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Times Leader 05-22-2011

Times Leader 05-22-2011

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The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 05-22
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The Times Leader

C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 $1.50
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TODAY’S
DEAL
NANTICOKE – The heads of
the Greater Nanticoke Area
School District and Luzerne
County Assess-
ment don’t think
the county and
Nanticoke
should have to
wait indefinitely
for a piece of the
tax revenue
windfall from
the sale of Mercy
Special Care
Hospital.
The city of
Scranton, Tunk-
hannock Town-
ship, and the
Scranton and
Tunkhannock
Area school dis-
tricts soon will
receive a com-
bined total of
more than $2.5
million in real
estate transfer
taxes from the
sale of Mercy’s
properties in
Scranton and Tunkhannock
Township to subsidiaries of the
for-profit Community Health
Nanticoke
in limbo
for sale
revenue
Greater Nanticoke Area
School District still hasn’t
seen cash from Mercy sale.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
“If Scran-
ton col-
lects that
much, Nan-
ticoke
should be
entitled to
its fair
share.”
Tony Perrone
Greater
Nanticoke Area
School District
superintendent
See MERCY, Page 15A
TA X R E V E N U E
P
LAINS TWP. – Gregory
Price stands near a pipe
gushing putrid acid mine
water into a pit on what
had been a family farm
and seethes.
“That’s 7,146 gal-
lons a minute. And
there are two pipes,”
he says.
The 59-year-old son
of a farmer drives his
GMC Jimmy along
the muddy edge of a
neighbor’s plowed acres to the far
endof the same pit, trudges through
riparian lowlands blighted by a Ja-
panese Knotweed infestation, and
points to a breach in a low earthen
dike that lets the acrid “yellow boy”
mine water gush frantically through
an ever-eroding, winding path
straight to the Susquehanna River,
where it clings to the east bank,
choking vegetation.
A national conservation group
just declared the
Susquehanna the
nation’s “Most En-
dangered River” be-
cause of the risk
from natural gas
drilling. But Price
looks at the discol-
ored shoreline and asks a simple
question. “What about this?”
It’s bad enough the state Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection
came in six years ago and drilled the
holes that bring the mine water to
the pit – an excavation his father
worked to sell topsoil, Price said.
But when he tries to show off the
small strip of still-arable land be-
tween the pit and the railroad tracks
in Plains Township, he’s stopped by
OUR ENDANGERED SUSQUEHANNA
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Gregory Price stands near a pit full of acid mine water. Price and his mother contend the state was only supposed to fill a nearby mine subsid-
ence, not drill the holes that now dump the yellow water into the pit and then to the Susquehanna River.
Harvest of anguish
Mine drainage project
disaster to family farm
See DRAINAGE, Page 16A
“They came in and made
our farm worthless.”
Gregory Price
Farmer
MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com
INSIDE
A NEWS
Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 2A, 12A
B PEOPLE
Birthdays 5B
C SPORTS
Outdoors 14C
D BUSINESS
Mutuals 6D
E VIEWS
Editorial 2E
F ETC.
Puzzles 2F
Travel 6F
G CLASSIFIED
Preakness
Shackleford
takes the prize
Sports, 1C
HANOVER TWP. – One by
one friends of Shana Bagley said
goodbye with candles and
words.
Approximately 50 people at-
tended a vigil Saturday night for
the 25-year-old woman who was
shot and killed the day before by
the ex-boyfriend of a neighbor in
the Hanover Village Apartments
complex.
They lit candles and placed
them on the concrete landing
outside Apartment 415, where
Bagley lived with her husband,
Brad, and three children. They
also wrote short messages on a
poster with a picture of her in a
wedding dress.
“We miss you and your heart,”
read one goodbye. “Gone but not
forgotten. God Bless you and
your children,” read another.
Dennice Minsavage, the sister
of Bagley’s husband, stood on
the landing holding a family pho-
to showing him, Shana, Bradley
Jr., Ariauna and Analiese.
“Her kids have no mother and
it’s sad because she was such a
good person,” said Minsavage of
Nanticoke.
On her 25th birthday, Bagley
came to the aid of her neighbor
Shaundra Langille and paid for it
with her life. Authorities said
James Cooper, 39, of Scranton
was upset about temporarily los-
ing custody of his 9-month-old
daughter to Langille and came
to the apartment to shoot her.
Before taking his own life with
Friends, family remember mom of 3 slain in shooting
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Candles
flicker
before
posters
with
photos of
shooting
victim
Shana
Bagley at
vigil for
the slain
woman
Saturday
night in
Hanover
Twp.
About 50 attend vigil for
woman killed the day before
by ex-boyfriend of a neighbor.
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
See VIGIL, Page 16A
KINGSTON – At its peak,
acid mine drainage dumped so
much iron oxide – the stuff that
makes the water a yellow orange
– into the Susquehanna that the
bottom of the river turned or-
ange in spots.
In a 2004 Times Leader arti-
cle, King’s College Environ-
mental Program Director Brian
Mangan noted such deposits in
the past had killed the river
insects, crayfish and clams.
At a 1996 conference on acid
mine drainage hosted by Wilkes
University, experts warned that
such drainage was dumping
Acid water
major peril
for a river
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See ACID, Page 16A
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Bialek, Franklin
Bukowski, Albert
Cannon, Raymond
Davenport, Dolores
DeLong, Russell
Dorosky, Bernadine
Ell, Elizabeth
Finn, Thomas
Lampert, Helen
Mazur, Frank
Orzechowski, Darlene
Potoski, Debbie
Reiser, Genevieve
Rice, Barbara
Sabatini, John
Sorber, Bart
Steinruck, Loretta
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 12A
BUILDING
TRUST
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correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
➛ timesleader.com
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829-7293
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jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Circulation
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Published daily by:
Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company
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Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
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Postmaster: Send address changes
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+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)
USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2011-142
D
olores “Dory” Giusti Daven-
port, 82, of Roswell, Ga., passed
away peacefully Wednesday, May
18, 2011.
Dory was born in Nanticoke and
lived much of her life in Nanticoke,
Levittown, Pa., and Newtown, Pa.
She retired fromthe State of New
Jersey at age 62. While living in
Newtown, she was a member of the
Forest Grove Church.
She was preceded in death by her
parents, Julia and Edward Novak;
and husbands, Joseph L. Giusti and
Joseph H. Davenport.
Dory is survived by her devoted
daughter and son-in-law, Sharon
andRodney Hinds. She was a loving
“Grammy” to grandchildren, Ashlie
and Jamie Weaver, and Kara and
Christopher Wallace. She delighted
in being “Great Grammy” to Lon-
donandPresleyWeaver, andAmelia
and McLane Wallace. She is sur-
vived by her much loved brother
and sister-in-law, Edward and Sylvia
Novak; several cousins; nieces and
nephews; and a multitude of
friends.
A memorial Mass will be at St.
Ann’s Catholic Church in Marietta,
Ga., at 2 p.m. Wednesday.
Inlieuof flowers, please make do-
nations toSt. Vincent de Paul Minis-
try, care of St. Ann’s Church (in
memory of Dory Davenport), 4905
Roswell Road, Marietta, GA 30062;
or a charity of your choice.
Arrangements are by the South-
Care Cremation Society and Memo-
rial Centers in Marietta.
Dolores Giusti Davenport
May 18, 2011
L
oretta A. Steinruck, 75, of Old
Tavern Road, Hunlock Creek,
passed away Friday afternoon, May
20, 2011, at Lehigh Valley Hospital-
Cedar Crest.
She was born on November 2,
1935, inBloomingdale, Pa., a daugh-
ter of the late Loren and Margaret
Bowman Culver.
Loretta was a graduate of Shick-
shinny High School, class of 1953.
Prior to retiring, she was employed
by Luzerne Outerwear, Shickshin-
ny, and Native Textiles in Dallas.
She was preceded in death by her
first husband, Arnold C. Smith; and
a sister, Kathleen Hart.
Surviving are her daughter Deb-
orahSmith, withwhomshe resided;
brothers, Delano Culver of Sweet
Valley and James Culver of King-
ston; sisters, Shirley Lewis of Still-
water and Connie Ridall of Shick-
shinny; longtime companion Bob
Grey; as well as nieces and neph-
ews.
Private funeral services will be
held Tuesday from the Charles L.
Cease Funeral Home, 634 Reyburn
Road, Shickshinny, with the Rev. C.
Glenn Neely, of the Reyburn Bible
Church, officiating. Interment will
be inBloomingdale Cemetery, Bloo-
mingdale. There will be no calling
hours.
Loretta A. Steinruck
May 20, 2011
More Obituaries, Page 12A
R
aymond Cannon, 79, of Park
Towers, Nanticoke, passed
away Thursday, May19, 2011, at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
He was a son of the late Andrew
and Helen Wasilewski Cannon. He
was a graduate of Nanticoke High
School.
He hadbeenemployedbyBiscon-
tini Coal Co., Alta Products, and
Penn Footwear.
Mr. Cannon was preceded in
death by brothers, Edward, Joseph,
Eugene and Andrew; and sisters,
Eleanore Crupi, Margaret Dycus
and Stacia Zionczkowski.
Surviving are sisters, Lois Pris-
tas, Irene Crupi, Dorothy Fabian,
and Patricia Jasonis; as well as niec-
es and nephews.
Funeral services will be held at
11:30 a.m. Monday fromthe Stanley
S. Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke, with a
Mass of Christian Burial at noon in
the main site of St. Faustina’s Par-
rish. Interment will be in St. Jo-
seph’s Cemetery, Nanticoke.
Friends may call from 10 a.m. until
the time of services.
Raymond Cannon
May 19, 2011
KINGSTON – Drug agents
seized 15 pounds of marijuana
with a street value of $45,000
when they arrested two people
on Thursday.
Police said the marijuana was
mailedfromTexas toanassisted
living facility on North Dawes
Avenue.
Keith B. Hayes, 19, of Coal
Street, Wilkes-Barre, and To-
nesha M. Chalmers, 31, of South
Sherman Street, Wilkes-Barre,
were charged with possession
with intent to deliver a con-
trolled substance, possession of
a controlled substance, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and
two counts of criminal conspir-
acy. TheywerearraignedbyDis-
trict JudgePaul Roberts inKing-
ston and jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for
lack of $35,000 bail each.
According to police:
An investigation by Kingston
drug agents and the Luzerne
County Drug Task Force with
the state Office of Attorney Gen-
eral learned a package contain-
ing 15 pounds of marijuana was
going to be delivered from Tex-
as to a private assisted living fa-
cility.
Surveillance was set up in the
area and watched the package
get delivered by a postal worker.
Chalmers, who authorities
said is employed by the compa-
ny that operates the facility, ar-
rived and conducted her own
surveillance inanattempt tosee
if the package was being
watched by authorities, accord-
ing to police.
Chalmers met up with Hayes
in a company-owned van. Chal-
mers stoppedthevaninthemid-
dle of the street and Hayes re-
trieved the package. They were
arrested during a traffic stop.
The package was addressed
to a fictitious name, according
to police.
Preliminary hearings are
scheduled on May 25 before Ro-
berts.
Two arrested, jailed
in Kingston drug bust
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WRIGHT TWP. – Almost ev-
eryone has been touched by can-
cer, according to organizers for
the ninth annual American Can-
cer Society’s Relay for Life of
Mountain Top held this weekend
at Crestwood High School.
About 150 walkers represent-
ing 16 teams gathered at the 24-
hour event to honor the memory
of those who lost their battle and
to support survivors.
Vicky Serhan and Sandy Hu-
dock from the relay committee
co-chaired the event with the
help of local volunteers, Crest-
wood School District administra-
tors, and others who donated
their time and talents. It caps off
the year of the committee’s fun-
draising efforts. Serhan said they
hope to top last year’s total of
$72,000 raised for cancer re-
search.
“The theme of the event is ‘Cel-
ebrate. Remember. Fight Back,’”
said Hudock.
The opening ceremony on Sat-
urday set the tone with a focus on
recent accomplishments in the
fight against cancer. The objec-
tive is to “inspire hope,” accord-
ing to the committee. Survivors
walked a victory lap whether
their survival is twentyyears long
or two days long.
Starting at 10 a.m., the relay in-
cluded a survivor and caretakers
breakfast, a flag football game,
massages, zumba, Irish dancing,
music from several performers,
raffles, a massive fireworks dis-
play and an emotional luminary
ceremony held at dusk.
Approximately 350 luminaries
lining the Crestwood football sta-
diumwere lit tohonor lovedones
whosufferedfromcancer, Serhan
said. In addition, the word
“hope” was lit on the stadium
seating area, she said.
The luminaria ceremony pro-
vides participants anopportunity
to grieve, reflect and find hope,
she said.
The Butterflies teamdreams of
a cancer-free world. Lisa Ayers,
member of the Butterflies and
chairwoman of the luminaria
committee said the participants
not only honor those who’ve
facedcancer but alsoseektohave
a good time.
“We ask the community to
come out and be part of this with
us,” she said.
The teams compete for most
miles walked, most hours and for
an overall “team spirit” award.
The Butterflies won the spirit
award last year and don’t want to
give it up, Ayers joked.
When thinking about the sig-
nificance of the luminaria cere-
mony, Ayers became emotional
saying it is “very moving.”
“It makes everyone pause to
thinkabout whywearehere,” she
said.
This morning, a closing cere-
monywas tobringthe event toan
emotional end, reminding every-
one to get ready for the next 364-
day fight.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Jane Jeffery of Wyoming walks the track at Crestwood High School during Saturday’s Relay For
Life. Jeffery walked for friends, family, and co-workers who either have cancer or have overcome it.
Stepping up to the battle
A Mountain Top event honors
cancer victims and survivors
while raising vital funds.
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent WEST WYOMING – Resi-
dents are advised that week-
ly trash pickups will be
scheduled for May 31 next
week due to the Memorial
Day holiday.
Containers or bags should
be placed curbside on Mon-
day evening.
Also, yard waste pickup
will be scheduled for June 3.
Residents are reminded to
place open containers curb-
side on Thursday evening.
Pickup will be Atherton
Park up to, but not includ-
ing, 8th Street.
MUNICIPAL BRIEF
WILKES-BARRE – The 6th
District Republican Committee
will meet 6 p.m. Tuesday at
GOP Headquarters, 41 S. Main
St, across from the Park &
Lock.
For information, contact
Patrick Umbra, District 6 sec-
retary, at 822-3597.
POLITICAL BRIEF
WILKES-BARRE – City
police reported the following:
• Mark McDermott of Barney
Street said Friday that his black
and silver 1995 Kawasaki Vulcan
motorcycle was stolen. The
motorcycle has Pennsylvania
license plate 4052E.
• A window was reported
smashed Friday at PLD Associ-
ates on Scott Street.
• Police arrested James Rush-
ton, 20, of Glen Lyon, on harass-
ment, public drunkenness and
possession of false identification
charges at 1:06 a.m. Saturday at,
Rodano’s, 53 Public Square.
Police said Rushton struck a
28-year-old woman in the face,
was found carrying another
person’s identification card and
was intoxicated.
• Police said a man was as-
saulted by several males on
Murray Street at 2:19 a.m. Sat-
urday.
• Police charged Charli
Chamberlain of Wilkes-Barre
with driving under the influence
following a traffic accident at
2:09 a.m. Saturday at the in-
tersection of Coal Street and
North Sherman Street.
Police said Chamberlain
crashed her vehicle into another
that was stopped at the traffic
signal.
Chamberlain submitted to a
breath test which found her
blood alcohol content to be .177
percent. An adult driver in
Pennsylvania with a blood alco-
hol content of .08 percent or
higher is considered legally
intoxicated.
• Three vehicles collided
after the traffic signal at the
intersection of East Market and
Pennsylvania Avenue lost power
and stopped functioning at 10:10
p.m. Friday.
Police said vehicles driven by
Aaron Adams of Wilkes-Barre
and Erica Luzetski of Dallas did
not stop at the intersection and
collided. The impact sent
Adams’ vehicle into a third
vehicle, which was stopped,
police said.
HAZLE TWP. – State police
said someone removed approxi-
mately 150 pounds of scrap
copper fittings and pipe from
the HVAC/plumbing shop of
the Hazleton Area Career Cen-
ter, 1451 West 23rd St.
• A student at Hazleton Area
High School said her cell phone
was removed from her purse
while in class between 11 a.m.
and 12 p.m. May 11.
• An 18-year-old student at
Hazleton Area High School
faces a charge of possession of a
weapon on school property,
state police said.
Johnny M. Gomez dropped a
7-inch folding knife while exit-
ing a restroom on May 11, state
police said. A school security
officer saw Gomez drop the
knife and secured the knife and
the student, state police said.
POLICE BLOTTER
Lottery summary
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 6-1-7
Monday: 8-8-7
Tuesday: 2-0-1
Wednesday: 2-9-6
Thursday: 1-4-5
Friday: 6-3-6
Saturday: 0-1-7
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 2-1-8-0
Monday: 5-1-4-1
Tuesday: 9-3-2-6
Wednesday: 6-4-8-4
Thursday: 2-0-8-0
Friday: 5-2-9-2
Saturday: 5-6-3-7
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 3-0-5-6-4
Monday: 4-9-9-2-6
Tuesday: 7-6-3-7-1
Wednesday: 0-7-1-0-8
Thursday: 4-2-3-8-2
Friday: 7-8-7-3-8
Saturday: 1-1-2-9-3
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 02-03-12-23-29
Monday: 08-15-16-24-26
Tuesday: 02-10-17-18-26
Wednesday: 13-14-17-21-23
Thursday: 1-13-22-24-25
Friday: 12-15-17-21-29
Saturday: 05-10-16-24-27
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 2-2-7
Monday: 0-0-0
Tuesday: 0-8-1
Wednesday: 1-8-4
Thursday: 5-8-2
Friday: 2-7-0
Saturday: 5-9-5
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 3-2-1-9
Monday: 0-1-1-1
Tuesday: 9-0-7-6
Wednesday: 8-1-2-9
Thursday: 5-8-5-7
Friday: 4-0-6-4
Saturday: 5-6-7-4
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 2-0-3-5-4
Monday: 7-5-9-8-7
Tuesday: 8-0-6-0-2
Wednesday: 1-6-6-1-4
Thursday: 1-2-6-9-9
Friday: 9-3-1-7-9
Saturday: 6-6-0-5-5
Cash 5
Sunday: 04-13-14-31-34
Monday: 07-12-14-40-42
Tuesday: 07-12-27-35-36
Wednesday: 02-28-34-41-43
Thursday: 04-15-16-20-31
Friday: 04-08-18-26-37
Saturday: 01-08-24-26-41
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 01-06-16-19-21-47
Thursday: 09-17-22-29-38-46
Powerball
Wednesday: 07-12-13-42-49
powerball: 16
powerplay: 04
Saturday: 02-08-40-49-50
powerball: 36
powerplay: 03
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 01-02-17-25-48
Megaball: 45
Megaplier: 04
Friday: 10-17-19-45-48
Megaball: 30
Megaplier: 04
A VIEW TO A THRILLING GALA
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
B
ond. James Bond. That was the theme for the spring gala for Osterhout Free Library
in Wilkes-Barre on Saturday. The event, which featured entertainment, food and
drinks, honored the work of famed 007 author Ian Fleming. All proceeds will go toward
the library and its mission to provide free books, CDs, DVDs and educational programs for
area residents.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
FORTY FORT
Forty Fort pool to open
The Forty Fort Community Pool will
be open from noon to 6 p.m. May 28-30
for Memorial Day weekend.
It also will be open Saturday, June 4,
and Sunday, June 5. The pool will open
daily starting June 11.
The membership and daily rates are:
• Residential family, $90
• Resident individual, $60
• Non-residential family, $125
Non-residential individual, $75
Daily pass, $3
Call Denise Syms at the Forty Fort
Borough Building at 287-8586, exten-
sion 24; or visit the website www.forty-
fort.org for information.
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons parade scheduled
The Parsons Lions Club host its
annual Memorial Day Parade on Mon-
day, May 30th at 10 a.m. to salute the
service and sacrifices of the men and
women of the military.
Participants will meet at 9:30 a.m. in
the parking lot next to the Anthracite
Café, 804 Scott Street, formerly the
V.F.W. Hall. The parade will proceed
down Mill Street to George Ave. and
conclude at the Scott Street Park,
where a memorial service will be held
by the Wyoming Valley Detachment
Marine Corps League.
Following the parade there will be an
antique car show from noon to 5 p.m.
at the Bears football field in Scott
Street Park.
WILKES-BARRE
Cookout schedule set
The Tyre Square Club Inc. will be
hosting its Barbecue Cookouts
throughout the year at their storefront,
corner of Wilkes-Barre Boulevard and
Hill Street.
The dates of the barbecue dinners
will be Saturdays and Sundays, begin-
ning May 21 and 22, then continuing
June 11 and 12, July 9 and 10, July 30
and 31, Aug. 13 and 14, Aug. 27 and 28,
Sept. 17 and 18, and Oct. 1 and 2, from
noon to 6 p.m.
HAZLE TWP.
Two arrested in theft
State police arrested John Paul Ed-
strom, 30, of Hazleton, and Stacey
Hvizda, 24, of Hazleton, on theft and
conspiracy charges Friday following a
vehicle chase that ended with police
ramming the fleeing vehicle into a
garage.
State police said a manager at J C
Penney in the Laurel Mall reported
that Edstrom and Hvizda fled the store
with 21 pairs of Arizona brand jeans
and 25 polo shirts at 12:35 p.m. Thurs-
day.
At 12:50 Thursday, state police said
they located the vehicle with Edstrom
and Hvizda inside and initiated a traffic
stop. The vehicle fled, and state police
used a PIT maneuver to stop the flee-
ing vehicle, which came to rest after
striking a garage, state police said.
State police charged Edstrom with
one count of felony retail theft, one
count of felony criminal conspiracy to
commit retail theft, one count of felony
fleeing or attempting to elude police
officers, one count of misdemeanor
resisting arrest and three summary
traffic violations.
Hvizda was charged with one count
of felony retail theft and one count of
felony criminal conspiracy to commit
retail theft.
Both are being held at Luzerne
County Correctional Facility in lieu of
$7,500 straight bail.
PLAINS TWP.
Fight, chase bring arrest
Joseph Fortune, 28, of Wilkes-Barre,
was arraigned Friday on charges he
resisted arrest by swinging at police
officers following a large fight behind
the Carriage Stop Plaza, 2500 East End
Blvd.
Police responding to the reported
fight Thursday said Fortune fled into a
wooded area behind the plaza and was
pursued by police. During the pursuit,
police said Fortune swung at an officer,
Sgt. Dale Binker, twice with a closed
fist. Fortune was shot with a Taser
once but escaped from police, fleeing
into a creek between the Carriage Stop
Plaza and the Melody Motel, where
police again shot him with a Taser and
arrested him, police said.
Fortune faces one charge each of
simple assault, resisting arrest, dis-
orderly conduct, harassment and pub-
lic drunkenness. He is being held at
Luzerne County Correctional Facility
in lieu of $5,000 straight bail.
I N B R I E F
where as cash-strapped districts strug-
gle to find ways to plug massive budget
holes.
In Pennsylvania, the Coatesville
School District in Chester County and
Keystone Oaks School District near
WILKES-BARRE – The Wilkes-Barre
Area School District would be among
the first districts in the state to resort to
a four-day week should school directors
decide to go with that option.
There are currently about 120 school
districts in the nation, most located in
the West and South, that utilize a four-
day week, according to Educational Re-
search Service, a nonprofit group that
conducts research for educators and the
public.
No district in Pennsylvania currently
operates on a four-day schedule, but the
issue is gaining attention here and else-
Pittsburgh recently announced they
were considering the option.
Wilkes-Barre Area’s finance commit-
tee on Thursday floated the idea of the
four-day week as one of several options
to consider to help the district over-
come a $6 million deficit.
Superintendent Jeff Namey said
rough estimates suggest the district
could save up to $1.6 million by having
the school buildings closed one day a
week. About $500,000 of that, possibly
more, would come from not having to
heat and light the buildings. The rest
would come from cutting costs to bus
E D U C AT I O N Not everyone’s sold on the idea, but Wilkes-Barre Area is looking to a budget aid that’s being studied elsewhere
Four-day school gaining traction
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Coughlin student Michaela Kates
doesn’t like a four-day school week.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
“It’s a long week. I don’t
think the kids would mind
going to school as much if
they knew they had a three-
day weekend.”
Debbie Ozark
Parent
See FOUR-DAY, Page 10A
BEAR CREEK TWP. – The shores of
an area lake were packed full of youthful
anglers, castingtheir luckandtheir lures
in hopes of taking home prizes.
The Wilkes-Barre Township’s10th An-
nual Mayor’s Fishing Derby was held
Saturday morning under overcast skies
–anideal situationfor fishing–at Moun-
tain Lake, with more than 100 children
participating in the two-hour event held
at the Settlement Camp.
The age groups of the anglers were
broken down to newborn to 5, 6 to 10,
and 11 to 15.
Mayor Carl Kuren, who has hosted
this event since its inception, began this
fishing derby a day earlier, helping in the
stocking of the approximate 1,500 trout.
“There’s a big crowd, but I think the
weather put the numbers a little lower
than expected,” said Kuren. “The first
one (fishing derby) we
had there were17 kids,
and now we are up to
about 150 kids, along
withtheir parents. The
camp is a beautiful
place to be.”
One of the parents of
the derby participants
was Joe Williams of
Edwardsville. He and
his 6-year-old son, Lo-
gan Williams, dodged
the casts of their sur-
rounding competitors.
Logan, who Joe en-
dearingly referred to
as “Bubba,” lost a few
fish but landed a few
more. His father encouraged his every
move.
Children were requested to bring safe-
ty goggles to the event, and if they did
not bring thempairs were provided. The
goggles were to keep the children from
snagging one another due to the nature
of the hooks used in the sport.
Joe Weiss and his daughter, Jolie
Weiss, 5, of Mountain Top, also partici-
pated. She came out big with a 15 inch-
plus palomino trout. “We run this event
so kids can get involved during their de-
velopmental years,” said Kuren. “It’s run
with the help of a lot of organizations
and people helping behind the scenes,
like the fire and police departments, and
the ambulance and municipal workers.”
Derby event
provides reel
fun for kids
Prizes were awarded to young
anglers in W-B Twp. competition.
JOHN KRISPIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Anglers hope for a bite during fishing
derby at Mountain Lake.
By JOHN KRISPIN
jkrispin@timesleader.com
“We run
this event
so kids can
get in-
volved dur-
ing their
develop-
mental
years.”
Carl Kuren
Wilkes-Barre
Twp. Mayor
WILKES-BARRE – Parishioners
from the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, slated to shut its doors in
June, made a late-game attempt to
preserve their place of worship Sat-
urday.
About 25 members of the Sacred
Heart Wilkes-Barre Foundation, a
group of church members fighting
to keep the church open, rallied on
the steps of the church on North
Main Street before 4 p.m. Mass.
“My grandparents helped build
this church,” said Ann Dougher, 77,
of Wilkes-Barre. “When people say
it’s just a building, I hate that, be-
cause it’s not just a building. I
raised 10 children. They had their
sacraments here. They were mar-
ried here. And my grandchildren. If
they were all here there would be 50
people here.”
In 2009, former Scranton Diocese
Bishop Joseph Martino announced
that the church would be
At Sacred Heart, a fight for survival goes on
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Parishioners of
Sacred Heart of
Jesus Roman Ca-
tholic Church in
Wilkes-Barre hold a
rally to protest its
scheduled closing.
Though one appeal
has been turned
down, they are
continuing their
campaign.
Parishioners of the Wilkes-Barre
church, set to close, hold a rally as
part of their campaign.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
See CHURCH, Page 10A
HANOVER TWP. – About 20 “dog-
testants” pranced and preened in
front of a panel of judges and their
adoring owners at Saturday’s fourth
annual “Hawkeye-minster Dog Show”
at the Hanover Area Junior-Senior
High School.
The show provides local dog own-
ers the opportunity to show off their
four legged pride-and-joys while also
adding more than $200 to the
school’s Leo Club, according to orga-
nizers.
The first dog show was inspired by
a Leo Club member who saw it as a
way to “give back” to the community,
said organizer Rich Gavlick, a teacher
at Hanover Area. Since then it has
been increasingly successful, growing
in popularity with this years’ roster of
contestants being the largest.
Awards were given for the dog
with the most personality, coolest
bark, best tricks, coolest walk, cool-
est fur, toughest look, boldest atti-
tude and for the overall “best in
show,” Gavlick said. The money
raised is used to support the Leo
Club, which Gavlick described as a
community minded and service-
group.
Club member Dave Gagliardi, 18,
said the Leo group is a part of the
local Lions Club International. Mem-
bers visit local nursing homes during
the holidays and choose a student of
the month announced at each board
of education meeting, among other
activities, he said. The dog show is
the biggest and most popular of the
group’s fundraisers.
Hanover Area Junior-Senior High School hosts dog show
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Lt. Joe Petrovich of the Luzerne County Correctional Facility wears a bite suit as he is ‘apprehended’ by Brutus
during a demonstration at a dog show Saturday morning at Hanover Area Junior-Senior High School.
Doggone good time
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
Tory Matric, 8, holds his dog Tinker-
bell, a mixed breed, as they wait for
the judging.
See DOG SHOW, Page 10A
‘The dog show gets the kids
involved.’’
Tony Gagliardi
Leo Club board member
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 5A
REYKJAVIK, ICELAND
Active volcano is erupting
S
cientists say Iceland’s most active
volcano, Grimsvotn, has started
erupting.
Iceland’s Meteorological Office con-
firmed Saturday that an eruption had
begun, and local media said smoke
could be seen coming from the volca-
no.
Grimsvotn lies under the uninhabit-
ed Vatnajokull glacier in southeast
Iceland.
It last erupted in 2004. Scientists
have been expecting a new eruption
and have said previously that this vol-
cano’s eruption will likely be small and
should not lead to the air travel chaos
caused in April 2010 by ash from the
Eyjafjallajokul volcano.
CLEVELAND, OHIO
Woman accuses suspect
Another woman has joined several
who say they were attacked by a man
suspected in the deaths of 11 women
whose remains were found near his
Cleveland home.
The 46-year-old South Carolina wom-
an, a Cleveland native, told East Cleve-
land police this week that she was
choked and raped by a man named
“Tone” in 1988, the Plain Dealer news-
paper reported Saturday. She said she
begged for her life and then fled to a
friend’s house, wearing only socks and
shoes.
She said she believes the man was
Anthony Sowell, whose trial on murder
and other charges is slated to start next
month. Sowell has pleaded not guilty.
YAMOUSSOUKRO, IVORY COAST
Inauguration finally held
President Alassane Ouattara was
inaugurated Saturday as Ivory Coast’s
president in the stately ceremony he
should have enjoyed six months ago,
but was prevented from holding by the
entrenched ruler who refused to accept
his election defeat and nearly dragged
the nation into civil war in a bid to stay
in power.
In an effort to stop Ouattara from
assuming office, outgoing president
Laurent Gbagbo deployed the army to
block the roads leading to the hotel
which had served as Ouattara’s cam-
paign headquarters in the weeks before
last year’s election.
Imprisoned inside, Ouattara was
forced to take the oath of office in the
hotel lobby at a ceremony attended
only by his closest aides.
TRIPOLI, LIBYA
NATO widens regime attack
NATO widened its campaign to
weaken Moammar Gadhafi’s regime
with airstrikes on desert command
centers and sea patrols to intercept
ships, the military alliance said Sat-
urday, amid signs of growing public
anger over fuel shortages in govern-
ment-held territory.
In the coastal town of Zawiya,
crowds apparently outraged by dwin-
dling fuel supplies tried to stab report-
ers in a minibus on a state-supervised
trip to the Tunisian border.
The journalists — a Chinese news
correspondent and two Britons: a BBC
technician and a Reuters video pro-
ducer — were not harmed in the at-
tack, the first of its kind targeting for-
eign reporters covering the Libyan
conflict.
The assailants also attacked the
government official accompanying the
reporters — once unimaginable in
Libya and a sign of the growing frustra-
tions of residents struggling to cope
with rising food prices and gasoline
shortages.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Guests are the ‘Life’ of the party
Guests in fancy costumes arrive for
the opening ceremony of the 19th Life
Ball in front of Vienna’s city hall, Aus-
tria, on Saturday. The Life Ball is a
charity gala to raise money for people
living with HIV and AIDS.
RAMALLAH, West Bank — Palesti-
nian officials said Saturday that Israel’s
dismissive response to President Ba-
rack Obama’s new Mideast peace pro-
posal proves there’s not enough com-
mon ground for meaningful negotia-
tions.
Despite such skepticism, Palestinian
President Mahmoud Abbas seemed in
no hurry to announce his next move. He
instructed his advisers to avoid public
comment, presumablytokeepattention
focusedonIsraeli PrimeMinister Benja-
min Netanyahu who appears to be set
on a collision course with Obama.
The U.S. president saidthis weekthat
Israeli-Palestinian border talks should
be based on Israel’s pre-1967 war lines,
with mutually agreed land swaps,
adopting a formula long sought by the
Palestinians, but rejected by Netanya-
hu.
In finally presenting his own vision of
the rough outlines of a peace deal, Oba-
masteppeddeeper intotheMideast fray
after more than two years on the side-
lines. However, hedidnot present aplan
of action with his ideas, and the re-
sponses from both sides indicated that
chances for renewing talks, largely on
hold since 2008, are increasingly re-
mote.
Obama and Netanyahu are to address
the pro-Israel lobbying group AIPACon
Sunday and Monday, respectively. The
Israeli leader also plans to address Con-
gress on Tuesday. A White House
spokesman has said Obama will speak
of the strong bond between Israel and
the U.S., but not deliver a policy speech.
The strain in the relationship became
apparent on Friday, after a two-hour
White House meeting between Obama
and Netanyahu. In front of TV cameras,
Netanyahu at times seemed to lecture
Obama, and suggested the president’s
ideas are unrealistic, saying that “peace
based on illusions” will quickly fail.
Among Abbas’ senior aides, mean-
while, there seemed to be some dis-
agreement over tactics.
Chief negotiator Saeb Erekat said it’s
best for the Palestinians to keep quiet
and let Netanyahu do the talking.
“We accept two states based on the
1967 lines, with agreed swaps ... and we
want Mr. Netanyahu to say this sen-
tence,” Erekat said.
Palestinians skeptical about talks
Officials believe Israel’s response to
Obama’s proposal proves there’s no
common ground for negotiations.
AP PHOTO
An Ultra-Orthodox
Jewish boy runs
next to bonfires in
Bnei Brak, Israel,
Saturday during Lag
Ba’Omer celebra-
tions to commemo-
rate the end of a
plague said to have
decimated Jews in
Roman times.
By KARIN LAUB
Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan — A Ta-
liban suicide bomber targeting
NATO medical trainers infiltrat-
ed Kabul’s main military hospi-
tal onSaturday andblewhimself
up in a tent full of Afghan med-
ical students eating lunch, kill-
ing six and wounding 23.
No foreign medical doctors or
nurses were among the dead or
wounded, Afghan and NATO of-
ficials said.
The blast, which thundered
across the capital, came as the
Taliban have stepped up attacks
as part of a spring offensive
against NATO, Afghan govern-
ment installations and officials.
Insurgents also have promised
revenge attacks after the U.S.
killing of Osama bin Laden.
Taliban spokesman Zabiullah
Mujahid claimed responsibility
for the attack, saying it was tar-
geting foreign trainers and Af-
ghan doctors who work with
them. He claimed two bombers
took part, but Defense Ministry
spokesman Gen. Mohammed
Zaher Azimi spokesman said on-
ly one attacker was involved and
only one blast was heard at the
Mohammad Daud Khan mili-
tary hospital.
The hospital is the largest in
Kabul with 400 beds, and its
grounds contain numerous
buildings and small parks. Af-
ghan army and police stepped
up patrols throughout the capi-
tal for fear of more attacks.
Bomber
kills 6 at
hospital
The blast came as the Taliban
have stepped up attacks as
part of a spring offensive.
By RAHIMFAIEZ
Associated Press
BUTTE LAROSE, La. — The final
wave of holdouts has mostly packed up
and left this town as water fromthe swol-
lenAtchafalaya River inchedtowardtheir
homes, their frustration and hope paint-
ed on signs outside their now-abandoned
homes.
“Nothingleft worthstealing,” readone.
“Stay strong. Believe,” urged another.
“Our hearts are broken, but our spirits are
not. We will come HOME,” are the words
Kip and Gwen Bacquet spray-painted on
theplastic liner that covers theentirefirst
floor of their house.
Most hadleft Butte LaRose days earlier
amidhightensionas the water continued
its dayslongtrektowardthe area. St. Mar-
tin Parish had ordered a mandatory evac-
uation to take effect Saturday, but then
pushed it back at least two days after offi-
cials said the river would crest May 27 at
a lower level than previously thought.
The delayed evacuation is likely to be a
source of both optimismand further frus-
tration for folks who have heard the same
grim forecast for days on end. Once the
water comes, residents maynot beableto
return for weeks. They’ll have to wait un-
til Monday for officials to decide whether
to reinstate the evacuation order.
“It’s probably a blessing for some be-
cause maybe some people who didn’t
have time to do additional sandbagging
will now have more time,” said Maj. Gin-
ny Higgins, a spokeswoman for the St.
Martin’s Parish sheriff’s office.
Kip and Gwen Bacquet moved their
furniture and other belongings to the sec-
ond floor of their home, 9 feet off the
ground. They are bracing for up to five
feet of water to inundate their neighbor-
hood. GwenBacquet, 54, saidthe canal in
their backyard has been rising about 4
inches per day. Their pier already was un-
derwater.
An agonizing wait in Louisiana
The last evacuees have left their
homes as water creeps up from the
Atchafalaya River.
By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. —
Pope Benedict XVI had a direct
line to the heavens Saturday,
with NASA’s help.
Speaking from the Vatican,
the pontiff bestowed a historic
blessing upon the 12 astro-
nauts circling Earth during the
first-ever papal call to space,
wishing a swift recovery for the
shuttle commander’s wounded
congresswoman wife and con-
dolences for a station astro-
naut mourning his mother’s
death.
The “extraordinary” conver-
sation, as Benedict described
it, occurred after the Endeav-
our astronauts inspected a
small gash in the shuttle’s bel-
ly, to ensure their safe return to
Earth after departing the Inter-
national Space Station in just
over a week. It is the next-to-
last flight in NASA’s 30-year
shuttle program.
Seated at a table before a tel-
evision set tuned to NASA’s
live broadcast from orbit, Ben-
edict told the space travelers
that “you are our representa-
tives spearheading humanity’s
exploration of new spaces and
possibilities for our future.” He
said he admired their courage,
discipline and commitment.
“It must be obvious to you
howwe all live together on one
Earth and how absurd it is that
we fight and kill each one,” the
pontiff said, reading from pre-
pared remarks. “I know that
Mark Kelly’s wife was a victim
of a serious attack, and I hope
her health continues to im-
prove.”
Benedict blesses Endeavour astronauts in papal call
AP PHOTO
In this photo released by Vatican newspaper L’Osservatore
Romano Pope Benedict XVI talks with astronauts Saturday.
By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
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THREE BEAUTIES CATCH RIDE IN A T-BIRD
AP PHOTO
A
trio of local area rodeo queens ride in the backseat of a 1955 Ford Thunderbird during the Parade America
on Saturday in Nampa, Idaho.
C M Y K
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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MEMORIAL
Day
WILKES-BARRE TWP. –
Wilkes University graduate An-
thony Dorunda is concerned
about the current job market,
but he put his worries on hold
for a few hours on Saturday.
He wanted to enjoy his com-
mencement with his fellow stu-
dents.
Dorunda, a communications
major from New Milford, gave
the student address at Wilkes
University’s 64th Annual Spring
Commencement at the Mohe-
gan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza.
“Finding a job is always a top-
ic of conversation for college se-
niors,” Dorunda said before the
ceremony. “Now that we’re grad-
uating, it becomes a more im-
mediate concern.”
As he approached the podium
for his address, he joked he
would keep his comments short
because, “I know the world’s
supposed to end in a few hours,
and we’ve all got better things to
do.”
He was referring to an Oak-
land, Calif., preacher’s predic-
tion that Saturday was Judg-
ment Day for Earth.
Dorunda told the audience,
“Many people say that college is
the best part of our lives, but I
believe that college prepares us
for the best part of our lives."
A total of 832 undergraduate
and graduate degrees where
awarded at Saturday’s ceremony
along with a number of special
honors for academic and civic
achievement. The Wandell
Award for academic achieve-
ment was presented to Konstan-
tina Papathomas, Endicott, N.Y.,
and Matthew Kogy of Larksville
for earning perfect 4.0 grade-
point averages while at Wilkes.
Papathomas plans to attend
medical school at the State Uni-
versity of New York this fall,
while Kogy will be traveling to
Japan to teach English.
Juvenile defense advocate at-
torney Robert Listenbee was
presented with an honorary
Doctorate of Laws degree for his
efforts to improve Pennsylva-
nia’s juvenile justice system.
As a member of the Inter-
branch Commission on Juvenile
Justice, Listenbee played an in-
tegral role in Luzerne County’s
recent “Kids for Cash” scandal,
which led to the conviction of
former Judge Mark Ciavarella.
Listenbee reminded the grad-
uates of their responsibility to
the disenfranchised of society
and their role in building Amer-
ica’s future.
“Children need to have some-
one to believe in them,” Listen-
bee said. “Someone to not give
up on them. In America, we
have Democracy. Freedom to
choose what you want to do.
People throughout the world are
willing to risk their lives to
come here and enjoy some of
the same opportunities you have
as Americans.”
In his closing remarks, Listen-
bee reminded the students the
key to success comes in finding
their “Growth Module.”
“It’s a place in your mind
where you can go to nurture
your dreams.”
Wilkes graduates prepare to head out into job market
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes University graduate Christopher Jordan, center, waves to
friends during procession at Mohegan Sun Arena.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
A list of Wilkes University gradu-
ates from Luzerne County follows.
