted earlier for the award of any degree / diploma or
associate ship of any other University / Institution.

Signature of the Guide: Head of the Department

( )

Place:

Date

2
DECLARATION

I V.GANESHKUMAR hereby declare that the project work done in “A Study


on Effectiveness of Employee Safety and Welfare Measures in Ashok Leyland, Ennore is
the original work done by me and submitted to the Kalasalingam University in
partial fulfillment of requirements for the award of Master of Business
Administration is a record of original work done by me under the guidance of
DR.S.RAJARAM Asst, Prof Kalasalingam University, Krishnankoil.

Enroll No:
Date:

(V.GANESHK
UMAR)

Signature of the Student

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I am extremely thankful and indebted to the Correspondent T.Kalasalingam, B.com


and the Vice-Principal Dr.C.Thangaraj, B.E., M.Tech., Ph.D., MISTE, MASPRS who had
given me the prestigious opportunity of being a student of this institution.

I acknowledge with a sense of gratitude of sincere thanks to Head of the Department of


Business Administration Dr. P.KAMESWARA RAO, M.B.A., Ph.D., who had provided me
all the facilities to complete my training.

I am much obliged to Dr.S.RAJARAM who is my project guide, for extending his support and
encouraging by giving constructive criticism during the training period.

I hearty thank Mr. K.RAMESH (HR Manager) of Hinduja Foundries limited for showing
tremendous patience and giving full freedom in guiding me towards the successful completion of
my project.

I owe special thanks to all the staff members of the business administration department. More
than teachers, they have all been real friends to me. I thank them for sharing their knowledge
with me.

In a special way, I submit my grateful thanks to my parents who provided me all the supports
through out the period of project development. I also render my deep thanks to my friends and
well wishers who had been a source of encouragement throughout the period of training.

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ABSTRACT

Changing economic and social factors have made the concept of safety and welfare measures
are very relevant for research and analysis. For better understanding the safety and welfare
measures of employees, the research was carried out in Ashok Leyland Limited, Ennore.

The primary objective of this study is to analyze the effectiveness of safety and welfare
measures of employees and suggests appropriate measures taken by the employees in Ashok
Leyland Limited.

To accomplish the primary objective of the study, a survey was conducted by preparing a
structured questionnaire which contains closed end question, and open end question.

The research design used for this study is descriptive in nature. The descriptive study helps
the researcher to find out various characteristics of the population.

Random sampling technique was adopted for selecting sample units from the employees. A
sampling size of 100 respondents selected for analyzing their opinion regarding safety and
welfare measures in Ashok Leyland Limited.

The methods of data collection for the study include both primary and secondary data. The
primary data were collected through questionnaire by conducting personal interview with the
employees. The source of secondary data was company profiles and websites. The statistical
tool used for analyzing and interpreting the opinions of the employees and the tool includes
simple percentage analysis, mean and cross tabulation.

The results were presented with the help of different charts and diagrams. Findings of the
study were drawn from the analyzing of data’s, suggestions and conclusions have been made
based on the findings.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

SUB
CHAPTER PAGE
CHAPTER TITLEAND CONCLUSION
FINDINGS, SUGGESTION
III
NO. 61
NO
NO.
3.1 Findings 62
I 1.1 Introduction 9
3.2 Suggestions 65
1.2 Importance of the study 11
3.3 Conclusion 67
1.3 Need of the study 12
IV BIBLIOGRAPHY 68
1.4 Scope of the study 13
V APPENDIX 71
1.5 Objective of the study 14

1.6 Problem of the study 15

1.7 Review of literature 16

1.8 Research methodology 28

1.9 Industry Profile 31

1.10 Company profile 33

II Data Analysis And Interpretation 36

2.1 Health Measures 37

2.2 Work Environment 38

2.3 Safety Measures 39

2.4 Welfare measures 40

III FINDINGS, SUGGESTION AND CONCLUSION 61


2.5 Allowances 41

3.1 Findings 62
3.2 Suggestions 65
3.3 Conclusion 67
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IV BIBLIOGRAPHY 68
V APPENDIX 71
List of Tables

2.1.1 Health Measures 37

2.1.2 Work Environment 38


2.1.3 Safety Measures 39

2.1.4 Welfare measures 40

2.1.5 Allowances 41

2.6 Age Wise Classification of Employees 42

2.7 Classification of Department 44

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2.8 Classification of Employee’s Education 46

2.9 Classification of Employee’s Salary 48


2.10 Classification of Employee’s Experience 50
2.11 The relationship between Age and Department 52
2.12 The relationship between Age and Education 54

2.13 The relationship between Age and Salary 56


2.14 The relationship between Age and Experience 58

List of Figures

2.1.6 Age Wise Classification of Employees 43

2.1.7 Classification of Department 45


2.1.8 Classification of Education Qualification 47

2.1.9 Classification of Salary 49

2.1.10 Classification of Employees Experience 51

2.1.11 The relationship between Age and Department 53

2.1.12 The relationship between Age and Education 55

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2.1.13 The relationship between Age and Salary 57

2.1.14 The relationship between Age and Experience 59

CHAPTER I

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1.1 INTRODUCTION

Employee Safety

“An occurrence in an industrial establishment causing bodily injury to a person which


makes him unfit to resume his duties in the next 48 hours”

- Factories Act 1948

Employee welfare

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Employee welfare defines as “efforts to make life worth living for workmen”. These
efforts have their origin either in some statute formed by the state or in some local custom or in
collective agreement or in the employer’s own initiative.

