P. 1
Understanding Plagiarism and Why You Should Not Commit It

Understanding Plagiarism and Why You Should Not Commit It

Views: 1|Likes:
Publicado porExamville Blog
What may constitute plagiarism and why you should not commit it. Students of all ages, as well as parents and teachers, will benefit from reading this article.
What may constitute plagiarism and why you should not commit it. Students of all ages, as well as parents and teachers, will benefit from reading this article.

More info:

Published by: Examville Blog on Feb 16, 2011
Direitos Autorais:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

http://www.Examville.

com

Understanding Plagiarism and Why You Should Not Commit It
Plagiarism is a topic that, as a student you have to take seriously. If you’re not careful, it can do severe damage to your academic standing and even affect your future far longer than you would imagine. It is not the merely the act of copying someone else’s work, a definition that dismisses the seriousness of the charge, but a type of fraud: the theft of intellectual property. There are a number of different ways to commit plagiarism. Turning in someone else’s work as your own and quoting from a text without citing the source are the clearest instances of it, but there are more subtle violations that aren’t always immediately obvious. Paraphrasing is not good enough – if too much of your work copies the style of your source, changing only a few words here or there, you’ve plagiarized it. When you present ideas as new when they are in fact derived from other sources, you’re stealing someone else’s words. As smart as you think you are, your teachers can often tell that you’ve submitted something that is not fully your own. Plagiarized portions of papers often seem different from the rest of it, leading teachers to suspect the section’s origin. There are numerous programs dedicated to analyzing students’ work and using the internet to figure out if text seems too close to its named or unnamed source material. The consequences for plagiarism range from small to devastating, depending on the policies of your high school or university. Some teachers will merely fail the offending assignment. Others will fail you
1

for the entire class, and at some schools, you might even find yourself expelled. No matter how tempting it is to “improve” your writing by heavily relying on the work of others, it is not worth the risk. You should instead seek help and learn how to express what you’ve learned without disrespecting your sources.
______________________________________________________________________________ © 2010 Examville.com, LLC

Visit Examville.com for all your test preparation (SAT, GRE, GMAT, LSAT), online review classes, and study guides.

2

You're Reading a Free Preview

Descarregar
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->