Doctor of Education
Kerry Speziale, Dallas, Doctor of
Education, Educational Adminis-
tration
Doctor of Pharmacy
John Chakan, Wilkes-Barre, Doctor
of Pharmacy, Pharmacy; Kevin
Coughlin, Nanticoke, Doctor of Phar-
macy, Pharmacy; Gaetano Fasciana,
Exeter, Doctor of Pharmacy, Pharma-
cy; Michael Gionfriddo, Shavertown,
Doctor of Pharmacy, Pharmacy;
Sherri Homanko, Hazle Township,
Doctor of Pharmacy, Pharmacy;
Kristina Loscombe, Plains, Doctor of
Pharmacy, Pharmacy, Kelly Monoski,
Wilkes-Barre, Doctor of Pharmacy,
Pharmacy; Courtenay Pientka, Nanti-
coke, Doctor of Pharmacy, Pharmacy;
Richard Powers, Wilkes-Barre, Doctor
of Pharmacy, Pharmacy; Michael
Prokopick, Hazle Township, Doctor of
Pharmacy, Pharmacy; Sarah Witkow-
ski, Glen Lyon, Doctor of Pharmacy,
Pharmacy; Lauren Zubey, Kingston,
Doctor of Pharmacy, Pharmacy
Master of Arts
Rachel Goetzke, Kingston, Master
of Arts, Creative Writing
Master of Business Adminis-
tration
Alexis Baez, Kingston, Master of
Business Administration; Arpana
Bawa, Wilkes-Barre, Master of Busi-
ness Administration; Naveenrit
Bhatti, Wilkes-Barre, Master of Busi-
ness Administration; Richard Cloeter,
Kingston, Master of Business Admin-
istration; Jason Decker, Kingston,
Master of Business Administration;
Tara DeGiusto, Plains, Master of
Business Administration; Martha
Fimowicz, Dallas, Master of Business
Administration; Jennifer Fitzmaurice,
Ashley, Master of Business Adminis-
tration; Vineet Goyal, Wilkes-Barre,
Master of Business Administration;
Jenna Gupko, Kingston, Master of
Business Administration; Karen
Kuklewicz, Sugar Notch, Master of
Business Administration; Quentin
Logan, Wilkes-Barre, Master of Busi-
ness Administration; Brandon Mag-
zanian, Kingston, Master of Business
Administration; Tonisha Morris,
Wilkes-Barre, Master of Business
Administration; Manpreet Pannu,
Kingston, Master of Business Admin-
istration; Michael Pryor, Wilkes-Barre,
Master of Business Administration;
Manveer Randhawa, Wilkes-Barre,
Master of Business Administration;
Thomas Shemansky, Hazleton, Mas-
ter of Business Administration; David
Straub, Wilkes-Barre Township, Mas-
ter of Business Administration; Le
Tran, Wilkes-Barre, Master of Busi-
ness Administration; David Valenti,
West Pittston, Master of Business
Administration
Master of Fine Arts
Benjamin Forsberg, Nescopeck,
Master of Fine Arts, Creative Writing;
Shawn Hatten, Ashley, Master of Fine
Arts, Creative Writing; Anne Henry,
Mountain Top, Master of Fine Arts,
Creative Writing; Joseph Nalbone,
Wilkes-Barre, Master of Fine Arts,
Creative Writing
Master of Science
Abdullah Almodian, Kingston,
Master of Science, Engineering
Management; Linda Benesky, King-
ston, Master of Science, Nursing;
Gretchen Black, Huntington Mills,
Master of Science, Education; Nicole
Bryk, Avoca, Master of Science,
Education; Daniel Casey, Pittston,
Master of Science, Education; Michele
P. Cassic, Hazle Township, Master of
Science, Nursing; Gina Considine,
Hanover Township, Master of Sci-
ence, Education; Neil Dadurka, Pitt-
ston, Master of Science, Education;
Lili Dibai, Kingston, Master of Sci-
ence, Education; Rachael Dunn,
Dallas, Master of Science, Education;
Ashley Fiume, Hazleton, Master of
Science, Education; Diane Gabrielle,
Freeland, Master of Science, Educa-
tion; Brian Gerrity, Plains, Master of
Science, Education; Tracey Ghannam,
Pittston, Master of Science, Educa-
tion; Judith Greenwald, Pittston,
Master of Science , Education; Ayman
Hamoh, Wilkes-Barre, Master of
Science, Engineering Management;
James Hughes, Mountain Top, Master
of Science, Education; Amber Jacobs,
Wilkes-Barre, Master of Science,
Education; William Kane, Wilkes-
Barre, Master of Science, Education;
Tracy Kaster, Mountain Top, Master of
Science, Education; James Keaney,
West Pittston, Master of Science,
Education; Jaclyn Krogulski, Dallas,
Master of Science, Education; John
Lawzano, Nanticoke, Master of Sci-
ence, Engineering Management;
Amber Lazo, Mountain Top, Master of
Science, Education; Leslie Lightner,
Dayton, Master of Science, Education;
Abby Loefflad, Mountain Top, Master
of Science, Education; Sushanth Mali,
Wilkes-Barre, Master of Science,
Electrical Engineering; Amanda
Marko, Plains, Master of Science,
Education; Kaitlyn Martin, Forty-Fort,
Master of Science, Education; Sarah
McNew, Wilkes-Barre, Master of
Science, Education; Kimberly Metzg-
er, Plains, Master of Science, Educa-
tion; Jeneive Michalek, Kingston,
Master of Science, Education; Erik
O’Day, Wilkes-Barre, Master of Sci-
ence, Education; Desiree Podrasky,
Wilkes-Barre, Master of Science,
Education; Sarah Polacheck, King-
ston, Master of Science, Education;
Jessica Raczkowski, Ashley , Master
of Science, Education; Rebecca
Rebovich, Pittston Township, Master
of Science, Education; Marianne
Rupchis, Mountain Top, Master of
Science, Nursing; Juexi Song, Wilkes-
Barre, Master of Science, Education;
Andrew Sorber, Hunlock Creek,
Master of Science, Education; Ruth-
ann Taylor, Dallas, Master of Science,
Nursing; Rajesh Velichala, Wilkes-
Barre, Master of Science, Electrical
Engineering; Jessica Vernon, Hazle-
ton, Master of Science; Education;
John Warnek, Avoca, Master of
Science, Education; Victoria Witner,
Nescopek, Master of Science, Educa-
tion; Lisa Wright, Nanticoke, Master
of Science, Education; Christine
Yatsko, Drums, Master of Science,
Nursing; Allison Zielinski, Dupont,
Master of Science, Education
Bachelor of Arts
Shevaun Ambrose, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Arts, Criminology; Da-
nielle Banas, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor
of Arts, Theatre Arts; Alexandria
Briggs, Larksville, Bachelor of Arts,
Elementary Education; Tauheedah
Catty, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Arts
Sociology; Matthew Duffy, Shaver-
town, Bachelor of Arts, History;
Anthony Ferrese, Pittston, Bachelor
of Arts, History; Alyssa Fusaro,
Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Arts, Com-
munications; Carl Glowacki, Mountain
Top, Bachelor of Arts, Political Sci-
ence; Michael Guba, Nuremberg,
Bachelor of Arts, History; Britney
Hazleton, Dallas, Bachelor of Arts,
Communications; Alison Heck, Ed-
wardsville, Bachelor of Arts, Psychol-
ogy; Lindsay Herron, Dallas, Bachelor
of Arts, Biology; Kevin Hettrich,
Kingston, Bachelor of Arts, Theatre
Arts; Melissa Hoover, Duryea, Bache-
lor of Arts, Communications; Daniel
Hunter, Dallas, Bachelor of Arts,
Political Science; Anne Janecek,
Mountain Top, Bachelor of Arts,
Integrative Media; Kirk Jones, Du-
ryea, Bachelor of Arts, Elementary
Education; Jeremy Kalinay, Nanti-
coke, Bachelor of Arts, Psychology;
Aliso Kasper, Shavertown , Bachelor
of Arts, Psychology; Sara Kaspriskie,
Exeter, Bachelor of Arts, Psychology;
Amanda Kaster, Mountain Top, Bach-
elor of Arts, History; Bonnie Kerin,
Laurel Run, Bachelor of Arts, Psy-
chology; Matthew Kogoy, Larksville,
Bachelor of Arts, English; Jeremy
LaPorte, West Pittston, Bachelor of
Arts, Political Science; Michael Lea-
hey, Larksville, Bachelor of Arts,
History; Rachel Leggieri, Larksville,
Bachelor of Arts, Communications;
Jack Lewis, Pittston, Bachelor of
Arts, History; Jacqueline Lukas,
Courtdale, Bachelor of Arts, Commu-
nications; David Mahalak, Wilkes-
Barre, Bachelor of Arts, Mathematics;
Herbert Nahas, Kingston, Bachelor of
Arts, History; Emily Parks, Hanover
Township, Bachelor of Arts, Ele-
mentary Education; Kristen Pechulis,
Plymouth, Bachelor of Arts, English;
Marquita Peck, Wilkes-Barre , Bache-
lor of Arts, Theatre Arts; Michael
Prokopick, Hazle Township, Bachelor
of Arts, Spanish; Whitney Roper,
Edwardsville, Bachelor of Arts, Com-
munications; Matthew Rutkoski,
Larksville, Bachelor of Arts, Spanish;
William Schweitzer, West Hazleton,
Bachelor of Arts , Psychology; Sarah
Simon, Kingston, Bachelor of Arts,
Elementary Education; Maggie Sor-
ber, Dallas, Bachelor of Arts, Psychol-
ogy; Cathy Styles, Wilkes-Barre,
Bachelor of Arts, Psychology; Mat-
thew Watkins, Courtdale, Bachelor of
Arts, Psychology; Kathryn Welsh,
Mountain Top, Bachelor of Arts,
Psychology; Kaitlin Wolcott, Duryea,
Bachelor of Arts, Elementary Educa-
tion; Sara Wolman, Shavertown,
Bachelor of Arts, Political Science;
David Yezefski, Nanticoke, Bachelor
of Arts, Theatre Arts; Jenna Zapo-
toski, Hanover Township, Bachelor of
Arts, Psychology
Bachelor of Business Adminis-
tration
Ali Salem, Alsagoor, Kingston,
Bachelor of Business Administration;
Majed Alsalhi, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor
of Business Administration; Abdullah
Alshaikh, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of
Business Administration; Brice Biruta,
Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Business
Administration; LaChanda Davis,
Ashley, Bachelor of Business Admin-
istration; Adam Fraley, Swoyersville,
Bachelor of Business Administration;
Andrew Hiller, Hunlock Creek, Bache-
lor of Business Administration; Gael
Kanyabugoyi, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor
of Business Administration; Amanda
Kemmerer, Mountain Top, Bachelor of
Business Administration; Edward
Pearson, Hughestown, Bachelor of
Business Administration; Joshua
Pstrak, Hanover Township, Bachelor
of Business Administration; Eric
Wagner, Plains, Bachelor of Business
Administration; Abdullah Yousef,
Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Business
Administration
Bachelor of Science
Ibrahim Almardumah, Wilkes-
Barre, Bachelor of Science, Mechani-
cal Engineering; Ali Alwuqayyan,
Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Science,
Electrical Engineering; Cassandra
Baloga, Dallas, Bachelor of Science,
Electrical Engineering; John Borzell,
West Pittston, Bachelor of Science,
Earth & Environmental Sciences;
Carmen Bower, Kingston, Bachelor of
Science, Nursing; Alexander Caicedo,
Pittston, Bachelor of Science, Me-
chanical Engineering; Timothy Car-
roll, Pittston, Bachelor of Science,
Accounting; Paul Chmiel, Old Forge,
Bachelor of Science, Accounting;
Ramatoulie Conteh, Wilkes-Barre,
Bachelor of Science, Accounting;
Brianna Cyprich, Wyoming, Bachelor
of Science, Biology; Russell Dehaut,
Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Science,
Electrical Engineering; James Deom,
Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Science;
Deanna Drako, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor
of Science, Environmental Engineer-
ing; Santino Gabos, Beaver Meadows,
Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engi-
neering; Paul Graham, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Science, Computer Sci-
ence; Jo Hardik, Wilkes-Barre, Bache-
lor of Science, Nursing; Jason Hom-
za, Kingston, Bachelor of Science,
Earth & Environmental Sciences;
Khalid Ismail, Edwardsville, Bachelor
of Science, Electrical Engineering;
Kevin Jacobs, Nanticoke, Bachelor of
Science, Environmental Engineering;
Hannah Laimer, Laflin, Bachelor of
Science, Biology; Justin Orlandini,
Dallas, Bachelor of Science; Michael
Pauley, Shickshinny, Bachelor of
Science, Chemistry; Joshua Perry,
Dallas, Bachelor of Science, Nursing;
Renee Poesnecker, Drums, Bachelor
of Science, Biology; Tylor Ricker,
Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of Science,
Biology; Amanda Rodney, Hunlock
Creek, Bachelor of Science, Nursing;
David Rossi, Conyngham, Bachelor of
Science, Electrical Engineering; Wei
Shang, Wilkes-Barre, Bachelor of
Science, Pharmaceutical Science;
Jessica Shuliga, Hazleton, Bachelor
of Science, Accounting; Lori Skurkis,
Pringle, Bachelor of Science, Nursing;
Frank Sokola, Hanover Township,
Bachelor of Science, Biology; Ryan
Williams, Forty Fort, Bachelor of
Science, Nursing
WILKES GRADUATES
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
DALLAS TWP. – The 85th
commencement ceremony at Mi-
sericordia University Saturday
marked a special milestone for
the 630 members of the class of
2011. Not only is it the largest
graduating class in the college’s
87-year history, but the class of
2011was the first to start as fresh-
men when College Misericordia
became Misericordia University
in August 2007.
“Commencement is so named
to connote that you are com-
mencing into another phase of
your life,” said President Michael
A. MacDowell as he addressed
the class. “And while that is true,
much of what you have experi-
enced and learned at Misericor-
diawill remainwithyoufor along
time.”
MacDowell bestowed honor-
aryDoctor of Humane Letters de-
grees to Charles “Rusty” Flack,
Jr.; Father Thomas O’Hara and
guest speaker NicholasDeBened-
ictis. Flack is the chairman and
CEO of Diamond Consolidated
Industries, an entrepreneur, civic
leader and philanthropist. Be-
cause of medical reasons, Flack
was not present at the ceremony,
and his brother, Harold, who is
the president of Diamond, ac-
cepted the degree for him.
Father O’Hara will end his 12-
year term as president of King’s
College in July.
“Under Father O’Hara’s leader-
ship, King’s College and its host
city of Wilkes-Barre have experi-
enced great progress,” said Mac-
Dowell.
Margaret Neff Burke, class of
1974, was awarded the Mother
CatherineMcAuleyMedal for her
service and commitment to the
college and community.
Burke is the founder and coor-
dinator of The Greater Pittston
Food Pantry; a board member
and nutritionist for the Care &
Concern Free Health Clinic; the
founder of TheKnittingMinistry;
a member of the Healing Hearts
Bereavement Support Team and
is aboardmember for theGreater
Pittston Meals on Wheels and a
weekly meal delivery volunteer.
DeBenedictis is the chairman,
CEO and president of Aqua
America and a former head of the
Pennsylvania Department of En-
vironmental Resources, now the
Department of Environmental
Protection. He has received nu-
merous awards for his public ser-
vice and civic leadership. DeBe-
nedictis’ career began at the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agen-
cy during its infancy in the early
1970’s and at a height of uncer-
tainty about the world environ-
ment.
“A few hours into my new ca-
reer, I got myfirst official environ-
mental assignment asanEPAoffi-
cer: to investigate chemical
dumping at a bore hole along
Route 81 near Pittston, Pennsyl-
vania,” he said. “Since then, I’ve
made a career out of fixing or fill-
ing holes. I’ve fixed holes in envi-
ronmental policy, holes in eco-
nomic plans, holes in safety mea-
sures and for the last decade at
Aqua America, we’ve been busy
fixing holes in water pipes be-
neath the ground.”
DeBenedictis told the class to
be good stewards of the environ-
ment as he recalled the history of
Northeastern Pennsylvania fuel-
ing the nation with timber to oil
to coal, and now natural gas.
“When it comes to the environ-
ment, you don’t get many second
chances,” he said. “Marcellus
Shale is Pennsylvania’s rare sec-
ond chance.
“The first energy boom here
was minedwithdirty, brutelabor.
This next stage is being done
with smart labor,” DeBenedicitis
said. “Inthepast twoyears, there-
gion has literally become a mag-
net for some of the world’s most
innovative thinkers, researchers,
analysts, inventors, activists,
economists and environmental-
ists.”
He toldthe class that their ‘per-
sonal energy’ is their most pre-
cious natural resource. “It’s sit-
ting right here in front of me in
caps and gowns,” he said. “It’s in
the hearts, minds, hands, wills
andsouls of eachandeveryoneof
you.”
Day for milestones, memories at Misericordia
Class, starting as freshmen
under university status,
largest in 87-year history.
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
INSIDE: For a list of graduates, see
Page 9A.
sericordia. “They taught me ev-
ery aspect of production and how
to interact with people on a pro-
fessional level.”
Beth shares a townhouse in a
Baltimore suburb with Kate, 26,
whois a third-grade teacher. Kate
got her teaching job just three
months after graduating in 2007.
She credits the triple certifica-
tion in elementary/secondary
education, special education and
early childhood development she
received at Misericordia for help-
ing her land a job so quickly.
The girl’s maternal grand-
mother, Ann Mitchell McGarry,
started the family tradition 57
years ago when she graduated
from the university in 1954. She
earned a degree in elementary
education and taught in the Pitt-
ston Area School District until
she died fromcancer at the age of
34. Her lovefor theschool is what
inspired Kate to enroll in the
campus in 2003. Ann’s name is
memorialized on a bench dedi-
cated by her classmates located
on campus between McHale and
Gildea halls.
“I really enjoyed the fact that
both of my sisters went to Miser-
cordia,” said Marianne. As a
member of the campus ministry
and Habitat for Humanity, Mar-
ianne has traveled to South
America, Georgia and Texas.
She’ll head for Guyana next week
to work inanorphanage, hospital
or soup kitchen. When she re-
turns home, Marianne said she
plans to focus on beginning a ca-
reer in nursing.
Bridget, a senior at Holy Re-
deemer High School, said she
didn’t plan on going to Misericor-
dia at first, but after touringother
schools, she realized that the uni-
versity was right for her.
“I like to keep it kinda chill,”
she said, adding that she likes the
quiet, country feel of the school.
“I feel that it’s a calm school, and
you can be yourself in it. The
whole essence of the school real-
ly pulls you in.”
Beth, 24, a production assist-
ant at Hackstone Productions in
Baltimore, said she wouldn’t
have gotten her job if it wasn’t for
the education she received at Mi-
DALLAS TWP. – When Mar-
ianne Guarnieri accepted her di-
ploma as she graduated from Mi-
sericordia University Saturday,
her parents must have felt a sense
of déjà vu. That’s because Mar-
ianne, 22, is the third daughter of
her immediate family in five
years to graduate from the
school.
Marianne, who graduatedwith
a degree in professional studies,
joins her two older sisters Beth
(Elizabeth) and Kate (Cathe-
rine) as Misercordia alumni.
Beth graduated with a degree in
communications in 2007 and
Kate graduated with a degree in
elementary and secondary edu-
cation in 2009.
The fourth sister, Bridget, 18,
will soon follow in the Guarnieri
tradition when she begins her
studies on the campus in the fall
and becomes a member of the
class of 2015. The four are among
the seven children of Dr. Louis
Guarnieri, D.C., and Marie
McGarry Guarnieri of Pittston.
Misericordia degree is a family tradition for the Guarnieris
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
The Guarnieri sisters sit on a bench donated by the Class of 1954, of which their grandmother Ann
Mitchell McGarry was a member. From left are Beth, Bridget, Marianne and Kate.
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 9A
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Local May 2011 graduates of
Misericordia University:
Erica Acosta, Wilkes-Barre, Orga-
nizational Management, MS; Lau-
ren Adamchak, Wyoming, Nursing,
BSN; Danielle Ader, Nanticoke,
Marketing, BS; Angela Anderson,
Shavertown, Nursing, BSN; Alysia
Ardo, Pittston, English, BA; Autumn
Aton, Mountain Top, Business
Administration, BS; Tracy August,
Wilkes-Barre, Business Adminis-
tration, MBA; Stan Balloun, Nuan-
gola, Business Administration,
MBA; Jean Bantell, Hughestown,
Nursing, RN, BSN; Megan Bargella,
Nanticoke, Nursing, BSN; Elizabeth
Barry, Dallas, Accounting, BS;
Danielle Bartz, Pittston, Elemen-
tary Education, BS; Erika Bigler,
Plains, Nursing, BSN; Amanda
Blank, Nanticoke, Medical Imaging,
BS; Michelle Boltz, Plains, Business
Administration, BS; Brittany Boris,
W. Hazleton, Business Adminis-
tration, BS; Brandi Brace, Hunlock
Creek, English, BA.
Therese Brdaric, Shavertown,
Nursing, RN, BSN; Susan Brdaric,
Shavertown, Nursing, BSN; Kari
Breazeale, Dallas, Communications,
BA; Michelle Bridge, White Haven,
Nursing, RN, BSN; Lauren Brigham,
West Wyoming, Business Adminis-
tration, MBA; John Brodhead,
Hanover Twp., Organizational
Management, MS; Eric Brojakowski,
Hunlock Creek, Professional Stud-
ies, BS; Jacqueline Brown, Nanti-
coke, Business Administration,
MBA; Matthew Brown, White
Haven, Biology, BS; Matthew Buck-
man, Dallas, Computer Science, BS;
Tricia Bump, Pittston, Business
Administration, BS; Leilani Cabrera,
Wilkes-Barre, Elementary Educa-
tion, BS; Lisa Capizzi, West Pitt-
ston, Education, MS; Michaelina
Capizzi, West Pittston, Physical
Therapy, DPT; Anthony Capristo,
Bear Creek Twp., Business Adminis-
tration, MBA; Ralph Capristo, Bear
Creek Twp.
Business Administration, MBA;
Patrick Cawley, Pittston, Business
Administration, MBA; Karen Cefalo,
Wyoming, Organizational Manage-
ment, MS; Karen Ceppa, Shickshin-
ny, Business Administration, MBA;
Tracey Chopick, Kingston, Business
Administration, MBA; Catherine
Cilvik, Dallas, Social Work, BSW;
Sharon Clark, Sweet Valley, Ele-
mentary Education, BS; Joseph
Clarke, Wilkes-Barre, Professional
Studies, BS; Kaitlyn Clarke,
Swoyersville, Speech-Language
Pathology, BMS; Julie Clifford,
Kingston, Accounting, BS; Court-
ney Coletti, Shavertown, Education,
MS; Leah Conant, Exeter, Physical
Therapy, DPT; Allison Connell, Forty
Fort, Elementary Education, BS;
Sharon Conway, Plains, Elementary
Education, BS; Annette Crilley,
Mountain Top, Management, BS;
Samantha Culver, Dallas, Psycholo-
gy, BS; Megan Delaney, Wilkes-
Barre, Business Administration,
MBA; Jennifer DeMaris, Shickshin-
ny, Nursing, RN, BSN.
Trisha Deyo, Mocanaqua, Nurs-
ing, BSN; Allison Difebo, Hanover
Twp., Occupational Therapy, MS;
Michael Dirsa, Shavertown, Sport
Management, BS; Vitaliy Doboni,
Plains, Accounting, BS; Steven
Dommes, Duryea, Accounting, BS;
Joseph Donahue, Pittston Twp.,
Business Administration, MBA;
Stevie Dorbad, Exeter, Physical
Therapy, BMS; Neil Dorman, Larks-
ville, Physical Therapy, DPT; El-
izabeth Dudascik, Dallas, Speech-
Language Pathology, BMS; Chris-
topher Dunbar, Forty Fort, Occupa-
tional Therapy, OTD; Patricia Du-
pak, Mountain Top, Nursing, RN,
BSN; Candice Dutko, Bear Creek
Twp., Organizational Management,
MS; Shannon Elqorchi, Harveys
Lake, Physical Therapy, BMS; Julia
Evans, West Pittston, Business
Administration, BS; William Evans,
Shavertown, Chemistry, BS; Angela
Evans, Noxen, Nursing, MSN;
Amanda Everitt, Freeland, Social
Work, BSW; Bruce Fahey, Exeter,
Business Administration, BS; Pawel
Filip, Edwardsville, English, BA;
Suzanne Frace, Nanticoke, Profes-
sional Studies, BS; Wendy Franklin,
Hanover, Nursing, BSN; Kristen
Gazowski, Larksville, Communi-
cations, BA.
John Giampietro, Dallas, Phys-
ical Therapy, DPT; Sarah Gill,
Wilkes-Barre, Philosophy, BA.;
Karen Goldsmith-Simms, Plains,
Nursing, BSN; Anthony Goncalves,
Dallas, Sport Management, BS;
Amy Groner, Dallas, Social Work,
BSW; Elwood Groner III, Dallas,
Social Work, BSW; Lois Gross,
Trucksville, Professional Studies,
BS; Anthony Grzyboski, Hunlock
Creek, Communications, BA; Mar-
ianne Guarnieri, Pittston, Profes-
sional Studies, BS; Kelly Guido,
Kingston, Speech-Language Pa-
thology, MS; Amy Gunshannon,
Dallas, History, BA; Kelly Guyette,
Kingston, Speech-Language Pa-
thology, BMS; Ryan Hannagan,
Wilkes-Barre, Physical Therapy,
BMS; Alexander Harding, Kingston,
History, BA; Tiffany Harris, Noxen,
English, BA; Jamie Havard, Wilkes-
Barre, Education, MS; Ashleigh
Helfrick, Nanticoke, Nursing, BSN;
Jason Heller, Kingston, Profession-
al Studies, BS; Laura Herbener,
Freeland, Nursing, RN, BSN; Lesley
Herring, Drums, Business Adminis-
tration, BS; Maureen Hornlein,
Dallas Twp., Organizational Man-
agement, MS.
Kristina Hrabcak, Wyoming,
Business Administration, BS;
Shawn Hughes, Dallas, History, BA;
Michael Jacewicz, Plains, Informa-
tion Technology, BS; Amanda
Jamieson, Hanover Twp., Commu-
nications, BA; Colleen Jenceleski,
Nanticoke, Nursing, BSN; Nicole
Johnson, Kingston, Nursing, BSN;
Darlene Johnson, Wilkes-Barre,
Professional Studies, BS; CRT; Ann
Jones, Plymouth, Nursing, RN,
BSN; Melony Jones, Hunlock Creek,
Elementary Education, BS; Mark
Jones, Wilkes-Barre, Business
Administration, BS; Kimberly Kara-
vitch, Forty Fort, Mathematics, BS;
Christine Karosa, Dupont, Nursing,
RN, BSN; Carissa Kasa, Pittston,
Mathematics, BS; April Kashuboski,
Freeland, Nursing, RN, BSN; Laila
Kazimi, Dallas, Medical Imaging,
BS; Rebekah Keller, Wapwallopen,
Speech-Language Pathology, BMS;
Suzanne Kelly, Kingston, Business
Administration, BS; Kayla Kendra,
Mountain Top, Elementary Educa-
tion, BS; Katelyn Kilmer, Nicholson,
Physical Therapy, DPT; Amanda
Kinney, Wilkes-Barre, Social Work,
BSW; Jamie Kinney, Hunlock Creek,
Nursing, BSN; Kimberly Knecht,
West Wyoming, Nursing, BSN;
Tammy Knell, Swoyersville, Nurs-
ing, RN, BSN; Alicia Koepke, Hun-
lock Creek, Business Adminis-
tration, BS; Christina Kolmansperg-
er, West Pittston, Business Adminis-
tration, BS.
Margaret Komishock, Conyng-
ham, Business Administration, BS;
Gary Koncewicz, West Wyoming,
Physical Therapy, DPT; Sandra
Kozloski, Dallas, Nursing, RN, BSN;
Mark Krokos, Plains, Education, MS;
Susan Kupstas, Hanover Twp.,
Nursing, BSN; Lauren Lando, Ed-
wardsville, Elementary Education,
BS; Jessica Lane, Dallas, Orga-
nizational Management, MS; Pame-
la Langdon, Shavertown, Orga-
nizational Management, MS; Jen-
nifer Laskowski, Larksville, Biology,
BS; Jonelle Lasky, Jenkins Twp.,
Elementary Education, BS; Ashley
Lazar, Conyngham, Medical Imag-
ing, BS; Alexandria Lee, Hugh-
estown, Social Work, BSW; Jessica
Lincoln, West Pittston, Business
Administration, BS; D’Andra Lind-
buchler, Wyoming, Nursing, BS;
John Lipka, Wyoming, Interdiscipl-
nary Studies, BA; Kimberly Loftus,
West Pittston, Nursing, BSN; Daniel
Luce, II, Wilkes-Barre, Elementary
Education, BS; Lindsey Ludorf,
Nanticoke, Medical Imaging, BS;
Kassandra Lutchko, Wilkes-Barre,
Biology, BS.
Marguerite MacDougall, Harveys
Lake, Social Work, BS; January
Macfarren, Courtdale, Business
Administration, BS; Rachel Mancu-
so, Kingston, Elementary Educa-
tion, BS; Lisa Marso, Dallas,
Speech-Language Pathology, BMS;
Regina Martin, Dallas, Business
Administration, MBA; Carol Mar-
tonick, Drums, Social Work, BSW;
Paige May, Dallas, Business Admin-
istration, BS; Holly Mayhue, Hanov-
er Twp., Nursing, RN, BSN; Allison
Mazonkey, Shickshinny, Psychology,
BS; Francesca Mazzeo, Wyoming,
Professional Studies, BS; Melissa
McCracken, Wilkes-Barre, Social
Work, BSW; Colleen McCue, Wilkes-
Barre, Elementary Education, BS;
Erin McDade, Sugar Notch, Orga-
nizational Management, MS; Jen-
nifer McHugh, Nuangola, Speech-
Language Pathology, MS; Lori
McIntyre, Pittston, Elementary
Education, BS; Patrick McKamy,
Wyoming, Organizational Manage-
ment, MS; Mark McLaughlin, King-
ston, Management, BS.
Jessica Meininger, Shickshinny,
Professional Studies, BS; Amanda
Mericle, Swoyersville, History, BA;
Amy Mertz, Wilkes-Barre, Profes-
sional Studies, BS; Milena Michalec,
Shavertown, Management, BS;
Michael Miller, West Pittston, Nurs-
ing, BSN; Jennifer Mines, Dallas,
Mathematics, BS; Susan Minsav-
age, Kingston, Speech-Language
Pathology, MS; Eugene Moisey,
Nescopeck, Health Care Manage-
ment, BS; Tammy Moore, Nesco-
peck, Business Administration, BS;
Jennifer Morgantini, Harding,
Business Administration, BS; Mela-
nie Mortimer, Dallas, Nursing, MSN;
Wendy Mowery, Nescopeck, Nurs-
ing, RN, BSN; Lauren Murphy,
Laflin, Nursing, MSN; Maura Neher,
Shavertown, Elementary Educa-
tion, BS; Carol Newell, Sweet Valley,
Nursing, RN, BSN; Rose Norton,
Wilkes-Barre, Social Work, BS;
Renee Novitski, Dallas, Elementary
Education, BS; Mario Oliveri,
Trucksville, Sport Management, BS;
Mary Oliveri, Harding, Manage-
ment, BS.
Cheryl Olmstead, Wilkes-Barre,
Business Administration, BS; Karen
Olszyk, Mountain Top, Elementary
Education, BS; Brittany O’Neill,
Harveys Lake, Elementary Educa-
tion, BS; Amber Orr, West Pittston,
Social Work, BSW; Carolyn Oshin-
ski, Nanticoke, Organizational
Management, MS; Jeannette
Owens, Plains, Social Work, BSW;
Jonine Owens, Wilkes-Barre, Nurs-
ing, RN, BSN; Melissa Pace, Pitt-
ston, Business Administration, BS;
Sid Pesotine, Luzerne, History, BA;
Jamie Petrucci, Exeter, Business
Administration, MBA; Rachel Pir-
ouz, Dallas, Occupational Therapy,
MS; Anthony Pirouz, Dallas, Biol-
ogy, BS; Yvette Ploskonka, Moun-
tain Top, Nursing, BSN; Cynthia
Polisky, Mountain Top, Marketing,
BS; Elizabeth Proietto, Plymouth,
Elementary Education, BS; Arthur
Pupa, Pittston, Sport Management,
BS; Jennifer Rafalko, Dupont,
Organizational Management, MS;
Scott Rave, Jr., Dallas, Psychology,
BS; Robin Razawich, Dallas, Phys-
ical Therapy, BMS; Frank Redmond,
Pittston, Sport Management, BS;
Cynthia Reed, Kingston, History,
BA.
Brittany Reilly, Wilkes-Barre,
Business Administration, BS; David
Riccardo, Plymouth, Nursing, BSN;
Mary Ritsick, Larksville, Social
Work, BSW; Jessica Ritz, Wilkes-
Barre, Business Administration, BS;
Andrew Roke, Wilkes-Barre, Sport
Management, BS; Erica Rosentel,
Hughestown, Psychology, BS; Erin
Rossick, Mountain Top, Occupation-
al Therapy, BMS; Michelle Row-
lands, Dallas, Nursing, MSN; Kaitlyn
Rozanski, Forty Fort, Business
Administration, BS; Regis Ruge-
manshuro, Wilkes-Barre, Business
Administration, MBA; Alexandra
Russin, West Pittston, Business
Administration, BS; Jessica Ryd-
zewski, Plains, Nursing, BSN; Kathy
Salek, Bear Creek Twp., Orga-
nizational Management, MS; Kristin
Santone, Nanticoke, Nursing, BSN;
Hollianne Sarnak, Nanticoke, Med-
ical Imaging, BS; Alysa Scavone,
Dallas, Occupational Therapy, BMS;
Maggie Schlude, Hanover Twp.,
Nursing, BSN; Amy Scott, Dallas,
Professional Studies, BS.
Ryan Seltzer, Kingston, Nursing,
RN, BSN; Kathryn Semcheski,
Shavertown, Health Care Manage-
ment, BS; Mary Semcheski, Larks-
ville, Communications, BA; Paul
Sgroi, Dallas, Organizational Man-
agement, MS; Ronald Shaw, Du-
ryea, Management, BS; Brittany
Shewan, Shavertown, Nursing,
BSN; Marya Siergiej, Nanticoke,
Elementary Education, BS; Brian
Simko, Pittston, History, BA; Mea-
gan Simkulak, Wyoming, Marketing,
BS; Leigh Sipple, Mountain Top,
Health Care Management, BS;
Andrea Slucki, Mountain Top, Nurs-
ing, MSN; Angela Smirne, Avoca,
Medical Imaging, BS; Richard
Smith, Sugarloaf, Physical Therapy,
BMS; Kelly Smith, Sweet Valley,
History, BA; Barbara Smith, Sugar-
loaf, Nursing, RN, BSN; Rachel
Soroka, Plains, Nursing, RN, BSN;
Mark Sorokach, Ashley, Business
Administration, BS; Amy Spinelli,
Wilkes-Barre, Business Adminis-
tration, MBA; Amanda Spurlin,
Hunlock Creek, Speech-Language
Pathology, MS; Joseph Stager, III,
Dallas, Professional Studies, BS;
Barron Stankus, West Pittston,
Professional Studies, BS; Barron
Stankus, West Pittston, Profession-
al Studies, BS; Jennifer Stegman,
Exeter, Organizational Manage-
ment, MS.
Kerri Stephens, Shavertown,
Organizational Management, MS;
Christine Stich, Drums, Nursing,
RN, BSN; Mailee Stine, Nanticoke,
Physical Therapy, DPT; Jane Stred-
ny, Harveys Lake, Nursing, BSN;
Kimberly Suchoski, Wilkes-Barre,
Medical Imaging, BS; Morgan Swan,
Harveys Lake, Organizational
Management, MS; Carol Sweetra,
Kingston, Nursing, BSN; Kerry
Swiech, Wapwallopen, Nursing, RN,
BSN; Matthew Swiontek, Edwards-
ville, Accounting, BS; Dominick
Tafani, Plymouth, Accounting, BS;
Barbara Thoma, Mountain Top,
Professional Studies, BS; Catherine
Thomas, Wilkes-Barre, Nursing,
BSN; Rachelle Tresilus, Edwards-
ville, Health Care Management, BS;
Lisa Tricarico, Wilkes-Barre, In-
formation Technology, BS; Lori
Trout, Weatherly, Health Care
Management, BS; Bradley Turner,
Hudson, Business Administration,
BS; Chantelle Udzella, Kingston,
Nursing, BSN; Gina Urbon, Hanover
Twp., Physical Therapy, BMS;
Abrielle Uritz, Wilkes-Barre, Nurs-
ing, RN, BSN; Michael Vacula,
Exeter, Business Administration,
BS.
Robyn Valentine, Dallas, Commu-
nications, BA; Kelly Vinnacombe,
Dallas, English, BA; Donna Vojtek,
Mountain Top, Business Adminis-
tration, MBA; Kevin Walsh, Drums,
Business Administration, BS; Ste-
ven White, Dupont, Business Ad-
ministration, BS; Meredith Whittak-
er, Forty Fort, Accounting, BS;
Cathy Williams, Kingston, Business
Administration, BS; Emily Wolter,
Harveys Lake, Nursing, BSN; Kayt-
lin Yachim, Dallas, English, BA;
Christopher Yashowitz, Mountain
Top, Business Administration, BS;
Justen Yatko, Pittston, Business
Administration, MBA; Brianna
Yonushka, Duryea, Accounting, BS;
Angela Yorina, Wyoming, Orga-
nizational Management, MS; Am-
ber Young, Plymouth, Organiza-
tional Management, MS; Jesse
Yurko, Hazle Twp., Physical Ther-
apy, BMS; Jessica Yuschovitz,
Dupont, Nursing, BSN; Lauren
Zack, Shavertown, Occupational
Therapy, BMS; Diane Zera, Pittston,
Nursing, RN, BSN; Stephen Zubko,
Dallas, History, BA; Adrienne Zul-
koski, Courtdale, Professional
Studies, BS.
MISERICORDIA GRADUATES
C M Y K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
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students.
Inorder togive students the re-
quired instructional time with
fewer days each week, the dis-
trict would have to extend class
time by 90 minutes each day. An-
other option would be to extend
the school year.
Coatesville superintendent Ri-
chard Como could not be reac-
hed for comment Friday. In a
May 5 story in the Philadelphia
Inquirer, Como said the district
is considering the option, which
is estimated to save that district
$1.7 million, as an alternative to
cutting 53 jobs.
Parents and students inter-
viewed outside Coughlin High
School in Wilkes-Barre on Friday
gave mixed reviews. Some liked
the idea, but others expressed
concerns that longer days would
wear students out. They were al-
so concerned it would conflict
with sports.
“We don’t like the idea,” Mi-
chaela Kates, 15, said as she
stood outside the school with
two friends. “Longer school days
wouldn’t be good at all . . . Alot of
kids were saying it’s good, but
they don’t realize how long
school would be.”
Parent Chris Monaghan and
her 17-year-old daughter, Alyssa,
agreed.
“I don’t think their attention
span can handle a longer school
day,” Chris Monaghan said. “I
don’t think they’re going to get
much out of that last period be-
cause they’re going to be so
burned out.”
“With sports you wouldn’t be
getting out till late at night. With
homework, I think it would be
too much to handle,” Alyssa Mo-
naghan said.
But parent Lori Gulius saidshe
thinks the longer classes would
benefit students.
“If they make the classes long-
er they’ll have more time to
teach. By the time they get in and
get settled, the extra time might
be beneficial inthe long run,” Gu-
lius said.
Parent Debbie Ozark liked the
idea of students getting a three-
day weekend.
“It’s a long week. I don’t think
the kids would mind going to
school as much if they knewthey
had a three-day weekend,” Ozark
said
Namey stressedthe proposal is
only in its preliminary stages.
Much more study must be done
to determine if the change is fea-
sible. The district would also
have to overcome numerous ob-
stacles.
For instance, even if the dis-
trict goes to four-day weeks, by
state law it must still transport
students to the Bear Creek Com-
munity Charter School and any
private or parochial school with-
in 10 miles of district boundaries
- unless those schools switched
to a four-day schedule too.
Afour-day schedule wouldalso
clash with classes many students
take at the Wilkes-Barre Area Ca-
reer and Technical Center, run
jointly by five member districts.
Namey said it’s possible those
districts would agree to make the
center a four-day school. Super-
intendents in several other dis-
tricts have expressed interest in
the four-day idea, he said.
“I believe the idea is work-
able," Namey said. “There are a
lot of questions and legitimate
concerns, and the School Board
will have to sit down and weight
the advantages and disadvantag-
es.”
Namey said he favors a longer
school day as opposed to extend-
ing the school year. But there are
issues with longer days, as well.
Contract language restricting
how many distinctly different
classes a high school teacher can
teach in a day - Algebra vs. geom-
etry, say - might have to be re-
vised.
Currently teachers are limited
to three different classes. A 2-1/2
hour limit on how long teachers
can be required to work without
a break may also have to be
changed.
“The union said they would
work with us on those issues,”
Namey said.
Staff writer Mark Guydish con-
tributed to this story.
FOUR-DAY
Continued from Page 3A
one of scores to close in the
11-county diocese under a
sweeping consolidation plan.
He ordered the parish be com-
bined with nearby St. Stanis-
laus Kostka at the St. Stanis-
laus site by July 2010.
The Sacred Heart Wilkes-
Barre Foundation, which was
established by Noreen Foti
and her husband Tony well
before the announcement to
help preserve the building
and artwork inside, appealed
the closing, first to Martino
and then to the Vatican.
The most recent appeal in
Rome was rejected.
Noreen Foti said the foun-
dation is now preparing three
appeals: one to the Apostolic
Signatura, the highest Roman
Catholic judicial authority
apart from the pope; one to
current Bishop Joseph Bam-
bera and an additional emer-
gency filing to the Vatican
high court.
Tony Foti said the third ap-
peal requests the church be
kept open at least until the
Vatican court renders a deci-
sion. It is scheduled to close
June 19.
If those appeals fail, the Fo-
tis said they would take other
action, including appealing
directly to the Pope.
Tony Foti said the Diocese
based its decision to close the
church on a survey of the
building’s façade, which did
not examine the building’s
supports but suggested there
may be damage to its struc-
tural integrity.
Tony Foti, a licensed public
engineer, said he “examined
the church from the top of the
steeple to the foundations”
and “can state unequivocally
there is no damage to the
structural integrity of this
church.
Parishioners also bemoaned
the loss of the historic-value
of the church, which was
erected in 1908.
The church’s first pastor,
the Rev. Joseph Murgas in
1905 transmitted a radio tele-
graph signal from a station in
Wilkes-Barre to another in
Scranton using the first sys-
tem of its kind. He devised
the system, the patent for
which he had sold in 1904 to
the Universal Aether Compa-
ny of Philadelphia, in the back
room of the church’s parish
house. Radio pioneer Gugliel-
mo Marconi had already suc-
cessfully transmitted radio
signals over water prior to
Murgas’ patent, but not over
land.
Murgas also painted some
of the artwork adorning the
walls of the building.
Other parishioners said
they simply wouldn’t know
where to turn if the church
closes.
John Dinis, 87, has lived
next to the church his whole
life, and has been attending
services there since his bap-
tism.
“I feel I have no church,” he
said. “I have no church.”
CHURCH
Continued from Page 3A
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Noreen and Tony Foti issue a statement regarding ongoing efforts to prevent the closure of Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church on North Main Street in Wilkes-Barre. The church is slated to close June 19.
His father, Tony Gagliardi, a school
board member, said ‘‘The dog show
gets the kids involved.” It is also a
good public relations effort for the
group.
The contestants varied in size,
shape, color and demeanor. Tiny Bub-
bles, a 140-pound rescued Newfoun-
dland won the largest award. Owner
James Nardone said he doesn’t do too
many tricks. District superintendent
Anthony Podscazy’s dog Dusty was
noted for an ability to “bark at every-
thing all the time” even when wearing
a collar designed to control barking.
Best in show winner Birdie, a Polish
Lowland sheepdog, began her career
in competition at Saturday’s event.
Owner Mimi McGowan said she is “ve-
ry proud” of Birdie for winning by
“just being herself.”
One highlight of the event was a
demonstration by the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility’s K-9 unit, which
strutted its stuff. Sgts. Mark Chudoba,
Jim Leary and Scott Jaskulski and Lt.
Joe Petrovich marched trained work
dogs Loky, Brutus, Wyatt and Rocky in
front of the participants showing their
skills at apprehension and obedience.
Jaskulski said the dogs go through
intensive training and certification be-
fore working at the prison. He added
each of them originated in Czechoslo-
vakia because of their strong work eth-
ic.