• To win over employee’s loyalty and increase their morale.

• To combine trade unionism and socialist ideas.

• To build up stable labor force, to reduce labour turnover and absenteeism.

• To develop efficiency and productivity among workers.

• To save oneself from heavy taxes on surplus profits.

• To earn goodwill and enhance public image.

• To reduce the threat of further government intervention.

• To make recruitment more effective (because these benefits add to job appeal).

Principles of Employee Welfare Service

Following are generally given as the principles to be followed in setting up an employee


welfare service:

• The service should satisfy real needs of the workers. This means that the manager must
first determine what the employee’s real needs are with the active participation of
workers.

• The service should such as can be handled by cafeteria approach. Due to the difference
in Sex, age, marital status, number of children, type of job and the income level of
employees there are large differences in their choice of a particular benefit. This is
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known as the cafeteria approach. Such an approach individualizes the benefit system
though it may be difficult to operate and administer.

• The employer should not assume a benevolent posture.

• The cost of the service should be calculated and its financing established on a sound
basis.

• There should be periodical assessment or evaluation of the service and necessary timely
on the basis of feedback.

1.2 IMPORTANCE OF THE STUDY

If there is no safety and welfare measure, there is no organization. The importance


of this study is as follows,

 Employee safety and welfare measures are the important factors of an organization to
maintain quality of work life of the employee.

 It develops both efficiency and productivity among the workers.

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 This study will helpful to create a good relationship between employees as well as the
employer.

 This study is help to the organization while analyze the problems facing by
an employee’s regarding this measures. And take necessary steps for the
purpose of satisfy the needs of an employee etc..,

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1.3 NEED OF THE STUDY

 Safety and welfare measure are the important factor for an organization to maintain
quality of work life of the employee.

 Safety and welfare facilities may patronage the employee to work better and it will lead
to increase in output.

 In every organization, an employee’s safety and welfare measure plays a vital role.
Hence I conducted research on this topic

 To identify the employees response among various benefits regarding safety and welfare
measures in Ashok Leyland Limited, Ennore.

 To provide some suggestions for the purpose of improving the employee’s


safety and welfare measures in Ashok Leyland Limited, Ennore.

 It helps to improve employee’s productivity or efficiency by increasing their physical and


mental health.

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1.4 SCOPE OF THE STUDY

The scope of the study is confined to HINDUJA FOUNDRIES Limited with respect to
start. This project throws light on the welfare and safety measures provided in Ashok Leyland
Limited. It also reveals the awareness and satisfaction of employee with safety and welfare
schemes. It also necessary to know the employee satisfaction about the safety and welfare
measures of the organization for the purpose of achieving their goals.

The study undertaken at HINDUJA FOUNDRIES Limited seeks answer to the mentioned
objectives, although the scope is limited to a particular sample size. The findings of the study
will also helpful to the future research students also want to know more about labour safety and
welfare measures in an organization.

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1.5 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

 To determine the opinion of employees regarding safety and welfare


measures schemes in HINDUJA FOUNDRIES LIMITED, Ennore.

 To find the level of satisfaction among the employees regarding safety and
welfare measures.

 To find out the benefits yield by the employees, which are provided by the
employer.

 To suggest the ways to improve safety and welfare measures.

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1.6 PROBLEM OF THE STUDY

An employee safety and welfare measure plays a vital role for the development of an each
and every organization. The main purpose for selecting this topic is to collect the opinions
regarding safety and welfare measures to the employees in HINDUJA FOUNDRIES Limited.

Finally I find out the problems facing by the employee regarding safety and welfare
measures such as medical facilities help line facilities etc.., so my request for this organization is
to develop these facilities and earn goodwill to each every employee in an organization.

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1.7 REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Safety Services

Prevention of accidents is an objective which requires o explanation. The costs of accidents


are enormous in suffering to the injured, in reduction or loss of earnings, in disabilities and
incapacities which afflict those involved and in compensation, insurance and legal costs, in lost
time, filling in reports and attending to enquiries, and in spoilage of materials, equipment and
tools to management.

Accidents are the consequence of two basic factors: technical and human. Technical
factors include all engineering deficiencies, related to plant, tools material and general work
environment. Thus, for example, improper lighting, inadequate ventilation, poor machine
guarding and careless housekeeping are some hazards which may cause accidents. Human
factors include all unsafe acts on the part of employees. An unsafe act is usually the result of
carelessness.

Young and new employees, because of their difficulty in adjusting to the work situation
and to life in general, also have many more accidents than do old and nature workers.

The Phenomenon of Accident Proneness

Some persons believe wrongly in the theory that certain individuals are accident prone, that
is , they have some personality trait as opposed to some characteristic of the environment which
predisposes them to have more accidents than others in work condition where the risk of hazards
is equal to all.

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COMPONENTS OF A SAFETY SERVICE

Among the many components of a safety service the following have proved effective when
applied in combination:

Appointment of safety officer

In big organizations, the appointment of a safety officer to head. The safety department is a
must. In small organizations, the personnel manager may look after the functions of this
department. The head of the safety department, who is usually a staff man, is granted power to
inspect the plant for unsafe condition, to promote sound safety practices (through posters an d
safety campaigns), to make safety rules, and to report violations to the plant manager.