Each participant received a certif-
icate along with a goodie bag, Gavlick
said. He thanked the entrants who
came to support the Leo’s Club.
DOG SHOW
Continued from Page 3A
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 11A
K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
G enetti’s
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
ST.M ARY’S
M ONUM ENTCO.
M onum ents-M arkers-Lettering
975 S.M AIN ST.HAN O VER TW P.
829-8138
N EXT TO SO LO M O N ’S CREEK
BARYCKI – Irene, funeral 9 a.m.
Monday from the Kiesinger
Funeral Services Inc., 255 McAl-
pine St., Duryea. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 9:30 a.m. at Sacred
Heart Church, Duryea. Friends
may call from 6 to 8 p.m. today.
BRENNAN – Jean, services at 8
p.m. Monday at Kniffen O’Malley
Funeral Home Inc., 465 S. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday.
CHARTERS – Lillian, celebration of
life 9 a.m. Thursday from
McLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washington
St., Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass
9:30 a.m. in the Church of Saint
Nicholas, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call from 8 to 9 a.m. Thurs-
day.
DELONG – Russell, friends may call
from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Mon-
day at the Hugh B. Hughes Funer-
al Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort. Funeral services will
be held Tuesday morning.
DRASS – Talitha, funeral 7 p.m.
today with a blessing service in
the Neil W. Regan Funeral Home
Inc., 1900 Pittston Ave., Scranton.
Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m.
today.
HARVEY – Lucille, funeral noon
Monday from the Sheldon-Ku-
kuchka Funeral Home Inc., 74 W.
Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Friends
may call Monday from11 a.m. until
the time of service at the funeral
home.
JESUIT – Lottie, funeral 11:15 a.m.
Monday in the Thomas P. Kear-
ney Funeral Home Inc., Old Forge.
Mass of Christian Burial noon in
Ss. Peter and Paul Church, West
Scranton. Family may pay their
respects from 2 to 5 p.m. today
at the funeral home.
KOREY – George, prayer service 2
p.m. Saturday, May 28, at the
Mercy Center Chapel, Miser-
icordia University Campus, Dallas.
All are welcome to attend.
KRASNO – Celia, Shiva today from
2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at 205
Joseph Drive, Kingston.
KUSKIEWICZ – Sylvester, funeral
9:30 a.m. Monday from the
Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C., 51
W. Green St., Nanticoke. Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. in Holy
Trinity Church, St. Faustina Par-
ish, Nanticoke. Friends may call
from 5 to 7 p.m. today.
MORGAN – Genevieve, funeral 10:30
a.m. Tuesday from Paul Leonard
Funeral home, 575 N. Main St.,
Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial
11 a.m. at Our Lady of the Holy
Eucharist Parish, Pittston. Friends
may call from 4 to 8 p.m. today
and Monday at the funeral home.
REINO – Margaret, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday in St. Therese’s Church,
Pioneer Avenue and Davis Street,
Shavertown. Friends may call
from 4 to 8 p.m. today at the
Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home
Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown.
REISER – Genevieve, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday at the Jendrzejewski
Funeral Home, 21 N. Meade St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
from 5 to 8 p.m. today.
RUNTA – Robert, funeral 9:15 a.m.
Monday from the Betz-Jastremski
Funeral Home Inc., 568 Bennett
St., Luzerne. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in Our Lady of
Victory Church, Harveys Lake.
Friends may call at the funeral
home from 4 to 7 p.m. today.
SANDERS – Anna, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday from the Kniffen O’Mal-
ley Funeral Home Inc., 728 Main
St., Avoca. Mass of Christian
Burial 10:30 a.m. in Sacred Heart
of Jesus Church, Dupont. Friends
may call from 9 to 10 a.m. Mon-
day at the funeral home.
SINE – Gertrude, celebration of life
8:30 a.m. Monday from McLaugh-
lin’s, 142 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass 9:30
a.m. in the Church of Saint Mary
of the Immaculate Conception,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
from 6 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
FUNERALS
B
art P. Sorber, 40, of Lake Town-
ship, passed away unexpectedly
Friday, May 20, 2011, at the Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
Mr. Sorber was born June 23,
1970, in Wilkes-Barre, and was a son
Donna Hoover Sorber of Pikes
CreekandthelateRodneyP. Sorber.
Bart graduated from Lake-Leh-
man High School in 1988 and was
employed as a pipeline welder for
Local 798 Pipeline Union.
He was a member of the Sons of
the American Legion, Harveys
Lake.
Surviving, in addition to his
mother, arehis brother, Brett Sorber
of Pikes Creek; his fiancée, Michelle
Adams of Lake Township; and sev-
eral aunts; uncles; cousins and
many friends.
Funeral will be held at 11 a.m.
Tuesday from the Curtis L. Swan-
son Funeral Home, corner of routes
29 and 118, Pikes Creek, with the
Rev. L.D. Reed, pastor of the Emma-
nuel Assembly of God Church, Har-
veys Lake, officiating. Interment
will be in the Maple Grove Cemete-
ry, Pikes Creek. Friends may call
from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday.
The family requests that inlieuof
flowers, memorial contributions be
sent to the charity of the donor’s
choice.
Bart P. Sorber
May 20, 2011
BARBARA SZYMANSKI RICE,
70, formerly of Duryea, passed
away Monday, September 6, 2010.
She was a daughter of the late
Francis and Anna Szymanski. She
is a graduate of the 1957 class of
Duryea High School. She was for-
merly employed by the Frederick
County Public School system
working as an administrative as-
sistant. She also enjoyed music
and teaching piano. She is sur-
vived by husband Bill Rice; and
son Glenn of Maryland; and son
Michael of Arizona. She was the
sister of Michelle Dale and hus-
band, Ken, of Vero Beach, Fla., and
Geraldine Sigman and husband,
Allen, of Castle Rock, Colo.
A memorial Mass and grave-
side service will be held at 10:30
a.m. Monday at the Nativity of Our
Lord Parish, 127 Stephenson St.,
Duryea. A reception will follow at
VFW Post 1227, 492 Stephenson
St, Duryea.
G
enevieve “Jean” Reiser, of South
Sherman Street, Wilkes-Barre,
passed away Thursday, May 19,
2011, at Hospice Community Care
Inpatient Unit at Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
Born January 20, 1923, in Hud-
son, she was a daughter of the late
JohnandMichaelina Brazinski Win-
cek.
Jean attended Wilkes-Barre area
schools and worked in the area gar-
ment industry. She was employed
for many years as a waitress for phy-
sicians at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital and was a member of the
International Ladies Garment
Workers Union.
Jean was a loving wife, mother
and grandmother; she enjoyed pol-
ka dancing and playing cards.
She was preceded in death by sis-
ters, Caroline Fields and Valerie
Wincek; and brothers, John and
Walter.
Surviving are her husband of 57
years, RaymondC. Reiser; daughter
Janice Weiss and her husband,
John, Pringle; sonTheodore Naugle
and his wife, Dorothy, Plymouth;
grandchildren, Theodore Naugle
and his wife, Jennifer, Shickshinny,
John Weiss and his wife, Karen,
Pringle, Debra Radzwilka and her
husband, Al, Plymouth Meeting,
Pa., and Michele Erdman and her
husband, Rahn, Dornsife, Pa.; great-
grandchildren, Nicholas, Lane,
Brooke, Trevor, Michael, and Sa-
mantha; a sister, Mary Wincek,
Hudson; as well as lovingnieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be held at
10 a.m. Monday at the Jendrzejew-
ski Funeral Home, 21 N. Meade St.,
Wilkes-Barre, with the Rev. John S.
Terry, Pastor, Our Ladyof Hope Par-
ish, officiating. Interment will be in
Oak Lawn Cemetery, Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call from5 to 8 p.m. to-
day.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to St. Joseph’s
Center, 320 S. Blakely St., No. 1,
Dunmore, PA18512.
Genevieve ‘Jean’ Reiser
May 19, 2011
D
ebbie Zavada Potoski, of Plains
Township, passed away Friday
afternoon, May 20, 2011, at her resi-
dence.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a
daughter of John Zavada Sr. and the
late Joan Atcavage Zavada. She was
educated in the Wilkes-Barre Area
schools and was a graduate of
CoughlinHighSchool, class of 1981.
She was a graduate of Luzerne
County Community College. She
was a founder of the Chicken Coop.
She was a member of Ss. Peter &
Paul Church, Plains Township.
In addition to her father, she is
survived by her husband, Leonard,
with whomshe celebrated their sec-
ond wedding anniversary on April
2, 2011; sons, Scott and Brandon;
brother, John Zavada Jr., and his
wife, Debbie, of Plains Township;
two nieces; as well as great-nieces
and great-nephews.
Funeral services will be held at
9 a.m. Tuesday from the Michael J.
Mikelski Funeral Home, 293 S. Riv-
er St., Plains Township. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be celebrated
at 9:30 a.m. at Ss. Peter & Paul
Church, Plains Township. Inter-
ment will be in the parish cemetery,
Plains Township. Friends may call
from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests donations be made to the
family.
Debbie Zavada Potoski
May 20, 2011
DARLENE (KEEFER) ORZE-
CHOWSKI, 64, of West Vaughn
Street, Kingston, died Friday, May
20, 2011, at University of Pennsyl-
vania, Philadelphia, Pa., surround-
ed by her family.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Hugh B. Hughes
& Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044
Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort.
FRANK A. MAZUR, 86, of
Larksville, passed away Saturday
morning, May 21, 2011, at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements are
pendingfromthe S.J. Grontkowski
Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St.,
Plymouth.
T
homas G. Finn, 84, of Wood-
bridge, Va., formerly of Wilkes-
Barre, passed away Wednesday,
May18, 2011, after a longbattle with
cancer.
Thomas was born in Wilkes-
Barre on February 20, 1927, a son to
Thomas and Catherine Kelly Finn.
He was a graduate of Coughlin
HighSchool. Tomservedinthe U.S.
Army in the Army Occupation in
Europe. He was a Boy Scout leader
for many years and received the Sil-
ver Beaver Award for his work with
the Scouts.
Tom was employed by the Char-
les n’ Mary Music Co. for many
years and later was associated with
Sides Music Co. He also operated
the bandshell for the City of Wilkes-
Barre and operated his own sound
system business. He provided the
sound for many area school plays.
He moved to Woodbridge, Va., in
1995 where he went into the auto
body business with his sons.
Tom was a member of St. Eliza-
beth Ann Seton Catholic Church.
He was preceded in death by his
son Hugh.
Tom is survived by his wife of 60
years, the former JoanDevaney; son
Thomas A. and his wife, Tamera, of
Woodbridge, Va.; son Brian and his
wife, Janet, of Horsham, Pa.; sonEd-
ward and his wife, Lei, of Wood-
bridge, Va.; daughter Karen and her
companion, Cathleen McGrath, of
Silver Spring, Md.; son Joseph and
his wife, Laura, of Kennett Square,
Pa.; son John and his wife, Sonia, of
Fredericksburg, Va.; daughter Ei-
leen Colarusso of Ellicott City, Md.;
brothers, Edward and his wife, Elea-
nor of Ames, Iowa, Paul and his
wife, Julie, of Palm Coast, Fla., Phi-
lip and his wife, Bernice, of Plains
Township, and Robert and his wife,
Mary Lou, of MountainLake, Pa.; 21
grandchildren; one great-grand-
child; as well as numerous nieces
and nephews.
A viewing will be held from 4
to 8 p.m. today at Miller Fu-
neral Home, 3200 Golansky Blvd.,
Woodbridge, Va. A Mass of Chris-
tian Burial will be held at 11:30 a.m.
Monday at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church, Woodbridge, Va.,
with interment to follow at Quanti-
co National Cemetery.
Donations may be made to St. El-
izabethAnnSetonCatholic Church;
or the charity of your choice.
Thomas G. Finn
May 18, 2011
Elizabeth “Betty”
Ernst Ell, 90, for-
merly of Wilkes-
Barre, died
Thursday, May
19, 2011, at Star
Hill Rest Home in
Monroe Town-
ship, Pa. She was
a devoted and much loved mother
and grandmother.
Born March 10, 1921, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of the late
Dr. William G. and Isabel Wideman
Ernst.
Betty attended Wilkes-Barre Busi-
ness College and worked as a secre-
tary for the federal government prior
to marriage.
She enjoyed doll collecting and at-
tending flea markets in her later
years. She made many friends in
those circles, as well as those of her
church and various senior centers.
Betty was a member of the Parish
of Saint Nicholas. Her faith and devo-
tion to God was steadfast.
An infant daughter, Bernadette;
sisters, Adele and Isabel; and a broth-
er, William Ernst, preceded her in
death.
She will be missedby her daughter
Paula andher husband, RickKlass, of
Monroe Township; grandchildren,
Jackie and Erick Klass; great-grand-
daughter, Lillie May Verrill; and niec-
es and nephews.
Celebration of Betty’s Life will
be held at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday from
McLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre, with funeral Mass at
nooninthe Churchof Saint Nicholas.
Interment will be inOakLawnCeme-
tery in Hanover Township. Visitation
will be heldat McLaughlin’s from4to
7 p.m. Monday.
Betty’s family thanks the staff of
Star Hill Rest Home for the compas-
sion, dignity and respect they offered
over the past 4 ½ years, and the care-
givers of Erwine’s Home Health and
Hospice for the excellent care and
compassion Betty was given in her fi-
nal moments.
Permanent messages and memo-
ries can be shared with Betty’s family
at www.celebrateherlife.com.
Elizabeth Ernst Ell
May 19, 2011
B
ernadine “Deany” Dorosky, 79,
of Kingston, was calledhome in-
to the arms of God Friday morning,
May 20, 2011.
She was born March 25, 1932,
lived in Kingston her entire life, and
was a daughter of the late Walter
and Mary Kachmar Seasock. Deany
was a 1949 graduate of Kingston
High School, where she was an ex-
ceptional athlete excelling in bas-
ketball, softball and bowling. She
was a lifelong member of St. Mary’s
Byzantine Catholic Church, King-
ston.
Together with her late husband,
Justin “Brick” Dorosky, they in-
stilled a love of family and sports in
their children and grandchildren.
She loved playing bingo and casino
hopping with her daughter.
She was preceded in death by her
parents; husband; and beloved
grandson Nicholas “"Nicky” Doros-
ky.
Left to cherish her memory are
her sons, Joseph and his wife, Anne,
Kingston, and Walter and his wife,
Cynthia, Avoca; daughter Beth Ste-
fanoski and her husband, Tom,
Swoyersville; brother, Walter “Son-
ny” Seasock, Louisiana; and sister,
Mary Lou Gorzynski, Maryland.
She was Nana to five grandchildren,
Jennifer, Allison, R.J., Dani, and
Nicky; as well as nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral will be at 9:30 a.m. Mon-
day from the Kopicki Funeral
Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston,
with Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. in St.
Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church.
Interment will be in the parish cem-
etery, Edwardsville. Friends may
call from2 to 5 p.m. today. Panachi-
da will be held at 5 p.m. today, with
the Rev. Michael Prodanets officiat-
ing.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions can be made to Challen-
ger Division Baseball, c/o Fred De-
Santo, 48 Norman St., Pittston, PA
18640; or to Muscular Dystrophy
Association, 36 N. Main St., Taylor,
PA18517.
Bernadine Dorosky
May 20, 2011
R
ussell Charles DeLong, 86, of
Chapin Apartments, Walnut
Street, Kingston, died Thursday,
May 19, 2011, in the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
He was born on January12, 1925,
in West Wyoming, and was a son of
the late Ralph and Gertrude De-
Long. Russell graduated fromForty
Fort High School and served in the
Pacific Theater during World War II
with the U.S. Air Force.
Prior to his retirement, he was
employed for many years by Cleve-
land Brothers Equipment Co. of
Wilkes-Barre. He was a member of
the Kingston Masonic Lodge 395,
the Kingston VFW and the Ply-
mouth Christian Church. Russell
was active in the Kingston Senior
Center for the last 10 years.
Russell was preceded in death by
his wife of 39 years, Doris Deno De-
Long; and a brother, Edwin De-
Long.
He is survived by his daughters,
Beth Ann DeLong Hornick and hus-
band, LTC John W. Hornick, Har-
deeville, S.C., and Karen DeLong
Miller, Esq., and husband, Kevin
Miller, of Annapolis, Md.; along
with granddaughter Jacqueline Ma-
rie Carini, Scranton; andgrandsons,
Hayden Charles Miller and Grant
Tate Miller, Annapolis, Md.; and his
sister, Shirley DeLong Norcross,
Forty Fort; as well as nieces and ne-
phews.
Funeral service will be held
at 10 a.m. Tuesday from the
Hugh B. Hughes &Son Inc. Funeral
Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort, with his pastor, the Rev. David
Quisenberry, officiating. The inter-
ment will be in Memorial Shrine
Cemetery, Carverton. Friends may
call from2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Mon-
day at the funeral home. A Masonic
service will be held at 7 p.m. by
Kingston Lodge No. 395, F & AM.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the Kingston Senior
Center, 680 Wyoming Ave., King-
ston, PA18704.
Russell Charles DeLong
May 19, 2011
F
ranklin A. Bialek, of Hanover
Township, passedintoeternal life
Tuesday, May 3, 2011, at the Veterans
Affairs Medical Center in Plains
Township.
Franklin was known to his many
friends as “Tobar.” He received the
nickname as a young boy after he and
his brother, John, went to the Ply-
mouth Theater repeatedly to see a
movie about two scientists named
Tobar and Timemack. John took the
name Timemack and Frank became
Tobar.
Tobar was an active outdoorsman
as both a hunter and a fisherman. He
attained a legendary status for trap-
ping at Red Rock, Forkston, Noxen
and Dutch mountain ranges long be-
fore the inception of all-terrain vehi-
cles and GPS systems.
Tobar was one of the original
coaches during the formation of the
Hanover Area Mini Hawk Football
program in the 1970s. In addition to
teaching the game of football, he
passed on his vast knowledge of the
outdoors to many of the young men
he coached, and they eventually be-
came excellent outdoorsmen them-
selves and will be forever grateful.
He also liked to entertain friends
and family by strumming his guitar,
belting out songs by his favorite art-
ist, Hank Williams Sr., a man on
whom Tobar was a historian.
Tobar was a veteran of the U.S. Ar-
my, a member of the AMVETS Post
59, and American Legion Post 609 of
Hanover Township. He was a lifelong
mechanic and was retired from em-
ployment with the Hanover Area
School District.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Adamand Mary Trzinski Bi-
alek; and brother, John.
He is survived by sisters, Eleanor,
Syracuse, N.Y., andMaryann, Illinois;
brothers, David and Joseph, both of
Hanover Township; nieces and neph-
ews; caretaker Sandra Stephensky;
andthe apple of his eye, PaytonSpita-
lek Stephensky, also of Hanover
Township.
All services will be private.
Arrangements are entrusted
to the Charles V. Sherbin Funeral
Home, Hanover Township.
A special thanks to his friends
Stanley “Corky” Browski and Joseph
Cembrock for years of caring, and to
the Morgans for being good neigh-
bors. And To, your best buddy, Jo-
seph “Babe” Spitalek, is waiting for
you in heaven.
Finally, Tobar, catch you on the re-
bound, God willing and the creeks
don’t rise. We’ll throw a twenty on
the bar and chop it up.
Franklin A. Bialek
May 3, 2011
ALBERT V. BUKOWSKI, 88, of
Plymouth, passed away Monday,
May 2, 2011. Albert was a U.S. Ar-
my veteran serving during World
War II. During his service, he re-
ceived the Good Conduct Medal,
the American Theater Service
Medal, the Asian Pacific Theater
Service Medal with four Bronze
Stars, andthe WorldWar II Victory
Medal. Surviving are nieces; neph-
ews; great-nieces; great-nephews;
and other family.
Funeral was held at the conve-
nience of the family from the S.J.
Grontkowski Funeral Home, Ply-
mouth. Interment was in St. Ma-
ry’s Nativity Cemetery. Visit
www.sjgrontkowskifuneralhome-
.com to submit condolences.
More Obituaries, Page 2A
HELEN LAMPERT, of Wyom-
ing, passed away Saturday morn-
ing, May 21, 2011, in the Highland
Manor Nursing and Convalescent
Center, Exeter.
Arrangements are pending
from the Metcalfe and Shaver Fu-
neral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming.
J
ohnJ. Sabatini, of Pace Street in
Larksville, died Wednesday,
May 18, 2011, at his home.
Born February 24, 1942, in
Wilkes-Barre, he was a son of the
late Oliver and Catherine Alles Sa-
batini.
John was a graduate of Saint
Leo’s High School in Ashley and
Wilkes-Barre Business College.
A U.S. Army veteran, he served
during the Vietnam era.
John was an assistant manager
for Weis Markets in Dallas for 25
years. He later worked as a correc-
tions officer at thestatecorrection-
al institutions at Mahanoy City,
Pa., Retreat andDallas before retir-
ing.
He will be missed by his wife,
the former Margaret Mitchell;
sons, Joseph John Sabatini of
Larksville and Michael John and
his wife, Sandi Sabatini, of Truss-
ville, Ala.; and grandsons, Joseph,
Jacob and Matthew Sabatini.
Celebration of John’s Life
will be heldat 8:30a.m. Tues-
day from McLaughlin’s, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre,
with funeral Mass at 9 a.m. in the
Church of Saint Ignatius. Inter-
ment will be in Saint Mary’s Mau-
soleum in Hanover Township. Vis-
itation will be held at McLaugh-
lin’s from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday.
Memorial donations are pre-
ferred and may be made to Medi-
cal Oncology Associates Prescrip-
tion Assistance Fund, 382 Pierce
St., Kingston, PA 18704-5535; or
Hospice Care of the VNA, 486
Northampton St., Edwardsville,
PA18704-4599.
Permanent messages and me-
mories can be shared with John’s
family at www.celebratehislife-
.com.
John J. Sabatini
May 18, 2011
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 13A
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Pennsylvania’s $3.7 billion —
and growing —debt to the feder-
al government for the cost of un-
employment benefits accumulat-
ed since the recession began has
gnawed at state lawmakers for
more than two years.
This coming week, the state
Senate and House each have
scheduledfloor votes onsubstan-
tially different unemployment
compensation-related bills as a
June 11 deadline to preserve 13
weeks of extra federally funded
emergency jobless benefits
looms.
That deadline kicked in Friday,
when the federal government de-
termined that Pennsylvania’s
April unemployment rate drop-
ped far enough to help trigger it.
Republican and Democratic
lawmakers appear united in
wanting to preserve the13 weeks
of benefits. Without them, 45,000
Pennsylvanians will immediately
lose a weekly check, and another
90,000 through the end of 2011
will miss out on those benefits al-
together, according to the state
Department of Labor and Indus-
try.
But action in the Republican-
controlled Legislature to keep
the 13 weeks — essentially, by
making a small change in state
law — will inevitably raise de-
bate over howtorepay the debt, a
subject dogged by partisan dis-
agreement since Pennsylvania’s
unemployment compensation
fundwent broke in2009. It is now
the nation’s largest unemploy-
ment compensation debt behind
California’s.
The average benefit inPennsyl-
vania is about $310 a week, and
benefits are capped at $564 a
week. Currently, the unemployed
can get 93 weeks of benefits.
ComeJune11, sevenweeks of fed-
erally-funded benefits are set to
expire. If the 13 weeks also ex-
pire, that would lower the overall
benefit to 73 weeks. Regular
state-funded benefits last 26
weeks.
The House bill, writtenby Rep.
Scott Perry, R-York, would keep
the 13 weeks of federal benefits
while also attempting to repay
the debt by 2018.
His approach —narrowing eli-
gibility and reducing benefits —
is supported by the Pennsylvania
Chamber of Business and Indus-
try, but opposed by Democrats,
the AFL-CIO and advocates for
the poor.
The Department of Labor and
Industry estimates that the bill, if
enacted, would save $632 million
in benefits costs annually, pri-
marily by changing the way a per-
son’s weekly benefit rate is deter-
mined. It also would require peo-
ple to register for employment
search services offer by the Penn-
sylvania CareerLink system as a
condition of receiving benefits
and reduce the weekly benefit for
people who collect severance
pay.
Sharon Dietrich, a lawyer with
the nonprofit Community Legal
Services in Philadelphia, said the
department’s estimate is signifi-
cantly understated because it
cannot quantify the effect of a
couple of changes to eligibility
proposed by Perry. For instance,
Perry’s bill would require that
benefits are denied to someone
who lost a job due to “miscon-
duct,” rather than the “willful
misconduct” in current law. It
would also require that someone
who leaves a job for compelling
personal reasons get benefits on-
ly if those reasons are work-relat-
ed.
It would not raise unemploy-
ment compensation taxes on em-
ployers, or employees.
Perry said his bill is sensible,
particularly at a time when Penn-
sylvania is spending money it
doesn’t have in its unemploy-
ment compensation trust fund.
“It’s insolvent,” Perry said.
“That eventually could impact
people that legitimately need it
and it wouldn’t be available.”
Minority Leader Frank Dermo-
dy, D-Allegheny, however, called
the bill “an all-out attack on the
middle class and working fam-
ilies” at a time when people are
trying to recover from a reces-
sion.
Even if Perry’s bill passes the
House, it is unlikely that it would
gain much traction in the Senate,
where Labor and Industry Com-
mittee Chairman John Gordner,
R-Columbia, favors an approach
to solvency that would reduce
benefits, limit eligibilityandraise
taxes on both employers and em-
ployees.
He also said he is exploring the
concept of issuing bonds to repay
the debt, an approach that in the-
ory would lower interest pay-
ments below those charged by
the federal government.
On Tuesday, the Senate is
scheduled to vote on a Gordner
bill that takes a much more limit-
ed approach than Perry’s.
The bill would keep the 13
weeks while reducing benefits
costs by anestimated$50 million
a year, in part by adding the same
work-search requirement includ-
ed in Perry’s bill.
It has Democratic support —
Gordner’s committee of seven
Republicans and four Democrats
unanimously approved it earlier
this month. But the bill does not
represent a broad attempt to pay
back the debt, an aimthat Gordn-
er suggested isn’t realistic within
the three weeks before the June
11 deadline.
“I think we need to take a look
at it,” Gordner said, “but basical-
ly we were given a short drill
here.”
Scramble on to maintain jobless benefits
AP FILE PHOTO
The state Senate and House, based at the Capitol building in Har-
risburg, each plan votes on jobless benefit bills.
June 11 deadline approaches to
preserve 13 weeks of extra
emergency jobless benefits.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ C L I C K
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 15A
➛ N E W S
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Affordable
Hearing
Systems in April.
Mercy Special Care Hospital
in Nanticoke was included in
that sale. The sale of proper-
ties in all three municipalities
was $150 million.
Transfer taxes were based
on the $80.6 million portion of
the Scranton properties sale
price and the $6 million Tunk-
hannock Township properties
sale price recorded in the
deeds in Lackawanna and
Wyoming counties. The city of
Scranton itself will see $2 mil-
lion in transfer taxes in June.
“If Scranton collects that
much, Nanticoke should be
entitled to its fair share,”
Greater Nanticoke Area
School District Super-
intendent Tony Per-
rone said.
But Regional Hospi-
tal of Scranton spokes-
woman Gladys Bernet
said in an email that no
deed was filed for the
sale of the Nanticoke
hospital “because the
real estate for Special
Care Hospital in Nanti-
coke is leased.”
Owned by Pa.
Luzerne County
property and tax re-
cords indicate that the
hospital complex,
which dropped the
“Mercy” moniker and
became Special Care
Hospital, and the ap-
proximately three
acres on which it lies is
owned by the Com-
monwealth of Pennsyl-
vania.
Troy Thompson,
press secretary for the
state Department of
General Services, said
Mercy had been leasing the
hospital property in Nanticoke
from the state for $1 per
month for the past 20 years.
When Mercy decided to sell
the hospital, the department
negotiated a new lease with
Nanticoke Hospital Co., a sub-
sidiary of Community Health
Systems, for $2,000 per month
effective May 1, with a
$500,000 option to buy.
The option to buy is pend-
ing legislative approval, be-
cause all sales of state-owned
property must be approved by
the General Assembly. The
lease is good for two years,
Thompson said.
Thompson said the depart-
ment prefers not to rent to for-
profit corporations, and Nanti-
coke Hospital Co. wants to
buy the property, but it takes
time for legislative approval
for the sale and nobody want-
ed to see hospital services dis-
rupted in the meantime.
Until the sale does take
place, the property, which has
an assessed value of
$14,573,600, will not return to
the tax rolls, Thompson said.
So, until the sale is ap-
proved, Nanticoke will lose
out on about $53,700 in prop-
erty taxes, the county will lose
about $76,000 and the school
district will be out about
$144,700 each year the proper-
ty remains under state owner-
ship.
Local officials upset
And that doesn’t sit well
with local officials.
“I don’t know if I agree with
him about not taxing
that property while
the state is renting it
to a for-profit compa-
ny,” said Tony Alu,
Luzerne County chief
assessor.
Alu said the county
could use additional
tax revenue as soon
as possible, and he in-
tends to ask his solic-
itor to look into case
law regarding the tax-
ation of state-owned
property being leased
to for-profit compa-
nies.
Perrone said he had
been trying for a
week to find out the
sale price for Special
Care Hospital and
how much the school
district stood to take
in real estate transfer
tax. But he was con-
founded because the
county Recorder of
Deeds Office had no
record of a sale.
“If Scranton got
that much money for Mercy,
I’m sure $30,000, $40,000 or
$50,000 would be a reasonable
amount for Nanticoke. I have a
school district that doesn’t
have a very big tax base. … Ev-
ery penny counts,” Perrone
said, noting that state budget
cuts for education are also
making it especially difficult
for the school district.
“Three hospitals were ap-
parently sold. Even if it’s not
taxable, there should be some
way the city can get some
money from it,” he said.
Holly Circo, city administra-
tor for Nanticoke, which has
been a financially distressed
city since May 2006, said she
would “refrain from comment-
ing until the commonwealth
determines which direction
they’re going to move in” on
the sale.
Bernet did not respond to a
message asking whether Nan-
ticoke Hospital Co. intended
to make any payments in lieu
of taxes to the city, county or
school district until the prop-
erty is sold.
Calculating transfer tax
As for the real estate trans-
fer tax to be realized through
the sale, the city and school
district should receive reve-
nue based on the fair market
value of the property rather
than the $500,000 sales price.
Joan Hoggarth, Luzerne
County deputy recorder of
deeds, said that if Nanticoke
Hospital Co. doesn’t pay the
state the fair market value of
the property, which is basical-
ly the assessed value, the com-
pany must submit a Real
Transfer Tax Statement of Val-
ue and the state Department
of Revenue will determine the
amount of real estate transfer
tax due.
So the city and school dis-
trict can expect to receive
somewhere in the neighbor-
hood of $73,000 in transfer tax
if and when the property is
sold.
The state receives 1 percent
and the school district and
city each get one-half percent
of the fair market value.
Williams said the depart-
ment’s real estate division ne-
gotiated the $500,000 sale
price based on the fact that the
building is more than 100
years old and that Mercy paid
for any and all of the improve-
ments to the buildings during
the past 20 years.
The assessed value of the
Tyler Memorial complex in
Tunkhannock Township is
$2.5 million and the sale price
recorded on the deed was
more than $5.9 million, ac-
cording to Wyoming County
Chief Assessor Eric Brown.
Tunkhannock Township and
Tunkhannock Area each will
receive nearly $29,800 in real
estate transfer tax based on
the one-half percent tax rate
on the recorded sale price.
Scranton School District
will receive about $400,000
based on the approximate $81
million sale price recorded in
the deed for Mercy’s Scranton
properties.
The city of Scranton will re-
ceive about $2 million or 2.5
percent of the price recorded
in the deed because Scranton
the city has a Home Rule Char-
ter and can set its own real es-
tate transfer tax rate.
MERCY
Continued from Page 1A
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Special Care Hospital in Nanticoke was part of a $150 million sale in April from Mercy Health Part-
ners to Nanticoke Hospital Co., a subsidiary of Community Health Systems.
“I don’t
know if I
agree with
him about
not taxing
that prop-
erty while
the state
is renting
it to a for-
profit com-
pany.
Tony Alu
Luzerne County
chief assessor
C M Y K
PAGE 16A SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
a rapidly flowing creek of the
same orange mine bile.
It’s so wide he can’t cross with-
out a risky jump, and it seems to
emerge from marshland where
his dad used to plow. He surmis-
es it’s more of the same mine wa-
ter, oozing up from a “crop fall,”
or mine-subsidence sinkhole that
appearedinthe farmland15years
ago – the event that started the
demise of the family farm.
Back in her home on Main
Street inPlains Township, Grego-
ry’s 91-year-old mother sits in her
small living room and laments
the farm saga.
Shehadabuyer for thefarmbe-
fore DEP showed up. She never
knew they planned to drill into
the mines and use the topsoil pit
to hold mine water, she insists.
She has written numerous let-
ters to representatives and sen-
ators, both state and federal. She
contacted local officials, and she
even tried talking to then-Gov.
Ed Rendell.
“They said I’m always com-
plaining,” Theresa Price con-
tends, “I said I just want the job
done so I can sell the farm.”
DEP’s viewpoint
From DEP’s standpoint, the
bore holes and pit did finish the
job.
Environmental Program man-
ager for the Wilkes-Barre District
Office Mike Korb recounts how a
previous bore hole drilled to
drain mine water decades ago
had blocked up. The result: Yel-
lowboy percolated to the surface
of nearby farms – including the
Prices’ – and seeped into base-
ments and yards.
According to letters provided
by Theresa Price, DEP officials
claim they could not gain access
to the original borehole site.
When Theodore Price contact-
ed the agency about the crop fall
in 1996, DEP reviewed the land,
sawthe pit and came up with the
idea.
Korb insists that Theodore
Price was informed in advance
and fully aware of plans to drill
newholes near his pit, let the wa-
ter drain into it and out to the riv-
er.
It’s a claim Gregory Price de-
nies, and Theodore Price can’t
defend or reject – he died in De-
cember, 1998, two years after the
crop fall had created the hole and
seven years before the work was
done on the land.
Price chronology
Theresa Price tells the chronol-
ogy this way: The hole appeared
in1996, and the family contacted
DEP. In April, 1998, her husband
signed paperwork granting ac-
cess to the land, but no work was
done.
In 2002 – after pushing to get
the work done – she admits she
signed paperwork without read-
ing it because she thought it sim-
ply renewed the right of entry.
She staunchly denies knowing
anything about the proposal to
drill holes and drain water into
the pit until after the work was
done.
And when DEPshowed her pa-
perwork with her signature nota-
rized by a notary public in Dau-
phin County, she balked. “I’ve
never been to Dauphin County in
my life!” she insists.
Korb counters that he investi-
gated the matter and is “utterly
convinced” there was nothing in-
appropriate done by DEP offi-
cials.
When asked why the DEP
dumped the water into the pit,
Korb notes simply that the bore
holes were too far from the river-
bank, and the pit served as a log-
ical reservoir to keep the yellow
boy from flooding the area.
The current method still puts
the pollutioninto the Susquehan-
na, Korbconcedes, but it is nodif-
ferent from what happened with
the previous drain pipe.
“Our job is to mitigate hazards
such as pits, holes and mine
shafts,” Korb said. “There is no
money to mitigate acid mine run-
off. There is no funding for mine
drainage treatment.”
The pit itself should not accu-
mulate much water, Korb said,
but seems to be blocked at the
river end, possibly by a beaver
dam – a claim Gregory Price re-
jects.
Korb said he has tried to work
with the Price family, but that
they have denied DEP access to
the land.
Onhis owninitiativeandnot as
a formal DEP effort, Korb had
contacted the North Branch
LandTrust toseeif theywouldbe
interested in acquiring the prop-
erty as a conservation area.
“My understanding is that it
has several protected species on
it,” he said.
And the Land Trust could ap-
ply for grant money – possibly
from Mohegan Sun Casino reve-
nue that is earmarked for Plains
Township – to clean up the acid
mine water before it hits the riv-
er.
Infact, there is a drainage prob-
lem near the casino that “im-
pacts” the problem by the river,
Korbsaid. The bankof Mill Creek
was breached near Route 315,
and water spills into a pit that
seeps into underground mines
which drain toward the Susque-
hanna.
DEP is working on resolving
that situation.
“I thought it was a perfect ap-
plication for (casino) money,”
Korb said. But, he contends, the
Price family never followed
through.
Gregory Price said it’s true the
Land Trust contacted him, but
said he was told the idea would
be presented to the trustees and
that he would hear back if they
decided to move on the proposal.
He never heard from them.
Water keeps gushing
Meanwhile, the water keeps
gushing, the plants keep dying,
andhe keeps payingpropertytax-
es on land he can’t sell or use.
The issue is just as vexing for
Korb, though from his point of
view, the Price family has exacer-
bated the problem rather than
help find a solution. “I spent a lot
of time and effort on this,” he
said, “I’mfrustrated by the whole
thing.”
Gregory Price stood and
watched a video he shot when
contractors came in to drill the
holes and fill the crop fall.
Workers pull upthe huge auger
and drop a long measuring tape,
declaring their bore more than
180 feet deep. A crane hoists a
huge casement that’s guided ver-
tically down the hole, and then a
backhoe taps it into the ground.
Much longer pipe – wide enough
for a lean man to comfortably
slide down – is inserted.
At one point a contractor jok-
ingly pretends to climb into the
pipe, evoking laughs from co-
workers.
As he watches, Gregory Price
says he never understood what
they were doing with the pipes
while he recorded the work. He
points to frames early in the pro-
ject that showthe topsoil pit con-
taining greenish water, not the
orange patina of acid mine drain-
age.
He recounts how one worker
gave him the calculations that
showed the huge pipes could
dump more than 7,000 gallons a
minutes.
When the video comes to a
scene with a backhoe leveling off
boulders and rocks dumped into
the crop fall, he says, “That’s all
they were supposed to do.”
Now, water pours endlessly
from those pipes to the river.
More flows from uphill of the
pipes into the pit. The land has
unflattering shade of yellow-or-
ange, emitting a foul smell on hot
summer days.
Illegal dumping ground
Adding insult to acid mine in-
jury, some people have used the
property as an illegal dumping
ground.
Gregory and Theresa Price in-
sist the state should either come
inandfixtheproblemor compen-
sate themfor the lost value of the
land.
Government papers say the pit
is 35 feet and 25 feet, and Grego-
ryPriceestimates theminewater
runs as deep as 20 feet in spots
right now.
Even if it were half that, at 7.4
gallons per cubic foot, the pit
would be holding 65,000 gallons
at any given moment.
But you don’t need the video.
The pit is so large and garishly
discolored, you can readily see it
–and the runoff into the Susque-
hanna – in satellite images using
Google or Bing Maps. Just look
for 5 North River Street, Plains,
Pa.
“They came in,” Gregory Price
says, “and made our farm worth-
less.”
DON CAREY PHOTOS /THE TIMES LEADER
Acid mine water running has cut a deep path as it winds from a pit on former farmland owned by Gregory Price to the Susquehanna
River. He says the farm land is now worthless.
DRAINAGE
Continued from Page 1A
Gregory Price stands near the point where acid mine drainage on
his family’s old farmland dumps into the Susquehanna River.
13,000 pounds of iron and 200,000
pounds of sulfate into the 440-mile Sus-
quehanna each day. In high concentra-
tions, the pollutants can kill everything
in a waterway, as had happened in
stretches of NanticokeCreekwhen, at its
peak, the Dundee Road mine outfall
poured7,000gallons of iron-pollutedwa-
ter into the stream every minute. Local
children dubbed the creek “The Stinky
Stream.”
Nationally, mine drainage has been
knowntokill waterfowl aswell, whenmi-
gratingflocksmistookanacidicpool fora
safe drinking stop.
The most common way to clean acid
mine water is a through construction of
wetlands specifically designed for the
task. Such efforts have cropped up in the
region in the past two decades, typically
near streams that feed into the Susque-
hanna.
Mitigation efforts have worked, as the
Susquehanna water quality has im-
proved, with one highly though briefly
visible piece of evidence: The almost
staggering number of mayflies that
emerge each August. The bugs exist
most of the year as “nymphs” under the
water, andtheir numbersduringthefran-
ticmatingseason–moreof amatingday,
as theydieoff quickly- areanindicator of
river quality.
The more mayflies, the healthier the
river, andthey have beensonumerous at
timesthatMarketStreetBridgewasbeen
closedtocleandeadfliesoff theroad. The
bridge lights attract the mayflies inthick
clouds, andthedeadonesweresonumer-
ous they made the surface slick.
And the Susquehanna’s health is inex-
tricablylinkedtothehealthof theChesa-
peake Bay by a simple fact: the 440-mile
river provides about half the freshwater
inthe bay.
ACID
Continued from Page 1A
a .22-caliber revolver, Coop-
er also wounded Brad Ba-
gley and another neighbor
Thomas Harris, authorities
said.
Harris and Brad Bagley
remained in fair condition
Saturday evening at the
Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center in Plains
Township, according to a
nursing supervisor.
Luzerne County District
Attorney Jackie Musto Car-
roll said the investigation of
the shootings includes de-
termining how Cooper ob-
tained the gun.
“They said they were go-
ing to look into that,” said
Musto Carroll. Details
might be available on Mon-
day, she said.
Autopsies are scheduled
for today on the bodies of
Bagley and Cooper.
Cooper and Langille ob-
tained protection from
abuse orders against each
other on Thursday when
she also was granted tem-
porary custody of their
daughter. The PFA against
Cooper did not bar him
from acquiring or possess-
ing weapons.
Lori Conklin had lived in
the apartment complex and
came back to participate in
the vigil.
“This was senseless,” she
said of Bagley’s death.
“She was a nice girl,” said
Meme Fayson, who lives in
the complex. “I don’t know
why this happened to her.”
Jennifer Jones remem-
bered Bagley as someone
who was easy to talk to and
very friendly.
“She didn’t deserve this.
She didn’t deserve this at
all,” said Jones.
VIGIL
Continued from Page 1A
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Dennice Minsavage,
Bradley Bagley’s
sister, tears up when
talking about her
sister-in-law Shana
Bagley during Sat-
urday’s candlelight
vigil for Shana at the
Hanover Village
Apartments. Shana
Bagley was shot to
death on Friday, her
birthday, by the ex-
boyfriend of a neigh-
bor.
On her 25th birthday, Bagley came to the aid of her
neighbor Shaundra Langille and paid for it with her life.
Authorities said James Cooper, 39, of Scranton was
upset about temporarily losing custody of his 9-month-
old daughter to Langille and came to the apartment to
shoot her.
OAKLAND, Calif. — They
spent months warning the world
of the apocalypse, some giving
away earthly belongings or
draining their savings accounts.
And so they waited, vigilantly,
on Saturday for the appointed
hour to arrive.
When 6 p.m. came and went at
various spots around the globe,
including the East Coast of the
United States, and no extraordin-
ary cataclysm occurred, Keith
Bauer — who hopped in his
minivan in Maryland and drove
his family 3,000 miles to Califor-
nia for the Rapture — took it in
stride.
“I had some skepticism but I
was trying to push the skepti-
cism away because I believe in
God,” he said in the bright morn-
ing sun outside the gated Oak-
land headquarters of Family Ra-
dio International, whose foun-
der, Harold Camping, has been
broadcasting the apocalyptic
prediction for years. “I was hop-
ing for it because I think heaven
would be a lot better than this
earth,”
But he added, “It’s God who
leads you, not Harold Camping.”
Bauer, a tractor-trailer driver,
began the voyage west last week,
figuring that if he “worked last
week, I wouldn’t have gotten
paid anyway, if the Rapture did
happen.” After seeing the non-
profit ministry’s base of oper-
ations, Bauer planned to take a
day trip to the Pacific Ocean, and
then start the cross-country
drive back home Sunday with his
wife, young son and another fam-
ily relative.
The May 21 doomsday mess-
age was sent far and wide via
broadcasts and web sites by
Camping, an 89-year-old retired
civil engineer who has built a
multi-million-dollar Christian
media empire that publicizes his
apocalyptic prediction. Accord-
ing to Camping, the destruction
was likely to have begun its
worldwide march as it became 6
p.m. in the various time zones,
although believers said Saturday
the exact timing was never writ-
ten in stone.
In New York’s Times Square,
Robert Fitzpatrick, who spent
his own money to put up adver-
tising about the end of the world,
expressed surprise at 6 p.m. as
he was surrounded by tourists.
“Obviously, I haven’t under-
stood it correctly because we’re
still here,” he said.
Many followers said though
the sun rose Saturday without
the foretold earthquakes,
plagues, and other calamities,
the delay was a further test from
God to persevere in their faith.
The Internet also was alive
with discussion, humorous or
not, about the end of the world
and its apparent failure to occur
on cue. Many tweets declared
Camping’s prediction a dud or
shared, tongue-in-cheek, their re-
lief at not having to do weekend
chores, pay their bills or take a
shower.
Apocalypse Saturday: Skeptics judge Judgment Day
AP PHOTO
A boy runs across a street unmindful of streamer proclaiming
coming of Judgment Day on Saturday in Manila, Philippines.
By GARANCE BURKE
Associated Press
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011
I
f you ask a kid today what his/
her favorite place to go is, you
will probably hear something like
“No place, now get away while I
text 240 of my friends, at least 227
of whom I’ve never actually met, on
my Doozleberry as I’m sitting here
in my climate-controlled bedroom
feeling connected.”
Someday, I’m sure, there will be a
movie about a young guy from the
year 2011 or 2017 or 2024 going
back in time to the 1950s with all of
his cell phone, Blackberry, Facebook
and Skype gear and “enlightening”
his youthful counterparts of that era
on life and love. Of course the be-
nighted 1950s kids will hail him like
Prometheus bringing fire from the
gods.
I will then write a review of the
flick, pointing out that it’s unreal-
istic. That’s not because time travel
is preposterous (which I hope it
isn’t). It’s because young folks of the
1950s simply didn’t need all that
stuff. They had their own ways –
quite satisfying ways – of linking up
with one another.
Let’s say it’s about 1954 and you’re
12 years old and want to see your
pal Joe. All you have to do is walk
over to his house (friends tended to
live near one another), park yourself
out front and shout “call for Joe.” If
Joe’s mom didn’t stick her head out
a window and shout that Joe was at
choir practice or had the mumps or
that you were a bad influence, out
would bound Joe, and there you
were.
Repeat that a few more times and
you had enough guys to play base-
ball.
There were plenty of other ways
for kids to find one another in times
past. Since only rural areas had
school buses, the half-hour walk to
and from your alma mater was invar-
iably in the company of the same
four or five of your buddies day
after day. That’s “buddies” as in
people you actually see and talk to
and whose houses you’ve been in-
side, not disembodied wraiths with
screen names.
Incidentally, I’m convinced that
many Facebook “friends” don’t really
exist. They’re imaginary characters
created by the page owner or per-
haps some guy who lives by himself
in Irkutsk and whose hobby is sup-
plying them.
For the more athletic (as a teen I
tripped over sidewalk cracks), social
interaction in the 1950s was heavily
bound to dancing. These days I reg-
ularly talk with high school classes
about mid-20th –century history, and
one thing I say always startles them.
Grandma and Granddad used to go
to high school dances every week.
That’s every, every, every week.
When school was out, the dancing
kids of the ’50s waltzed on down to
the big pavilions at Sans Souci in
Hanover Township or Hanson’s at
Harveys Lake. In fact, that’s probably
how Mr. and Mrs. Gramps met, and
they never ran the risk of having
their identities stolen by spyware
based in China.
Don’t think I’m knocking the cyber
age. I dearly love the members of
my old high school class. We com-
municate via our computers, sending
email, jokes, political statements,
advice, music and pictures. Since
we’re now so scattered around, we’d
be in real-life trouble without Micro-
soft.
But we relics of the ’50s also
know when to sign off the Dell and
get ourselves out to our monthly
meetings and other events, where we
see the familiar faces and tell stories
old and new and give the occasional
hug and dry one another’s tears.
Maybe that’s the way it should be.
TOM MOONEY
R E M E M B E R W H E N
Linking up
face-to-face
in the Fifties
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist.
Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
G
us Genetti is the owner and operator of the Best Western Genetti Hotel &Confer-
ence Center in Wilkes-Barre. He and his wife, Val, also own similar facilities in
Dickson City and Williamsport. Genetti, 72, is a native of Hazleton and is a gradu-
ate of the Valley Forge Military Academy in Wayne. He also served in the United States
Army. He and his wife have six children: Valeria, Gus, Patricia, Cathy, Maria and Jacque.
They have six grandchildren and live in Wilkes-Barre.
You’ve been involved in
the hotel business for 48
years. We can assume you
must enjoy it. “I love any
business. I’m an entrepre-
neur at heart. I see oppor-
tunities all over, and it’s
rather frustrating some-
times becauseI want todo
everything. But I like ca-
tering. It is somewhat in-
tense, but I like that. I like
activity and I like the ac-
tion. And I like meeting
people. I used to be an
introvert at one time,
and though it took me a
while, I enjoy people.”
You’ve saidthat you
like to engage in con-
versations with peo-
ple that you don’t re-
ally know. “I’ll sit at a
table with a bunch of
strangers andinterview
them all. They all have
stories and I love to hear
their stories. I always
think it’s a shame to meet some-
bodyandnot knowwhotheyare.”
You’ve had some pretty fa-
mous guests. Any favorites?
“To be honest, I’m not really im-
pressed with celebrities and I’m
somewhat intimidated . But I real-
ly like Joe Paterno. He’s been in
our facilities many times and I
thought he was a great guy. But
for themost part, withcelebrities,
if they’re here, I don’t tend to take
photographs or seek them out. I
figure they deserve their priva-
cy.”
What do you do to relax? “I’m
a pilot and my wife is a pilot, so I
like to fly. We flew up to Alaska
and that was just an awesome op-
portunity.”
What’s it like commanding
such a vessel, thousands of feet
in the air? “It’s a lot easier than
drivingacar, quitefrankly. As long
as you know what you’re doing,
there’s not so many things to
bump into up there.”
Favorite food? “Chicken Par-
mesan.”
Always in the fridge? “Ballan-
tine Ale. It’s hard to find, but I buy
a case every two months or so. I
really enjoy it.”
First car? “A 1930 Model A
Ford. I bought it in 1957 and own-
ed it until just a few years ago.”
Hobbies or interests? “I’m
enamored by history. I’m really a
history buff.”
Defining moment? “When I
was in the service, I was without
direction, and they did a battery
of aptitude tests and put me into
electronics. I ended up with se-
cret clearance and was working
with nuclear missiles. Go figure. It
was quite a surprise to me. But as
far as my army career, other than
my job, I wasn’t happy with my-
self. I was very introverted and
hadverylittleconfidence, andI al-
so had a negative attitude in life.
“I had a three-day pass, and de-
cided I was going to go on a self-
MEET GUS GENETTI
S
.
J
O
H
N
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I
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/
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I
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A
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See MEET, Page 9B
W
ILKES-BARRE – Max Bartikowsky
smiles when he talks about his No. 14
basketball jersey that hangs on the wall
insidetheJewishCommunityCenter’s gymnasium.
Bartikowsky is now “commissioner” of the “5:30
Club” – a group of multi-aged men who have played
basketball at the JCC, it seems, since the days of
peach baskets and two-hand set shots. Bartikowsky
laughs whenhe talks about some of the past stars of
the club, people like the late Leonard Brader.
“I took over as commissioner after Le-
onarddied,” Bartikowskysaid. “We’ve al-
ways had a lot of fun playing a game we
love.”
But Bartikowsky, 80, turns serious
when he talks about the honor about to
be bestowed upon him. Bartikowsky,
president of Bartikowsky Jewelers, will
be one of three people to be inducted in-
to Junior Achievement’s organization’s
Business Hall of Fame. Carol Mueller of
McDonald’s and Earl Berger of Berger
Family Dealerships are also being in-
ducted during the 24th Annual Junior
Achievement Business Hall of Fame din-
ner that will be heldMay 25 at the Wood-
lands Inn & Resort in Plains Township.
“It’s quite an honor,” Bartikowsky
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Max Bartikowsky, president of Bartikowsky Jewelers, will be one of three people inducted into Junior Achievement’s Business Hall of Fame on May 25.
A gem of an honor
Max Bartikowsky among Junior Achievement’s Business Hall of Fame honorees
What: 24th Annual Junior
Achievement Business Hall of
Fame Dinner
When: Wednesday, May 25
Where: Woodlands Inn & Re-
sort, Plains Township
Time: 6 p.m.
Tickets: $125
Info: Call 602-3600
IF YOU GO
Name: Max Bartikowsky
Age: 80
Residence: Forty Fort
Work: President/CEO of Barti-
kowsky Jewelers, Wilkes-Barre
Education: Wyoming Seminary;
University of Pennsylvania’s
Wharton School; Wilkes College
MAX BARTIKOWSKY
See HONOR, Page 9B
By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O C C A S I O N S
E
lizabeth Fasciana and Joseph
Daley, together with their par-
ents, announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Dr. Guy M. and Patricia Fasciana,
Pittston Township. She is the grand-
daughter of John and Dolores Miller,
Pittston Township, and Michael and
Helen Fasciana, Pittston.
The prospective groom is the son
of James and Margaret Daley, Pitt-
ston Township. He is the grandson of
the late Frank and Theresa Daley and
the late Joseph and Helen Mullen.
Elizabeth is a 2003 graduate of
Seton Catholic High School and
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in business administration from Col-
lege Misericordia in 2007. Elizabeth
is employed by Bayada Nurses as a
client service manager.
Joseph is a 2003 graduate of Seton
Catholic High School and earned a
Bachelor of Science degree in biology
from the Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity in 2007. Joseph is finishing his
third year at the New York College of
Podiatric Medicine, New York, N.Y.,
pursuing his Doctor of Podiatric
Medicine. He will graduate in May
2012.
The couple will exchange vows on
June 25, 2011, at Sacred Heart of
Jesus Church, Dupont.
Fasciana, Daley
R
ichard and JoAnn Danko, King-
ston, are pleased to announce the
engagement and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter, Kristen Renee,
to Jason Cunningham, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jim Cunningham, Bloomsburg.
Kristen is the granddaughter of the
late Joseph and Irene Collepardi and
the late Joseph and Albina Danko.
Jason is the grandson of the late
Jim and Vivian Cunningham, Catawis-
sa.
Kristen is a 2004 graduate of Grea-
ter Nanticoke Area High School and a
2008 graduate of Misericordia Uni-
versity, Dallas, where she earned her
bachelor’s degree in early childhood
and elementary education. Kristen is
pursuing her master’s degree in mid-
dle school mathematics at Wilkes
University. She is a second-grade
teacher at a local area school district.
The prospective groom is a 1998
graduate of Central Columbia High
School and a 2002 graduate of Lock
Haven University. Jason is employed
by PPL, Berwick.
A summer wedding is planned on
the beach at sunset in North Cape
May, N.J., with family and friends
attending.
Cunningham, Danko
A
my Olson and Stephen Court-
ney were united in marriage
on May 13, 2011, by the Honor-
able Martin Kane.
The bride is the daughter of
Theresa Olson, Wilkes-Barre, and
Jim Olson, Plains Township. She
is the granddaughter of William
and Pauline Olson, Hudson, and
the late Robert and Theresa
McBride, Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is the son of Wil-
liam and Irene Courtney, Wilkes-
Barre. He is the grandson of the
late Ann and William Courtney,
Wilkes-Barre, and the late Irene
and John Walker Sr., Edwards-
ville.
A reception to celebrate their
union will be hosted by the
bride’s mother at a later date.
Amy is a 2002 graduate of
Coughlin High School and a 2006
graduate of Luzerne County Com-
munity College with an associ-
ate’s degree in business manage-
ment. She is employed at Staples,
Wilkes-Barre Township, as the
copy center expert.
Stephen is a 2002 graduate of
Coughlin High School. He is em-
ployed at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital as a pharmacy techni-
cian.
The couple resides in Wilkes-
Barre with their two children,
Stephen Michael and Zachary
Taylor Courtney.
Olson, Courtney
M
r. and Mrs. George Michael
Phillips will celebrate their 60th
wedding anniversary May 28, 2011.
George Michael and Maryann
have two children, Bruce Phillips
and his wife, Judy, and Barbara
Hoover and her husband, Francis Sr.
They are the grandparents of six
grandchildren: Francis Jr.; Adam and
his wife, Jen; Michael and his wife,
Alison; Hilary; Kristen; and Mat-
thew. They are the great-grandpar-
ents of Joshua, Jacob and David
Hoover.
They will celebrate with family.
The Phillipses
R
obert and Alberta Barnard, Lu-
zerne, are celebrating their 40th
wedding anniversary today, May 22,
2011. They were married in St. Ann’s
Church, Luzerne.
Alberta is the daughter of the late
Ben and Stella Wishnefski, Luzerne.
Robert is the son of the late George
and Shirley Barnard, Forty Fort.
They are the parents of a son, Ke-
vin, who is married to the former
Heather Posluszny.
They have a granddaughter Kayla.
The couple will celebrate their
anniversary with a family dinner.
The Barnards
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center
Evanofski, Lisa and Daniel, Exeter, a son,
April 29.
Belles, Abigail and James, Noxen, a
daughter, May 1.
Laudenslager, Natasha and Jonathan,
Kingston, a son, May 1.
Remakus, Crystal and Larry Gonzalez,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 2.
Walsh, Jill and Jeff Cotter, Dallas, a
daughter, May 2.
McDougal, Heather and Greg Ritsick,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 2.
Andes, Amanda and Stephen Trush,
Edwardsville, a son, May 3.
Petzold, Maureen and Joseph, Mountain
Top, a daughter, May 3.
Norton, Christina and Justin, Dickson
City, a daughter, May 3.
Wei, Xin and Yong Qiu Zhong, Mountain
Top, a daughter, May 4.
Sosa, Jenny and Daniel Calixto, Wilkes-
Barre, a son, May 4.
Perrins, Laura and Nygee Taylor,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 4.
Tarnowski, Brittany and Chris Leonard,
Nanticoke, a son, May 5.
Werner, Deanna and Jim, Wilkes-Barre, a
son, May 5.
Grabowski, Raven and Loren Pedley,
Lake Winola, a daughter, May 5.
Jensen, Amy and Richard Kamowski,
Nescopeck, a daughter, May 5.
McNally, Laura and Norman Gensel,
Plymouth, a daughter, May 5.
Adams, Heather and Eugene Jr., Mehoo-
pany, a son, May 6.
Sterling, Heather and Shae, Laceyville, a
daughter, May 6.
Tomlin, Nicole Ann, Nanticoke, a son,
May 7.
Smith, Maneka, Hazleton, a son, May 8.
Hansen, Krystyna and Pete, Dallas, a
daughter, May 9.
Jackson, Kelly Ann and Earl O’Brien,
Avoca, a daughter, May 9.
Lehane, Genevieve and Con, Dallas, a
daughter, May 10.
Mancini, Margaret and Justin, Pittston
Township, a son, May 10.
Scavone, Nicole and Ronald, Wyoming, a
daughter, May 10.
Nelson, Kathryn and Bradley, Mt. Poco-
no, a daughter, May 10.
Urban, Rebecca and Michael Therriauh,
Blakeslee, a daughter, May 10.
Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s
Center at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital
Mishkula, Cristy and Bernard Posten,
Pittston, a son, May 10.
Crispell-Walsh, Tiffany and Francis
Michael Walsh Jr., Pittston Township,
a son, May 1 1.
Rybak, Rebecca and Jason, Nanticoke, a
son, May 13.
Herbst, Nina and Bryan, Old Forge, a
son, May 14.
Twardowski, Leanne and Frank, Jenkins
Township, a daughter, May 14.
Walko, Christina and Donald Parsons,
Luzerne, a son, May 14.
Gregory, Ciara and Jeremy Miller,
Wyoming, a son, May 15.
Hess, Laura and Travis, Hunlock Creek,
a daughter, May 16.
Rinaldi, Francesca and Michael Hodle,
Dallas, a daughter, May 16.
Bender, Katrina and Jacob Puscavage
IV, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 16.
BIRTHS
CentraState Medical Center, Freehold,
N.J.
Costa, Melissa and Jason, a son, April
27. Grandparents are Anthony and
Celia Lacina, West Wyoming, and
Carlos and Luisa Costa, Millstone
Township, N.J.
OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS
Fairview Elementary School
Ronald Grevera, principal, Fairview Ele-
mentary School, recently announced the
following sixth-grade students who
attained Principal’s List and High Hon-
ors for the third quarter of the 2010-2011
school year.
Principal’s List: Lauren Anderson, Za-
chary Anderson, Suraj Dalsania, Marlee
Dillon, Joshua Edwards, Maria Ellis,
Samantha Forgatch, Cara Henahan,
Danielle Jones, Nicholas Jones, John
Kehl, Noah Kulp, David Lackenmier,
Emily Lehman, Lauren Rowski, Gwyneth
Shermanski, Neil Simasek, Rachel
Speck, Nicole Teberio, Curtis Tokach,
Jacob Way.
High Honors List: Nicholas Andrews,
Ashton Balliet, Anna Clark, Natalie
Everett, Anna Fox, Kate Garcia, James
Graves, Huntier Hashagen, Megan Hu-
dock, Jacob Kastreva, Kyle Katra, Adam
Keil, Aaron Keller, Jordan Kotowski,
Michael Kozelsky, Samuel Majdic, Abigail
Martino, Zachary Matson, Alexandria
Smolenak, Michael Ullman.
Northwest Area School District
Ryan Miner, principal, and Joseph Rasmus,
assistant principal, Northwest Area
Senior High and Middle School, recently
announced the third quarter Honor Roll
for the school year 2010/2011.
Grade 7: High Honors: Ashley Brubaker,
Carlee Capece, Emily Clarke, Rachel
Connolly, Kelsey Cook, Kelli Crockett,
Maggie Dow, Eric Evans, Hannah Everett,
Haily Gee, Catherine George, Elizabeth
Gurzynski, Cheyenne Huffman, Alexis
Kennedy, Kaylee Kishbaugh, Sarah
Kozlowski, Benjamin Krouse, Amy Kulp,
Anya Leitem, Tanner MacDougall, Vin-
cent Pavill IV, Terasa Pierontoni, Garrett
Reese, Brandon Reno, Ariana Saxe, Alex
Schechterly, Brooke Stavitzski, Jeremy
Walsh, Cody White. Honors: Neno Agnel-
lo, Andrew Boberick, Brandi Brown,
Kelsey Brown, Douglas Campbell, Erin
Cerase, Tyde Chamberlain, Kira Demp-
sey, Alan Diltz, Reese Godfrey, Brianna
Hardiman, Bryce Harrison, Noah Howe,
Katie Jones, Tanner Kennedy, Jillian
Kondrosky, Joshua Marr, Robert Maw-
son, Selena Maybury, Brooke Mendegro,
Abaigael Noss, Zachary Schwartz, En-
terprise Smallcomb, Alexis Verbinski,
Gabrielle Winn, Hayley Zavislak.
Grade 8: High Honors: Hope Hudak, Mar-
garet Murphy, Faith Rierson, Emily Snyd-
er, Marissa Sorber. Honors: Zachary
Briggs, Shelby Burke, Emma Everett,
Kaitlyn Ford, Emily Gleco, Cody Hart,
Lindsay Kashnicki, Shannon McCabe,
Sydney Moyer, Lane Naugle, Taylor
Pawlik, Morganne Piestrak, Olivia Pies-
trak, Katelin Price, Jacob Ratowski, Tori
Reinard, Tye Sutphen, Anthony Trent,
Kelby Truchon, Reagan Weiss, Kelsey
Yustat.
Grade 9: High Honors: Andrew Antolik,
Wyatt Cox, Destiny Fisher, Kyleigh Hoov-
er, Sierra Macierowski, Charles Marge-
lewicz, Joshua Piestrak, Angel Rollo,
David Samulevich, Bruno Walkowiak,
Ashley Williams. Honors: Kaitlin Agnello,
Bethany Ascenzi, Scott Avery, Jessica
Barchik, Janet Bash, Emily Buerger,
Emily Clements, Alyssa Coutts, Victoria
Daltroff, Samantha Eckroth, Eric Gur-
zynski, Kylee Hazur, Joseph Jenkins,
Rhiannon Judge, Sara Kashnicki, Kristen
Kondrosky, Tessa Leck, Michael Lewis,
Olivia Magni, Olivia McCorkel, Susan
Mendegro, Matthew Mitchell, Justin
Ratowski, Tristan Roche, Samuel Shaffer,
Eric Shemelewski, Kylie Sidoti, Michaela
Spaide, Alycia Stuart, Andrew Swiatek,
Hannah Weiss, Zachary T. White.
Grade 10: High Honors: James Begliomini,
Jr., Kyle Cragle, Hanna Dalmas, Alisa
Evans, Peter Feno, Harry Haas, Amanda
Jimcosky, Matthew Korea, Elora Lencos-
ki, Devon Mazonkey, Tyler Meininger,
Loren Schemery, Lacey Schultz, Frazee
Sutphen III, Kevin Volkel, Kyleigh Wall,
Kirsten Walsh, Chloe Weiss. Honors:
Tiffany Adams, Jacob Barchik, Alexan-
der Barretts, Curtis Bohl, Glenn Carr,
Rachel Crills, Richard Dillon, Kayla Gar-
ren, Sara Gleco, Alan Gulbierz, Aleesha
Hildebrand, Kenneth Jones III, Brielle
Killian, Daniel Krouse, Austin Leftwich,
Nicholas Lugiano, Alyssa Meeker, Josh-
ua Mitarnowski, Jenna Morris, Nicole
Nugent, Nathan Parsons, Morgan Price,
Erica Sadowski, Sara Schechterly, Crys-
tal Seashock, Alexander Sirak, Larry
Spaide, Andrew Stola, Dana Wido, Alivia
Womelsdorf, Janie Yeager, Joseph
Young, Brandon Zagata.
Grade 1 1: High Honors: Deanna Gill, Cody
Halchak, Kathryn Kalbach, Brandylynn
Macierowski, Karly Mason, Jeffrey Nel-
son, Matthew Schwiter. Honors: Clarissa
Anderson, Travis Antoniello, Kayla Buc-
zek, Brandon Butler, Skyler DiPasquale,
Joshua Dunay, Michael Faruolo, Joshua
Hess, Amber Holoman, Heather Hufford,
Maranda Koehn, Kristina Kulp, Rachel
Linso, Joelle Marvin, Colleen McCoy,
Jordan Monick, Marena Rasmus, An-
drew Rindos, Nicholas Roche, Sarah
Shaffer, Amanda Sivco, Jesse Smith,
Jordan Spencer, Alicia Stavitzski, Kyle
Stempien, Derek Sutliff, Peter Wolfe.
Grade 12: High Honors: Paul Ascenzi Jr.,
Willing Glatfelter, Kyla Hennigan, Shanna
Hummel, Andrea Jimcosky, Michael
Kennedy, Nneka Kennedy, Ryan Kon-
drosky, Charles Krouse, Corynn Kuchta,
Angela Lewis, Mackenzie Maurer, Con-
nor McAlarney, Lacey McCourt, Timothy
Race, Bret Rutkoski, Rachel Schwiter,
Nicole Shepherd, Chloe Swope. Honors:
Alyssa Andes, Maria Begliomini, Nikki
Black, Caitlyn Bonk, Steven Dillon, David
Drozdowski, Rochelle Dymond, Jeffrey
Englehart, Kelsey Floyd, Thomas Grego-
ry, Jody Higgins, Garrett Hittle, Chad
Howe, Dillon Kashula, Amy Kramer, Kyle
Kramer, Kelsey Leck, Joshua Martin,
Taylor Mazonkey, Felipe Ochoa, Anna
Mae Olivo, Alicia Perrego, Janice Ri-
chardson, Danielle Rodney, Matthew
Sorgen, Hayley Triplett, Michael Werner,
Alyssa Wido, David Wojciechowicz, Jr.,
Nicholas Yarnell, Randy Yeager.
HONOR ROLLS
Students at MMI Preparatory School
recently participated in a Walk for Au-
tism sponsored by eighth-graders. The
project was led by mid-school counselor
Jennifer Collins, whose son, Jonah, has
autism. During the walk, which was
spearheaded by eighth-grade students
Keegan Farrell and Medina Saeed, stu-
dents in grades 6-1 1 made laps around
the school’s new walking trails. Students
were also able to purchase a dress-down
day. Funds raised through the Walk for
Autism will benefit Autism Speaks, the
nation’s largest autism science and
advocacy organization. Planning the
walk, from left, first row, are Saeed,
Farrell and Collins.
MMI Preparatory students
walk for autism awareness
The Wyoming Seminary Mock Trial team competed for the first time in the National High School Mock Trial Competi-
tion in Phoenix, Ariz. The team took sixth place in the event, one of the highest finishes for a team from Pennsylvania.
Forty-eight teams competed. The Seminary team served as Pennsylvania’s state representative in the competition, which
included teams from 43 states, Guam, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, South Korea and Australia. This
year’s national winner was John Adams High School of South Bend, Ind. Several team members also received awards
based on their performance in the courtroom. Logan May received three Outstanding Attorney Awards and Renata
O’Donnell received one Outstanding Attorney Award. Lina Bader was awarded two Best Witness Awards and Ellie McDou-
gal and Amanda Immidisetti each received a Best Witness Award. Adam Carlisle served as teacher coach and attorneys
Neil T. O’Donnell, Cathy O’Donnell and Frank J. Brier served as attorney advisers. Team members at the competition,
from left, are Caroline Reppert, Alaina Schukraft, O’Donnell, Immidisetti, Harry Parkhurst, May, Ashlyn Reiser, Leah
Goldberg, Bader and McDougal.
Wyoming Seminary Mock Trial team competes at national level
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 3B
➛ O C C A S I O N S
The Times Leader allows you to
decide how your wedding notice
reads, with a few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in
Sunday’s People section, with
black-and-white photos, free of
charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to
edit announcements that exceed
that word count. Announcements
must be typed or submitted via
www.timesleader.com. (Click on
the "people" tab, then “weddings”
and follow the instructions from
there.) Submissions must include
a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We
do not run first-year anniversary
announcements or announce-
ments of weddings that took place
more than a year ago. (Wedding
photographers often can supply
you with a black-and-white proof
in advance of other album pho-
tographs.)
All other social announcements
must be typed and include a day-
time contact phone number.
Announcements of births at local
hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements
with local connections also are
accepted. Photos are only accept-
ed with baptism, dedication or
other religious-ceremony an-
nouncements but not birth an-
nouncements.
Engagement announcements
must be submitted at least one
month before the wedding date to
guarantee publication and must
include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement an-
nouncements once the wedding
has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are
published free of charge at the
10th wedding anniversary and
subsequent five-year milestones.
Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times
Leader or mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to
Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or
e-mailed to people@timeslead-
er.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
G
ina Maria Federici and James
Joseph Shock III were united in
marriage on Oct. 16, 2010, at the
Forty Fort United Methodist Church.
Uniting them in marriage was the
bride’s lifelong friend the Rev. Louis
Falcone, Luzerne.
The bride is the daughter of Ange-
line Federici and the late Thomas
Federici, Swoyersville. Gina is the
granddaughter of the late Carmella
and Anthony Zambito, Swoyersville,
and the late Peter and Helen Federici,
Luzerne.
The groom is the son of James
Shock Jr. and Elizabeth Shock, Sugar
Notch. Jim is the grandson of James
Shock Sr. and the late Sylvia Shock
and Mary Brink and the late Leo
Brink, all of Nanticoke.
The bride, who was escorted down
the aisle by her uncle, Martin Feder-
ici, chose her close friend, Mandy
Salus, as her maid of honor. Brides-
maids were her sister, Angela Feder-
ici, her sister-in-law, Nadeen Federici,
and sister of the groom, Sarina
Shock. Sarah Zambito and Janet
Federici were chosen as flower girls.
The groom chose his lifelong
friend, Dave Plisko, as his best man.
Groomsmen were Bart Josefowicz
and brothers of the bride, Tom Feder-
ici and Pete Federici. Dominic Feder-
ici, nephew of the bride, was chosen
as the ring bearer.
Scriptural readings were offered by
godmother of the bride, Denise Scal-
zo, and close friend of the family,
Joann Costello.
The bride was honored at a bridal
shower given by her mother at the
River Grille, Plains Township, Pa.
The parents of the groom hosted a
rehearsal dinner at Marvelous Mugs,
Scranton, Pa.
Gina graduated from Bishop
O’Reilly High School in 1998 and
earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in
elementary education from King’s
College in 2003. She is employed at
Pittston Area Intermediate Center.
Jim is a 2001 graduate of Hanover
Area Jr./Sr. High School and earned
a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychol-
ogy with a minor in sociology from
King’s College in 2005. Jim is em-
ployed by Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs as a full-time table games
dealer.
The couple resides in Swoyersville,
Pa., where they just recently pur-
chased their first home.
Shock, Federici
G
ary and Jean Hoffmann, Tanners-
ville, Pa., announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Laura Jean
Hoffmann, to Brian Carl Palermo,
son of Tom Palermo, Baltimore, Md.,
and Lori Palermo, Gouldsboro, Pa.
Miss Hoffmann graduated from
Pocono Mountain East. She is a grad-
uate student at Wilkes University and
is employed with Allstate Insurance.
Mr. Palermo graduated from North
Pocono High School. He attended
Lycoming College and is employed
with Camelback Mountain Resort.
The couple resides in Gouldsboro,
Pa.
A September 2011 wedding is
planned at Mountain Springs Lake
Resort, Reeders, Pa.
Hoffmann, Palermo
A
my Lazarski and Chris Rhinard,
together with their families,
announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Kevin and Sue Lazarski, Elysburg.
She is the granddaughter of Edward
Walsh and the late Catherine Walsh,
Maryland, and the late Alfred and
Josephine Lazarski, Mt. Carmel.
The prospective groom is the son
of Debbie Rhinard, Tunkhannock,
and Ed Rhinard, Laceyville. He is the
grandson of the late Angelo “Nails”
and Audrey Labori, Tunkhannock,
and the late Ken and Hilda Rhinard,
Orangeville.
Amy is a 2002 graduate of South-
ern Columbia High School and
earned a bachelor’s degree in music
education from Lebanon Valley Col-
lege in 2006. She is pursuing her
master’s degree in music at West
Chester University and is employed
by the Shikellamy School District.
Chris is a 2002 graduate of Tunk-
hannock Area High School and
earned a bachelor’s degree in history
from The Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity in 2006. He earned his mas-
ter’s degree in curriculum and in-
struction from Bloomsburg Uni-
versity in 2008 and is employed by
the Mt. Carmel School District.
The couple will exchange vows in
July 2011 at Eagle Rock Resort.
Rhinard, Lazarski
L
orenza Galella and Matthew
Dunnigan, together with their
families, announce their engage-
ment and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter
of Lorenzo and Patricia Galella,
Harding. She is the granddaught-
er of the late Joan Morgan and
the late Jack Morgan, both of
Wilkes-Barre; and the late Pas-
quale and Henrietta Galella, Hill-
dale, Plains Township.
The prospective groom is the
son of Kim Dunnigan, Hughes-
town, and Matthew Dunnigan,
Huntersville, N.C. He is the
grandson of Bronwen Miglionico
and the late Martin Miglionico,
Hughestown, and Jack and Mary
Dunnigan, West Pittston.
The bride-to-be is a 2003 gradu-
ate of Wyoming Area High School
and a 2006 graduate of Susque-
hanna University with a degree in
creative writing and public rela-
tions. She is the communications
and media relations manager at
Johnson & Wales University,
North Miami, Fla.
The prospective groom is a
2002 graduate of Wyoming Area
High School and a 2006 graduate
of Bucknell University, where he
earned a degree in business man-
agement and economics. He is an
investment associate at H.I.G
Capital Management, Miami, Fla.,
and will be pursuing a Master of
Business Administration degree
at the University of Pennsylva-
nia’s Wharton School of Business.
The couple resides in Miami
Beach, Fla., and will exchange
vows on June 18 at the Fisher
Island Club, Fisher Island, Fla.
Galella, Dunnigan
T
he parents of Karen Lucy Gower
and Karl Michael Fraedrich Aho
announce their engagement.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Wayne and Mary Gower, White Haven.
She is the granddaughter of the late Mr.
and Mrs. Fred Brandmier and the late
Mr. and Mrs. John “Beaver” Gower Jr.
Karen, a 2003 graduate of Crestwood
High School, earned a Bachelor of
Science degree in environmental stud-
ies fromEast Stroudsburg University in
2007. She is employed at Bear Creek
Camp and Conference Center as the
environmental programs manager.
The prospective groomis the son of
Robert and Lynn Aho, Baraga, Mich.
He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs.
Royal Fraedrich and the late Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Aho.
Karl, a 2003 graduate of Baraga High
School, earned a Bachelor of Arts de-
gree in philosophy fromValparaiso
University in 2007. He earned his Mas-
ter of Arts degree in philosophy from
Boston College in 2010 and is pursuing
a Ph.D. in philosophy at Baylor Uni-
versity, Waco, Texas.
Karen and Karl were engaged on
Oct. 13, 2010, in Waco, Texas, and will
be wed on Dec. 17, 2011, in White
Haven.
Aho, Gower
A
nnouncement is made of the
engagement and upcoming wed-
ding of Ashley Lynn Faraday to Ralph
Lester Kettle Jr., both of Ransom.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Lori Faraday, Pittston Township. She
is the granddaughter of Lillian and
Jimmy Suriano, Pittston Township,
and Robert Faraday and the late
Arlene Faraday, Ransom.
She is a 2004 graduate of Pittston
Area and earned a bachelor’s degree
in information sciences and tech-
nology from Penn State University.
The prospective groom is the son
of Ralph Kettle Sr. and Mary Anne
Pasternak, both of Ransom.
He is a 2005 graduate of Abington
Heights. He is employed with Wa-
bash International and is an assistant
fire chief for the Newton Ransom
Volunteer Fire Company.
A September wedding is planned.
Kettle, Faraday
J
essica Marie Morris and Michael
Konetski were united in marriage
on Aug. 6, 2010, at St. Leo’s Church
with the Rev. Thomas J. O’Malley
officiating.
The bride is the daughter of Dave
and Teresa Morris, Ashley. She is the
granddaughter of Theresa Marek, the
late John Marek and the late Frank
and Margaret Morris, all of Ashley.
The groom is the son of Michael
Konetski, Ashley, and Susan Konet-
ski, Hanover Township. He is the
grandson of John and Joan Glushef-
ski and the late Raymond and Ruth
Konetski, all of Hanover Township.
The bride, escorted by her father,
was attended by Jennifer Fissler,
matron of honor; Lynne Barber, maid
of honor; and bridesmaids Kendall
Morris, sister of the bride, Amy Kane
and Robyn Finberg.
The groom chose his brother, Ryan
Konetski, as best man. Ushers were
Jeff and Kyle Konetski, brothers of
the groom. Groomsmen were David
Morris, brother of the bride; and
Peter Yousaitis, Brad Binder, Mat-
thew Potsko and Jared Weibley.
Scriptural readings were offered by
Jeff and Kyle Konetski. Offertory gifts
were presented by grandparents of
the bride and groom, Theresa Marek,
John and Joan Glushefski and Mat-
thew Potsko and Peter Yousaitis.
A bridal shower, hosted by the
bridesmaids, was held in July at Irem
Country Club, Dallas. The rehearsal
dinner was hosted by the groom’s
father at Ruby’s Inn. An evening
cocktail hour, dinner and dancing
were held at Sand Springs Country
Club, Drums.
Mrs. Konetski is a 1999 graduate of
Hanover Area High School and a
2004 graduate of York College of
Pennsylvania.
Mr. Konetski is a 1999 graduate of
Hanover Area High School and a
2003 graduate of Millersville Uni-
versity, Millersville.
They reside in Bryan, Texas, with
their two boxers, Phillie and Nova.
Morris, Konetski
J
acob Thomas Ide and Caleb John
Ide, twin sons of Thomas and
Kimberly Ide, Shickshinny, were
baptized on May 8,
2011, by the Rev.
Anthony Generose at
the Holy Spirit Par-
ish Church of St.
Martha, Stillwater.
Jacob and Caleb
were born Jan. 30,
2011, at 3:42 a.m. and
3:43 a.m. at Lehigh
Valley Hospital, Al-
lentown.
Jacob’s godmother
is his aunt, Katie
Moran, Edwardsville.
Caleb’s godmother is
his aunt, Megan Ide,
Hershey.
The twins are the grandchildren of
Gary and Jackie Moran and Thomas
and Donna Ide, all of Edwardsville.
Jacob and Caleb were honored at a
celebration attended by family and
friends at their home.
Jacob T. and Caleb J.
Ide baptized
Jacob Ide
Caleb Ide
S
tanandPeggy Gavlick, Swoyers-
ville, will celebrate their 50thwed-
ding anniversary onMay 27. They were
marriedonMay 27, 1961, at St. Ignatius
Church, Kingston.
The Gavlicks are the parents of four
children: KarenNortonandher hus-
band, Donald; Cheryl Bednar andher
husband, Michael; Stanley Gavlick and
his wife, Colleen; andMelissa Kuliska
andher husband, Marcus.
They have three grandchildren,
Jessie, Shauna andTrevor.
Peggy is the former Peggy Hosey,
daughter of the late Agnes andCharles
Hosey. Stanley Jr. is the sonof the late
Stanley Gavlick Sr. andMargaret Gav-
lick, currently residing inColorado.
Stanis retiredafter 45 years of self
employment inthe snack foodbusiness
andaccordionist. Peggy spent many
years as a homemaker andemployee of
the Wyoming Valley West foodservice.
StanandPeggy will celebrate their
anniversary withfamily andfriends at a
Mass at 5 p.m. onMay 28 at Holy
Name/St. Mary’s Church, Swoyersville,
officiatedby the Rev. Anthony Urban,
Stan’s first cousin. Afamily dinner will
be heldafter the service.
The Gavlicks
M
r. and Mrs. Nester Urban cele-
brated their 50th wedding anni-
versary on May 13, 2011. They were
married at St. Faustina Church, for-
merly Holy Trinity Church, Nanti-
coke, by the late Rev. Emil M. Hus-
sack.
Mrs. Urban is the former Phyllis
Prushinski, daughter of the late An-
thony and Viola Prushinski.
She graduated from Nanticoke
High School in 1950 and was employ-
ed by the Berwick Area School
School District for 35 years as a head
cook prior to her retirement.
Mr. Urban is the son of the late
Charles and Mary Urban.
He served in the National Guard
for six years and was employed by
Kline’s Auto Industrial Supplies Inc.,
Allentown, as a sales representative
for 41 years prior to his retirement.
They are members of St. Joseph’s
Church, Berwick.
The couple has four children: Gre-
gory, Berwick; Christopher and his
wife, Jean, Bella Vista, Ark.; Debra
Modlesky and her husband, John,
Berwick; and Lorraine Labus and her
husband, Greg, West Chester.
They have five grandchildren,
Brittany and Brandon Modlesky and
Tyler, Daniel and Michael Labus.
The Urbans
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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HEROLD’S
FARM
MARKET
FAMILY RUN FOR OVER 100 YEARS
Daily 9-7
1/8 Mile Past Hanover Mall
Sans Souci Pkwy, Hanover
735-2918
• Hanging Baskets
• Large Selection of
Flowering Pots
• Cemetery Logs
• Potted Perennials
• Vegetable Plants
• 35 Varieties of Tomatoes
• 22 Varieties of Peppers
Wyoming Area High School
Vito Quaglia, principal, Wyoming
Area High School, recently an-
nounced the students who qual-
ified for the Honor Roll for the
second marking period ending
April 19.
Grade 7: High Honors: Joseph
Buczynski, Matthew Carlson,
Brian Cumbo, Erin Donnelly,
Katharyn Dymond, Alexis Harris,
Laura Heinzlmeir, Samantha
Holcomb, Kelsey Kasisky, Han-
nah Klaproth, Zachary Lagrue,
Ashley Lamoreaux, Cassandra
Lockhart, Michael Murphy, Ryan
Murphy, Lauren Perry, Victoria
Remley, Anthony Shaver, Ste-
phanie Sokach, Rachel Solano,
Jessica Sorick, Krystina Stanc-
zyk, Morgan Tarnalicki, Anna
Thomas, Nicole Wright, Megan
Wysocki. Honors: Robert Acacio,
Mackenzie Bilbow, Ryan Burton,
Ian Chandler, Kareemah Condry,
Matthew Dovidas, Blaise Erzar,
Mikayla Klimas, Lindsey Klinges,
Klaryssa Kolbeck, Maria Marstell,
Megan Mattioli, Victoria Mattioli,
Heather Nametko, Jay Neely,
Austin Rought, Amber Salvo,
Jennie Skursky, Kelly Sypulski,
Nico Vasquez, Daniela Vigueras,
Claudia Waltz, Eric Whyte.
Grade 8: High Honors: Amy Lynn
Alder, Madeleine Ambruso, Julia
Banas, Marcyssa Brown, Cecelia
Chisdock, Carlane Costello,
Juliana DeNardi, Joshua Donvi-
to, Emily Endres, Destini Esposi-
to, Chaslyn Facciponti, Dominick
Forlenza, Abigail Gibbs, Sergey
Gnilopyat, Nikolas Gushka, Tan-
ner Johnson, Olivia Katulka,
Amber Kuharchik, Zoe Laporte,
Geneva Laviska, Anthony Len-
kaitis, Maria Marcum, John
Marianacci, Melissa Mazzitelli,
Justin Palovchak, Victoria Pen-
nington, Mia Ashley Perrino,
Rachel Polacheck, Jude Polit-
Moran, Carrie Pozaic, Emma
Ramage, Sara Romanowski,
Lauren Sokirka, Haley Stack-
house, Brittany Thomas, Fran-
cesca Trottini, Peter Urban II,
Emily Wolfgang, Jeremy Zezza.
Honors: Sierra Beyer, Mariah
Bronsburg, Danielle Bulger,
Kenneth Burkhardt, Marc Cher-
venitski, Jr., Steven Dauber,
Cordell Gresh, Madison Hind-
marsh, Hannah Johnston, Nicole
Kolessar, Caitlyn Kraynak, Za-
chary Lopatka, Alexa Malloy,
Lauren Maloney, Evan Musto,
Abby Orth, Nina Owen, Maria
Pelliccia, Carmen Randazzo,
Julianna Scappaticci, Zachary
Scrobola, Nikki Sellitto, Zachary
Sypniewski, Johnathan Urban,
Shaun Vazquez, Olivia White,
Samantha Williams.