Support by line management

The head of the safety department, whether enjoying a staff or a functional position, by
him, cannot make a plan safe. His appointment lulls line management into assuming that all its
safety problems have been solved.

Elimination of hazards

Although complete elimation of all hazards is virtually impossibility but following steps
can be taken to help reduce them:

Job safety analysis

All job procedures and practices should be analyzed by an expert to discover hazards. he
should then suggest changes in their motion patterns, sequence and the like

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Placement

A poorly placed employee is more apt to incur injury than a properly placed employee.
Employees should be placed on jobs only after carefully estimating and considering the job
requirements with those which the individual apparently possesses.

Personal protective equipment

Endless variety of personal safety equipment is available nowadays which can be used to
prevent injury.

Materials handling

Though often ignored, the careless handling of heavy and inflammable materials is an
important source of several injuries and fire.

Hand tools

Minor injuries often result from improperly using a good tool or using a poorly designed
tool. Therefore, close supervision and instruction should be given to the employees on the
proper tool to use an the proper use of the tool.

Safety training, education and publicity

Safety training is concerned with developing safety skills, whereas safety education is
concerned with increasing contest programmes, safety campaigns, suggestion awards, and
various audiovisual aids can be considered as different forms of employee education.

Safety inspection

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An inspection by a trained individual or a committee to detect evidence of possible safety
hazards (such as poor lighting, slippery floors, unguarded machines, faulty electrical
installations, poor work methods and disregard of safety rules) is a very effective device to
promote safety.

Factories Act, 1948

The principal Act to provide for various labor welfare measures in India is the Factories
Act, 1948. The Act applies to all establishments employing 10 or more workers where power is
used and 20 or more workers where power is not used, and where a manufacturing process is
being carried on.

Employee Welfare Officer

Section 49 of the factories act provides that in every factory wherein 500 or more
workers are ordinarily employed the employer shall appoint at least one welfare officer.

The welfare officer should possess; (i) a university degree; (ii) degree or diploma in
social service or social work or social welfare from a recognized institution; and (iii) adequate
knowledge of the language spoken by the majority of the workers in the area where the factory is
situated.

¯ Supervision

¯ Counseling workers

¯ Advising management

¯ Establishing liaison with workers

¯ Working with management and workers to improve productivity.

¯ Working with outside public to secure proper enforcement of various acts.

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Health of Employees

1. Cleanliness

Every factory shall be kept clean by daily sweeping or washing the floors and work
rooms and by using disinfectant where necessary.

2. Disposal of wastes and effluents

Effective arrangements shall be made for the disposal of wastes and for making them
innocuous.

3. Ventilation and temperature

Effective arrangements shall be made for ventilation and temperature so as to provide


comfort to the workers and prevent injury to their health.

4. Dust and fume

Effective measures shall be taken to prevent the inhalation and accumulation of dust and
fumes or other impurities at the work place.

5. Artificial humidification

The State Government shall make rules prescribing standard of humidification and
methods to be adopted for this purpose.

6. Overcrowding

There shall be in every work room of a factory in existence on the date of commencement
of this act at least 9.9cubic meters and of a factory built after the commencement of this act at
least 4.2 cubic meters of space for every employee.

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7. Lighting

The State Government may prescribe standards of sufficient and suitable lighting.

8. Drinking Water

There shall be effective arrangement for wholesome drinking water for workers at
convenient points.

9. Latrines and urinals

There shall be sufficient number of latrines and urinals, clean, well-ventilated,conveniently


situated and built according to prescribed standards separately for male and female workers.

10. Spittoons

There shall be sufficient number of spittoons placed at convenient places in the factory.

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Safety of Employees

Fencing of machinery

All dangerous and moving parts of machinery shall be securely fenced. Screws,
bolts and teeth shall be completely encased to prevent danger.

Work on or near machinery in motion

Lubrication or other adjusting operation on moving machinery shall be done only by


a specially trained adult male worker.

Employment of young persons on dangerous machines

No young person shall be allowed to work on any dangerous machine (so prescribed
by the state government) unless he is sufficiently trained or is working under the supervision
of knowledgeable person.

Device for cutting off power

Suitable device for cutting of power in emergencies shall be provided.

Hoists and lifts

These shall be made of good material and strength, thoroughly examined at least once
in every six months and suitably protected to prevent any person or thing from being trapped.

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Welfare of Employees

 There shall be separate and adequately screened washing facilities for the use of male and
female employees.

 There shall be suitable places provided for clothing not worn during working hours and
for the dying of wet clothing.

 There shall be suitable arrangement for all workers to sit for taking rest if they are
obliged to work in a standing position.

 There shall be provided the required number of first-aid boxes or cupboard (at the rate of
one for every 150 workers) equipped with the prescribed contents readily available
during the working hours of the factory.

 The State Government may make rules requiring that in any specified factory employing
more than 250 employees a canteen shall be provided and maintained by the occupier for
the use of the employee.

 There shall be provided sufficiently lighted and ventilated lunch room if the number of
employees ordinarily employed is more than 150.

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Restrictions in the Factories Act on the employment of young person’s

1. Prohibition as to employment of children (Section 67)

No child who has not completed his fourteenth year shall be required or allowed to work in any
factory.