Grade 9: High Honors: Drew Bed-
narski, Emily Bellanco, Mallory
Bohan, Tyler Marie Bonita, Nicole
Cumbo, Morgan DeAngelo, Lisa
Guido, Audrey Hiedacavage,
Michaela Jurchak, Sara Justave,
Courtney Melvin, Brittney Mi-
chael, Austin Shission, Leo
Skoronski, Katherine Sokirka,
Danielle Spagnuolo, Gabrielle
Spagnuolo, Mari Elizabeth Tag-
gart, Abigail Thornton, Brittney
Winsock, Brian Wisowaty, Gared
Zaboski. Honors: Britney Ben-
koski, Amanda Bialy, Kyle Bor-
ton, Stephanie Brown, Brian
Buckman, Cody Colarusso, Sally
Deluca, Jaclyn DeNardi, Jo-
nathan Gamble, Julia Gober,
Jamie Hannis, Katherine Harri-
son, Matthew Hine, Steven
Huntz, Ariana Keller, Raelana
Scaltz, Keegan Thomas, Chris-
topher Wall.
Grade 10: High Honors: John
Bankus, Gabrielle Bohan, Victo-
ria Brown, Gregory Cajka, Mi-
chael Carey, Andrew Coco, Ni-
cholas Esposito, Casey Kasisky,
Kaitlyn Kross, Zachary Lanun-
ziata, Brittany Lemardy, Maria
Marianacci, Andrew Morrison,
Dylan Pegg, Abby Raieski, Ange-
la Raieski, Stormy Ruiz, Brittani
Shearer, Leslie Shumlas, Rachael
Stark, William Weiss IV, Devaney
Wood. Honors: Gabrielle Alberi-
gi, Kelly Bauman, Mariah Bel-
lanco, Megan Bonomo, Valerie
Bott, Marissa Charney, Glynnis
Cowley, Serra Degnan, Nicholas
Dominick, Alexandria Dougherty,
Nikki Giordano, Michael Harding,
Nicholas Heck, Katelyn Higgins,
Timothy Holden, Rebecca John-
son, Ashley Klein, Christina
Klinges, Emily Kneeream, Alex-
ander Krispin, Rachel Leandri,
Jessica Martin, Megan Milunic,
Nicholas O’Brien, Mark O’Hara,
Salvatore Polit-Moran, Evan
Rider, Amber Rodda, Courtney
Sadowski, Jared Saporito, Emily
Shemanski, Eric Smith, Stepha-
nie Spudis, Katie Tibus, Erik
Walkowiak, Tyler Wrubel, Jacob
Wysocki, Elizabeth Zekas, Jor-
dan Zezza.
Grade 1 1: High Honors: Johanna
Abend, Trevor Alder, John Barce-
lon, David Bonomo, Duyen Bui,
Mark Dymond, Allison Golden,
William Gray III, Jessica Hollister,
Keri Irace, Theresa Kelly, Serena
Kozokas, Emily Lukasavage, Nick
Mazzone, Megan Potoski, Sara
Radzwilka, Adam Romanowski,
James Scrobola, Jonathan
Scrobola, Samantha Shiner,
Brittany Smetana, Jacqueline
Stash, Martine Tonnesen, Louis
Vullo. Honors: Alexandra Amico,
Christina Argenio, Nicholas
Bartoli, Morgan Bilbow, Amber
Bolton, Kyle Brogan, Sarah
Crake, Alyssa Crawford, Michael
Gentile, Kimberly Golden, Naomi
Handzelek, Jordan Johnston,
Michael Kohut, III, Leah Laneski,
Kyle Lanunziata, Emily Letoski,
Kaitlin Maguire, Gianna Mar-
ranca, Brionna Murray, Daniel
Newhart, James Pennington,
Brina Platt, James Rose, Jr.,
Hanna Shelley, Aaron Steve,
Riley Thomas, Kristy Voychuk,
Erin Weida.
Grade 12: High Honors: Andrew
Ambruso, Jillian Balberchak,
Caitlin Bernoskie, Macawley
Brown, Alyssa Cajka, Karisa
Calvitti, Ryan Carey, Jessica
Dauber, David Dorbad, Alex
Ellsworth, Holly Ference, Alaina
Gercak, Michelle Gitkos, Michelle
Golden, Debra Gross, Linnae
Homza, Ronald Klepadlo, Kayla
Kross, Sarah Mack, Brianna
Mikolaichik, Amy Novak, Jessica
Olejnik, Alecia Panuski, Saman-
tha Scott, Tia Spagnuolo, Kevin
Thornton, Caitlin Vitale, Alyssa
Zekoski. Honors: Kayla Bardzel,
Robert Brzozowski, Brittany
Bubblo, Dustin Harris, Maria
Kelly, Matthew Kolbeck, Kaithlyn
Oravitz, Kourtny Schwerdtman,
Julia Solomon, Rachel Taylor,
Stacie Terran, Michael Tomas-
zewski, Amber Trantham, Lauren
Wysocki, Stanley Yanik.
HONOR ROLL
Wyoming Seminary Lower School recently held an art show and
reception to showcase the works of second-grade students who
have been studying art history and art appreciation. Students
created their own versions of some of the fine paintings they have
studied and a favorite work was framed for the show that was held
in the Sordoni Library. The show represents a traditional rite of
spring at the Lower School and was followed by a formal reception
for family, friends, teachers and classmates. With her painting
titled, ‘Vase of Flowers,’ is Anne Osterburg, Kingston, with her
parents Dr. Julie Kuhlken and Fredrik Osterburg and sister, Car-
olina.
Seminary second-graders showcase artwork
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 5B
Photographs and information must be
received two full weeks before your
child’s birthday.
To ensure accurate publication, your
information must be typed or computer-
generated. Include your child’s name, age
and birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and
great-grandparents’ names and their
towns of residence, any siblings and their
ages. Don’t forget to include a daytime
contact phone number.
We cannot return photos submitted for
publication in community news, including
birthday photos, occasions photos and all
publicity photos. Please do not submit
precious or original professional pho-
tographs that require return because such
photos can become damaged, or occasion-
ally lost, in the production process. Send
to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.
GUIDELINES
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) published free of charge
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
If your child’s photo and birthday
announcement is on this page, it will
automatically be entered into the
“Happy Birthday Shopping Spree”
drawing for a $50 certificate. One
winner will be announced on the first
of the month on this page.
WIN A $50 GIFT
CERTIFICATE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Andi Stella Blaski, daughter of
Sam and Denise Blaski, Kingston,
is celebrating her 10th birthday
today, May 22.Andi is a grand-
daughter of John and Maureen
Blaski and Dan and Dianne Bar-
tusek, all of Kingston. She is a
great-granddaughter of Bob
Davis, Exeter. Andi Stella has a
brother, Jake Major, 1 1.
Andi S. Blaski
Madison Elizabeth Brdaric,
daughter of Shaun and Therese
Brdaric, Jackson Township,
celebrated her eighth birthday
May 20. Madison is a grand-
daughter of Philip and Sharon
Mathers, Donna Brdaric and
Stephen Brdaric. She is a great-
granddaughter of Dorothy Shut-
lock. She has two sisters, Maris-
sa, 6, and Macey, 3.
Madison E. Brdaric
Jax William Leininger, son of
Jason and Denise Leininger,
Birdsboro, celebrated his third
birthday May 19. Jax is a grand-
son of Joseph and Betty Knorr,
Ashley; Charles Leininger, Elver-
son; and Pamela Leininger,
Ephrata. He has two brothers,
Jason and Joseph, 4.
Jax W. Leininger
Matthew Smith, son of Artie and
Michele Smith, Dorrance, is
celebrating his eighth birthday
today, May 22. Matthew is a
grandson of Bill and Stella Polny,
Dorrance, and the late Art and
Jean Smith. He has a brother,
Mike, 10.
Matthew Smith
Kate Bunton,
Kingston, a
reporter for
Misericordia
University’s
student news-
paper, The
Highlander,
recently re-
ceived a first-place award for
investigative reporting from the
American Scholastic Press
Association. Bunton received
the award for her story, ‘Sculp-
ture Sparks Naked Discussion,’ a
report published in November
2010 regarding discussions over
the appropriateness of the
placement of a male figurative
sculpture in an art exhibit on
the campus. It was the first
investigative reporting award
for the newspaper. Bunton is a
communications major.
Monica The-
roux, a junior
at Holy Re-
deemer High
School, was
one of 240
vocalists in
the state to
participate in
the 2011 Pennsylvania Music
Educators Association (PMEA)
Honors Chorus at Lancaster
Bible College. The Honors Cho-
rus is held in conjunction with
the PMEA’s annual music in-
service conference. Guest con-
ductor for the public concert
was Dr. Christopher Kiver, choral
director from Penn State Uni-
versity. Students are selected to
participate based on competi-
tions held throughout the
school year. Theroux, the
daughter of Dr. John and Mary
Theroux, Kingston, also partici-
pated in district and regional
chorus festivals. Ann Manganel-
lo is the chorus director at Holy
Redeemer.
Aimee Wilder, Tunkhannock,
was recently inducted into
Widener University’s chapter of
Kappa Theta Epsilon, the Na-
tional Honor Society for Coop-
erative Education. To be in-
ducted, students must exhibit
superior scholarship, exemplary
character and distinguished
personal qualities. Wilder is
pursuing an accounting/sport
management degree at the
university.
Ryan Barber, a senior from
Kingston, recently received the
Robert Pittman Award during
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill School of Jour-
nalism and Mass Communi-
cation 2011 scholarships and
awards ceremony. The $8,000
award was created in 1994 by
the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times
to honor Robert Pittman, edi-
torials editor for that newspa-
per from1964 to 1991. Pittman
earned his master’s degree
from the UNC journalism school
in 1957. The award includes a
summer internship at the
Times.
Emily Louise Deubler, Dallas,
was recently inducted into Pi
Mu Epsilon, the national honor
society for mathematics at The
University of Scranton. Deubler
is a senior majoring in both
biomathematics and philosophy.
NAMES AND FACES
Bunton
Theroux
Several eighth-grade students at St. Jude School were the recip-
ients of the Bishop’s Youth Award that recognizes young men and
women who are involved in their parish and/or Catholic school and
are outstanding public examples of young Catholics who testify to
their faith. They must be involved in a minimum of four apostolates
to be nominated by their pastor, principal or youth director. The
awards were presented by Bishop Joseph Bambera at a special litur-
gy in St. Peter’s Cathedral, Scranton. Award winners, from left, first
row, are Jillian Hayden, Gabrielle Mohutsky, Renee Brown and Alana
Wilson. Second row: Connor Murray, Conlan McAndrew and Jacob
St. Jude students earn Bishop’s Youth Awards
The Wyoming Seminary Upper School and Lower School recent-
ly held a fundraiser to benefit the International Red Cross in its
efforts to aid the victims of the devastating earthquake and tsuna-
mi in Japan. The Upper School student activities office sold T-
shirts at both schools and the Upper School International Club
donated some of its proceeds from its annual International Dinner
and a club member also created a video to aid the fundraising
effort. Faculty, staff, students and parents from both campuses
also made gifts to the fund which collected more than $4,600.
With one of the T-shirts, from left: Jennifer Siff, director of student
life; Mako Matsuzaki, freshman, Tokyo, Japan; Masahiro Chiba,
freshman, Tokyo, Japan; and Yinbo Gao, freshman, Shanghai,
China, International Club representative.
Sem students hold fundraiser for quake victims
The Wilkes University International Club and the Wilkes University
Pre-Law Society recently held a fundraiser to benefit American Red
Cross relief efforts for victims of the Japan tsunami and earthquake.
‘Hope for Japan’ was initiated by Sara Wolman and orchestrated with
the help of students Daniel Keith Hunter and Randy Keiser. The fun-
draiser featured 70 Japanese meals donated by Katana, Wilkes-
Barre. Nearly $500 was raised and all funds will be donated to the
American Red Cross. Participants, from left, are Andrew Miller, Hun-
ter, Keiser and Wolman.
Wilkes clubs raise money for earthquake relief
Barbara Welch’s fifth-grade language arts class at the United
Hebrew Institute recently conducted a school-wide food drive to
benefit local citizens. The food drive was held in honor of Dwaina
Brooks from Dallas, Texas, who, with the help of family and
friends, prepared and delivered meals to local homeless shelters.
The students read about her generosity in their anthologies. Each
grade at the school participated by bringing in nonperishable
food items and monetary donations over a two-week period. More
than 200 items were collected and will be donated to Sarah’s
Table, a Jewish Family Service program. Some of the participants,
from left, first row, are Jacob Kaplan, Lily Drak, Chava Kornblatt
and Haley Rudofker. Second row: Rabbi Raphael Nemetsky, princi-
pal; Lisa Morgan, Jewish Family Service; and Welch.
UHI fifth-graders hold food drive
The Wilkes-Barre Academy Leo Club, a youth service organization
consisting of seventh- and eighth-grade students, recently performed
its annual Earth Day project as part of the Lions Club Green Team
efforts. Several members decorated paper shopping bags with envi-
ronmental themes. The bags were given to Thomas’ Market, King-
ston, and distributed to customers who were asked to return the
bags on their next visit. The event was organized by Olivia Gregorio.
The club is sponsored by the Wilkes-Barre Lions Club. Some of the
members with their bags, from left, are Gregorio, Olivia Greer, Ariana
Notartomaso, Samantha Pollick, Victoria Stack, Danielle Marchese
and Emily Schramm.
W-B Academy Leo Club members mark Earth Day
The students of the Wyoming Valley Montessori School, King-
ston, recently conducted a ‘Socks for Japan’ collection as part of
their community outreach. The students collected a large number
of new socks for victims of the earthquake. Each month students
and parents of the school participate in a community project.
Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Benen Griffith,
Kingston, and Clara Burgos, Harveys Lake. Second row: Kevin
Basalyga, Dallas; Grazia Saporito, Pittston; Kevin McNulty, King-
ston; Clare DellaValle, Shavertown; and Dennis Puhalla, head of
school.
Montessori students conduct sock collection
Wyoming Valley West High School recently announced the Stu-
dents of the Month for May. Students are chosen by teachers based
on their academic performance, school spirit and conduct. Students,
from left, first row: Miles Fagley-Orfanella, son of Amy Fagley and
Jamie Orfanella, Kingston; Scott Luff, son of Scott and Jennifer Luff,
Courtdale; and Christopher Kovaleski, son of Joseph and Maria Kova-
leski, Swoyersville. Second row: Caitlin McCue, daughter of Chris and
Heidi McCue, Kingston; Sarah Miller, daughter David and Barbara
Miller; Rachel Kester, daughter of Joseph and Debra Kester, Larks-
ville; and Amanda Dekmar, daughter Chuck and Diane Dekmar, King-
ston. Yasin Abdallah, son of Mohamed and Seham Abdallah, King-
ston, was also a Student of the Month.
Students of the Month named at WVW
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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G.A.R. Memorial Junior-Senior
High School
Colleen Robatin, principal, G.A.R.
Memorial Junior-Senior High
School, recently announced the
members of the Honor Roll for
the third quarter.
Grade 12: Highest Honors: Jef-
frey Ankner, Katelyn Arcelay,
Nigel Bowman, Ryan Burkhardt,
Katlin Clark, Wilton Curiel,
Ashley Evans, Catherine Golya,
Hector Izaguirre, Anastasia
Jablowski, Adam Krull, Ryan
Kuren, Jillian Lavelle, Kaitlin
McCann, Danielle Monsuer,
Anna Ondish, Bobbielynn Ri-
chardson, Tyshara Rinaldi,
Leanna Rolon, Nicolas Sosa Jr.,
Christopher Stortz, Joseph
Taylor, Julianna Toole. High
Honors: Raymond Ashford,
Andrew Barrow, Kayla Borum,
Joseph Boyer, Crystal Camacho,
Katelynn Carley, Michael Cast-
erline, Sheikh Conteh, Michael
Delaney, Keenan Harris, Jas-
mine Johnson, Joshua Kaskey,
Jacqualyn Kocher, Ashley Malo-
ney, Samantha Miller, Nancy
Pacheco, Joshua Pachick, Javon
Pendarvis, Gary Polakoski, Tara
Price, Alicia Riggsbee-Powell,
Adrienna Rowe, Cassandra
Ventura, Justin Warman, Heath-
er Yaron, Zackary Yashkus.
Honors: Amanda Bankes, Shac-
quar Bradford, Emilee Bubblo,
Krystina Davison, Dane Dudick,
Kaitlyn Dunbar, Mikol Durling,
Essence Gibson, Cody Gromel,
Terrel Harris, Brent Herbert,
Mary Hester, Krista Holloway,
Lance Letteer, Henry Lopez,
Jessica Mashinski, Stephanie
McGraw, Nakira Minor, Brianna
Norton, Nina Phillips-Anaya,
Avery Picketts, Patrick Smith,
Edison Suquilanda, Jeffrey
Thomas, Keyonna Thomas,
Destinee Twyman, Lorianne
Zaleski.
Grade 1 1: Highest Honors: Elissa
Domzalski, Daniel Faust, Beth
Anne Gilbert, Kaleigh Killian,
Tara Kolativa, Nicole Krzywicki,
Justin McCarthy, China Mor-
ningstar, Ryan Pavone, Casey
Phillips, Trenaya Reid, Laurel
Roughsedge, Steven Trebunak,
Thomas Tyson. High Honors:
Alysha Baker, Kaleigh Bubblo,
Lauren Ciliberto, Darrell Craw-
ford, Denzel Kemp, Samantha
Kirschner, Warren Kolc, El-
izabeth McGlynn, Toni Skibinski,
Marisol Sosa, Edgar Tapia,
Steven Udiski, Barbara Yelland.
Honors: Lauren Apolinaro, Lien
Do, Zachary Ellis, Dennis Hynes,
Jessica Kipa, Jordan Liguori,
Eric Olszyk, Andrew Smith,
Michael Smith, Jeremy Soto,
Thomas Williams, Kimberly
Wolfe.
Grade 10: Highest Honors: Edou-
kou Aka-Ezoua, Jian Chi, Dou-
glas Delescavage, Candice
Hartman, Brian Klapat, Julianna
Leco, Tyler Mulvihill, Alec Nie-
miec, Stefanie Short, Victoria
Wallace, Hailey Williams. High
Honors: Everett Appleby, Jef-
frey Chintalla, Nathaniel Ekas,
Luke Height, Francis Mapp,
Molly McCarthy, Nicolas Old-
ziejewski, William Richardson,
Shakir Soto, Rachel Vitale.
Honors: Shayna Acosta, James-
Dante Baker, Lucas Benton,
Samantha Bryan, Christopher
Diaz, Zachary Farrell, Edward
Flippen, Jennifer Flynn, James
Gallagher, Weslee McDermott,
Corey Moore, Vincent Phan,
Yazmin Ramirez, Jerry Reyes,
Marquise Sampeur, Joseph
Sipsky, Rodrigo Tapia, Brittany
Thomas, Bryan Velez.
Grade 9: Highest Honors: Jahlil
Harvey, Bradley Pachick, Sarah
Petro, Jada Smith, Joseph
Snipas, Martin Snyder. High
Honors: Yan Mary Abreu-Tejeda,
Breah Cooper, Randall Faulk,
Rebecca Glaude, Deanna Hester,
James Holmes, Patricia Houder-
shieldt, Michelle Huertero,
Alvaro Izaguirre, Shiniese
Jones, Breana Mosier, Melissa
Ponce, Kaitlyn Raineri, Jacob
Revak, Michael Rowe, Patrick
Shovlin, Erickson Taveras,
Adrian Thomas, Steven Tyson,
Brittany Wolovich, Richard Yost.
Honors: Joseph Arcelay, Abbi-
gail Borum, Courtney Colorusso,
Brian Dapas, Amber Echols,
Joseph Evans, Kevin Evans,
Tyler Frame, Jessie Gibson,
Jonathan Hynes, Doreen Kier-
nan, Amanda Kosich, Anthony
Luton, Deandra Mark, Jennifer
McDonald, Madisen Nichol,
Gunnar Phillips, Richard Sickler,
Jonathan Smith, Erich Snyder,
Lamont Twyman, Jocelyne
Vazquez, Korey Welkey, Jessica
Wills.
Grade 8: Highest Honors: Anis-
sah Baht-T’om, Seth Callahan,
Vanessa Castillo, Christina
Cherkis, Jimmy Donovan, Za-
chary Faust, Kariana Goicoe-
chea, Katelyn Oldziejewski,
Aaron Pekar, Shianne Roberts,
Larissa Stucker, Rachel Wielgo-
polski. High Honors: Sa’id Abdul
Qayir, Alexander Boback, Sa-
mantha Conahan, Paige Elmy,
Joshua Flynn, Zachary Gon-
zalez, Gabrielle Hynes, Jeremy
Klapat, Katlin Kofchak, Diane
Lopez, Bo McPeek, Kati Mendo-
za, Devin Nesbitt, Samantha
Peterson, Jaqueline Rocha,
Mahogany Shack, Ismaila Sonko,
Raquel Sosa, Kayla Stair, Mari-
lyn Tapia, Ian Valles, Jeffrey
Warnagris, Sean-Paul William-
son, Tydus Winstead. Honors:
Gabrielle Branch, Nashae Caru-
so, Anthony Easter, Gabriella
Forst, Nigebo Francis, Zoe Ge-
orge, Corey Hardik, Devon Har-
ris, James Hawkins III, Jasmine
Hernandez, Shawn Kennedy,
Catherine Luckey, Lamonica
Mateo, Skye Miller, Brett Price,
Edwin Sosa, Brittany Stephen-
son, Anamaria Suarez, Oshea
Taylor, Anthony Tlatenchi, Alys-
sa Yelland.
Grade 7: Highest Honors: Tristino
Altavilla, Shaquan Everett,
Banessa Flores, Dylan Frame,
Nathan Mattey, Victoria Mess-
inger, Robert Petrovich. High
Honors: Michael Bodosky, Brian
Cruz, Jeremy Erhardt, Avery
Harris, Jocelyn Lee, Henderson
Marte Jr., Jacob Massaker,
Hayden Moody, McKenzie Ni-
chol, Rofiat Oseni, Giselle Reyes
Guadarrama, Casey Ross, Erin
Scafella, Noah Schoettle, Pedro
Tapia Jr., Breanna Taylor, Kayla
Unvarsky, Erick Velez. Honors:
Johnny Amigon, Cha’Zuayla
Boseman, Shamika Dates, Des-
mond Dyer, Antwone Easter,
Myuanna Fitzgerald, Victor
Galeno, Giselle Huertero, Laura
Kolarik, Tahjir Lewis, Diance
McCloe-Hall, Ivanna Nin, Ryan
Ondish, Lindsey Quinn, Angel
Reese, Skye Reese, Isell Reyes-
Martinez, Josmarlyn Rivas Adon
Jr., Austin Rivera, Tyi Rookwood,
Briee Shovlin, Corey Smith,
Darion Stouchko, Amber Tem-
arantz, Mohamed Toure, Britta-
ny Vital, Giovanny Vivar, Tyler
Winstead.
HONOR ROLL
Four eighth-grade students from Wyoming Area Catholic School
recently received the Bishop’s Youth Awards at St. Peter’s Cathedral.
Gaetano Buonsante, Peter Kulick and Mary Pat Blaskiewicz repre-
sented Wyoming Area Catholic and Carina Forte represented St.
Mary’s of the Immaculate Conception Church, Wilkes-Barre. The
award recognizes young people for their exemplary practice of faith
and their genuine commitment to service in parishes and schools. It
is the highest recognition offered to Catholic youth of the diocese.
Award winners, from left: Buonsante, Forte, Kulick, Blaskiewicz and
Lucille Procopio, principal.
Students receive Bishop’s Youth Awards
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 7B
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Coastal Carolina University,
Conway, S.C.
Samantha Krawczuk, White Haven,
Bachelor of Science degree in
business administration.
Gwynedd-Mercy College,
Gwynedd Valley
Kaylynn Curfman, Berwick, Bache-
lor of Science degree in biology
secondary education.
Juniata College, Huntingdon
Brittany M. Rusczyk, Wapwallopen,
Bachelor of Science degree in
biology.
Emily R. Koval, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Science degree in
biology, cum laude.
Millersville University of
Pennsylvania, Millersville
Amanda A. Marchetti, Hazleton,
Master of Arts degree in English.
Brooke F. Barski, Berwick, Bachelor
of Science degree in music
education, magna cum laude.
Megan E. Frantz, Blakeslee, Bache-
lor of Science degree elemen-
tary and early childhood educa-
tion, cum laude.
Julee M. Maguire, Blakeslee, Bach-
elor of Science degree in busi-
ness administration.
William N. Barnes, Dallas, Bachelor
of Science degree in social stud-
ies education, cum laude.
David L. Hanadel, Dallas, Bachelor
of Arts degree in government.
Elyse E. Apaliski, Harveys Lake,
Bachelor of Science degree in
biology.
Robert J. Moss, Nanticoke, Bache-
lor of Science degree in business
administration.
Stephanie C. Kilvitis, Avoca, Bache-
lor of Science degree in business
administration.
Mark J. Stewart, Wilkes-Barre,
Bachelor of Arts degree in so-
ciology.
Leah R. Bordow, Kingston, Bachelor
of Arts degree in earth science.
Jeffrey D. Ostrum, Kingston, Bach-
elor of Science degree in occu-
pational safety and environ-
mental health.
Rachel M. Fritz, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Science degree in
biology, magna cum laude.
Shane A. Kishel, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Science degree in
elementary and early childhood
education.
Andrew Slocum, Shavertown,
Bachelor of Science degree in
biology, magna cum laude.
OUT-OF-TOWN
GRADUATIONS
Penn State Wilkes-Barre
Penn State Wilkes-Barre recently
announced the 201 1 Spring Dean’s
List. To be eligible for the Dean’s
List, students must complete 12 or
more credits with at least a 3.50
semester grade point average. The
following students were named to
the Dean’s List:
David W. Angelella, Harding; Bailee
M. Antal, Pittston Township; Todd
M. Belles, Shickshinny; Melissa M.
Bennett, Jessup; Kevin A. Bennett,
Laceyville; Candy R. Benscoter,
Wyalusing; Burton J. Berrettini,
Forty Fort; Cory R. Blowers, Hones-
dale; Eric J. Bogumil, Mountain
Top; Matthew A. Boozer, New
Bethlehem; Shannon A. Brace,
Hunlock Creek; Nikki Broody,
Shavertown; Jordan M. Broody,
Shavertown; Marley K. Bross,
Shavertown; Rachel L. Buckman,
Dallas; Brandon W. Burke, Ed-
wardsville; Sabrina M. Bush, Tunk-
hannock; Bradley C. Calaman,
Carlisle; Nikolas D. Capitano, Sha-
vertown; Michael J. Cappos,
Wilkes-Barre; Jonathan C. Casey,
Old Forge; Kyle A. Casterline,
Shickshinny; Michael C. Cefalo,
Exeter; Tyler M. Chase, New Alba-
ny; Sudan Chen, Kingston; Suxia
Chen, Kingston; Daniel J. Coates,
Ashley; Robert R. Constable,
Stroudsburg; Gregory C. Davis,
Dallas; Raymond M. Dearmitt,
Harding; Ivana A. Derby, Larksville;
Jesse A. Derrick, Benton; Stephen
J. Dotzel, Mountain Top; Michael P.
Dulebohn, Laflin; Daniel A. Dy-
mond, Tunkhannock; Shane E.
Grady, Sweet Valley; Christina L.
Hanley, Nanticoke; Darren L. Haus-
er, Wysox; Jessica L. Helman,
Julian; Eric W. Hillard, Emlenton;
Staci A. Hills, Shavertown; Kevin P.
Hoban, Pittston; Paul E. Holmgren
Jr., Hanover Township; Lindsey G.
Howell, Tunkhannock; Kathryn A.
Huffsmith, Tunkhannock; Shantelle
U. Johnson, Effort; Ceili A. Jones,
Wilkes-Barre; Ryan M. Kazokas,
Kingston; Andrew K. Kempinski,
Dallas; James Kovalik, Wilkes-
Barre; Kristy M. Kravitsky, Wyom-
ing; Bradford J. Lapsansky, Plains;
Kyle A. Levalley, Shickshinny;
Albert R. Levanavage, Pittston;
Ryan R. Ligi, Endwell, N.Y.; Randy
W. Lohr, Springville; Frank Lombar-
do, Yatesville; Matthew B. Luksic,
Shavertown; Laura J. Mann, Mid-
dletown, N.Y.; Nicholas R. Martin,
Exeter; Jason D. Medrano, Scran-
ton; John-Paul C. Mericle,
Swoyersville; Samantha N. Miller,
Exeter; Megan A. Millo, Dallas;
David J. Mizzer, West Wyoming;
Leo J. Monelli, Forty Fort; Matthew
J. Morris, Kingston; Caitlyn A.
Munley, Jenkins Township; Garry
R. Musselman Jr., Dallas; Ray A.
Musto, Wilkes-Barre; Jessica R.
Musto, Wilkes-Barre; Johnathan R.
Myrkalo, Inkerman; Robert P. Naro,
Wilkes-Barre; Jennifer M. Naro,
Larksville; Rebekah L. Nulton,
Dallas; Mark B. Orlando, Schuylkill
Haven; Eric M. Oshinski, Forty Fort;
Colleen M. Paddock, Swoyersville;
Shawn J. Palsgrove, Hanover
Township; Michael L. Parrent,
Duryea; Michael D. Pelleschi, Dal-
las; Harriet E. Polites, Wilkes-Barre;
Andrew J. Race, Hughestown;
Richard K. Rachkowski, Harding;
Brian Reese, Hughestown; Kristine
E. Rhubright, Laceyville; Brendan
J. Rinehimer, Pocono Pines; Laris-
sa S. Robak, Throop; Brent W.
Robbins, Wyoming; Andrew P.
Sawchak, Hanover Township;
Daniel Scatena, Pittston; Chad M.
Schraeder, Dallas; Donovan W.
Schwartz, State College; Justin M.
Seliga, Nanticoke; Matthew B.
Sharr, Avoca; Bradley C. Sherman,
Dallas; Brooke E. Shultz, Cogan
Station; Erik J. Sipple, Wilkes-
Barre; Thomas K. Smith, Sweet
Valley; Mitchell J. Smith, Taylor;
Clinton P. Sorber, Sweet Valley;
Kianna M. Spencer, Dallas; Ira L.
Staff, Factoryville; Robert E. Stitzer
Jr., Forty Fort; Kristine J. Strong,
Dallas; Lacy L. Strong, Nanticoke;
Scott D. Summa, Lehman; Adam E.
Supey, Dallas; Ernest J. Thivierge,
Lake Ariel; Matthew R. Thomas,
Sweet Valley; Caitlyn M. Traver,
Mehoopany; Phillip T. Trometter,
Williamsport; John S. Ulichney Jr.,
West Nanticoke; Michelle L. Urban,
Kingston; Ryan A. Urzen, Dallas;
Justin A. Vincent, York; Michele
Vowler, Bloomsburg; Daniel B.
Walters Jr., Nicholson; Paige L.
Wasilewski, Kingston; Ryan M.
White, Royersford; Christopher R.
Winslow, Larksville; Joshua D.
Witmer, Lancaster; Jeffrey M.
Wojcik, Exeter; Yu W. Xie, Archbald;
Nicholas J. Yuhas, Duryea; John D.
Zack, Exeter; Michael G. Zaleskas
Jr., Shavertown; Amy Linn Zdipko,
Wilkes-Barre.
DEAN’S LIST
Rice Elementary School recently held a contest for sixth-grade
students to decide the design of the cover for their graduation book-
let. Eighty students participated in the contest. Graduation will take
place at 10 a.m. June 3 in the school gymnasium. Contest winners,
from left, are Sarah Klush, Stephanie Thorpe, Christine Jumper and
Maria Morgante.
Rice Elementary students help design booklet cover
The first-grade class at Apple Tree/Susquehanna Prep, Forty Fort, were recently visited by Helene
Skopek of Pleasure of Your Company Therapy Dogs and participated in a dog safety program. The
children were taught proper animal handling and pet safety. Participants, from left, first row, are
Ariana Marien, Will Youngman, Samantha Casey, Christy the dog, Abby May, Tyler Wood and Lauren
Amend. Second row: Aiden Flaim, Nathan Thayer, Colleen O’Malley, Angelo Lomabrdo, Skopek,
Sophia Stash and Sophia Snell. Third row: Christian Harvey, Jenna Williams and Evan Swartz.
Therapy dog visits Apple Tree/Susquehanna Prep students
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 9B
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help trip, so I bought two books:
‘The Power of Positive Thinking’
and ‘How to Win Friends and In-
fluence People.’ And I read them
both that weekend. And I really
thought that ‘The Power of Posi-
tive Thinking’ was just ‘hoping.’ I
really didn’t think that an atti-
tude could change people and
change a performance. I was na-
ive. I was unaware. I came back
on Monday morning, and they
say in the Army that you can
never volunteer, but I volun-
teered to clean the latrine for an
inspection. I was determined to
prove to myself that the power
of positive thinking and a posi-
tive attitude wouldn’t make a
difference. But I approachedit in
a positive manner. They just
wanted me to clean it up and
mop it, but I scrubbed it. I pol-
ished all of the copper. I asked
for paint, andI paintedtheshow-
er stall. I painted the floor. I
paintedthewalls. It endedupbe-
ing about a four-day job, and ev-
erybody was feeling sorry for
me. But I thought, ‘This is pretty
good. I’m my own boss. I’m the
one that decided to polish the
brass. I’m the one that decided
to make it four days instead of
one day.’ Even though I was in
the Army, I was my own boss.
Then, they let me drive a truck
and they let me pick my own
jobs. If I sawa job that needed to
be done, I would volunteer for it.
Everybody thought I was on the
short end of the stick, but I was
having a ball. And I realized the
power of positive thinking really
works. You have to believe in
yourself. All of sudden, it affect-
ed the sergeant and everyone
around me. I felt better, they had
developed respect for me, and I
never lookedback fromthat mo-
ment.”
Alan Stout writes about local people.
Reach him at 970-7131.
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
said. “I looked at the list of past
recipients and it really is a Hall of
Fame.”
Bartikowsky should feel even
more honored by the award be-
cause the recipients are chosen
annually by the winners.
In addition to the Hall of Fame
inductees, Junior Achievement
will honor the recipients of the
Entrepreneur of the Year award:
Scott Lynett, George Lynett Jr.,
Bobby Lynett and Matthew Hag-
gerty of Times-Shamrock Com-
munications.
Bartikowsky said he’s working
on his speech for the big night.
He said he will tell the story of
Bartikowsky’s from its begin-
nings in1887 when the first store
opened with his grandfather, also
Max, at the helm. But Bartikow-
sky intends to focus on his invol-
vement with the business, an as-
sociation that began in 1948 and
continues today.
“I think it’s important to tell
people how we built our busi-
ness,” Bartikowsky said. “And I
want people to know why we de-
cided to remain in the down-
town.”
Bartikowsky’s was located on
Public Square from 1948 to 1974
at the site where the Ramada Inn
now sits. When the Agnes flood
hit in June 1972, Bartikowsky
said the store moved to a modu-
lar building at the corner of
North Main and Union streets
where Blue Cross is nowlocated.
“We wanted to stay down-
town,” he said. “We were always a
downtown store.”
Bartikowsky’s movedtoits cur-
rent location at 141 South Main
Street in 1978. Bartikowsky said
the location formerly housed a
Giant Food Market. He said the
building was ideal and the park-
ing was just what the business
needed.
Born and raised in Wilkes-
Barre, a young Max Bartikowsky
attained celebrity status as the
impish inspiration for cartoonist
Ham Fisher’s “Little Max” – a
supporting character in the Joe
Palooka comic book series.
Bartikowsky is a graduate of
Wyoming Seminary and he at-
tended the University of Pennsyl-
vania’s Wharton School and
Wilkes College. He served in the
U.S. Navy from 1951 through
1955. After completing the Gem-
ological Institute of America’s
Diamond Grading class, he took
an active role as the third gener-
ation running the Bartikowsky
family jewelry business. Max is
currently the president and CEO
of Bartikowsky Jewelers which
will celebrate 124 years in busi-
ness this year.
Bartikowsky has beeninvolved
with many community organiza-
tions and programs, such as the
Jewish Community Center of
WyomingValley, Wilkes-Barre Li-
ons Club, the Board of Temple Is-
rael, Wyoming Seminary Alumni
Association, Wyoming Valley
Family Service Association and
the American Heart Association.
In2008, he andAnna Cervenak
received the Distinguished Com-
munity Service Award from the
Anti-Defamation League (ADL).
In 1964, Bartikowsky pur-
chased his first horse and raced it
at Pocono Downs. He still owns
horses andheoperates Big10Sta-
ble.
HONOR
Continued from Page 1B
“It’s quite an honor. I looked at the
list of past recipients and it
really is a Hall of Fame.”
Max Bartikowsky
The staff of the Misericordia University student newspaper, The
Highlander, recently won 2010-11 American Scholastic Press Associ-
ation awards, including a first place in the Scholastic Newspaper
category for overall content and appearance and a first place for
Outstanding Investigative Reporting by print editor Kate Bunton,
Kingston. The competition included high schools and colleges
across the country. Some of the staff members, from left, Amanda
Jamieson, Hanover Township, editor-in chief; Julia Truax, Millville,
content manager; and April Dulsky, Center Moreland, web editor.
Misericordia student newspaper wins awards
C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011

timesleader.com
SOME RULES
were just made
to be broken.
Especially
when they start
breaking the
hearts of kids.
Steph Blan-
nard is just one of the compet-
itors who caught a bad break
during this week’s District 2
Class 3A track and field cham-
pionships.
She’s a star pole vaulter for
Wyoming Valley West who came
into districts as a co-favorite to
win her event.
Only her dreams got lost
through little fault of her own.
It would be easy to blame it all
on the rain.
But the real responsibility lies
with the people who made pole
vaulters jump in adverse condi-
tions.
That would be District 2 offi-
cials.
Much to the surprise of com-
petitors, they insisted the pole
vault should continue Wednes-
day - despite a drizzle that turn-
ed into a downpour shortly into
the competition.
And because competitors
completed their three tries at
clearing the bar in groups of five,
that meant some athletes took
their turns in drier conditions
than others.
That’s unfair.
“I slid down the pole three
times and I couldn’t even hold
my grip,” said Blannard, a senior.
She said when athletes com-
plained about the conditions,
they were told to push through
the situation.
It pushed Blannard right out
of contention to make it to
states.
Her best vault of the year
cleared 9 feet, 6 inches, but she
couldn’t even make 8-6 in a diffi-
cult rainstorm that eventually
stopped the competition that
finally resumed Saturday.
“We wanted it to stop,” Blan-
nard said. “Someone could have
seriously got hurt. I almost got
hurt. I almost ended up in the
box from sliding down my pole.
Other events were suspended.
But you’re not suspending an
event, which is the most danger-
ous event at the meet?
“This is the first meet where
I’ve had to jump in a downpour
and I’ve been jumping since my
seventh grade year.”
What happened next should
have track and field fans jumping
with outrage.
Aprecedent to right a wrong
District 2 officials discussed
the possibility of giving the
vaulters a do-over. But they
determined that was impossible,
because the National Federation
of High School Athletics doesn’t
allow second chances for events
that already began.
“Once an event is completed,
you can’t bring them back,”
District 2 chairman Frank Ma-
jikes said. “That’s opening a can
of worms. If a baseball game is
stopped in the second or third
inning, you don’t come back and
start the first and second inning
over. Or in football, if there’s
lightning, you don’t go back and
start the game over.”
That’s oversimplifying things.
Because in those other sports,
all competitors are playing
through the same elements. In
this track meet, particularly in
the pole vault, some athletes
were forced to deal with worse
conditions than others.
“What it is, it is,” Majikes said.
“It’s unfortunate, but that’s the
rule.”
It’s one that needs to be mod-
ified, if not changed.
“It’d take more than you or I,”
Wyoming Valley West athletic
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Common
sense not
in rules
See SOKOLOSKI , Page 15C
BALTIMORE—Shackleford was sweat-
ing profusely, bucking and kicking until six
crewmen finally shoved himinto the No. 5
gate at the Preakness.
One ton of horseflesh all but screamed,
“Get me out of here.”
Less than two minutes after the gate
sprang open, the nervous colt was a cool
classic winner.
Shackleford held off a late charge by the
2-1 favorite Animal Kingdom, spoiling yet
another Triple Crown try and beating the
KentuckyDerbywinnerbyahalf-lengthSat-
urday at Pimlico.
The
chestnut
colt, who
led into the
stretch in
the Derby
two weeks
ago, finished the job at 12-1 odds, covering
the13-16 miles in1:56.47.
With jockey Jesus Castanon aboard,
Shackleford battled Flashpoint for the lead
until midwayonthefinal turnandthendug
in to hold off the onrushing Animal King-
dombefore107,398 fans.
“He was a little hot in the beginning, but
he was able to calmdown,” Castanon said.
“He’s a good horse and able to handle it.”
It was the first victory in a Triple Crown
racefor Castanonandtrainer DaleRomans,
a Louisville, Ky., native, who
H O R S E R A C I N G
Shackleford’s one cool champ
AP PHOTO
Shackleford, front right, ridden by Jesus Castanon, is on his way to winning the
Preakness Stakes. Animal Kingdom, left, ridden by John Velazquez, took second.
Sweating, nervous colt has to be
shoved into starting gate, then he
holds off Derby king to win Preakness
By BETH HARRIS
AP Racing Writer
See PREAKNESS , Page 15C
SCRANTON — Dannah Hay-
ward knows better than anyone
at the District 2 Class 3A Track
and Field Championships just
how difficult it is to try to catch
up to Shelley Black.
Hayward attempts it every
day.
That pursuit helped give the
Coughlin junior the extra push
necessary to meet state qualify-
ing standards in two hurdling
events, allowing Hayward to join
her senior teammate for the
state championships next week-
end at Shippensburg University.
“At meets, it’s very hard be-
cause she’s always way ahead,”
said Hayward, the second-best
hurdler in both the school and
the district. “She gets credit and
I don’t get much, but I under-
stand why.
“I have an advantage over the
other girls who are the top ones
at their school. I have her topush
me every day.”
Black’s push drove Hayward
all the way to the medal stand
early Saturday morning.
On the way there, Hayward
was wiping away tears over the
fear that she just missed her spot
at states. While still onthe stand,
she heard the public address an-
nouncement that her
D I S T R I C T 2 C L A S S 3 A T R A C K A N D F I E L D
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Shelley Black of Coughlin is en route to winning the 300 hurdles race Saturday in Scranton. Black also finished first in the 100 hurdles and the long jump.
Coughlin hurdlers, Dallas girls celebrate
PIAA meet next for Black and
Hayward, who place 1-2 in 100,
300. Mounts roll to 3A title.
By TOMROBINSON
For The Times Leader
See GIRLS , Page 6C
MOOSIC — The slump con-
tinues for Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre.
For the second consecutive
day, the Yankees held the lead in
a game at PNC Field, but lost.
On Saturday, the Yankees
dropped a 5-3 decision to Indi-
anapolis for their fifth consecu-
tiveloss overall andsixthconsec-
utive setback at home.
The Yankees held a 3-2 lead af-
ter the fifth inning when Bran-
don Laird punched a single to
left field to score Austin Krum.
But SWB squandered a two-out,
bases-loaded opportunity in the
frame when Kevin Russo lined
out to end the threat.