2. Employment of Children and Adolescent (Section 68)

A child who has completed his fourteenth year or an adolescent shall not be required or allowed
to work in any factory unless following conditions are fulfilled:

1. The manager of the factory has obtained a certificate of fitness granted to such young

2. While at work, such child or adolescent carries a token giving reference to such
certificate.

3. Certificate of fitness (Section 69)

Before a young person is employed in the factory, a certifying surgeon has to certify that such
person is fit for that work in the factory.

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Welfare Funds

In order to provide welfare facilities to the workers employed in mica, iron, ore,
manganese ore and chrome ore, limestone and dolomite mines and in the beedi industry, the
welfare funds have been established to supplement the efforts of the employers and the State
Government under respective enactments.

The welfare measures financed out of the funds relate to development of medical
facilities, housing, supply of drinking water, support for education of dependents and recreation,
etc.

Voluntary Benefits

Benefits are also given voluntarily to workers by some progressive employers. These
include loans for purchasing houses and for educating children, leave travel concession, fair
price shops for essential commodities and loans to buy personal conveyance.

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Machinery Connected with Employee Welfare Work

1. Chief inspector of Factories

It is the duty of the Chief inspector of factories (who generally works under the
administrative control of the labour commissioner in each state) to ensure enforcement of various
provisions of Factories Act i8n respect of safety, heath and welfare of workers.

2. Central Labour Institute

The institute was set up in Bombay in 1966 to facilitate the proper implementation of the
Factories Act, 1948; to provide a centre of information for inspectors, employers, workers and
others concerned with the well being of industrial labour and to stimulate interest in the
application of the principles of industrial safety, health and welfare

3. National Safety Council

The National Safety Council was wet up on 4th March, 1966 in Bombay at the initiative of
the Union Ministry of Labour and Rehabilitation, Government of India, as an autonomous
national body with the objective of generating developing and sustaining an movement of safety
awareness at the national level.

4. Director General of Mines Safety

The Director General of Mines Safety enforces the Mines Act, 1952. He inspects electrical
installation and machinery provided in the mines and determines the thickness of barriers of 2
adjacent mines in order to prevent spread of fire and danger of inundation.

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Appraisal of Welfare Services

1. One of the main obstacles in the effective enforcement of the welfare


provisions of the Factories Act has been the quantitative and qualitative
inadequacy of the inspection staff.
2. at present, a labour welfare officer is not able to enforce laws independently
because he has to work under the pressure of management.
3. Women workers do not make use of the crèche facilities either because they
are dissuaded by the management to bring their children with them or
because they have to face transport difficulties.

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1.8 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

‘ Research’ means a scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific
topic. Research is a careful investigation or inquiry especially through search for new facts in
any branch of knowledge. Research comprises of defining and redefining problems, formulating
hypothesis or suggested solutions collecting, organizing and evaluating data, making deduction
and reaching conclusions, and at last carefully testing the conclusion to determine whether they
fit the formulating hypothesis.

‘Methodology’ is defined as “the study of methods by which we gain knowledge, it deals


with cognitive processes imposed on research by the problems arising from the nature of its
subject matter”.

Research Design : Descriptive research

Methods of Data Collection : Primary data and Secondary data

Sampling method : Convenience sampling

Sampling size : 100

Research Tools : Structured questionnaire

Tools used for analysis : Frequency, Cross tabulation and Mean

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RESEARCH DESIGN

DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH

In this project, Descriptive research has been used. Descriptive research includes survey and
fact findings enquiries of different kinds. The major purpose of descriptive research is
description of the state of affairs, as it exists at present.

The main feature of this method is that the researcher has no control over the variable; he
can only report what has happened or what is happening. The methods of research utilized in
descriptive research are survey of all kinds; it is concerned with the research studies with a focus
on the portrayal of the characteristic of a group or individual or a situation. The main objective
is to acquire knowledge.

RESEARCH INSTRUMENT

The research instrument in this study is a ‘structured questionnaire’. Structured


questionnaires are those questionnaires in which there are definite, concrete and predetermined
questions to, for which the researcher collects data. The questions are presented exactly with
same wording and in the same order to all the respondents.

QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN

The structured question is framed. The questionnaire consists of the following information,

1. Close ended

The questionnaires were framed to suit the study and using five point scales for
getting the opinion of the employees regarding five dimensions like Health Measures, Work
Environment, Safety Measures, Welfare Measures and Allowances.

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DATA COLLECTION

Data refers to information or facts. It includes numerical figures, non numerical figures and
descriptive facts and qualitative and quantitative information. The task of data collection begins
after a research problem has been defined and research plan has been decided.

Primary Data

The primary data are those that are collected through questionnaire and direct personal
interview. The questionnaire was framed in such a manner to obtain correct information, graded
suitably for the study. All the questionnaires were collected through personal contact from the
respondents.

Secondary Data

Secondary data has been collected through oral communication. Secondary data about the
company profile and other details were collected from the company.

SAMPLING PROCEDURE AND ITS SIZE

Random sampling is the sampling procedure used in this survey. This sampling is used for
selection of homogeneous sample for study. It refers to selecting a sample of study objects on
convenience. Here researcher may make use of any convenient base to select the required
number of samples.

The sample size was taken for this study was 100 respondents only.

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1.9 INDUSTRY PROFILE

AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY

The origin of automobile is not certain. In this section of automobile history, we will only
discuss about the phases of automobile in the development and modernization process since the
first car was shipped to India. We will start automotive history from this point of time.

The automobile industry has changed the way people live and work. The earliest of
modern cars was manufactured in the year 1895. Shortly the first appearance of the car followed
in India. As the century turned, three cars were imported in Mumbai (India). Within decade there
were total of 1025 cars in the city.

The dawn of automobile actually goes back to 4000 years when the first wheel was used
for transportation in India. In the beginning of 15th century Portuguese arrived in China and the
interaction of the two cultures led to a variety of new technologies, including the creation of a
wheel that turned under its own power. The actual horseless carriage was introduced in the year
1893 by brothers Charles and Frank Duryea. It was the first internal-combustion motor car of
America, and it was followed by Henry Ford's first experimental car that same year.

One of the highest-rated early luxury automobiles was the 1909 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost
that featured a quiet 6-cylinder engine, leather interior, folding windscreens and hood, and an
aluminum body. It was usually driven by chauffeurs and emphasis was on comfort and style
rather than speed.

During the 1920s, the cars exhibited design refinements such as balloon tires, pressed-steel
wheels, and four-wheel brakes. Graham Paige DC Phaeton of 1929 featured an 8-cylinder engine
and an aluminum body

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The 1937 Pontiac De Luxe sedan had roomy interior and rear-hinged back door that suited
more to the needs of families. In 1930s, vehicles were less boxy and more streamlined than their
predecessors. The 1940s saw features like automatic transmission, sealed-beam headlights, and
tubeless tires.

The year 1957 brought powerful high-performance cars such as Mercedes-Benz 300SL. It
was built on compact and stylized lines, and was capable of 230 kmh (144 mph).This was the
Indian automobile history, and today modern cars are generally light, aerodynamically shaped,
and compact.

The automotive industry designs, develops, manufactures, markets, and sells the world's
motor vehicles. In 2008, more than 70 million motor vehicles, including cars and commercial
vehicles were produced worldwide.

In 2007, a total of 71.9 million new automobiles were sold worldwide: 22.9 million in
Europe, 21.4 million in Asia-Pacific, 19.4 million in USA and Canada, 4.4 million in Latin
America, 2.4 million in the Middle East and 1.4 million in Africa. [2] The markets in North
America and Japan were stagnant, while those in South America and Asia grew strongly. Of the
major markets, Russia, Brazil, India and China saw the most rapid growth.

About 250 million vehicles are in use in the United States. Around the world, there were
about 806 million cars and light trucks on the road in 2007; they burn over 260 billion gallons of
gasoline and diesel fuel yearly. The numbers are increasing rapidly, especially in China and
India. In the opinion of some, urban transport systems based around the car have proved
unsustainable, consuming excessive energy, affecting the health of populations, and delivering a
declining level of service despite increasing investments..

In 2008, with rapidly rising oil prices, industries such as the automotive industry are
experiencing a combination of pricing pressures from raw material costs and changes in
consumer buying habits. The industry is also facing increasing external competition from the
public transport sector, as consumers re-evaluate their private vehicle usage. Roughly half of the
US's fifty one light vehicle plants are projected to permanently close in the coming years with

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the loss of another 200,000 jobs in the sector, on top of the 560,000 jobs lost this decade.[8] As a
result, in 2009, China became the largest automobile market in the world

1.10 COMPANY PROFILE

The origin of Ashok Leyland can be traced to the urge for self-reliance felt by
independent India. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, India's first Prime Minister persuaded Mr.
Raghunandan Saran, an industrialist, to enter automotive manufacture. In 1948, Ashok Motors
was set up in what was then Madras, for the assembly of Austin Cars. The Company's destiny
and name changed soon with equity participation by British Leyland and Ashok Leyland
commenced manufacture of commercial vehicles in 1955.

Since then Ashok Leyland has been a major presence in India's commercial vehicle
industry with a tradition of technological leadership, achieved through tie-ups with international
technology leaders and through vigorous in-house R&D.

Access to international technology enabled the Company to set a tradition to be first with
technology. Be it full air brakes, power steering or rear engine busses, Ashok Leyland pioneered
all these concepts. Responding to the operating conditions and practices in the country, the
Company made its vehicles strong, over-engineering them with extra metallic muscles.
"Designing durable products that make economic sense to the consumer, using appropriate
technology", became the design philosophy of the Company, which in turn has molded consumer
attitudes and the brand personality.

Ashok Leyland vehicles have built a reputation for reliability and ruggedness. The
5,00,000 vehicles we have put on the roads have considerably eased the additional pressure
placed on road transportation in independent India.

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In the populous Indian metros, four out of the five State Transport Undertaking (STU)
buses come from Ashok Leyland. Some of them like the double-decker and vestibule buses are
unique models from Ashok Leyland, tailor-made for high-density routes.

In 1987, the overseas holding by Land Rover Leyland International Holdings Limited
(LRLIH) was taken over by a joint venture between the Hinduja Group, the Non-Resident Indian
transnational group and IVECO. (Since July 2006, the Hinduja Group is 100% holder of
LRLIH).

The blueprint is prepared for the future reflected the global ambitions of the company,
captured in four words: Global Standards, Global Markets. This was at a time when liberalization
and globalization were not yet in the air. Ashok Leyland embarked on a major product and
process up gradation to match world-class standards of technology.