That’s been a trend for the
team of late as they left seven
runners on base in the game.
They didn’t have many opportu-
nities withrunners inscoringpo-
sition going 1-for-4. During the
five-gameslidehowever, theYan-
kees are hitting .153 (6-for-39)
with runners in scoring position
while leaving a total of 42 run-
ners on base.
All of Saturday’s problems we-
I N T E R N AT I O N A L L E A G U E
Yanks again fail in clutch as losing streak climbs to 5
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Yankees second baseman Kevin Russo fields a ball hit by Indi-
anapolis’ Jason Jaramillo. Russo threw out Jarmillo at first base.
During its slide, SWB is
6-for-39 (a .153 average) with
runners in scoring position.
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
See SWB , Page 7C
5
INDIANS
3
YANKEES
SCRANTON—Tunkhannock’s GavinColley and
Honesdale’s Lionel Wilsonstoodout at the District
2 Class 3ATrack andFieldChampionships as the
only boys withthree goldmedals.
Wilsonhadthe bonus of a silver medal, but
Colley took home a winintheir head-to-head
showdowninthe 200-meter dashinone
of the top events Saturday whenthe
meet concluded.
“I was looking forwardto that
race all year long,” Colley said
after winning in21.79 seconds
while Wilsonbecame one of two
other state qualifiers inthe event in22.08. “Lionel
rana 21.8 at the Spagna (Championships). I figured
Tigers fall just short of boys title
By TOMROBINSON
For The Times Leader
See BOYS , Page 6C
Jeremy Roberts of Dallas
competes in the shot put.
He finished in sixth place.
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories and
update them promptly. Sports
corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the sports department at
829-7143.
➛ S P O R T S
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
Interleague
INDIANS -$108 Reds
YANKEES -$175 Mets
BLUE JAYS -$135 Astros
Rays -$138 MARLINS
PIRATES -$105 Tigers
PHILLIES -$155 Rangers
ORIOLES -$110 Nationals
Cards -$155 ROYALS
WHITE SOX -$130 Dodgers
Braves -$135 ANGELS
Mariners -$130 PADRES
GIANTS -$120 A’s
D’BACKS -$150 Twins
RED SOX -$138 Cubs
National League
Rockies -$108 BREWERS
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
Eastern Conference Finals
HEAT 5 Bulls
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
SHARKS -$120/
even
Canucks
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
By Roxy Roxborough
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
Today's Events
H.S. BASEBALL
Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 1 p.m.
Northwest at Hanover Area, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Berwick, 3 p.m.
Nanticoke at Crestwood, 3 p.m.
H.S. SOFTBALL
Pittston Area at Crestwood, 1 p.m.
Monday, May 23
H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL
(5:45 p.m.)
Hazleton Area at Crestwood
North Pocono at Berwick
Dallas at Meyers
Wyoming Area at Coughlin
Nanticoke at Delaware Valley
H.S. BASEBALL
Holy Redeemer at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. SOFTBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Holy Redeemer at Hazleton Area
Dallas at Berwick
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
District 2 quarterfinals
(All games 4:30 p.m.)
North Pocono at Berwick
Lake-Lehman at Holy Redeemer
Delaware Valley at Dallas
Meyers at Coughlin
W H A T ’ S O N T V
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED — Formula One, Spanish Grand Prix, at
Barcelona, Spain
Noon
VERSUS — IRL, Indianapolis 500 Bump Day
2 p.m.
ABC — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, John Deere
Dealers 250, at Newton, Iowa
7 p.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, Summer Nationals, at Topeka,
Kan. (same-day tape)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Noon
ESPN — NCAA Division I playoffs, regionals, Ken-
tucky vs.
3:30 p.m.
ESPN — NCAA Division I playoffs, regionals, TBA
CYCLING
6:30 p.m.
VERSUS — Tour of California, final stage, Santa
Clarita to Thousand Oaks, Calif.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Volvo World Match
Play Championship, semifinal and championship
matches, at Casares, Spain
1 p.m.
TGC — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, fi-
nal round, at Greer, S.C.
3 p.m.
CBS — PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza Invitational, final
round, at Fort Worth, Texas
4:30 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Sybase Match Play Championship,
semifinal andchampionshipmatches, at Gladstone,
N.J. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
TBS/YES — N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees
1:30 p.m.
ROOT — Detroit at Pittsburgh
WQMY — Texas at Philadelphia
2 p.m.
WGN — L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN — Chicago Cubs at Boston
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m.
TNT —Playoffs, conference finals, game 3, Chica-
go at Miami
NHL HOCKEY
3 p.m.
NBC — Playoffs, conference finals, game 4, Van-
couver at San Jose
SOCCER
10:55 a.m.
ESPN2 —Premier League, Blackpool at Manches-
ter United
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN2 — French Open, first round, at Paris
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Reinstated RHP Alfredo
Simon from the restricted list. Transferred INF Ce-
sar Izturis to the 60-day DL. Optioned RHP Jason
Berken to Norfolk (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS—Placed RHP Alex White
on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Josh Judy from
Columbus (IL).
DETROIT TIGERS—Placed LHP Brad Thomas on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 11. Selected the
contract of LHP Charlie Furbush from Toledo (IL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Selected RHP Mi-
cah Owings from Reno (PCL). Released INF Rus-
sell Branyan. Sent RHP Armando Galarraga out-
right to Reno.
FLORIDA MARLINS—Placed RHP Josh Johnson
on the15-day DL. Selected the contract of RHPJay
Buente from New Orleans (PCL). Transferred INF
Donnie Murphy to the 60-day DL.
Eastern League
READINGPHILLIES—AnnouncedRHPJoseCon-
treras was assigned to the team from Philadelphia
(NL).
TRENTON THUNDER—Announced OF Austin
Krum was assigned to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
Midwest League
QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS—Announced INF
Yunier Castillo and INF Romulo Ruiz were trans-
ferred to extended spring training. Announced INF
Packy Elkins was promoted to Palm Beach (FSL).
Announced INF Colin Walsh, INF Victor Sanchez
and INF Ronny Gil were activated from extended
spring training.
COLLEGE
GEORGE MASON—Announced sophomore F
Luke Hancock will transfer.
B A S E B A L L
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 26 16 .619 —
Yankees ................................... 21 19 .525 4
Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 21 20 .512 4
1
⁄2
Syracuse (Nationals)............... 17 22 .436 7
1
⁄2
Buffalo (Mets)........................... 18 25 .419 8
1
⁄2
Rochester (Twins) ................... 16 23 .410 8
1
⁄2
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays) ....................... 24 17 .585 —
Gwinnett (Braves) .................. 22 20 .524 2
1
⁄2
Charlotte (White Sox)............ 19 21 .475 4
1
⁄2
Norfolk (Orioles)..................... 14 28 .333 10
1
⁄2
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Columbus (Indians) ................. 28 14 .667 —
Louisville (Reds) ...................... 24 18 .571 4
Toledo (Tigers) ........................ 21 22 .488 7
1
⁄2
Indianapolis (Pirates)............... 19 25 .432 10
Saturday's Games
Indianapolis 5, Yankees 3
Lehigh Valley 4, Gwinnett 3
Pawtucket at Toledo, late
Charlotte 6, Buffalo 3
Syracuse 2, Rochester 0
Durham at Columbus, late
Norfolk 8, Louisville 6
Today's Games
Charlotte at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Rochester, 1:05 p.m.
Durham at Columbus, 1:05 p.m.
Louisville at Norfolk, 1:15 p.m.
Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley, 1:35 p.m.
Pawtucket at Toledo, 2 p.m.
Monday's Games
Pawtucket at Toledo, 6:30 p.m.
Durham at Columbus, 6:35 p.m.
Indianapolis at Yankees, 6:35 p.m.
Syracuse at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m.
Louisville at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Eastern League
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
New Hampshire (Blue Jays) . 26 14 .650 —
New Britain (Twins) ............... 23 15 .605 2
Reading (Phillies)................... 24 17 .585 2
1
⁄2
Trenton (Yankees) ................. 22 18 .550 4
Binghamton (Mets) ................ 13 25 .342 12
Portland (Red Sox) ................ 12 25 .324 12
1
⁄2
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Altoona (Pirates) ...................... 21 19 .525 —
Bowie (Orioles) ........................ 21 20 .512
1
⁄2
Harrisburg (Nationals)............. 19 19 .500 1
Akron (Indians)......................... 20 22 .476 2
Richmond (Giants) .................. 19 22 .463 2
1
⁄2
Erie (Tigers) ............................. 17 21 .447 3
Saturday's Games
Harrisburg 7, Binghamton 2
Altoona 2, Akron 0, 1st game
Reading 4, Richmond 3
Erie at Bowie, late
New Hampshire at New Britain, ppd., rain
Portland at Trenton, late
Akron at Altoona, late2nd game
Today's Games
Harrisburg at Binghamton, 1:05 p.m.
Portland at Trenton, 1:05 p.m.
Richmond at Reading, 1:05 p.m.
NewHampshire at NewBritain, 1:35 p.m., 1st game
Akron at Altoona, 2 p.m.
Erie at Bowie, 2:05 p.m.
New Hampshire at New Britain, 3:35 p.m., 2nd
game
Monday's Games
New Hampshire at Portland, 6 p.m.
Bowie at Altoona, 6:30 p.m.
Binghamton at New Britain, 6:35 p.m.
Erie at Richmond, 7:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
S O F T B A L L
NCAA Division I Softball
Regionals Glance
Double Elimination
(x-if necessary)
University Park (Pa.) Regional
Friday, May 20
Oregon 3, Albany (NY) 1
Fordham 2, Penn State 0
Saturday, May 21
Oregon 2, Fordham 0
Penn State 6, Albany (NY) 1, Albany eliminated
Game5: Fordham2, PennState2, Bottom13th, late
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Oregon (41-14) vs. Game 5 winner, Noon
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 2:30
p.m.
College Park (Md.) Regional
Friday, May 20
Baylor 4, Lehigh 0
East Carolina 5, Maryland 1
Saturday, May 21
Baylor 2, East Carolina 0
Maryland 11, Lehigh 0, Lehigh eliminated
East Carolina 2, Maryland 0, Maryland eliminated
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Baylor (42-12) vs. East Carolina (41-21),
Noon
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 2:30
p.m.
Louisville (Ky.) Regional
Friday, May 20
California 6, Jacksonville State 3
Louisville 5, Illinois-Chicago 2, 9 innings
Saturday, May 21
California 4, Louisville 0
Jacksonville State 1, vs. Illinois-Chicago 0, UIC
eliminated
Game 5: Louisville (37-19) vs. Jacksonville State
(40-20), 7 p.m.
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: California (41-10) vs. Game 5 winner, 2
p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 4:30
p.m.
Knoxville (Tenn.) Regional
Friday, May 20
Oklahoma State 2, Georgia Tech 1
Tennessee 8, Liberty 0
Saturday, May 21
Oklahoma State 6, Tennessee 1
Georgia Tech 4, Liberty 3, Liberty eliminated
Game 5: Tennessee (48-11) vs. Georgia Tech
(45-11), 7 p.m.
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Oklahoma State (39-17) vs. Game 5 win-
ner, 2 p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 4:30
p.m.
Athens (Ga.) Regional
Friday, May 20
UAB 2, Florida State 0
Georgia 8, Georgia State 0
Saturday, May 21
Georgia 9, UAB 2
Florida State 6, Georgia State 1, Georgia St. elim-
inated
Florida State 13, UAB 1, UAB eliminated
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Georgia (49-12) vs. Florida State (32-27),
Noon
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 2:30
p.m.
Gainesville (Fla.) Regional
Friday, May 20
UCLA 2, Jacksonville 0
Florida 8, Bethune-Cookman 0
Saturday, May 21
Florida 4, UCLA 2
Jacksonville 8, Bethune-Cookman 0, B-C eliminat-
ed
UCLA12, Jacksonville 4, Jacksonville eliminated
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Florida (49-9) vs. UCLA (35-18)
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 3:30
p.m.
Ann Arbor (Michigan) Regional
Friday, May 20
Kentucky 8, Notre Dame 0
Michigan 5, Western Michigan 0
Saturday, May 21
Kentucky 7, Michigan 6
Notre Dame 4, Western Michigan 0, WMUeliminat-
ed
Michigan 9, Notre Dame 8, ND eliminated
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Kentucky (38-14) vs. Michigan (53-5), 1
p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 3:30
p.m.
Tuscaloosa (Ala.) Regional
Friday, May 20
Memphis 4, Chattanooga 1
Alabama 8, Jackson State 0
Saturday, May 21
Alabama 7, Memphis 1
Chattanooga 8, Jackson State 1, Jackson St. elim-
inated
Game 5: Memphis (36-13) vs. Chattanooga (43-13),
7 p.m.
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Alabama (48-8) vs. Game 5 winner, 2 p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 4:30
p.m.
Columbia (Mo.) Regional
Saturday, May 21
DePaul 2, Indiana 1
Missouri 12, Illinois State 3
DePaul 2, Missouri 1, 11 innings
Illinois State 3, Indiana 1, Indiana eliminated
Game 5: Missouri (47-8) vs. Illinois State (36-18), 7
p.m.
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: DePaul (41-13) vs. Game 5 winner, 2 p.m.
Norman (Okla.) Regional
Friday, May 20
Tulsa 9, Missouri State 7
Oklahoma 7, Iona 1
Saturday, May 21
Oklahoma 6, Tulsa 0
Missouri State 4, Iona 2, Iona eliminated
Tulsa 11, Missouri State 0, Mo. State eliminated
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Oklahoma (39-16) vs. Tulsa (45-14)
College Station (Texas) Regional
Friday, May 20
Syracuse 3, LSU 0, 11 innings
Texas A&M10, Sacred Heart 2
Saturday, May 21
Texas A&M13, Syracuse 5
LSU10, Sacred Heart 0, Sacred Heart eliminated
LSU 5, Syracuse 0, Syracuse eliminated
Sunday, May 22
Game6: Texas A&M(43-13) vs. LSU(40-17), 1p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 4 p.m.
Austin (Texas) Regional
Friday, May 20
Houston 7, Louisiana-Lafayette 2
Texas 2, Texas State 0
Saturday, May 21
Houston 1, Texas 0
Louisiana-Lafayette 11, Texas State 2, Texas St.
eliminated
Louisiana-Lafayette 5, Texas 3, Texas eliminated
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Houston (42-16) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette
(51-10), 2 p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 4:30
p.m.
Tempe (Ariz.) Regional
Friday, May 20
Long Beach State 6, San Diego State 2
Arizona State 10, North Dakota State 0
Saturday, May 21
Arizona State 8, Long Beach State 0
Game 4: North Dakota State (30-26) vs. San Diego
State (32-20), 8:30 p.m.
Game 5: Long Beach State (38-17) vs. Game 4 win-
ner, 11 p.m.
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Arizona State (52-6) vs. Game 5 winner,
5:30 p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 8 p.m.
Tucson (Ariz.) Regional
Friday, May 20
New Mexico State 9, Texas Tech 0
Arizona 10, Harvard 0
Saturday, May 21
Arizona 8, New Mexico State 0
Texas Tech 7, Harvard 0
Game 5: New Mexico State (44-16) vs. Texas Tech
(41-15), 10 p.m.
Sunday, May 22
Game 6: Arizona (42-16) vs. Game 5 winner, 3 p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 5 p.m.
Seattle Regional
Thursday, May 19
BYU 2, Auburn 1
Washington 6, Portland State 2
Friday, May 20
Washington 4, BYU1
Auburn 2, Portland State 1, Portland St. eliminated
BYU 4, Auburn 3, Auburn eliminated
Saturday, May 21
Washington 7, BYU 5, BYU eliminated
Stanford (Calif.) Regional
Friday, May 20
Stanford 3, Pacific 0
Fresno State 1, Nebraska 0, 10 innings
Saturday, May 21
Stanford 3, Fresno State 1
Nebraska 11, Pacific 1, Pacific eliminated
Game5: FresnoState(35-18) vs. Nebraska(40-13),
11 p.m.
Sunday, May 22
Game6: Stanford(40-15) vs. Game5winner, 6p.m.
x-Game 7: Game 6 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 8:30
p.m.
L A C R O S S E
NCAA Division I Lacrosse
First Round
Saturday, May 14
Johns Hopkins 12, Hofstra 5
Notre Dame 13, Penn 6
Duke 15, Delaware 14
Cornell 12, Hartford 5
Sunday, May 15
Maryland 13, North Carolina 6
Virginia 13, Bucknell 12, OT
Denver 13, Villanova 10
Syracuse 10, Siena 4
Quarterfinals
Saturday, May 21
At James Shuart Stadium
Hempstead, N.Y.
Virginia 13, Cornell 9
Denver 14, Johns Hopkins 9
Sunday, May 22
At Gillette Stadium
Foxborough, Mass.
Syracuse vs. Maryland, Noon
Notre Dame vs. Duke, 2:30 p.m.
Semifinals
Saturday, May 28
At M&T Bank Stadium
Baltimore
Virginia vs. Denver, 4 or 6:30 p.m.
Syracuse-Maryland winner vs. Notre Dame-Duke
winner, 4 or 6:30 p.m.
Championship
Monday, May 30
At M&T Bank Stadium
Baltimore
Semifinal winners, 3:30 p.m.
C Y C L I N G
Tour of California
Friday
At Paso Robles, Calif.
Sixth Stage
A15-mile individual time trial
1. DavidZabriskie(Garmin-Cervelo), UnitedStates,
30 minutes, 35.92 seconds.
2. Levi Leipheimer, (RadioShack), United States,
30:49.80.
3. Tejay Van Garderen (HTC-Highroad), United
States, 31:15.94.
4. Peter Velits (HTC-Highroad), United States,
31:23.54.
5. Maarten Tjallingii (Rabobank), Netherlands,
31:24.48.
6. Chris Horner (RadioShack), United States,
31:26.64.
7. Jakob Fuglsang (Leopard-Trek), Denmark,
31:28.69.
8. Jeremy Vennell (Bissell), New Zealand,
31:34.08.
9. Rory Sutherland (United Healthcare), Australia,
31:34.51.
10. Christian Vande Velde (Garmin-Cervelo), Unit-
ed States, 31:36.06.
Overall Results
1. Chris Horner (RadioShack), United States, 17
hours, 17 minutes, 1 second.
2. Levi Leipheimer (RadioShack), United States, 38
seconds behind.
3. Rory Sutherland (United Healthcare), Australia,
1:38 behind
4. Christian Vande Velde (Garmin-Cervelo), United
States, 1:39 behind.
5. TomDanielson (Garmin-Cervelo), United States,
1:44 behind.
6. Tejay Van Garderen (HTC-Highroad), United
States, 1:54 behind.
7. Linus Gerdemann (Leopard-Trek) Germany,
2:26 behind.
8. Ryder Hesjedal (Garmin-Cervelo), Canada, 2:27
behind.
9. Laurens Ten Dam (Rabobank), Netherlands,
2:43 behind.
10. Andy Schleck (Leopard-Trek), Luxembourg,
2:54 behind.
H . S . G I R L S
S O C C E R
DISTRICT 2 PLAYOFFS
Friday's result
First round
North Pocono 3, Wyoming Valley West 0
Sunday's result
First round
Meyers 1, Honesdale 0
Monday's games
Quarterfinals
No. 9 North Pocono (8-4-2) at No. 1 Berwick
(12-1-1), 4:30 p.m.
No. 5 Lake-Lehman (6-6-2) at No. 4 Holy Re-
deemer (6-7), 4:30 p.m.
No. 6 Delaware Valley (5-7-2) at No. 3 Dallas
(8-3-2), 4:30 p.m.
No. 10 Meyers (10-2-2) at No. 2 Coughlin (11-2-1),
4:30 p.m.
Wednesday's games
Semifinals
(at Lake-Lehman H.S.)
North Pocono/Berwick winner vs. Lehman/
Redeemer winner, time TBA
DelVal/Dallas winner vs. Meyers/Coughlin winner,
time TBA
NOTE: If Lake-Lehman advances to the semi-
finals, the game will be played at Spartan Stadium
in Kingston.
Friday, May 27
Championship
Wednesday’s winners, at Lake-Lehman H.S., time
TBA
H O C K E Y
National Hockey League
FIRST ROUND
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Washington 4, New York Rangers 1
Wednesday, April 13: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers
1, OT
Friday, April 15: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 0
Sunday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 2
Wednesday, April 20: Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers
3, 2OT
Saturday, April 23: Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 3
Thursday, April 14: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0
Saturday, April 16: Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4
Monday, April 18: Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 2
Wednesday, April 20: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0
Friday, April 22: Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 3, OT
Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4, OT
Tuesday, April 26: Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 2
Boston 4, Montreal 3
Thursday, April 14: Montreal 2, Boston 0
Saturday, April 16: Montreal 3, Boston 1
Monday, April 18: Boston 4, Montreal 2
Thursday, April 21: Boston 5, Montreal 4, OT
Saturday, April 23: Boston 2, Montreal 1, 2OT
Tuesday, April 26: Montreal 2, Boston 1
Wednesday, April 27: Boston 4, Montreal 3, OT
Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 3
Wednesday, April 13: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0
Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1
Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2
Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2,
2OT
Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay 8, Pittsburgh 2
Monday, April 25: Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 2
Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay 1, Pittsburgh 0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Vancouver 4, Chicago 3
Wednesday, April 13: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0
Friday, April 15: Vancouver 4, Chicago 3
Sunday, April 17: Vancouver 3, Chicago 2
Tuesday, April 19: Chicago 7, Vancouver 2
Thursday, April 21: Chicago 5, Vancouver 0
Sunday, April 24: Chicago 4, Vancouver 3, OT
Tuesday, April 26: Vancouver 2, Chicago 1, OT
San Jose 4, Los Angeles 2
Thursday, April 14: San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2, OT
Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 0
Tuesday, April 19: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 5, OT
Thursday, April 21: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3
Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 1
Monday, April 25: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT
Detroit 4, Phoenix 0
Wednesday, April 13: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2
Saturday, April 16: Detroit 4, Phoenix 3
Monday, April 18: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2
Wednesday, April 20: Detroit 6, Phoenix 3
Nashville 4, Anaheim 2
Wednesday, April 13: Nashville 4, Anaheim1
Friday, April 15: Anaheim 5, Nashville 3
Sunday, April 17: Nashville 4, Anaheim 3
Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim 6, Nashville 3
Friday, April 22: Nashville 4, Anaheim 3, OT
Sunday, April 24: Nashville 4, Anaheim 2
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Tampa Bay 4, Washington 0
Friday, April 29: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2
Sunday, May 1: Tampa Bay 3, Washington 2, OT
Tuesday, May 3: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 3
Wednesday, May 4: Tampa Bay 5, Washington 3
Boston 4, Philadelphia 0
Saturday, April 30: Boston 7, Philadelphia 3
Monday, May 2: Boston 3, Philadelphia 2, OT
Wednesday, May 4: Boston 5, Philadelphia 1
Friday, May 6: Boston 5, Philadelphia 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Vancouver 4, Nashville 2
Thursday, April 28: Vancouver 1, Nashville 0
Saturday, April 30: Nashville 2, Vancouver 1, 2OT
Tuesday, May 3: Vancouver 3, Nashville 2, OT
Thursday, May 5: Vancouver 4, Nashville 2
Saturday, May 7: Nashville 4, Vancouver 3
Monday, May 9: Vancouver 2, Nashville 1
San Jose 4, Detroit 3
Friday, April 29: San Jose 2, Detroit 1, OT
Sunday, May 1: San Jose 2, Detroit 1
Wednesday, May 4: San Jose 4, Detroit 3, OT
Friday, May 6: Detroit 4, San Jose 3
Sunday, May 8: Detroit 4, San Jose 3
Tuesday, May 10: Detroit 3, San Jose 1
Thursday, May 12: San Jose 3, Detroit 2
CONFERENCE FINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 2
Saturday, May 14: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 2
Tuesday, May 17: Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5
Thursday, May 19: Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0
Saturday, May 21: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 3
Monday, May 23: Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, May 25: Boston at Tampa Bay, 8 p.m.
x-Friday, May 27: Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Vancouver 2, San Jose 1
Sunday, May 15: Vancouver 3, San Jose 2
Wednesday, May 18: Vancouver 7, San Jose 3
Friday, May 20: San Jose 4, Vancouver 3
Sunday, May 22: Vancouver at San Jose, 3 p.m.
Tuesday, May 24: San Jose at Vancouver, 9 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 26: Vancouver at San Jose, 9 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 28: San Jose at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Lightning 5, Bruins 3
Boston ............................................. 3 0 0 — 3
Tampa Bay ...................................... 0 3 2 — 5
First Period—1, Boston, P.Bergeron 3, 11:47. 2,
Boston, Ryder 5 (Kelly, Kaberle), 16:34. 3, Boston,
P.Bergeron 4, 17:58 (sh). Penalties—Seidenberg,
Bos (holding stick), 17:51;Peverley, Bos, major
(fighting), 20:00;M.Bergeron, TB, major (fighting),
20:00;Downie, TB, minor-misconduct (roughing),
20:00.
Second Period—4, Tampa Bay, Purcell 3 (Gagne),
6:55. 5, Tampa Bay, Purcell 4 (Ohlund, Lecavalier),
7:58. 6, Tampa Bay, Bergenheim 9 (Moore), 10:53.
Penalties—Gagne, TB (goaltender interference),
3:52;Marchand, Bos (interference), 8:17;Horton,
Bos (roughing), 17:25;Downie, TB (diving), 17:25.
Third Period—7, Tampa Bay, Gagne 4 (Malone),
6:54. 8, Tampa Bay, St. Louis 8 (Gagne, Hedman),
19:23 (en). Penalties—None.
Shots on Goal—Boston 9-13-8—30. Tampa Bay
10-13-14—37.
Power-play opportunities—Boston 0 of 2;Tampa
Bay 0 of 2.
Goalies—Boston, Thomas 10-5-0 (36 shots-32
saves). Tampa Bay, Roloson (9-6), M.Smith 1-0-0
(17:58 first, 21-21).
A—21,216 (19,758). T—2:42.
Referees—Dan O’Halloran, Tim Peel. Linesmen—
Shane Heyer, Jonny Murray.
AHL Playoff Glance
FIRST ROUND
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Portland 4, Connecticut 2
Thursday, April 14: Portland 3, Connecticut 2
Saturday, April 16: Portland 3, Connecticut 2, OT
Sunday, April 17: Connecticut 3, Portland 1
Tuesday, April 19: Connecticut 3, Portland 1
Thursday, April 21: Portland 5, Connecticut 4
Saturday, April 23: Portland 6, Connecticut 4
Binghamton 4, Manchester 3
Thursday, April 14: Manchester 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, April 15: Binghamton 4, Manchester 3, OT
Sunday, April 17: Manchester 5, Binghamton 4, OT
Tuesday, April 19: Manchester 6, Binghamton 3
Wednesday, April 20: Binghamton5, Manchester 4,
OT
Friday, April 22: Binghamton 2, Manchester 1, 2OT
Saturday, April 23: Binghamton 6, Manchester 5,
OT
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Norfolk 2
Friday, April 15: Norfolk 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1
Saturday, April 16: Norfolk2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
0
Tuesday, April 19: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton2, Norfolk
1
Wednesday, April 20: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4,
Norfolk 2
Friday, April 22: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2, Norfolk 1
Saturday, April 23: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 6, Nor-
folk 3
Charlotte 4, Hershey 2
Thursday, April 14: Charlotte 5, Hershey 4
Sunday, April 17: Hershey 4, Charlotte 2
Tuesday, April 19: Hershey 3, Charlotte 2
Wednesday, April 20: Charlotte 3, Hershey 2
Friday, April 22: Charlotte 5, Hershey 3
Sunday, April 24: Charlotte 2, Hershey 1, OT
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Manitoba 4, Lake Erie 3
Saturday, April 16: Lake Erie 6, Manitoba 4
Sunday, April 17: Manitoba 3, Lake Erie 2, OT
Tuesday, April 19: Lake Erie 2, Manitoba 1
Thursday, April 21: Lake Erie 6, Manitoba 3
Friday, April 22: Manitoba 2, Lake Erie 0
Sunday, April 24: Manitoba 3, Lake Erie 1
Tuesday, April 26: Manitoba 4, Lake Erie 1
Hamilton 4, Oklahoma City 2
Thursday, April 14: Hamilton 5, Oklahoma City 2
Saturday, April 16: Hamilton 2, Oklahoma City 1
Tuesday, April 19: Oklahoma City 2, Hamilton 0
Wednesday, April 20: Oklahoma City 5, Hamilton 2
Friday, April 22: Hamilton 2, Oklahoma City 0
Sunday, April 24: Hamilton 4, Oklahoma City 1
Houston 4, Peoria 0
Wednesday, April 13: Houston 4, Peoria 1
Friday, April 15: Houston 3, Peoria 2, OT
Monday, April 18: Houston 5, Peoria 3
Tuesday, April 19: Houston 2, Peoria 1
Milwaukee 4, Texas 2
Thursday, April 14: Milwaukee 5, Texas 2
Saturday, April 16: Texas 3, Milwaukee 1
Tuesday, April 19: Texas 3, Milwaukee 2, OT
Wednesday, April 20: Milwaukee 3, Texas 2
Friday, April 22: Milwaukee 2, Texas 1, OT
Monday, April 25: Milwaukee 3, Texas 2, 2OT
DIVISION FINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Binghamton 4, Portland 2
Wednesday, April 27: Binghamton 3, Portland 2
Thursday, April 28: Binghamton 5, Portland 3
Saturday, April 30: Portland 3, Binghamton 2
Monday, May 2: Binghamton 6, Portland 1
Tuesday, May 3: Portland 6, Binghamton 2
Friday, May 6: Binghamton 3, Portland 0
Charlotte 4, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2
Thursday, April 28: Charlotte 3, Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton 2
Saturday, April 30: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3, Char-
lotte 0
Monday, May 2: Charlotte2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
1, OT
Wednesday, May 4: Charlotte 1, Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton 0
Friday, May 6: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton1, Charlotte 0
Saturday, May 7: Charlotte 4, Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
ton 3
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Hamilton 4, Manitoba 3
Thursday, April 28: Hamilton 4, Manitoba 1
Sunday, May 1: Hamilton 4, Manitoba 2
Tuesday, May 3: Manitoba 5, Hamilton 4
Wednesday, May 4: Manitoba 2, Hamilton 1, 2OT
Friday, May 6: Hamilton 5, Manitoba 1
Sunday, May 8: Manitoba 1, Hamilton 0
Monday, May 9: Hamilton 2, Manitoba 1, 3OT
Houston 4, Milwaukee 3
Friday, April 29: Milwaukee 3, Houston 1
Sunday, May 1: Houston 2, Milwaukee 0
Tuesday, May 3: Milwaukee 5, Houston 3
Thursday, May 5: Houston 3, Milwaukee 2, OT
Friday, May 6: Houston 3, Milwaukee 2, OT
Sunday, May 8: Milwaukee 5, Houston 4, OT
Tuesday, May 10: Houston 4, Milwaukee 2
CONFERENCE FINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Binghamton 4, Charlotte 0
Thursday, May 12: Binghamton 7, Charlotte 4
Friday, May 13: Binghamton 3, Charlotte 0
Tuesday, May 17: Binghamton 7, Charlotte 1
Wednesday, May 18: Binghamton 4, Charlotte 3,
OT
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Houston 3, Hamilton 2
Friday, May 13: Houston 2, Hamilton 1
Sunday, May 15: Houston 3, Hamilton 2
Tuesday, May 17: Houston 3, Hamilton 2
Wednesday, May 18: Hamilton 8, Houston 1
Friday, May 20: Hamilton 4, Houston 2
Sunday, May 22: Hamilton at Houston, 5:05 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 24: Hamilton at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
B A S K E T B A L L
NBA
FIRST ROUND
Saturday, April 16
Chicago 104, Indiana 99
Miami 97, Philadelphia 89
Atlanta 103, Orlando 93
Dallas 89, Portland 81
Sunday, April 17
Memphis 101, San Antonio 98
New Orleans 109, L.A. Lakers 100
Boston 87, New York 85
Oklahoma City 107, Denver 103
Monday, April 18
Miami 94, Philadelphia 73
Chicago 96, Indiana 90
Tuesday, April 19
Boston 96, New York 93
Orlando 88, Atlanta 82
Dallas 101, Portland 89
Wednesday, April 20
Oklahoma City 106, Denver 89
San Antonio 93, Memphis 87
L.A. Lakers 87, New Orleans 78
Thursday, April 21
Chicago 88, Indiana 84
Miami 100, Philadelphia 94
Portland 97, Dallas 92
Friday, April 22
Boston 113, New York 96
Atlanta 88, Orlando 84
L.A. Lakers 100, New Orleans 86
Saturday, April 23
Indiana 89, Chicago 84
Portland 84, Dallas 82
Memphis 91, San Antonio 88
Oklahoma City 97, Denver 94
Sunday, April 24
Philadelphia 86, Miami 82
Boston 101, New York 89, Boston wins series 4-0
Atlanta 88, Orlando 85
New Orleans 93, L.A. Lakers 88
Monday, April 25
Memphis 104, San Antonio 86
Dallas 93, Portland 82
Denver 104, Oklahoma City 101
Tuesday, April 26
Orlando 101, Atlanta 76
Chicago 116, Indiana 89, Chicago wins series 4-1
L.A. Lakers 106, New Orleans 90
Wednesday, April 27
Miami 97, Philadelphia 91, Miami wins series 4-1
San Antonio 110, Memphis 103, OT
Oklahoma City 100, Denver 97, Oklahoma City
wins series 4-1
Thursday, April 28
Atlanta 84, Orlando 81, Atlanta wins series 4-2
L.A. Lakers 98, New Orleans 80, L.A. Lakers wins
series 4-2
Dallas 103, Portland 96, Dallas wins series 4-2
Friday, April 29
Memphis 99, San Antonio 91, Memphis wins series
4-2
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Sunday, May 1
Memphis 114, Oklahoma City 101
Miami 99, Boston 90
Monday, May 2
Atlanta 103, Chicago 95
Dallas 96, L.A. Lakers 94
Tuesday, May 3
Miami 102, Boston 91
Oklahoma City 111, Memphis 102
Wednesday, May 4
Chicago 86, Atlanta 73
Dallas 93, L.A. Lakers 81
Friday, May 6
Chicago 99, Atlanta 82
Dallas 98, L.A. Lakers 92
Saturday, May 7
Memphis 101, Oklahoma City 93, OT
Boston 97, Miami 81
Sunday, May 8
Dallas 122, L.A. Lakers 86, Dallas wins series 4-0
Atlanta 100, Chicago 88
Monday, May 9
Miami 98, Boston 90, OT
Oklahoma City 133, Memphis 123, 3OT
Tuesday, May 10
Chicago 95, Atlanta 83
Wednesday, May 11
Miami 97, Boston 87, Miami wins series 4-1
Oklahoma City 99, Memphis 72
Thursday, May 12
Chicago 93, Atlanta 73, Chicago wins series 4-2
Friday, May 13
Memphis 95, Oklahoma City 83
Sunday, May 15
Oklahoma City 105, Memphis 90, Oklahoma City
wins series 4-3
CONFERENCE FINALS
Sunday, May 15
Chicago 103, Miami 82
Tuesday, May 17
Dallas 121, Oklahoma City 112
Wednesday, May 18
Miami 85, Chicago 75, series tied 1-1
Thursday, May 19
Oklahoma City 106, Dallas 100, series tied 1-1
Saturday, May 21
Dallas at Oklahoma City, late
Sunday, May 22
Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, May 23
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 24
Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 25
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Thursday, May 26
Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, May 27
x-Dallas at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.
Saturday, May 28
x-Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 29
x-Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Monday, May 30
x-Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
NBA LEADERS
PLAYOFFS / INCLUDES GAMES OF FRIDAY,
MAY 20, 2011
SCORING AVERAGE
................................................ G FG FT PTS AVG
Durant, OKC......................... 14 131117 411 29.4
Nowitzki, DAL....................... 12 113104 342 28.5
Rose, CHI ............................. 13 124 97 366 28.2
Howard, ORL ....................... 6 51 60 162 27.0
Anthony, NYK....................... 4 33 29 104 26.0
James, MIA........................... 12 106 76 305 25.4
Wade, MIA............................ 12 105 88 304 25.3
Westbrook, OKC.................. 14 109 94 325 23.2
Bryant, LAL........................... 10 83 50 228 22.8
Randolph, MEM................... 13 100 87 289 22.2
Paul, NOR............................. 6 42 39 132 22.0
Granger, IND........................ 5 43 14 108 21.6
Aldridge, POR...................... 6 53 19 125 20.8
Pierce, BOS.......................... 9 68 30 187 20.8
Ginobili, SAN........................ 5 31 32 103 20.6
Parker, SAN.......................... 6 43 31 118 19.7
Allen, BOS............................ 9 57 24 170 18.9
Johnson, ATL....................... 12 87 34 226 18.8
Terry, DAL ............................ 12 77 35 215 17.9
Bosh, MIA............................. 12 74 55 203 16.9
T E N N I S
WTA Brussels Open
At Primerose Royal Tennis Club
Brussels, Belgium
Purse: $618,000 (Premier)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Championship
Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Peng Shuai
(8), China, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Doubles
Championship
Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, and Galina
Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. KlaudiaJans andAl-
icja Rosolska (2), Poland, 3-6, 6-0, 10-5 tiebreak.
ATP Power Horse World Team
Cup
At Rochusclub
Duesseldorf, Germany
Purse: $1.13 million (World Championship)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Championship
Germany 2, Argentina 1
Singles
Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Juan Monaco, Argen-
tina, 7-6 (4), 6-0.
Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, def. Philipp Kohl-
schreiber, Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (4).
Doubles
Philipp Kohlschreiber and Philipp Petzschner, Ger-
many, def. Juan Ignacio Chela and Maximo Gonza-
lez, Argentina, 6-3, 7-6 (5).
ATP World Tour Open
de Nice Cote d'Azur
At The Nice Lawn Tennis Club
Nice, France
Purse: $561,450 (WT250)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Championship
Nicolas Almagro (3), Spain, def. Victor Hanescu,
Romania, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-3.
Doubles
Championship
Eric Butorac, United States, and Jean-Julien Rojer
(2), Netherlands Antilles, def. Santiago Gonzalez,
Mexico, and David Marrero (4), Spain, 6-3, 6-4.
WTA Internationaux de
Strasbourg
At Centre Sportif de Hautepierre
Strasbourg, France
Purse: $220,000 (Intl.)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Championship
Andrea Petkovic (2), Germany, def. Marion Bartoli
(1), France, 6-4, 1-0, retired.
Doubles
Championship
Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, and Chuang
Chia-jung (4), Taiwan, def. Natalie Grandin, South
Africa, and Vladimira Uhlirova (2), Czech Republic,
6-4, 5-7, 10-2 tiebreak.
G O L F
Colonial
At Colonial Country Club
Fort Worth, Texas
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,204;Par 70
Third Round
Charlie Wi ..........................................64-67-66—197
David Toms .......................................62-62-74—198
John Senden .....................................65-66-70—201
Stuart Appleby...................................71-64-67—202
Paul Goydos ......................................70-65-67—202
Mark Wilson.......................................65-66-71—202
D.J. Trahan........................................67-71-65—203
Brian Gay............................................64-71-68—203
Marc Leishman..................................66-68-69—203
Rory Sabbatini ...................................68-64-71—203
Steven Bowditch...............................67-64-72—203
Ryan Palmer ......................................69-69-66—204
Alex Cejka..........................................69-69-66—204
Arjun Atwal.........................................69-67-68—204
Kevin Na.............................................69-65-70—204
Chez Reavie......................................62-71-71—204
Martin Laird........................................69-70-66—205
Matt Kuchar........................................71-67-67—205
John Mallinger...................................67-71-67—205
Bo Van Pelt ........................................68-69-68—205
Robert Karlsson................................69-68-68—205
William McGirt ...................................69-67-69—205
Steve Marino .....................................66-70-69—205
Hunter Mahan....................................67-69-69—205
Bill Haas.............................................67-67-71—205
Rod Pampling....................................65-69-71—205
Kent Jones.........................................66-68-71—205
Rickie Fowler.....................................63-69-73—205
Dean Wilson ......................................69-70-67—206
Sergio Garcia ....................................66-73-67—206
Josh Teater ........................................68-70-68—206
Zach Johnson....................................68-69-69—206
Kevin Stadler .....................................69-68-69—206
Brandt Snedeker ...............................69-67-70—206
Kevin Streelman................................72-67-68—207
Spencer Levin ...................................66-71-70—207
Fredrik Jacobson..............................70-68-69—207
Nathan Green ....................................64-73-70—207
Kris Blanks.........................................69-68-70—207
Stewart Cink ......................................64-71-72—207
Lucas Glover .....................................71-64-72—207
Sean O’Hair .......................................71-68-69—208
Chris Kirk ...........................................67-72-69—208
David Hearn.......................................68-70-70—208
Blake Adams .....................................72-66-70—208
Jim Furyk ...........................................67-69-72—208
Brendon de Jonge ............................64-72-72—208
Kyle Stanley.......................................70-69-70—209
Steve Flesch......................................69-70-70—209
Jason Day ..........................................71-68-70—209
Henrik Stenson .................................66-71-72—209
Chris DiMarco ...................................69-67-73—209
Tim Herron.........................................69-66-74—209
Jimmy Walker....................................72-67-71—210
Michael Bradley ................................69-69-72—210
Anthony Kim......................................67-70-73—210
Greg Chalmers..................................71-66-73—210
Adam Scott ........................................66-70-74—210
Boo Weekley .....................................66-70-74—210
Tim Petrovic.......................................67-69-74—210
Jeff Overton.......................................67-68-75—210
Bill Lunde ...........................................70-69-72—211
Michael Connell ................................70-69-72—211
Matt Bettencourt ................................70-69-73—212
Pat Perez............................................71-68-73—212
Brandt Jobe .......................................70-68-75—213
Joe Ogilvie.........................................70-69-75—214
Cameron Tringale.............................72-67-76—215
Michael Sim.......................................72-67-76—215
David Mathis ......................................70-68-78—216
R A C I N G
Indy 500
Indianapolis 500 Lineup
Through qualifying Saturday (Qualifying
continues Sunday with nine spots to be
filled;race May 29)
Indianapolis
Top 10 practice speeds for the Indianapolis
500
Name (car number) and four-lap qualifying
average
Row1
Alex Tagliani (77), 227.472 mph;w-Scott Dixon (9),
227.340;Oriol Servia (2), 227.168
Row 2
Townsend Bell (99), 226.887;Will Power (12),
226.773;w-Dan Wheldon (98), 226.490
Row 3
w-Buddy Rice (44), 225.786;x-Ed Carpenter (67),
225.121;y (w)-Dario Franchitti (10), 226.379
Row 4
Takuma Sato (5), 225.736;Vitor Meira (14),
225.590;r-JR Hildebrand (4), 225.579
Row 5
r-James Hinchcliffe (06), 225.572;Bertrand Ba-
guette (30), 225.285;Davey Hamilton (11), 225.250
Row 6
w-Helio Castroneves (3), 225.216;John Andretti
(43), 224.981;E.J. Viso (59), 224.732
Row 7
Bruno Junqueira (41), 224.691;Justin Wilson (22),
224.511;r-Jay Howard (88), 224.483
Row 8
Tomas Scheckter (07), 224.433;Tony Kanaan (82),
224.417;Simona De Silvestro (78T), 224.392
x-finished qualifying in top nine and ran slower time
in shootout
y-finishedqualifyingintopninebut didnot complete
four-lap run and dropped to ninth
w-previous winner
r-rookie
NASCAR Sprint Cup
Sprint Showdown Results
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) David Ragan, Ford, 40 laps, 146.9 rating, 0
points, $46,925.