In the journey towards global standards of quality, Ashok Leyland reached a major
milestone in 1993 when it became the first in India's automobile history to win the ISO 9002
certification. The more comprehensive ISO 9001 certification came in 1994, QS 9000 in 1998
and ISO 14001 certification for all vehicle manufacturing units in 2002. It has also become the
first Indian auto company to receive the latest ISO/TS 16949 Corporate Certification (in July
2006) which is specific to the auto industry.

Spread over 135 acres, Ashok Leyland Ennore is a highly integrated Mother Plant
accounting for over 40% ALL production. The plant manufactures a wide range of vehicles and
house production facilities for important aggregates such as Engines, Gear Box, Axles and other
key in-house components.

Established in 1980, Hosur-I is the engine-manufacturing center within the Ashok


Leyland production system. Apart from producing various types of diesel engines (including the
engines manufactured under license from Hino of Japan) and CNG engines, the plant also
manufactures and assembles heavy duty and special vehicles, Axles, AGBs, Marine Gear Box,
etc.The facility is spread over 103 acres and is innovatively laid out, optimizing the use of all
resources.

36
Ashok Leyland established this state-of-the-art production facility in 1994 at Hosur.
Spread over 236 acres, Hosur- II houses finishing and assembly facilities including sophisticated
painting facilities. The complex also houses one of the largest press facilities in India for
pressing frame side members. Laid out with an eye for the future, Hosur II has won acclaim from
several automotive experts who have visited the facility.

Established in 1982, the Alwar Unit in Rajasthan is an assembly plant for a wide range of
vehicles with an emphasis on passenger chassis, including CNG buses, situated close to the
northern market.Ashok Leyland's Bhandara Unit houses manufacturing and assembly facilities
for sophisticated synchromesh transmission and also has facilities for assembly of vehicles. The
Doctrine Casting Unit (DCU) at Hyderabad is Ashok Leyland's in-house supplier of Grey and

Spheroid Graphite Iron castings. Formerly known as Doctrine Castings Ltd, this unit was
acquired by Ashok Leyland in 1990 to augment the foundry capacity of the Group. DCU was
awarded the ISO 9002 certification in 1995.

Ashok Leyland’s brand new Cab Panel Press Shop is an imposing addition to the
industrial skyline of Hosur. At 800 m above sea level, it is also the tallest in the Hosur industrial
belt. This state-of-the-art facility is housed in a 99-acre expanse with a built up area of over
15,000 sq.m. The Shop is equipped to stamp select panels for Cargo cab, G-45 and C-45 FES -
totally, 55 panels and their variants. Right now it houses eight presses and has the provision to
accommodate four more.

The versatility of the presses can be utilized for making panels of complex shapes and
profiles with appropriate tooling and dies. In addition to catering to our present needs, the Press
Shop can take up additional panels of new / current models. Right at the design stage, a rainwater
harvesting facility was integrated into the Shop. A 60,000-sqm lawn and the 2,500 saplings
planted recently in the premises will give the Shop a cool, green cover. Built with an investment
of Rs 1350 million, the Shop is designed and developed to be a state-of-the-art facility. The

37
210m long Press Shop consists of two bays with a 36m span in each bay. The 24m high Press
bay has an underground tunnel, 7.1m deep and 90m long, to handle the end bits generated during
the process of panel pressing. The other bay is 17m high.

CHAPTER II

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

38
2.1 HEALTH MEASURES

Particulars
Weighted values

Pure drinking water is available 3.8

The Canteen is kept clean 3.3

The Quality of food is satisfactory 3.5

Periodical health check up is conducted 3.65

Latrine & Urinals are kept clean 3.45

Average Mean 3.54

2.1.1 Table shows Health Measures

Inference

39
From the above table reveals that the workers are satisfied with the Health measures
provided by the company. Particularly Pure drinking water is more satisfied and the company
has to improve the canteen facilities.

2.2 WORK ENVIRONMENT

Particulars
Weighted values

The Work place is hygienic


3.03

Proper ventilation is available 3.66

Lighting facilities are properly provided 3.66

Disposal of waste are properly done 3.38

The work place is free from noise 3.6

Average Mean 3.466

2.1.2 Table shows of Work Environment

Inference

40
From the above table reveals that the workers are satisfied with the Work
Environment. Most of the respondents are highly satisfied with ventilation and lighting facilities.
The company should maintain work place properly.

2.3 SAFETY MEASURES

Particulars Weighted values

The Machines are properly fenced 3.9

Rotating and Moving parts of machines are guarded 3.68


properly

The Safety equipments are provided 3.59

Training programs are conducted to handle safety 3.47


equipments

The Electrical equipments are inspected properly 3.48

Average Mean 3.624

2.1.3 Table shows the Safety Measures

Inference

41
From the above table reveals that the workers are satisfied with the Safety Measures
provided by the company. Most of the respondents are highly satisfied with the machines fenced.
The firm should conduct more training programs to handle safety equipments.

2.4 WELFARE MEASURES

Particulars
Weighted values

First aid box is beneficiary 3.91

Rest room are properly maintained 3.15

Transport facilities are provide benefits to the


employees 3.53

Incentives are satisfactory 3.54

Medical facilities are reach to the employees 3.19

Average Mean 3.464

2.1.4 Table shows the Welfare measures

Inference

From the above table reveals that the workers are satisfied with the welfare measures
provided by the company. Mostly employees are highly satisfied with first aid box. The company
should improve the rest room and medical facilities.