2. (4) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 40, 125.2, 0,
$36,925.
3. (6) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 40, 107.7, 0, $32,625.
4. (2) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 40, 114.7, 0, $30,525.
5. (9) Joey Logano, Toyota, 40, 98.5, 0, $29,525.
6. (13) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 40, 82.9, 0,
$27,525.
7. (8) David Gilliland, Ford, 40, 80, 0, $26,525.
8. (14) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 40, 82.7, 0,
$25,925.
9. (5) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 40, 88.4, 0, $25,425.
10. (10) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 40, 77.8, 0, $25,175.
11. (3) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 40, 100.9, 0,
$24,900.
12. (11) Casey Mears, Toyota, 40, 70.2, 0, $24,625.
13. (7) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 40, 84.8, 0,
$24,375.
14. (18) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 40, 64.7, 0, $24,275.
15. (12) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 40, 61.5, 0, $24,175.
16. (16) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 40, 55.7, 0, $24,075.
17. (17) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 40, 48.5, 0, $23,975.
18. (21) T.J. Bell, Toyota, 40, 43.1, 0, $23,875.
19. (19) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 40, 42, 0, $23,775.
20. (27) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, 40, 35.1, 0,
$23,675.
21. (23) Tony Raines, Ford, 40, 35.7, 0, $23,550.
22. (22) David Starr, Ford, ignition, 29, 49.5, 0,
$23,425.
23. (20) Andy Lally, Ford, 28, 41.5, 0, $23,325.
24. (26) David Stremme, Chevrolet, accident, 27,
48.5, 0, $23,225.
25. (24) Boris Said, Ford, accident, 3, 31.7, 0,
$23,125.
26. (15) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, accident, 2,
32.3, 0, $23,025.
27. (25) Derrike Cope, Ford, accident, 2, 28.5, 0,
$22,916.
S O C C E R
Major League Soccer
EASTERN CONFERENCE
.................................................. W L T Pts GF GA
New York................................. 4 2 3 15 13 6
Philadelphia............................ 5 3 2 17 8 7
Houston................................... 3 3 4 13 13 10
Columbus................................ 3 2 4 13 8 9
New England .......................... 3 3 4 13 9 12
D.C........................................... 3 4 3 12 13 18
Toronto FC.............................. 2 4 5 11 11 17
Chicago................................... 1 3 5 8 12 15
Sporting Kansas City............. 1 5 1 4 11 17
WESTERN CONFERENCE
.................................................. W L T Pts GF GA
Los Angeles............................ 5 2 5 20 17 12
FC Dallas ................................ 5 3 2 17 13 10
Real Salt Lake........................ 5 1 1 16 9 2
Colorado.................................. 4 3 3 15 12 10
Seattle...................................... 3 3 5 14 13 11
Portland ................................... 4 3 2 14 12 14
Chivas USA ............................ 3 3 3 12 11 9
San Jose.................................. 2 4 3 9 10 11
Vancouver ............................... 1 5 5 8 12 16
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 2, Chicago 1
New York at Houston, late
Los Angeles at Chivas USA, late
Sporting Kansas City at Seattle FC, late
New England at San Jose, late
Columbus at Portland, late
International League attendance
Team Total Games Average
Lehigh Valley 179,900 20 8,545
Louisville 150,514 18 8361
Columbus 98,387 16 6,149
Pawtucket 116,692 19 6,141
Indianapolis 132,248 23 5,749
Toledo 90,673 16 5,667
Durham 109,706 20 5485
Buffalo 105,204 20 5,260
Norfolk 80,105 17 4,712
Gwinnett 96,531 22 4387
Rochester 88,569 21 4217
Syracuse 57,685 15 3845
Charlotte 79,039 23 3436
SWB Yankees 41,962 13 3227
Source: Milb.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 3C
YANKEES S UNDAY
Today
Indianapolis
1:05 p.m.
Monday
Indianapolis
6:35 p.m.
Tuesday
Indianapolis
10:35 a.m.
Thursday
at Louisville
6:35 p.m.
May 30
at Indianapolis
6:05 p.m.
May 29
at Louisville
6:05 p.m.
Saturday
at Louisville
6:05 p.m.
Friday
at Louisville
6:35 p.m.
U P C O M I N G S C H E D U L E
DellinBetances: The23-year-old,
right-hander is theNo. 3overall
prospect for theYankees andis the
toppitchingprospect.
Last week, heaccomplished
somethingnot manyplayers can
saytheydidwhenheloweredhis
ERAfrom1.00enteringtheweek.
Hedidthat bygoing10
2
⁄3 innings
andonlygivinguponeearnedrun
intwostarts. For Double-ATren-
ton, his recordis 3-1, but his ERA
has droppedto0.94.
MannyBanuelos: LikeBentanc-
es, his teammateat Trenton, Banue-
los loweredhis ERAlast week. The
5-foot-11, 155-poundlefty, whois the
No. 2pitchingprospect andtheNo.
4overall prospect intheorganiza-
tion, pitchedsixscoreless innings
for Trentonagainst ErieonMay17.
The20-year-oldonlyallowedtwo
hits intheouting, whilestrikingout
seven. His ERAdroppedto2.25this
seasonandoverall hehas fanned27
in32innings for theThunder.
GarySanchez: Acatcher, he’s just
18but is ratedtheNo. 2overall
prospect intheorganization, only
behindScranton/Wilkes-Barre
catcher Jesus Montero.
Playingfor Single-ACharleston,
hehadagoodweekfor theRiver-
Dogs, going7-for-21withtwohome-
rs andsixRBI insixgames. He
raisedhis battingaveragefrom.216
to.238beforeSaturday’s game.
AustinRomine: Another catcher
andtheNo. 6overall prospect for
theYankees, the22-year-oldis
havingasolidseasonat Trenton.
Hehas beenconsistent this
seasonfor theThunder, hitting.269
withthreehomeruns and21RBI in
134at-bats after Friday.
SladeHeathcott: The20-year-old
outfielder was suspendedfive
games last weekfor Single-AChar-
lestonafter beingejectedfroma
gamefor instigatingabench-clear-
ingbrawl. Hereturnedtothelineup
mid-weekandwent 0-for-6on
Thursdaybeforea3-for-4perform-
anceonFriday.
Heis hitting.311withthreehome
runs, 14RBI andfivestolenbases in
34games for theRiverDogs. Hehas
alsobeenreachingbaseat agood
clipwith16extra-basehits and14
walks this season. Notable: Tampa
thirdbasemanRobert Lyerlyleads
all Yankeeminor leaguers inbatting
average, hitting.337in166at-bats
beforeSaturday.
YA N K E E S P R O S P E C T S
Double-A hurler
drops ERA to 0.94
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Editor’s Note: The Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre Yankees have taken a page
from their parent club by winning
championships.
SWB has racked up four consecutive
International League North Division
titles and more could be on the way
because the minor league system is
stacked with top prospects that are
close to contributing at the Triple-A
or Major League level, according to
Baseball America.
Russ Canzler, the Hazleton
Area graduate, continued his solid
hitting this season for the Tampa
Bay Rays’ Triple-Ateam, the
DurhamBulls.
Last week, Canzler helped the
Bulls to a victory over the Louis-
ville Bats, going 2-for-3 with three
runs scored and his third home
run of the season on Wednesday.
Through Friday, he’s hitting
.303, with three home runs and19
RBI, in 37 games for Durham. He
also has three stolen three bases
and an on-base percentage of .406.
Chris Sedon, a Coughlin gradu-
ate, played in his first game for the
Gateway Grizzlies, an independ-
ent teamin Sauget, Ill., last week-
end.
As DHin a 9-5 win over River
City last week he went 2-for-2
with a triple, a home run and
three RBI.
The teamwhich competes in
the Frontier League, opened its
home schedule on Friday and
Sedon was 2-for-4.
Earlier this month in an exhibi-
tion against Southern Illinois,
Sedon belted a grand slamin a 6-0
victory.
L O C A L S I N M I N O R S
Bulls’ Canzler has
big night vs. Bats
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
The ClevelandIndians are
getting a lot of attentionfor their
hot start to the 2011seasoninthe
AmericanLeague Central.
What isn’t being mentionedas
muchis that the Indians’ Triple-A
affiliate, the Columbus Clippers,
are off to a sizzling start as well.
The defending Governors’ Cup
champions andTriple-Acham-
pionClippers enteredSaturday
withthe best record, at 28-14, in
the International League andlead
the league’s West Divisionby a
wide margin.
They useda13-game winning
streak fromApril 20 to May 5 to
opena sizable leadinthe league
anddivision. Includedinthat
streak was an18-12 winover Char-
lotte whenthe Clippers useda
nine-runeighthinning to secure
the victory after trailing 9-5 enter-
ing the seventh.
Columbus also scoredan8-5
winover Gwinnett whenit trailed
5-2 entering the eighthinning
before scoring six inthe final two
frames.
The Clippers are ledoffensively
by right fielder JeradHead, who is
hitting a lusty .336 withfive home
runs and16 RBI. ShortstopCord
Phelps is also having a stellar
campaign, batting .299 witha
team-leading sevenhome runs
and26 RBI before Saturday.
Columbus’ toppitcher is Zach
McAllister, who is 7-0 this season
ineight starts. The former Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre Yankee has
posteda 2.42 ERA, with42 strike-
outs in52 innings after throwing
sevenshutout innings ina winon
Friday.
PLAYERSOFTHEWEEK
Syracuse’s Michael Aubrey and
LehighValley pitcher BrianGor-
donwere namedthe International
League batter andpitcher of the
week, respectively, for the week of
May 9-15.
Aubrey, 29, who beganthe
week hitting .171withno home
runs, went ona tear, hitting .444
withfour home runs, a1.167 slug-
ging percentage andanon-base
percentage of .545.
Gordon, 32, was a reliever for
the IronPigs to beginthe season
andwas summonedto start a few
games andrespondedwell. He
allowedjust six hits andone walk
in13 2/3 innings for LehighValley
during the week.
ONTHISDATE
OnMay 22, 1998, PrestonWil-
son, former major leaguer for
several teams, starteda three-
game series withthe Norfolk
Tides against the Charlotte
Knights, but endedthe tripinthe
other dugout.
Wilsonwas tradedfromthe
Mets to the Marlins as part of the
deal that sent Mike Piazza to New
York.
Onthat night against his former
team, Wilsonwent 2-for-4 witha
home runinCharlotte’s victory.
I . L . N O T E B O O K
Hot Clippers follow
lead of parent Tribe
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Today in
SWB history
May 22, 1992
The Red Barons began a
franchise record 14-game
home winning streak on this
date. The streak, which began
with a 4-3 win over the Roch-
ester Red Wings, lasted until
June 11.
The team ended the season
winning the International
League North Division title
that year with a record of
84-58 and advanced to the
Governors’ Cup.
On this date
DomonicBrown: Thetopprospect
intheorganizationwascalledupby
thePhiladelphiaPhilliesfromTriple-A
LehighValleyFridaynight andwas
expectedtobeinthestartinglineup
Saturdaynight against theTexas
Rangersandright-hander Colby
Lewis.
Theleft-handedhittingoutfielder
leavestheIronPigswitha.341average
in41at-bats, withtwohomers,10RBI
andanon-basepercentageof .429and
asluggingpercentageof .737. Hehit
safelyinall11gamesheplayedfor
LehighValley.
outingonWednesday, hehadthebest
start of hisseason, goingsixshutout
inningsandstrikingout eight.
JoeSavery: Theformer pitcher in
Triple-Ahasrebrandedhimself asa
batter intheorganizationandhas
shownvalueinClassA.
Hebegantheseasonfor Clearwater
onatear andhascooledoff abit with
hisaveragedippingto.346(46-
for-133). Hehas10extra-basehitsand
14RBI in130at-batsfor theThreshers.
Hisslight downperiodhasallowed
Double-AReading’sMatt Rizzotti to
passhimfor theorganizational leadin
battingaverage. Rizzotti, adesignated
hitter for theR-Phils, ishitting.354.
Brownhit .210inlimitedactionfor
thePhilsinthelatter half of last year.
BrodyColvin: Theteam’stoppitch-
ingprospect, accordingtoBaseball
America, threwjust twoinningsthis
seasonfor Single-AClearwater before
beingshut downwithabackinjury.
Hisisexpectedbackbytheendof the
month.
JesseBiddle: ThePhillies’ No.1pick
from2010continuestoimproveafter a
roughstart for Low-ALakewood.
The19-year-oldleftybeganthe
seasonwithfour straight losses. But
sincethen, he’sgone2-1andhaslow-
eredhisERAbynearlythreerunsto
hiscurrent markof 4.70. Inhislatest
P H I L L I E S M I N O R L E A G U E R S
Highly regarded outfielder Brown rejoins parent club
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Editor’s Note: The
Philadelphia Phillies
minor league systemhas
lost some highly regard-
ed prospects during the
last few years with many
trades being made to
help the parent club.
But that doesn’t mean
the cupboard is bare.
The Phillies have pro-
duced more young talent
and might have more
pieces to deal if they
need to make a midsea-
son trade this season.
Here are how some of
the top prospects in the
Philadelphia organization
are faring this spring:
A murders’ row of bad tim-
ing and poor weather have the
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yan-
kees off to a rough start in the
International League.
No, the Yankees are more
than holding their own in the
I.L. East standings.
The Yankees, while currently
sitting in second place in their
division, are next to the last in
the International League in
attendance, drawing just
51,584 fans to PNC Field
through the season’s first 14
games.
“April can be tricky in North-
eastern Pennsylvania,” Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre Yankee presi-
dent Kristen Roe said, noting
that the one good week of
weather during the month was
while the Yankees were on the
road.
“We were glad to have fewer
games in April.”
Rose is confident that once
the temperatures start to rise,
so will the Yankees attendance
numbers.
She points to two recent
fireworks nights that each drew
more than 7,000 people to
PNC Field as signs that the
fans are willing to come out to
games. Another fireworks
promotion on Friday, which
was canceled because of the
rain, drew a crowd of 9,622.
Still, attendance woes seem
to be as much a part of the
baseball season for Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre the last few years
as its success on the field,
where it’s won four consecutive
division titles.
Last season, according to
baseball-reference.com, the
Yankees drew only 338,731 fans
– 12th best in the 14-team
league. And that was while the
Yankees were winning the
division by 11 games.
A planned remodeling of the
stadium will help, Rose said.
“I think you only have to
look at what it’s done in other
markets,” she said. “It’s going
to be great for the region, hav-
ing a state-of-the-art ballpark.”
Rose added that the remod-
eled park will be much more
intimate than the 10,000-seat
facility is now, which should
make it more popular with
baseball fans.
For now the team marketing
department is relying on spe-
cial nights at the stadium –
such as fireworks night and
some giveaways – to lure in
extra fans.
The Yankees plan to have
fireworks after each home
Friday night game this season.
Perhaps the Yankees need to
re-examine just what promo-
tional items they are offering.
Rose doesn’t seem to put
much faith in the giveaways
bringing more fans to the stadi-
um, however.
“What we see is that people
arrive early,” she said of the
team’s pervious giveaway
nights. “But it doesn’t neces-
sarily change the attendance
number.”
A minor league team just
down Interstate 81 from the
Yankees has had quite a differ-
ent experience with giveaway
nights, the numbers show.
The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Penguins have had some im-
pressive turnouts for giveaway
items this past ice hockey
season.
For 39 home dates this past
year, the Penguins average
6,175 in paid attendance. But
for the three nights last season
that the Penguins offered ei-
ther a bobblehead or wobbler
to fans, the Penguins averaged
more than 8,000 fans.
“It’s just not a game-night
experience,” said Penguins
president Jeff Barrett, who
added he didn’t want to com-
pare what the Penguins do to
what the Yankees do. “It adds
to the entertainment value for
the fans at the arena. And,
hopefully, gets those fans to
come back.”
Another big hit for the Pen-
guins has been player cards
that contain a small piece of a
game-worn jersey. The Pen-
guins gave those cards out four
times last season and averaged
more than 7,600 those nights.
Barrett said it’s the collecti-
bility of the cards that make
them so popular.
“Some fans have been col-
lecting those from the very
beginning (of the franchise),”
Barrett said.
Team exec: Better weather to bring out fans
Yanks off to slow start at gate
By JOE SOPRANO
jsoprano@timesleader.com
Today: Post-Game Kids Fun Run
June 3: Live music on Bud Light
Bullpen/SWBY Team T-Shirt Gate
Giveaway
June 5: Post-Game Kids Fun Run
June 7: KRAFT Singles Tuesday
Night
June 10: Girl Scout Night and
Sleepover
June 16 Live music
June 17: Post-game fireworks
June 18: Youth Baseball/Softball
Night/ Post-game fireworks
June 19: Post-Game Kids Fun Run
June 21 KRAFT Singles Tuesday
Night Tickets
July 4: Post-game fireworks/Live
music
July 5: Tuesday Night Tickets
July 7: Live music on Bud Light
Bullpen
July 8: Faith Night/SWB Yankees
Baseball Gate Giveaway/Post-game
fireworks
July 9: Live music
July 10: Post-game Kids Fun Run
July 22: Post-game fireworks
July 23: Live music/Hero Apprecia-
tion Night/Post-game fireworks
July 24: Post-Game Kids Fun Run
Aug. 2: KRAFT Singles Tuesday
Night Tickets
Aug. 4: Live music
Aug. 5: Post-game fireworks
Aug. 6: SWBY Aluminum Sport
Bottle Gate Giveaway/Live music
on Bud Light Bullpen/Post-game
fireworks
Aug. 7: Post-game Kids Fun Run
Aug. 9: Singles Tuesday Night
Tickets
Aug. 11: Live music
Aug. 16: KRAFT Singles Tuesday
Night TIckets
Aug. 18: Live music
Aug. 19: Live music/Post-game
fireworks
Aug. 23: KRAFT Singles Tuesday
Night Tickets
Aug. 25: Live music
Aug. 26: Live music /Post-game
fireworks
Aug. 27: SWB Yankees Jersey Bag
Gate Giveaway/Purina Incredible
Dog Team/Live music
Aug. 28: Post-Game Kids Fun Run
Sept. 4: Post-Game Kids Fun Run
U P C O M I N G
P R O M O T I O N S
STATISTICS ARE THROUGH THURSDAY’S GAMES
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
PHILADELPHIA — Cliff Lee
threw eight dominant innings
against the team he led to the
World Series last year, Ryan
Howard hit a solo homer and
the Philadelphia Phillies beat
the Texas Rangers 2-0 Saturday
night.
Lee (3-4) allowed five hits
and struck out 10 to earn his
first win since April 14. The
lefty helped the Rangers cap-
ture the first AL pennant in
franchise history after joining
them last July. But he turned
down more money from Texas
and the New York Yankees to
return to Philadelphia, signing
a $120 million, five-year deal.
Yankees 7, Mets 3
NEW YORK — Mark Teixei-
ra homered for the third
straight game, Alex Rodriguez
also connected and the New
York Yankees went deep four
times to back A.J. Burnett in a
victory over the Mets.
Russell Martin and Curtis
Granderson also homered as
the Yankees evened the Sub-
way Series at one apiece and
snapped a six-game skid at
home — their longest since
2003.
All four homers came off
Chris Capuano (3-5), who
allowed only 11 runs in his
previous five starts. But he
couldn’t keep up the Mets’ run
of stingy pitching lately —
they had given up just one run
while winning their past three
games.
Pirates 6, Tigers 2
PITTSBURGH — Andrew
McCutchen went 3 for 4 and
scored twice, and Kevin Cor-
reia finally won at home as the
Pittsburgh Pirates beat the
Detroit Tigers.
Correia (6-4) entered the
game winless in three starts at
PNC Park this season but al-
lowed two runs and seven hits
over 6 2-3 innings, striking out
four as the surging Pirates
captured their season-high
fourth straight win.
Brewers 3, Rockies 2
MILWAUKEE — Shaun
Marcum won his sixth straight
decision with eight effective
innings and Jonathan Lucroy
homered, lifting the Milwaukee
Brewers to a victory over the
Colorado Rockies.
Milwaukee has won nine of
12 overall and has the NL’s best
winning percentage at home at
.714 (15-6) after John Axford
survived an adventure in the
ninth for his 11th save.
Giants 3, Athletics 0
SAN FRANCISCO — Tim
Lincecum pitched a three-
hitter, and the San Francisco
Giants beat the cross-bay rival
Oakland Athletics for their
fourth straight victory.
The two-time NL Cy Young
Award winner allowed Ryan
Sweeney’s two-out single in the
first before retiring 21 straight
batters, leading the Giants past
the A’s for the second day in a
row.
White Sox 9, Dodgers 2
CHICAGO — Mark Buehrle
threw seven strong innings to
become the career victories
leader in interleague play, Paul
Konerko drove in three runs
and the Chicago White Sox
beat the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Buehrle (4-3) allowed seven
hits and two runs to win for
the third time in four starts,
giving him his 24th interleague
victory — breaking his tie with
Jamie Moyer atop the career
list. He struck out one, and
didn’t walk anyone for the
second time in three starts.
Blue Jays 7, Astros 5
TORONTO — Jose Bautista
hit two home runs, increasing
his major league leading total
to 18, Yunel Escobar added a
tie-breaking drive and the
Toronto Blue Jays rallied to
beat the Houston Astros.
Bautista hit a a three-run
drive to left off Brett Myers in
the sixth and added a solo shot
to left against Jose Valdez in
the eighth. It was his third
multihomer game of the sea-
son and 14th of his career.
Cardinals 3, Royals 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Jake
Westbrook pitched eight shut-
out innings and Matt Holliday
broke a scoreless tie with a
two-run homer in the eighth,
lifting St. Louis over Kansas
City.
Westbrook, (4-3) whose
longest start this year had been
seven innings, gave up four
hits, with three walks and
three strikeouts while raising
his career mark in Kauffman
Stadium to 3-0. Kansas City’s
Nate Adcock went five score-
less innings in his first major
league start.
Indians 2, Reds 1
CLEVELAND — Travis Buck
hit a go-ahead two-run homer
in the seventh inning to give
Josh Tomlin and the Cleveland
Indians a victory over the Cin-
cinnati Reds.
Buck connected with two
outs against Homer Bailey
(3-1), who took a one-hitter
into the seventh before the
Reds tied their season-high
losing streak at four games.
Orioles 8, Nationals 3
BALTIMORE — Jeremy
Guthrie pitched seven solid
innings to win for the first time
since opening day, and Nolan
Reimold’s two-run homer
keyed a four-run third inning as
the Baltimore Orioles beat the
Washington Nationals.
Guthrie (2-6) allowed just
two unearned runs and hadn’t
won in his past seven starts.
He came in with the poorest
run support of any American
League starter.
Marlins 5, Rays 3
MIAMI — Javier Vazquez
pitched seven shutout innings
in his best start of the season,
and the Florida Marlins defeat-
ed cross-state rival Tampa Bay
for the second day in a row.
M A J O R L E A G U E R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
Philadelphia Phillies starter Cliff Lee threw eight shutout in-
nings against the Rangers Saturday night to earn the victory.
Lee dominates
Texas batters
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cleveland 5, Cincinnati 4
Pittsburgh 10, Detroit 1
N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y. Yankees 1
Philadelphia 3, Texas 2
Washington 17, Baltimore 5
Houston 5, Toronto 2
Boston 15, Chicago Cubs 5
Florida 5, Tampa Bay 3
L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings
Kansas City 3, St. Louis 0
Arizona 8, Minnesota 7
L.A. Angels 9, Atlanta 0
Seattle 4, San Diego 1
San Francisco 2, Oakland 1, 10 innings
Saturday's Games
Toronto 7, Houston 5
Chicago White Sox 9, L.A. Dodgers 2
St. Louis 3, Kansas City 0
Cleveland 2, Cincinnati 1
Baltimore 8, Washington 3
Florida 5, Tampa Bay 3
Pittsburgh 6, Detroit 2
N.Y. Yankees 7, N.Y. Mets 3
San Francisco 3, Oakland 0
Philadelphia 2, Texas 0
Chicago Cubs at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Arizona, 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Cincinnati (Volquez 3-1) at Cleveland (C.Carrasco
2-2), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 3-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 4-3),
1:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 2-3) at Toronto (Drabek
3-2), 1:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 4-2) at Florida (Buente 0-0),
1:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 3-2) at Pittsburgh (Maholm 1-6),
1:35 p.m.
Texas (Harrison 3-4) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 3-1),
1:35 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 2-4) at Baltimore (Till-
man 2-3), 1:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-3) at Chicago White Sox
(E.Jackson 3-5), 2:10 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Garcia 5-0) at Kansas City (O’Sullivan
2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Atlanta(D.Lowe3-3) at L.A. Angels (Chatwood2-2),
3:35 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 5-2) at San Francisco (J.San-
chez 3-3), 4:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 4-4) at San Diego (Stauffer
0-2), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 3-5) at Arizona (D.Hudson 4-5),
4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-4) at Boston (Wakefield
0-1), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Milwaukee 7, Colorado 6, 14 innings
Saturday's Games
Milwaukee 3, Colorado 2
Sunday's Games
Colorado (Jimenez 0-3) at Milwaukee (Wolf 3-4),
2:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
I N T E R L E A G E
Phillies 2, Rangers 0
Texas Philadelphia
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Andrus ss 3 0 1 0 Rollins ss 3 0 2 0
Morlnd rf 4 0 0 0 Brown rf 4 0 0 0
Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 Polanc 3b 4 0 2 0
MiYong 1b 4 0 3 0 Howard 1b 4 1 2 1
ABeltre 3b 4 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 3 1 0 0
Napoli c 3 0 1 0 Ruiz c 2 0 0 0
DvMrp lf 3 0 0 0 Mayrry cf 2 0 1 1
Gentry cf 3 0 0 0 WValdz 2b 3 0 0 0
CLewis p 2 0 0 0 Cl.Lee p 3 0 1 0
Rhodes p 0 0 0 0 Madson p 0 0 0 0
Torreal ph 1 0 0 0
Tomko p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 0 6 0 Totals 28 2 8 2
Texas.................................. 000 000 000 — 0
Philadelphia....................... 010 001 00x — 2
DP—Texas 2, Philadelphia 1. LOB—Texas 6, Phi-
ladelphia 6. HR—Howard (10). SB—Kinsler (9),
Cl.Lee (1). CS—Moreland (1), Brown (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Texas
C.Lewis L,4-5 .......... 6
2
⁄3 7 2 2 2 6
Rhodes.....................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Tomko ...................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
Cl.Lee W,3-4 ........... 8 5 0 0 2 10
Madson S,9-9.......... 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP—by C.Lewis (Mayberry, Rollins).
Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds;First, Mike DiMu-
ro;Second, Tim Welke;Third, Andy Fletcher.
T—2:31. A—45,604 (43,651).
Yankees 7, Mets 3
New York (N) New York (A)
ab r h bi ab r h bi
JosRys ss 5 2 3 0 Jeter ss 4 2 2 0
DnMrp 1b 4 1 2 0 Grndrs cf 4 1 1 1
Beltran rf 3 0 1 1 Teixeir 1b 3 1 1 3
Bay lf 2 0 0 1 AlRdrg dh 4 2 2 1
FMrtnz dh 3 0 0 0 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0
Turner 3b 4 0 1 1 Martin c 3 1 1 2
Thole c 4 0 0 0 Swisher rf 3 0 0 0
Pridie cf 4 0 0 0 Dickrsn rf 0 0 0 0
RTejad 2b 3 0 0 0 AnJons lf 3 0 0 0
Harris ph 1 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 0 0 0 0
ENunez 3b 3 0 0 0
Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 30 7 7 7
New York (N)..................... 200 010 000 — 3
New York (A) ..................... 022 002 01x — 7
LOB—New York (N) 7, New York (A) 0.
2B—Jos.Reyes (14). HR—Granderson (15), Teix-
eira (12), Al.Rodriguez (9), Martin (8). SB—
Jos.Reyes (17), Jeter (3). SF—Bay, Teixeira.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York (N)
Capuano L,3-5 ........ 5
1
⁄3 6 6 6 0 5
Beato......................... 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
T.Buchholz............... 1 1 1 1 0 0
New York (A)
A.J.Burnett W,5-3 ... 6
1
⁄3 6 3 3 3 4
Logan........................ 0 1 0 0 0 0
Robertson H,9.........
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Chamberlain H,10 .. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ayala......................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Umpires—Home, Jeff Kellogg;First, Eric Cooper-
;Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Tim Timmons.
T—2:44. A—48,286 (50,291).
Pirates 6, Tigers 2
Detroit Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 5 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 2 3 0
Santiag 2b 3 0 1 0 Tabata lf 4 2 2 0
Dirks lf 4 1 1 0 GJones rf 3 1 1 1
MiCarr 1b 4 1 2 1 Diaz ph-rf 1 0 1 2
Boesch rf 3 0 1 1 Beimel p 0 0 0 0
Perry p 0 0 0 0 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0
Schlrth p 0 0 0 0 Walker 2b 3 0 0 1
VMrtnz ph 1 0 0 0 Overay 1b 3 0 0 1
Alurqrq p 0 0 0 0 Doumit c 4 0 2 0
JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 0 BrWod 3b 4 0 1 0
Avila c 4 0 2 0 Cedeno ss 4 0 2 0
Inge 3b 4 0 1 0 Correia p 2 0 0 0
Scherzr p 2 0 0 0 Veras p 0 1 0 0
Raburn rf 2 0 1 0 Paul ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 210 2 Totals 33 612 5
Detroit................................. 000 200 000 — 2
Pittsburgh .......................... 000 003 30x — 6
DP—Detroit 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB—Detroit 8, Pitts-
burgh 6. 2B—Dirks (1), Mi.Cabrera (13), Boesch
(10), G.Jones (5). CS—Diaz (1). SF—Walker,
Overbay.
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Scherzer L,6-1 ........ 5
2
⁄3 7 3 3 0 7
Perry.........................
1
⁄3 3 3 3 1 0
Schlereth.................. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Alburquerque........... 1 1 0 0 0 2
Pittsburgh
Correia W,6-4.......... 6
2
⁄3 7 2 2 0 4
Veras H,7................. 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
Beimel ...................... 0 2 0 0 0 0
Hanrahan S,13-13 .. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Beimel pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Perry pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Umpires—Home, Chris Guccione;First, Mike Win-
ters;Second, Mike Muchlinski;Third, Mark Wegner.
T—3:08. A—37,958 (38,362).
Blue Jays 7, Astros 5
Houston Toronto
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 4 2 1 0 YEscor ss 4 2 1 2
AngSnc 2b 4 0 1 1 CPttrsn lf 4 0 0 0
Pence rf 5 1 2 0 Bautist rf 4 2 3 4
Ca.Lee dh 5 2 2 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0
Wallac 1b 3 0 2 1 JRiver 1b 4 0 1 0
CJhnsn 3b 3 0 2 3 RDavis cf 4 0 0 0
Barmes ss 4 0 0 0 EThms dh 3 1 2 0
Bogsvc lf 4 0 1 0 JMcDnl 3b 3 0 0 0
Quinter c 3 0 0 0 JMolin c 3 2 2 1
Totals 35 511 5 Totals 33 710 7
Houston.............................. 201 010 001 — 5
Toronto............................... 000 003 31x — 7
E—Barmes (2). DP—Houston 2, Toronto 1. LOB—
Houston 8, Toronto 2. 2B—Ang.Sanchez (6), Ca-
.Lee (8), E.Thames (1). HR—Y.Escobar (4), Bautis-
ta 2 (18). SB—Ca.Lee (2), Bautista (5). SF—Wal-
lace, C.Johnson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Myers L,1-4.............. 6
2
⁄3 8 6 5 0 2
Escalona..................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
J.Valdez ................... 1 2 1 1 0 0
Toronto
Morrow..................... 6 9 4 4 3 6
Janssen W,1-0 ........ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Frasor H,4................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Rauch H,1................
1
⁄3 2 1 1 0 0
Dotel S,1-1...............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Morrow pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
PB—J.Molina.
Umpires—Home, Tony Randazzo;First, Dan Belli-
no;Second, Larry Vanover;Third, Brian Gorman.
T—2:37. A—21,494 (49,260).
Cardinals 3, Royals 0
St. Louis Kansas City
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Theriot ss 4 0 1 1 Gordon lf 3 0 1 0
Jay rf 5 0 1 0 MeCarr cf 4 0 1 0
Pujols 1b 3 1 1 0 Hosmer 1b 3 0 1 0
Hollidy dh 3 1 1 2 Francr rf 3 0 0 0
Rasms cf 4 0 0 0 Butler dh 3 0 0 0
YMolin c 3 0 1 0 Aviles 3b 3 0 1 0
Craig lf 4 0 2 0 Treanr c 2 0 0 0
Descals 3b 4 1 0 0 Maier ph 1 0 0 0
Greene 2b 2 0 0 0 B.Pena c 0 0 0 0
Getz 2b 3 0 1 0
AEscor ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 32 3 7 3 Totals 28 0 5 0
St. Louis............................. 000 000 021 — 3
Kansas City ....................... 000 000 000 — 0
DP—St. Louis 2. LOB—St. Louis 8, Kansas City 4.
2B—Theriot (6), Y.Molina (11), Craig (4). HR—Hol-
liday (6). SB—Getz (8). CS—Y.Molina (3). SF—
Theriot.
IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
Westbrook W,4-3.... 8 4 0 0 3 3
Salas S,6-6.............. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Kansas City
Adcock ..................... 5 3 0 0 1 4
L.Coleman ............... 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
Collins L,2-2 ............ 1 1 1 1 1 0
Bl.Wood ...................
2
⁄3 1 1 1 1 0
Tejeda ...................... 1 1 1 1 1 0
HBP—by Adcock (Pujols). WP—Tejeda 2.
Umpires—Home, Angel Hernandez;First, Angel
Campos;Second, Chad Fairchild;Third, Joe West.
T—2:41. A—32,229 (37,903).
White Sox 9, Dodgers 2
Los Angeles Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Carroll ss 4 1 1 0 Pierre lf 5 0 1 0
JuCastr 2b 4 0 2 0 AlRmrz ss 4 2 3 2
Ethier dh 3 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 0 0 0
Kemp cf 3 0 1 1 McPhrs 1b 0 0 0 0
GwynJ ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Konerk dh 5 0 3 3
Barajs c 4 0 0 0 Przyns c 5 2 3 0
Sands lf 3 1 1 1 Rios cf 4 1 1 2
Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 Vizquel 3b 4 1 1 0
Gions rf 4 0 1 0 Lillirdg rf 3 2 2 2
Mitchll 3b 4 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 3 1 2 0
Totals 34 2 7 2 Totals 37 916 9
Los Angeles....................... 001 001 000 — 2
Chicago.............................. 100 600 20x — 9
DP—Los Angeles 2. LOB—Los Angeles 7, Chica-
go 8. 2B—Loney (5), Al.Ramirez 2 (8), Pierzynski
(5), Vizquel (4). HR—Sands (1), Rios (4), Lillibridge
(4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Garland L,1-4 .......... 3
2
⁄3 11 7 7 1 2
Troncoso.................. 2
1
⁄3 2 0 0 1 1
Cormier .................... 2 3 2 2 1 2
Chicago
Buehrle W,4-3......... 7 7 2 2 0 1
T.Pena...................... 2 0 0 0 2 3
HBP—by Garland (Lillibridge).
Umpires—Home, Adrian Johnson;First, Fieldin
Culbreth;Second, Gary Cederstrom;Third, Lance
Barksdale.
T—2:33. A—25,519 (40,615).
Orioles 8, Nationals 3
Washington Baltimore
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Berndn cf 4 0 0 0 Andino 2b 5 1 1 1
Dsmnd ss 4 1 2 0 AdJons cf 5 1 2 0
L.Nix lf 3 0 0 0 Markks rf 5 2 2 1
Werth rf 4 0 1 0 Guerrr dh 4 1 2 1
Stairs dh 4 1 1 0 Wieters c 4 0 2 1
AdLRc 1b 3 0 1 0 Hardy ss 4 0 1 1
Morse 1b 1 0 0 0 MrRynl 3b 3 1 1 0
WRams c 3 0 0 1 Reimld lf 4 1 1 2
Espinos 2b 4 0 1 0 BSnydr 1b 4 1 2 0
HrstnJr 3b 3 1 1 0
Totals 33 3 7 1 Totals 38 814 7
Washington ....................... 002 000 001 — 3
Baltimore............................ 004 000 40x — 8
E—L.Nix (2), B.Snyder (1). DP—Baltimore 1.
LOB—Washington 5, Baltimore 7. 2B—Desmond
(8), Stairs (1), Espinosa (6), Andino (2), Ad.Jones
(8), Mar.Reynolds (10), B.Snyder (1). HR—Reimold
(1). SF—W.Ramos.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Lannan L,2-5............ 6 9 6 6 1 6
Kimball...................... 1 4 2 2 0 1
Clippard.................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
Guthrie W,2-6.......... 7 5 2 0 1 4
Ji.Johnson ............... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Uehara ..................... 1 1 1 1 0 0
Lannan pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Umpires—Home, Greg Gibson;First, Todd Tiche-
nor;Second, Gerry Davis;Third, Mike Estabrook.
T—2:35. A—33,107 (45,438).
Indians 2, Reds 1
Cincinnati Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Stubbs cf 4 0 1 0 Brantly lf 4 0 1 0
JGoms dh 4 0 0 0 ACarer ss 4 1 1 0
Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 Choo rf 3 0 1 0
BPhllps 2b 3 1 0 0 CSantn c 3 0 0 0
Bruce rf 2 0 1 0 T.Buck dh 3 1 1 2
Rolen 3b 4 0 0 1 OCarer 2b 3 0 1 0
FLewis lf 3 0 0 0 LaPort 1b 3 0 0 0
Hanign c 3 0 2 0 Hannhn 3b 3 0 0 0
T.Wood pr 0 0 0 0 Carrer cf 3 0 0 0
RHrndz c 0 0 0 0
Renteri ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 29 1 4 1 Totals 29 2 5 2
Cincinnati ........................... 000 000 100 — 1
Cleveland........................... 000 000 20x — 2
DP—Cleveland 2. LOB—Cincinnati 5, Cleveland 3.
2B—O.Cabrera (7). HR—T.Buck (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
H.Bailey L,3-1.......... 7 4 2 2 0 4
Arredondo................ 1 1 0 0 0 2
Cleveland
Tomlin W,6-1........... 7 3 1 1 1 3
Pestano H,5............. 1 1 0 0 0 3
C.Perez S,12-13..... 1 0 0 0 2 1
HBP—by Tomlin (B.Phillips).
Umpires—Home, Bill Miller;First, James Hoye;Se-
cond, Manny Gonzalez;Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T—2:21. A—40,631 (43,441).
Marlins 5, Rays 3
Tampa Bay Florida
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fuld cf 3 0 0 0 Bonifac cf 3 1 0 0
Ruggin ph-rf 1 1 0 0 HRmrz ss 4 2 2 1
Zobrist rf-2b 5 0 0 0 Morrsn lf 4 0 1 2
Joyce lf 3 0 1 0 GSnchz 1b 3 0 1 0
BUpton ph-cf 0 1 0 0 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0
Longori 3b 3 1 0 0 J.Buck c 3 0 0 0
Ktchm 1b 2 0 1 0 Helms 3b 3 1 1 0
Shppch ph-c 0 0 0 1 Infante 2b 3 1 1 2
SRdrgz 2b 3 0 1 0 Vazquz p 2 0 0 0
Damon ph-lf 1 0 1 2 OMrtnz ph 1 0 0 0
Jaso c 4 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0
ARussll p 0 0 0 0 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0
CRams p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
BGoms p 0 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0
Brignc ss 3 0 0 0 LNunez p 0 0 0 0
Price p 2 0 0 0
J.Cruz p 0 0 0 0
EJhnsn
ph-1b 2 0 1 0
Totals 32 3 5 3 Totals 30 5 6 5
Tampa Bay......................... 000 000 030 — 3
Florida ................................ 200 001 20x — 5
E—Brignac (4). DP—Tampa Bay 1. LOB—Tampa
Bay 8, Florida 3. 2B—Kotchman (5), S.Rodriguez
(9), Morrison (9). HR—H.Ramirez (4), Infante (1).
SB—E.Johnson (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Price L,5-4 ............... 6
2
⁄3 6 5 5 1 4
J.Cruz.......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
A.Russell .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0
C.Ramos..................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
B.Gomes..................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Florida
Vazquez W,3-4 ....... 7 3 0 0 2 7
M.Dunn.....................
2
⁄3 0 2 2 2 1
R.Webb.................... 0 0 1 1 1 0
Choate...................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Mujica H,3................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
L.Nunez S,17-17..... 1 1 0 0 0 2
R.Webb pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
A.Russell pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Umpires—Home, Wally Bell;First, Laz Diaz;Sec-
ond, Scott Barry;Third, John Hirschbeck.
T—2:57. A—21,814 (38,560).
Giants 3, Athletics 0
Oakland San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 Torres cf 3 1 0 0
Barton 1b 4 0 0 0 FSnchz 2b 4 0 2 0
Sweeny rf 4 0 1 0 Posey c 4 1 2 1
CJcksn lf 3 0 0 0 Burrell lf 4 0 0 0
M.Ellis 2b 3 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 0 0 0 0
Kzmnff 3b 3 0 0 0 C.Ross rf-lf 3 1 1 1
AnLRc 3b 0 0 0 0 Huff 1b 4 0 2 0
Blevins p 0 0 0 0 MTejad 3b 3 0 1 1
Powell c 3 0 1 0 Fontent ss 3 0 1 0
KSuzuk pr-c 0 0 0 0 Linccm p 3 0 0 0
Pnngtn ss 3 0 0 0
Andrsn p 1 0 0 0
Matsui ph 1 0 0 0
Devine p 0 0 0 0
Breslw p 0 0 0 0
Ziegler p 0 0 0 0
DeJess ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 30 0 3 0 Totals 31 3 9 3
Oakland.............................. 000 000 000 — 0
San Francisco.................... 100 000 02x — 3
E—Kouzmanoff (7), Powell (1). LOB—Oakland 3,
San Francisco 9. 2B—F.Sanchez (9), Posey (5),
Fontenot (7). S—Lincecum. SF—M.Tejada.
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
Anderson L,2-4 ....... 5 5 1 1 1 5
Devine...................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Breslow.................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Ziegler ......................
1
⁄3 2 2 2 0 0
Blevins......................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 1 0
San Francisco
Lincecum W,4-4...... 9 3 0 0 0 6
HBP—by Anderson (C.Ross).
Umpires—Home, C.B. Bucknor;First, Dale Scott-
;Second, Jerry Meals;Third, John Tumpane.
T—2:24. A—42,152 (41,915).
N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
Brewers 3, Rockies 2
Colorado Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fowler cf 4 0 1 0 Weeks 2b 4 1 1 0
Herrer 2b 4 0 1 0 C.Hart rf 4 0 0 0
CGnzlz lf 4 1 1 1 Braun lf 4 0 1 0
Tlwtzk ss 3 1 2 0 Fielder 1b 2 1 1 1
S.Smith rf 4 0 0 1 McGeh 3b 3 0 0 0
JoLopz 3b 3 0 0 0 YBtncr ss 3 0 0 0
Daley p 0 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 1 1 1
MtRynl p 0 0 0 0 CGomz cf 3 0 1 0
Giambi ph 1 0 1 0 Marcm p 2 0 0 0
Splrghs pr 0 0 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0
Wggntn 1b 4 0 0 0
JMorls c 2 0 0 0
Mrtnsn p 2 0 0 0
Amezg 3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 2 6 2 Totals 28 3 5 2
Colorado ............................ 100 000 001 — 2
Milwaukee.......................... 200 010 00x — 3
E—Jo.Lopez (4), Herrera (2). DP—Colorado 1.