42
2.5 ALLOWANCE

Particulars Weighted values

Education allowance are satisfactory 3.49

Festival advance are provided 3.18

Overtime allowance are properly provided 3.76

Travel allowance are satisfactory 3.55

House rent allowance are properly given to the employees 3.48

Average Mean 3.492

2.1.5 Table shows the Allowances

Inference:

From the above table reveals that the workers are satisfied with the Allowances provided by
the company. Most of the respondents are highly satisfied with overtime allowances. Some of the
respondents are not satisfied with festival advance.

FREQUENCY TABLE

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2.6 Age Wise Classification of Employees

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid below25 10 10.0 10.0 10.0

26 to 35 21 21.0 21.0 31.0

36 to 45 35 35.0 35.0 66.0

above 45 34 34.0 34.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

INFERENCE

From the above table reveals that out of 100 respondents 35% of respondents are in
between the age group of 36 to 45 years and 10% of respondents are in between the age group of
below 25 years.

44
2.1.6 Figure show the Age Wise Classification of Employees

45
2.7 Classification of Department

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid Production 15 15.0 15.0 15.0

Store 29 29.0 29.0 44.0

Finance 35 35.0 35.0 79.0

Hr 21 21.0 21.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

INFERENCE

From the above table reveals that out of 100 respondents 35% of respondents are
working in finance department and 15% of respondents are working in production department.

46
2.1.7 Figure shows the Classification of Department

47
2.8 Classification of Employee’s Education

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid School level 19 19.0 19.0 19.0

College level 26 26.0 26.0 45.0

Diploma 32 32.0 32.0 77.0

Other 23 23.0 23.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

INFERENCE

From the above table reveals that out of 100 respondents 32% of respondents are
studied up to diploma level and 19% of respondents are studied up to the school level.

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2.1.8 Figure shows the Classification of Education Qualification

49
2.9 Classification of Employee’s Salary

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid below 10000 15 15.0 15.0 15.0

10001 to 15000 40 40.0 40.0 55.0

15001 to 20000 26 26.0 26.0 81.0

above 20000 19 19.0 19.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

INFERENCE

From the above table reveals that out of 100 respondents 40% of respondents are
receiving the amount of salary is Rs.10001-15000 and 15% of respondents are receiving the
amount of salary is below Rs.10000.

50
2.1.9 Figure shows the Classification of Income/Salary

51
2.10 Classification of Employee’s Experience

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid below 5 10 10.0 10.0 10.0

6 to 10 24 24.0 24.0 34.0

11 to 15 31 31.0 31.0 65.0

above 15 35 35.0 35.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

INFERENCE

From the above table reveals that out of 100 respondents 35% of respondents are having
above 15 years of experience and 10% of respondents are having below 5 years of experience in
the company.

52
2.1.10 Figure shows the Classification of Employees Experience

53
Cross tabulation

A cross-tabulation is the merging of the frequency distribution of two or more variables in


a single table. Cross tabulation results in tables that reflect the joint distribution of two or more
variables with a limited number of categories or distinct values. The categories of one variable
are cross-classified with the categories of one or more other variables. Thus the frequency
distribution of one variable is subdivided according to the values or categories of the other
variables.

2.11 Table shows the relationship between Age and Department

INFERENCE

From the table reveals that out of 100 respondents, 11 respondents are in between the
age group of below 25, 23 respondents are in between the age group of 26-35, 33 respondents are
in between the age group of 36-45, 33 respondents are in between the age group of above 45. 15
respondents are working in production department, 28 in store, 35 in finance and 22 in HR.

54
2.1.11 Figure shows the relationship between Age and Department

55
2.12 Table shows the relationship between Age and Education

INFERENCE

From the above table reveals that out of 100 respondents, 16 respondents are studied up
to school level, 27 respondents are studied up to college level, 34 respondents are studied up to
diploma and 23 respondents are comes under other category.

56
2.1.12 Figure shows the relationship between Age and Education

57
2.13 Table shows the relationship between Age and Salary

INFERENCE

From the above table reveals that out of 100 respondents, 15 respondents are getting
salary below 10000, 40 respondents are getting salary 10000–15000, 26 respondents are getting
salary 15001- 20000 and 19 respondents are getting salary above 20000.

58
2.1.13 Figure shows the relationship between Age and Salary

59
2.14 Table shows the relationship between Age and Experience

INFERENCE

From the above table reveals that out of 100 respondents, 10 respondents are having
below 5 years of experiences, 24 respondents are having 6-10 years of experiences, 31
respondents are having 11-15 years of experiences and 35 respondents are having above 15 years
of experiences.

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2.1.14 Figure shows the relationship between Age and Experience

61
CHAPTER III

FINDINGS, SUGGESTION AND CONCLUSION

62
3.1 FINDINGS

 The workers are satisfied with the Health measures provided by the company.
Particularly Pure drinking water is more satisfied and the company has to improve the
canteen facilities.

 The workers are satisfied with the Work Environment. Most of the respondents are
highly satisfied with ventilation and lighting facilities. The company should maintain
work place properly.

 The workers are satisfied with the Safety Measures provided by the company. Most of
the respondents are highly satisfied with the machines fenced. The firm should conduct
more training programs to handle safety equipments

 The workers are satisfied with the welfare measures provided by the company. Mostly
employees are highly satisfied with first aid box. The company should improve the rest
room and medical facilities.

 The workers are satisfied with the Allowances provided by the company. Most of the
respondents are highly satisfied with overtime allowances. Some of the respondents are
not satisfied with festival advance.

 Table reveals that out of 100 respondents 35% of respondents are in between the age
group of 36 to 45 years and 10% of respondents are in between the age group of below 25
years.

 Table reveals that out of 100 respondents 35% of respondents are working in finance
department and 15% of respondents are working in production department.

63
 Table reveals that out of 100 respondents 32% of respondents are studied up to diploma
level and 19% of respondents are studied up to the school level

 Table reveals that out of 100 respondents 40% of respondents are receiving the amount of
salary is Rs.10001-15000 and 15% of respondents are receiving the amount of salary is
below Rs.10000.

 Table reveals that out of 100 respondents 35% of respondents are having above 15 years
of experience and 10% of respondents are having below 5 years of experience in the
company.

 Most of the respondents (35% of the data) are collected from the finance department.

 Most of the respondents (34% of the respondents) are studied up to diploma level.

 Most of the respondents (40% of the respondents) are getting salary 10000–15000.

 Most of the respondents (35% of the respondents) are having above 15 years of
experiences in that company.

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SUGGESTIONS

65
3.2 SUGGESTIONS

 The organization may conduct the general meetings for the purpose of
creating proper relationship between employee as well as employer.

 Some of the respondents feel the medical facilities are not satisfied. So the organization
should take necessary steps for improving the medical facilities to the employees

 Most of the respondents feel canteen facility is very good compare than other facilities.
So the organization follows the same principle for running the canteen facility.

 Most of the respondents feel the help line is not satisfied. So the organization takes
necessary steps to improve the help line facilities towards the employees.
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 In Ashok Leyland Limited, all the safety and welfare facilities are there but some of the
facilities are not properly run such as medical, helpline facilities etc., so the company
should improve the above facilities for the benefit of employees.

CONCLUSION

67
3.3 CONCLUSION

Changing economic and social factors have made the concept of safety and welfare measures are
very relevant for research and analysis. For better understanding the safety and welfare measures
of employees, the research was carried out in Ashok Leyland Limited, Ennore.

68
The primary objective of this study is to analyze the factor that causes of an imbalance
between safety and welfare measures of employees and suggests appropriate measures taken by
the employees in Ashok Leyland Limited.

The organization should follow the same rules and regulations regarding safety and welfare
facilities for the purpose of benefit of an employee in an organization.

The company may conduct the general meetings towards the employees for the purpose the
improving their product. Then the Ashok Leyland Limited is one of the best automobile
industries throughout the world. My best wishes for achieving your target….

BIBLIOGRAPHY

69
BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. L.M.PRASAD

- HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (Eight Editions)

70
2. C.B. GUPTA

- HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (Sixth Edition)

3. C.R. KOTHARI

- RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (Seventh Edition)

WEBSITES

1. www.hinduja foundries.com

2. www.google.com

3. www.ask.com

APPENDIX

71
QUESTIONNAIRE

A STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF EMPLOYEES SAFETY AND WELFARE


MEASURES IN HINDUJA FOUDRIES LIMITED, ENNORE.

I am V.GANESHKUMAR studying MBA in KALASALINGAM UNIVERSITY,


Krisnankovil. I am doing project on “EFFECTIVENESS OF EMPLOYEES’ SAFETY AND
WELFARE MEASURES” in HINDUJA FOUNDRIES Ltd, ENNORE. So please spend your
valuable time for answering the following questions.

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INSTRUCTIONS

• Tick the relevant box

PERSONAL DATA

_____________________________________________________________________________
_

Name of the employee ……………………………………….

Age: Below 25 26-35 36-45 Above 45

Department Production Store Finance HR

Educational qualifications: School level college level diploma others

Salary: Below 10,000 10001-15000 15001-20000 above 20000

Experience: Below 5 years 6-10 years 11-15 years above 15 years

1. HEALTH MEASURES

HS S NEUTRAL DS HDS
Pure drinking water is available

The Canteen is kept clean

73
The Quality of food is satisfactory

Periodical health check up is conducted

Latrine & Urinals are kept clean

2. WORK ENVIRONMENT

HS S NEUTRAL DS HDS

The Work place is hygienic

Proper ventilation is available

Lighting facilities are properly provided

Disposal of waste are properly done

The work place is free from noise

3. SAFETY MEASURES

HS S NEUTRAL DS HDS

The Machines are properly fenced

Rotating and Moving parts of machines are


guarded properly

The Safety equipments are provided

Training programs are conducted to handle safety


equipments

The Electrical equipments are inspected properly

74
4. WELFARE MEASURES

First aid box is beneficiary HS S NEUTRAL DS HDS


Rest room are properly maintained

Transport facilities are provide benefits to the


employees

Incentives are satisfactory

Medical facilities are reach to the employees

5. ALLOWANCES

HS S NEUTRAL DS HDS

Education allowance are satisfactory

Festival advance are provided

Overtime allowance are properly provided

Travel allowance are satisfactory

House rent allowance are properly given to the


employees

HS - Highly satisfied

S - Satisfied

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DS - Dissatisfied

HDS - Highly dissatisfied

76