LOB—Colorado 5, Milwaukee 4. 2B—Tulowitzki
(9), Weeks (11), Fielder (13), C.Gomez (7).
3B—Tulowitzki (2). HR—C.Gonzalez (6), Lucroy
(4). CS—Fowler (6), Braun (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Mortensen L,1-1...... 6
2
⁄3 5 3 2 3 5
Daley ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 3
Mat.Reynolds...........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
Marcum W,6-1 ........ 8 4 1 1 2 8
Axford S,11-13........ 1 2 1 1 0 2
WP—Mortensen.
Umpires—Home, Gary Darling;First, Bruce Dreck-
man;Second, Paul Emmel;Third, Rob Drake.
T—2:39. A—42,240 (41,900).
T H I S D A T E I N
B A S E B A L L
May 22
1933 —Joe Sewell of the NewYork Yankees struck
out for the first time this season, during a 3-0 win
over Cleveland. Sewell would strike out only three
more times in 524 at-bats.
1957 — The Boston Red Sox hit four home runs in
the sixth inning of an11-0 win over Cleveland. Gene
Mauch, Ted Williams, Dick Gernert and Frank Mal-
zone connected. All the homers came on the first 16
pitches from Cal McLish.
1959 —Baltimore’s Hoyt Wilhelmpitched a one-hit-
ter against theNewYork Yankees for a5-0win. Jer-
ry Lumpe’s single in the eighth spoiled the no-hit
bid.
1963—Mickey Mantlehit apitchfromKansas City’s
Bill Fischer off the right-field facade at Yankee Sta-
dium in an 8-7 victory over the A’s.
1968 — Willie Stargell of the Pittsburgh Pirates hit
three home runs, a double and a single in a 13-6
victory over the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field.
Stargell’s double just missed going out, as it
bounced off the railing of the left-field bleachers.
1976 —St. Louis’ Reggie Smith hit three home runs
— two right-handed and one left-handed — and
drove in five runs in a 7-6 win over the Philadelphia
Phillies. Smith’s third homer came with two outs in
the ninth and broke a 6-6 tie.
1977 — Boston and Milwaukee hit a combined 11
home runs in a 14-10 Red Sox victory at Fenway
Park, tying a major league record. The Red Sox
connected for six of the home runs in the first game
of a doubleheader.
1983 — Cliff Johnson of the Toronto Blue Jays hit
his 18th career pinch homer. The shot off Balti-
more’s Tippy Martinez tied Johnson with Jerry
Lynch on the career pinch home run list.
1998 — Brian Cox went 6-for-6, including a grand
slam in a 10-run third inning, as Florida State rolled
past Delaware 27-6 in the NCAA Atlantic II Region-
al. Freshman Matt Diaz hit three home runs for the
Seminoles.
F R I D A Y ’ S
L A T E B O X E S
Brewers 7, Rockies 6, 14
innings
Colorado Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fowler cf 7 0 1 1 Weeks 2b 6 1 2 0
Herrer 2b 7 0 1 0 C.Hart rf 6 0 0 0
Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 0 Braun lf 5 1 1 1
Splrghs lf 3 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 7 1 2 2
Giambi 1b 4 1 1 1 McGeh 3b 5 1 1 1
Amezg ss 2 1 1 0 YBtncr ss 6 2 3 1
S.Smith rf 6 0 3 1 MiRivr c 6 0 2 0
JoLopz 3b 6 0 1 0 Nieves pr-c 0 0 0 0
Wggntn lf-1b 6 2 3 0 CGomz cf 5 1 2 0
Iannett c 6 1 2 1 Greink p 0 0 0 0
Hamml p 2 1 1 2 Lucroy ph 1 0 1 1
MtRynl p 0 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0
RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0
Lndstr p 0 0 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0
CGnzlz ph 1 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Counsll ph 1 0 0 0
JMorls ph 1 0 1 0 Mitre p 0 0 0 0
Daley p 0 0 0 0 BBoggs ph 1 0 0 0
Street p 0 0 0 0 McClnd p 0 0 0 0
Chacin ph 1 0 0 0
FPauln p 0 0 0 0
Totals 56 616 6 Totals 50 714 6
Colorado .......... 002 011 000 000 11 — 6
Milwaukee........ 100 101 010 000 12 — 7
One out when winning run scored.
E—Jo.Lopez 2 (3), Y.Betancourt (3). DP—Colora-
do 1, Milwaukee 2. LOB—Colorado 9, Milwaukee
11. 2B—Amezaga(1), S.Smith(13), Wigginton2(6),
Weeks (10). 3B—S.Smith (2). HR—Giambi (5),
Hammel (1), Fielder (10), McGehee (4), Y.Betan-
court (3). SB—C.Gomez 2 (11). CS—S.Smith (1).
S—Hammel, C.Hart, C.Gomez, Greinke.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Hammel .................... 6
2
⁄3 8 3 2 2 1
Mat.Reynolds H,7 ...
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
R.Betancourt
BS,3-3 ...................... 1 2 1 1 0 2
Lindstrom................. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Belisle....................... 2 1 0 0 1 2
Daley ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Street BS,2-16 ........ 1 2 1 1 0 0
F.Paulino L,0-4
BS,1-1 ......................
1
⁄3 1 2 2 1 0
Milwaukee
Greinke..................... 6 8 4 4 0 9
Hawkins.................... 2 1 0 0 0 1
Axford....................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Loe............................ 2 1 0 0 0 2
Mitre.......................... 2 3 1 1 0 0
McClendon W,1-0... 1 2 1 0 0 0
HBP—by Hammel (Braun). WP—Hammel.
Umpires—Home, Rob Drake;First, Gary Darling-
;Second, Bruce Dreckman;Third, Paul Emmel.
T—4:35. A—33,361 (41,900).
Giants 2, Athletics 1, 10
innings
Oakland San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Crisp cf 5 0 1 0 Torres cf 3 1 1 0
Fuents p 0 0 0 0 FSnchz 2b 3 0 0 1
Barton 1b 3 0 1 0 Huff 1b 4 0 1 1
DeJess rf 4 0 0 0 Posey c 3 0 1 0
Wlngh lf 4 0 1 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0
KSuzuk c 4 0 0 0 C.Ross lf 4 0 1 0
M.Ellis 2b 3 1 2 0 Fontent ss 3 0 0 0
Kzmnff 3b 3 0 0 0 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0
Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 MTejad 3b 4 0 0 0
Sweeny cf 0 0 0 0 Vglsng p 2 0 0 0
Pnngtn ss 4 0 0 0 RRmrz p 0 0 0 0
Cahill p 2 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
CJcksn ph 1 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0
Balfour p 0 0 0 0 Burrell ph 1 0 0 0
Wuertz p 0 0 0 0 BrWlsn p 0 0 0 0
AnLRc 3b 1 0 0 0 Burriss ss 1 1 1 0
Totals 34 1 5 0 Totals 32 2 5 2
Oakland ........................ 000 010 000 0 — 1
San Francisco.............. 100 000 000 1 — 2
One out when winning run scored.
E—K.Suzuki (1), Huff (1). DP—San Francisco 1.
LOB—Oakland 6, San Francisco 9. 2B—M.Ellis
(10), Posey (4). SB—M.Ellis (5), Torres (3). S—
Torres.
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
Cahill......................... 6 1 1 1 2 6
Balfour ...................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Wuertz...................... 1 1 0 0 1 0
Ziegler ...................... 1 0 0 0 1 2
Fuentes L,1-5..........
1
⁄3 2 1 1 1 0
San Francisco
Vogelsong................ 6 4 1 0 2 5
R.Ramirez................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
Affeldt ....................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Romo........................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Br.Wilson ................. 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ja.Lopez W,2-0....... 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP—by Cahill (F.Sanchez). PB—Posey.
Umpires—Home, John Tumpane;First, C.B. Buck-
nor;Second, Dale Scott;Third, Jerry Meals.
T—3:26. A—42,224 (41,915).
Mariners 4, Padres 1
Seattle San Diego
ab r h bi ab r h bi
ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0 Denorfi rf 3 1 0 0
Figgins 3b 4 0 0 0 Bartlett ss 4 0 1 0
Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 4 0 2 1
AKndy 2b 2 1 1 0 Cantu 3b 4 0 0 0
FGtrrz cf 4 0 0 0 Maybin cf 3 0 1 0
Olivo c 4 2 2 1 Hawpe 1b 2 0 0 0
Peguer lf 4 1 1 1 OHudsn 2b 3 0 0 0
Ryan ss 3 0 2 2 RJhnsn c 3 0 0 0
Bedard p 3 0 1 0 Latos p 1 0 0 0
Cust ph 1 0 0 0 EPtrsn ph 0 0 0 0
Ray p 0 0 0 0 Luebke p 0 0 0 0
Neshek p 0 0 0 0
Headly ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 8 4 Totals 28 1 4 1
Seattle ................................ 020 101 000 — 4
San Diego.......................... 000 000 001 — 1
E—Ryan (4), Bartlett (9). DP—Seattle 3, San Diego
2. LOB—Seattle 5, San Diego 3. 2B—Olivo (3),
Ryan (6). 3B—Peguero (1). HR—Olivo (3). SB—
A.Kennedy (4), Bartlett (8). SF—Ryan.
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Bedard W,2-4.......... 8 3 0 0 2 9
Ray............................ 1 1 1 0 1 0
San Diego
Latos L,1-6............... 6 8 4 4 1 4
Luebke ..................... 2 0 0 0 1 3
Neshek..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires—Home, Tim McClelland;First, Marvin
Hudson;Second, Ted Barrett;Third, Brian Runge.
T—2:32. A—26,501 (42,691).
Angels 9, Braves 0
Atlanta Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 MIzturs 2b 3 1 0 0
Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 Willits ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Conrad 2b 1 0 0 0 Aybar ss 3 2 1 0
McCnn c 4 0 0 0 Abreu dh 3 1 2 1
C.Jones dh 3 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 3 1 1 1
D.Ross ph 1 0 0 0 BoWlsn 1b 1 0 0 0
Hinske lf 3 0 2 0 Callasp 3b 3 1 2 3
Fremn 1b 3 0 0 0 Conger c 4 0 0 1
AlGnzlz ss 2 0 0 0 Trumo 1b-rf 4 1 3 3
DHrndz ss 1 0 0 0 Amarst lf-2b 4 0 0 0
McLoth cf 3 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 3 2 1 0
Mather rf 3 0 2 0
Totals 31 0 4 0 Totals 32 910 9
Atlanta ................................ 000 000 000 — 0
Los Angeles....................... 006 201 00x — 9
LOB—Atlanta 4, Los Angeles 7. 2B—Abreu (9),
Trumbo (8), Bourjos (7). HR—Trumbo (7). SB—
Bourjos (4). CS—Abreu (2). S—Aybar.
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
T.Hudson L,4-4....... 3
2
⁄3 7 8 8 3 2
C.Martinez ............... 2
1
⁄3 2 1 1 1 2
Asencio .................... 2 1 0 0 0 0
Los Angeles
E.Santana W,2-4..... 9 4 0 0 0 7
HBP—by T.Hudson (Aybar, Bourjos, M.Izturis).
Umpires—Home, Brian Knight;First, Jerry Layne-
;Second, Bob Davidson;Third, D.J. Reyburn.
T—2:28. A—40,211 (45,389).
Diamondbacks 8, Twins 7
Minnesota Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Span cf 4 1 1 0 Blmqst lf 3 1 1 0
Plouffe ss 3 2 1 2 RRorts 3b 4 0 1 3
Kubel rf 5 0 1 2 J.Upton rf 3 0 0 0
Mornea 1b 5 0 1 0 S.Drew ss 4 2 2 1
Cuddyr 2b 4 1 1 1 CYoung cf 3 1 1 0
Valenci 3b 4 1 1 1 Monter c 4 1 2 1
DYong lf 4 1 2 0 Nady 1b 4 2 2 1
RRiver c 2 0 0 0 KJhnsn 2b 4 1 2 2
Revere ph 1 0 1 0 IKnndy p 2 0 0 0
Butera c 1 1 1 1 Heilmn p 0 0 0 0
Dunsng p 2 0 0 0 Brrghs ph 1 0 0 0
Perkins p 0 0 0 0 JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0
AlBrntt p 0 0 0 0 DHrndz p 0 0 0 0
LHughs ph 1 0 0 0 Patersn p 0 0 0 0
Slowey p 0 0 0 0
Dumtrt p 0 0 0 0
Tolbert ph 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 710 7 Totals 32 811 8
Minnesota.......................... 010 001 023 — 7
Arizona............................... 000 010 52x — 8
DP—Arizona 1. LOB—Minnesota 6, Arizona 4.
2B—Butera (3), R.Roberts (4), C.Young (13), Nady
(4), K.Johnson(8). 3B—Kubel (1). HR—Plouffe(3),
Cuddyer (5), Valencia (4), S.Drew(3). CS—Bloom-
quist (2). S—C.Young, I.Kennedy.
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Duensing L,2-4........ 6 7 5 5 1 5
Perkins .....................
2
⁄3 1 1 1 1 0
Al.Burnett .................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Slowey......................
2
⁄3 3 2 2 0 0
Dumatrait..................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Arizona
I.Kennedy W,5-1..... 7
2
⁄3 6 4 4 1 3
Heilman H,2.............
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
J.Gutierrez...............
1
⁄3 2 2 2 0 0
Da.Hernandez ......... 0 1 1 1 3 0
Paterson S,1-1 ........
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Da.Hernandez pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
Duensing pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
Umpires—Home, Tim Tschida;First, Jeff Nelson-
;Second, Marty Foster;Third, Bill Welke.
T—2:46. A—27,450 (48,633).
Dodgers 6, White Sox 4, 10
innings
Los Angeles Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
GwynJ cf 3 0 0 0 Pierre lf 5 0 2 0
Sands ph-cf-lf 1 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 5 0 0 0
Carroll ss 5 2 4 0 A.Dunn dh 5 0 0 1
Ethier rf 4 0 1 0 Konerk 1b 5 0 0 0
Kemp dh-cf 4 2 2 2 Quentin rf 4 0 2 0
Uribe 2b 3 0 0 0 Rios cf 4 1 1 0
JuCastr 2b 2 1 1 1 RCastr c 3 1 1 1
Loney 1b 5 0 1 1 Przyns ph-c 1 0 1 0
Navarr c 4 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 4 1 1 2
Gions lf 5 0 2 1 Morel 3b 3 0 1 0
Guerrir p 0 0 0 0 Vizquel ph 1 1 1 0
Elbert p 0 0 0 0
MacDgl p 0 0 0 0
Mitchll 3b 5 1 1 1
Totals 41 612 6 Totals 40 410 4
Los Angeles................. 200 000 001 3 — 6
Chicago ........................ 030 000 000 1 — 4
DP—Chicago 1. LOB—Los Angeles 9, Chicago 6.
2B—Carroll 2 (9), Loney (4), Quentin (16), Rios (7),
R.Castro (2). HR—Kemp (10), Mitchell (1), Beck-
ham (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Lilly............................ 7 7 3 3 0 5
Jansen W,1-0 .......... 2 1 0 0 0 2
Guerrier H,7.............
1
⁄3 2 1 1 0 0
Elbert H,1.................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
MacDougal S,1-1....
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Humber .................... 7 5 2 2 1 4
Thornton H,4 ...........
1
⁄3 1 0 0 2 1
Crain H,6..................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
S.Santos L,2-1
BS,1-7 ...................... 1
1
⁄3 5 4 4 1 2
Ohman......................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Umpires—Home, Lance Barksdale;First, Adrian
Johnson;Second, Fieldin Culbreth;Third, Gary Ce-
derstrom.
S T A N D I N G S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston............................................ 24 20 .545 — — 8-2 W-7 15-9 9-11
New York ....................................... 24 20 .545 — — 4-6 W-1 14-12 10-8
Tampa Bay..................................... 25 21 .543 — — 4-6 L-3 11-13 14-8
Toronto........................................... 23 22 .511 1
1
⁄2 1
1
⁄2 8-2 W-1 11-10 12-12
Baltimore........................................ 20 24 .455 4 4 5-5 W-1 11-14 9-10
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Cleveland....................................... 28 15 .651 — — 6-4 W-2 17-4 11-11
Detroit............................................. 22 23 .489 7 2
1
⁄2 5-5 L-5 11-8 11-15
Kansas City ................................... 22 23 .489 7 2
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 17-12 5-11
Chicago.......................................... 21 26 .447 9 4
1
⁄2 7-3 W-1 9-13 12-13
Minnesota...................................... 15 28 .349 13 8
1
⁄2 3-7 L-1 4-11 11-17
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles .................................. 23 23 .500 — 2 3-7 W-1 10-10 13-13
Texas ............................................. 23 23 .500 — 2 5-5 L-3 15-9 8-14
Oakland.......................................... 22 24 .478 1 3 3-7 L-4 11-12 11-12
Seattle ............................................ 20 24 .455 2 4 4-6 W-3 11-12 9-12
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia................................... 28 17 .622 — — 5-5 W-2 16-8 12-9
Florida............................................ 26 18 .591 1
1
⁄2 — 6-4 W-2 14-11 12-7
Atlanta............................................ 25 22 .532 4 2
1
⁄2 5-5 L-3 14-10 11-12
New York ....................................... 22 23 .489 6 4
1
⁄2 7-3 L-1 10-12 12-11
Washington ................................... 21 24 .467 7 5
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 11-9 10-15
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis ....................................... 27 20 .574 — — 6-4 W-1 14-9 13-11
Cincinnati...................................... 25 21 .543 1
1
⁄2 2 5-5 L-4 15-11 10-10
Milwaukee .................................... 23 23 .500 3
1
⁄2 4 7-3 W-2 15-6 8-17
Pittsburgh..................................... 22 23 .489 4 4
1
⁄2 4-6 W-4 9-11 13-12
Chicago ........................................ 19 24 .442 6 6
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 9-13 10-11
Houston........................................ 16 30 .348 10
1
⁄2 11 3-7 L-1 9-13 7-17
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
San Francisco ............................... 26 19 .578 — — 7-3 W-4 12-5 14-14
Colorado........................................ 23 21 .523 2
1
⁄2 3 4-6 L-2 11-10 12-11
Arizona........................................... 21 23 .477 4
1
⁄2 5 6-4 W-4 14-10 7-13
Los Angeles .................................. 21 26 .447 6 6
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 11-14 10-12
San Diego...................................... 19 26 .422 7 7
1
⁄2 5-5 L-1 8-16 11-10
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 5C
➛ S P O R T S
EDWARDSVILLE – With the
Wyoming Valley Conference
Division II championship on the
line, Northwest softball head
coach Karen May had a simple
message for her team.
Put the bat on the ball and
good things will happen.
The Rangers responded by
playing small ball, pulling out a
3-0 victory against Hanover
Area on Saturday morning at
Wilkes University’s softball
complex. Winning pitcher Ra-
chel Linso also got the job done,
throwing a four-hit shutout
while striking out eight and
walking none.
Northwest (13-1), the top seed
in Class A, and Hanover Area
(12-2), likely the third seed in
2A, continue their seasons this
week in the District 2 playoffs.
“That was our game plan
right from the start,” said May,
whose team’s only loss this
season came against the Haw-
keyes, 6-3 on April 21. “We just
need to put the ball in play
anywhere we can and work from
there.”
And the Rangers did.
After four scoreless innings,
Northwest center fielder Aman-
da Howley started off the fifth
inning by reaching base on a
walk. Howley advanced to third
on a throwing error.
Third baseman Anna-May
Olivo then laid down a sacrifice
bunt along the third base line.
As the ball was thrown to first
for the out, Howley raced home
safely to put the Rangers up 1-0.
Hanover Area starter Danielle
Tuzinski responded by striking
out the next two batters to end
the inning. Tuzinski took the
loss, giving up just one earned
run on six hits, striking out
eight and walking three.
The Hawkeyes’ best chance to
redeem themselves came in the
bottom half of the fifth inning
with runners on first and third
with two outs, but they failed to
capitalize offensively.
“We left too many runners on
base,” Hawkeyes head coach
Tami Thomas said. “I think
that’s what the key was. The
errors hurt us in the game, but
we played well. I’m proud of
them.”
Linso limited the amount of
runners in scoring position and
relied on her defense to record
numerous ground-ball outs. She
allowed only two runners to
reach third base in her com-
plete-game shutout.
Hawkeyes third baseman
Brittany McNair was the only
one to record an extra-base hit
off Linso, smacking a double off
the right field wall in the second
inning.
“I had a lot of confidence in
myself and the team behind me
today,” said Linso. “My riser
was working a lot and I had
great communication with my
catcher today.”
Both teams struggled to find
any offensive rhythm through
the first four innings. That all
changed with Olivo’s bunt in the
fifth.
May reiterated her plan to
stay the course, no matter the
score or situation.
“I told them all day,” she said.
“We talked about it before the
game, to continually put the ball
in play and it’ll happen.”
The Rangers added insurance
runs in the sixth inning with
more of the same philosophy.
First baseman Rachel White-
sell and right fielder Taylor
Perlis each hit a single before
shortstop Jaden Perrillo walked
to load the bases. With one out,
Howley slapped a single to
score Whitesell, while Perlis
scored on a fielding error during
the play to go up 3-0.
Northwest................................. 000 012 3 — 3
Hanover Area.......................... 000 000 0 — 0
WP -- Linso, 7 IP, 4H, 0R, 0ER, 0BB, 8K; LP --
Tuzinski, 7 IP, 6H, 3R, 1ER, 3BB, 8K;
2B— NW: Whitesell; HAN: McNair. 3B—none.
HR—none. Top hitters – NAN: Whitesell 2-4 with
a double, Howley 1-2 with an RBI single; HAN:
McNair 1-3 with a double.
Nanticoke 11,
Crestwood 1 (5 inn.)
Nanticoke used two home
runs to score eight times in the
bottom of the fifth and end the
game due to the 10-run rule.
Katie Wolfe had a three-run
homer in the inning and Kayley
Schinski ended the game with a
solo shot. Wolfe and Linsday
Roberts each had RBI doubles
during the game.
Sarah Bertoni allowed four
hits to pick up the victory. Brit-
tany Blass had two of the hits
for Crestwood.
Crestwood ..................................... 100 00 — 1
Nanticoke....................................... 200 18 — 11
WP – Sarah Bertoni, 5 IP, 4H, 1R, 0ER, 2BB, 4K;
LP – Alyssa Davies, 5 IP, 12H, 11R, 6ER, 1BB,
2K;
2B— NAN, Lindsey Roberts, Katie Wolfe. HR—
NAN, Kayley Schinski, Wolfe. Top hitters – CRE,
Brittany Blass 2-for-2; NAN, Bertoni 2-for-3, Kayla
Benjamin 2-for-3, Wolfe 2-for-3, Schinski 2-for-3.
Meyers 9, GAR 7
The Mohawks rallied from a
6-0 deficit after three innings to
post the victory.
Amy Kowalczyk led the come-
back with a pair of home runs
and finished 4-for-4. Chrissy
Shonk added a homer and dou-
ble.
Julie King allowed one run
over the final four innings to
pick up the victory.
Meyers...................................... 000 342 0 — 9
GAR.......................................... 015 100 0 — 7
WP – Julie King, 7 IP, 6H, 7R, 3ER, 2BB, 2K; LP –
Nicole Krzywicki, 7 IP, 10H, 9R, 9ER, 3BB, 5K;
2B— MEY, Chrissy Shonk. HR— MEY, Shonk,
Amy Kowalczyk 2. Top hitters – MEY, Kowalczyk
4-for-4.
Tunkhannock 2,
Wyoming Valley West 1
Ashley Inman allowed one
run and five hits in seven in-
nings to lead Tunkhannock to a
win against the Spartans. Erica
Yanora went 3-for-4 with two
singles and a double for the
Tigers.
Cailtin Edwards highlighted
the Valley West’s offense, going
2-for-3 with a triple.
Tunkhannock ...................... 200 000 000 — 2
Valley West ......................... 100 000 000 — 1
WP – Ashley Inman, 7 IP, 5H, 1R, 1ER, 0BB, 2K;
LP – Abby Owens, 7 IP, 7H, 2R, 2ER, 1BB, 0K;
2B—TUNK: Inman, Erica Yanora. 3B— WVW:
Caitlin Edwards. HR— none. Top hitters – TUNK:
Inman 1-4 with a double, Yanora 3-for-4 with a
double; WVW: Edwards 2-for-3 with a triple.
H I G H S C H O O L S O F T B A L L
Northwest shuts out Hanover Area to win division
By RYAN KONOPKI
For The Times Leader
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Jen Maciejczak of Hanover Area puts the ball in play against
Northwest at Wilkes University’s field Saturday morning.
HERSHEY – Wyoming Semi-
nary’s quest for the PIAA Class
2A boys tennis championship
came to an end Saturday morn-
ing as Holy Ghost Prep defeated
the Blue Knights 3-1 at the Her-
shey Raquet Club.
Prep, the District 1champion,
won both doubles matches in
straight sets. Connor Pietriak
rallied for a 2-6, 6-4, 6-2 victory
over Seminary’s George Park-
hurst at No. 1 singles.
Harry Parkhurst picked up
Seminary’s only win, a 6-1, 6-2
decision over Brennan Oakes at
No. 3 singles. Seminary’s B.J.
Ghosh and Prep’s Karl Hillier
were tied a set apiece at No. 2
singles, but the match wasn’t
completed after Prep picked up
a decisive third point. Hillier
won the first set 6-4. Ghosh
came back to win a tiebreaker in
the second 7-5.
“It was a little better thanI an-
ticipated,”SeminarycoachMike
Balutanski said of the season
where the Blue Knights won the
District 2 title. “Of course, it
hurts a little to lose in the semis
because we won a couple very
exciting matches.
“You realize you’re one of the
topfour teams inClass 2Ainthe
state, so it was a very successful
season.”
Prep went on to defeat Dis-
trict 3 champion Wyomissing
3-2 later in the day for the cham-
pionship.
Singles: 1. Connor Pietriak (HG) def. George
Parkhurst 2-6, 6-3, 6-4; 2. Match not completed; 3.
HarryParkhurst (WS) def. BrennanOakes6-1, 6-2.
Doubles: 1. Christian Bernlohr/Evan Tarzian
(HG) def. James Curtis/Herny Cornell 6-2, 6-3; 2.
DanBurke/ChardNowak(HG) def. ChrisKim/Evan
Botwin 6-1, 6-2.
P I A A B OY S T E N N I S
Seminary
loses in semis
to eventual
state champ
KINGSTON — If they were
still angry over a tough loss, it
didn’t show. Instead, the Tunk-
hannock Tigers took the field
Saturday and dusted off Wyom-
ing Valley West in a very busi-
ness-like manner.
After having their 11-game
winning streak snapped in the
final inning on Monday by Dallas,
the Tigers rebounded in impres-
sive fashion, beating the host
Spartans 13-0.
“Yeah, I’d have to say it was
(our best all-around performance
of the season),” Tunkhannock
coach Gary Custer said.
Hard to argue with that.
Mike Healey and Chase Knott
combined on a one-hitter, allow-
ing just three baserunners over
seven innings. Healey struck out
seven in six innings of work be-
fore Knott came on for a 1-2-3
seventh inning, striking out two
and getting a groundout to end
the game.
After walking two batters in
the first, Healey quickly settled
down and dominated the rest of
the way, allowing just a single to
Stephen Dosiak to lead off the
bottom of the third.
At the plate, Healey (2-4, 3
RBI) and fellow Division I recruit
Mike Papi both homered. Papi
sent a solo shot over the right-
field fence onto Pierce Street in
the third and Healey connected
for a two-run shot to left in the
fifth.
Rich Condeelis (RBI), Wes
Custer (RBI) and Ryan Goodwin
(2 RBI) all added two hits apiece
for the Tigers, who finished with
13 from nine different players.
It was an important tune-up for
the Tigers, who finished the
regular season at 12-2 after losing
to Dallas 6-5 on Monday.
“We went inside and worked
hard,” Custer said of the four
days in between games this week.
The matchup with the Spartans
was postponed twice by rain
before the teams were finally able
to play Saturday. “We took it as a
much-needed game. We needed
to win this game.”
The victory gave the Tigers the
inside track for the No. 2 seed in
the upcoming District 2 Class 3A
tournament – the same spot they
were in last season when they
won the district title.
Valley West (9-5) faced a much
different scenario coming into the
game. The Spartans look to be
locked into the No. 3 seed in the
District 2-4 Class 4A tournament,
where they are in line to host
Wallenpaupack in the quarterfi-
nals.
Schedules and seedings for all
four District 2 tournament brack-
ets are expected to be updated
tonight.
“This wasn’t going to change
our complexion for where we are
in the standings in the district. So
we were just trying to get ready,”
Valley West coach John Milius
said. “Of course in all fairness to
them, they hit the ball. They put
the ball in play and we were
lackluster.”
Tunkhannock Wyoming Valley West
ab r h bi ab r h bi
KCuster cf 5 1 1 2 Dosiak ss 3 0 1 0
Zaner 2b 0 0 0 0 Leonard 2b 3 0 0 0
Saylor dh 4 1 1 1 Pchlis 3b-p 2 0 0 0
Papi ss 3 2 1 1 Clcker 1b-p 2 0 0 0
Healey p 4 2 2 3 Alxndr p-1b 2 0 0 0
Condeelis 1b 4 2 2 1 Stelevich p 1 0 0 0
Ash ph 1 0 0 0 Potoski c 3 0 0 0
WCuster c 3 2 2 1 Shillbr lf-cf 2 0 0 0
Cline ph 1 1 1 0 Yuhas rf 2 0 0 0
McClain 3b 2 0 0 0 Smcrko cf-p 2 0 0 0
Weiss ph 0 1 0 0
Goodwin lf 4 1 2 2
Lee rf 4 0 1 1
Totals 35131312 Totals 22 0 1 0
Tunkhannock............................ 201 240 4 — 13
Wyoming Valley West ............ 000 000 0 — 0
2B – Cline; HR – Papi, Healey
IP H R ER BB SO
Tunkhannock
Healey (W, 6-2) ......... 6.0 1 0 0 2 7
Knott ............................. 1.0 0 0 0 0 2
Wyo. Valley West
Alexander (L, 4-2) ..... 2.2 3 3 2 1 2
Stelevich...................... 1.2 4 5 3 1 1
Pechulis....................... 1.2 2 1 1 1 1
Clocker......................... 0.2 4 4 4 3 1
Smicherko................... 0.1 0 0 0 0 0
H I G H S C H O O L B A S E B A L L
Tunkhannock bounces back
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Tunkhannock’s Mike Healey rounds third base after hitting a two-run
homer during Saturday’s 13-0 WVC baseball victory over Wyoming
Valley West in Kingston.
HONESDALE – Maureen
Lisman scored the game’s lone
goal off a corner kick from
Kaylee Macko in the 47th min-
ute, carrying Meyers to a 1-0
first-round victory over Hones-
dale in the District 2 girls soc-
cer playoffs Saturday.
Both Meyers’ Alivia Weidler
and Honesdale’s Brittany Krin-
er made seven saves.
The Mohawks (10-2-2) ad-
vance to the quarterfinals and
will play at Coughlin (11-2-1) on
Monday.
Honesdale ended its season
at 11-3.
Meyers............................................................. 0 1 — 1
Honesdale...................................................... 0 0 — 0
Second half: 1. MEY, Maureen Lisman (Kay-
lee Macko), 47th minute
Shots: MEY 8, HON 7; Saves: MEY 7 (Alivia
Weidler), HON 7 (Brittany Kriner); Corners: MEY
3, HON 7.
D I S T R I C T 2 S O C C E R
Meyers moves
to quarterfinals
The Times Leader staff
HUGHESTOWN — Crest-
wood held off a seventh-inning
rally to secure a 7-5 upset of
Pittston Area on Saturday in a
Wyoming Valley Conference
Division I game.
Despite the loss, the Patriots
(10-4) still clinched the Division I
East title thanks to Hazleton
Area’s win over Holy Redeemer
earlier in the day.
The District 2 baseball commit-
tee is scheduled to meet tonight
to discuss seedings and schedules
for all four brackets. Check
www.timesleader.com on Sunday
night or Monday’s edition of The
Times Leader for playoff updates.
On Saturday, Anthony Caladie
went 2-for-2 with a double and
two RBI to lead the Comets
(3-11). Matt Ritz and Zack Berg
added two hits apiece for Crest-
wood.
Josh Razvillas (3-3), Brian
Delaney (2-4, 2 RBI) and R.J.
Emmett (2-4, double) led the
Patriots, who scored three runs in
the bottom of the seventh.
Crestwood Pittston Area
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ritz cf 5 2 2 0 Bone p-lf 2 0 0 0
Beshada rf 3 1 0 0 Hahn lf 0 0 0 0
Slembarski rf 0 0 0 0 Castellino p 0 0 0 0
Brynok 1b 2 1 0 0 Callahan p 0 0 0 0
Berg c 3 2 2 1 Loftus dh 4 1 1 0
Aigeldinger lf 3 1 1 0 Svokinas ss 2 1 0 0
Miale p 2 0 0 0 Emmett 2b 4 2 2 0
Survilla lf-p 2 0 0 0 Musto c 3 0 0 0
Caladie ss 4 0 2 2 Delaney rf 4 0 2 2
Snyder 3b 4 0 1 0 Razvillas 1b 3 1 3 0
Sadvary 2b 4 0 0 0 Antal cf 2 0 0 0
ASchwb 3b 2 0 0 0
Totals 32 7 8 3 Totals 26 5 8 2
Crestwood ................................... 202 021 0 — 7
Pittston Area................................ 010 100 3 — 5
2B – Aigeldinger, Caladie, Emmett
IP H R ER BB SO
Crestwood
Miale............................. 3.2 2 2 2 5 4
Survilla (W, 1-0)......... 3.1 6 3 3 1 2
Pittston Area
Bone (L, 3-1) .............. 3.0 2 4 0 0 2
Castellino..................... 2.0 2 2 2 2 2
Callahan....................... 2.0 4 1 1 1 1
Hazleton Area 2,
Holy Redeemer 1
John Medvecky singled home
Kyle Klein with no outs in the
bottom of the eighth to give
Hazleton Area an extra-innings
victory.
Klein led off the inning with a
double. Anthony Zaloga picked
up the win in relief for the Cou-
gars (9-6).
Steve Ruch homered for Re-
deemer (8-6) in the sixth to tie
the score 1-1.
Holy Redeemer Hazleton Area
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Malloy cf 4 0 2 0 Cara ss 3 0 0 0
Policare 2b 4 0 0 0 Rubasky c 5 0 1 0
Ruch 3b-p 4 1 2 1 Greco pr 0 0 0 0
Choman 1b 4 0 0 0 Medvcky 3b 4 0 3 1
Ritsick p 3 0 1 0 Barletta cf 4 0 1 0
Cavanaugh p 1 0 0 0 Niknnko lf 2 1 1 0
Dusmuir ss 0 0 0 0 Carelli pr 0 0 0 0
Ringsdorf dh 2 0 1 0 LaRose rf 0 0 0 0
Bish pr 0 0 0 0 Zaloga p 0 0 0 0
Tsevdos lf 2 0 0 0 Chirico dh 2 0 0 0
Ell ph 1 0 0 0 Vigna 1b 2 0 2 1
Peterlin c 2 0 0 0 Bayzick p 3 0 0 0
English ph 1 0 0 0 Klein 2b 2 1 1 0
Byorick lf 3 0 0 0 Bannon ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 31 1 6 1 Totals 28 2 10 2
Holy Redeemer........................ 000 001 00 — 1
Hazleton Area........................... 010 000 01 — 2
2B – Nikonenko, Vigna, Klein; HR – Ruch.
IP H R ER BB SO
Holy Redeemer
Ritsick........................... 5+ 5 1 1 7 3
Ruch............................. 2.0 2 0 0 1 2
Cavanaugh (L, 1-3)... 0+ 3 1 1 1 0
Hazleton Area
Bayzick......................... 5.1 5 1 1 4 2
Zaloga (W, 4-3).......... 2.2 1 0 0 0 1
Coughlin 6, Nanticoke 1
Anthony Grillini and Dylan
Concini combined to hold Nanti-
coke to three hits in a game that
was moved to Ted Hiller Park
from Hilldale Park.
Bob Sorokas, Dominick Gulius
and Concini all finished with a
single and an RBI for Coughlin
(6-9).
Eric Hauer had all three hits
for the Trojans (2-12).
Nanticoke Coughlin
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Briggs 2b 2 1 0 0 Parsnik ss 2 2 0 1
Yudichak c 3 0 0 0 Sorokas cf 3 1 1 1
Hauer cf 3 0 3 1 Grillini p-3b 3 0 0 0
Ivan 1b 0 0 0 0 Gulius c 3 0 1 1
Clawson dh 3 0 0 0 Cninghm3b 3 0 0 0
Jezewski lf 2 0 0 0 Sypnwski rf 0 0 0 0
Domulvcz ph 1 0 0 0 Concni dh-p 3 1 1 1
Passetti p-3b 3 0 0 0 PAndrws 1b 3 1 1 0
Ioanna 3b-p 2 0 0 0 Haupt lf 2 1 1 0
Yalch ph 1 0 0 0 Sod 2b 2 0 0 1
Decker rf-p 1 0 0 0
Meck ph 1 0 0 0
Higgs ss 1 0 0 0
Vitale ss 1 0 0 0
Totals 24 1 3 1 Totals 24 6 5 5
Nanticoke..................................... 100 000 0 — 1
Coughlin....................................... 200 400 x — 6
IP H R ER BB SO
Nanticoke
Passetti (L, 1-3) ......... 3.0 3 6 6 3 3
Ioanna .......................... 2.0 1 0 0 0 2
Decker.......................... 1.0 1 0 0 1 0
Coughlin
Grillini (W, 2-3) ........... 4.0 2 1 1 1 2
Concini ......................... 3.0 1 0 0 1 2
Hanover Area 12,
Wyoming Seminary 2
Kurt Pericci and Kyle Kreitzer
each finished with two hits and
two RBI to lead the Hawkeyes.
Cory Dickson, Mike View, Mike
Sulcoski, Mickey Ferrence and
Zach Kollar all added a double
for Hanover Area (9-4).
Ferrence struck out seven in
five innings for the win.
Bo Saidman doubled for the
Blue Knights (4-9).
Hanover Area Wyoming Seminary
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Dickson cf 4 2 2 1 Wiles 2b 0 1 0 0
Pericci 2b 3 2 2 2 Chiba 2b 1 0 0 0
Sulcoski 3b 2 1 1 1 ASaidmn 2b 1 0 0 0
Ceretta ph 0 0 0 0 Yngmn 1b 3 0 1 0
View 1b 2 2 1 2 Skudlski ss 3 1 0 0
Ferrence p 3 2 1 1 Polachek p 3 0 0 1
Rutkoski ph 1 0 0 0 OBrien cf 0 0 0 0
Kollar ss 1 2 1 1 BSaidmn dh 3 0 1 0
Williams ph 1 0 0 0 Seyer lf 2 0 1 0
Kreitzer c 4 1 2 2 Harvey c 2 0 0 0
Kocher lf 0 0 0 0 Sherwood c 1 0 0 0
Cook p 0 0 0 0 Rubando 3b 2 0 0 0
Zuranski dh 2 0 1 1 Huang 3b 1 0 0 0
Lukchnsky rf 0 0 0 0 Bath rf 2 0 0 0
McDonnell rf 4 0 0 0 Cheng rf 0 0 0 0
Jolley ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 27121111 Totals 25 2 3 1
Hanover Area ........................... 022 322 1 — 12
Wyoming Seminary ................ 200 000 0 — 2
2B – Dickson, Sulcoski, View, Ferrence, Kollar,
BSaidman
IP H R ER BB SO
Hanover Area
Ferrence (W, 5-1)...... 5.0 2 2 0 3 7
Cook............................. 2.0 1 0 0 0 4
Wyo. Seminary
Polachek (L, 1-3)....... 2.0 3 4 2 4 2
Skudalski ..................... 2.0 4 3 3 2 2
BSaidman ................... 2.0 3 4 1 2 0
ASaidman ................... 1.0 1 1 1 0 1
Northwest 12, MMI Prep 6
The Rangers opened their day
on the road in Drifton, winning
the first of their two scheduled
games.
Pete Feno (2-4, triple, three
RBI), Ryan Kondrosky (2-3, dou-
ble, RBI), Matt Korea (2-4, three
RBI) and Tyler Kittle (solo home
run) led Northwest at the plate to
improve to 6-6 heading into an
afternoon game against Lake-
Lehman.
Fran Swankoski and Alec
Andes each finished with two hits
and two RBI for the Preppers
(5-9).
Northwest MMI Prep
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Mazonkey ss 2 2 0 0 Krchnr p-2b 3 2 1 0
Feno lf-2b 4 2 2 3 DeJesus ph 0 0 0 0
DPsqle 2b-3b 2 3 1 1 Kollar cf 4 0 0 0
Kondrosky 1b 4 1 2 1 Hornak ss 4 1 1 1
Korea c 4 1 2 3 Swankski c 4 1 2 2
Stempien cf-lf 5 0 1 1 Yncha 3b-p 4 2 2 0
Grznsk 3b-1b 2 0 1 0 Yamulla rf 2 0 0 0
Shaffer ph 1 0 0 0 Andes 1b 4 0 2 2
Kittle p-cf 3 2 1 1 McCoy 2b 2 0 0 1
McAlarney rf 4 1 2 0 JDriscoll lf 2 0 0 0
PDriscoll ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 31121210 Totals 30 6 8 6
Northwest .................................. 302 310 3 — 12
MMI Prep................................... 110 002 2 — 6
2B – Kondrosky; 3B – Feno; HR – Kittle
IP H R ER BB SO
Northwest
Kittle (W, 1-0) ............. 4.0 4 2 2 0 4
Gurzynski .................... 3.0 4 4 3 3 3
MMI Prep
Karchner (L, 4-2) ....... 3.0 6 5 5 2 2
Kollar ............................ 2.0 2 4 2 5 1
Yencha......................... 2.0 4 3 3 2 1
Lake-Lehman 23, Northwest 1
Bryan Mathers slugged two
home runs and racked up five
RBI for the Black Knights in a
four-inning victory.
Tyler McGovern (2-2, 4 RBI)
and Curt Barbacci (2 RBI) also
homered for Lake-Lehman (13-1),
which took a half-game lead in
the Division II race.
If Meyers (12-1) defeats Wyom-
ing Seminary today, the Mo-
hawks and Knights will meet to
decide the Division II title, most
likely on Monday afternoon at a
neutral site to be determined.
Kyle Stempien went 2-for-2
with a double for the Rangers
(6-7), who were playing their
second game of the day.
Lake-Lehman Northwest
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Murphy lf 3 4 3 2 Mzonkey ss 2 0 0 0
Everett 2b 3 2 3 2 Feno lf 1 0 0 0
Mathers ss 2 4 2 5 Begliomini lf 0 0 0 0
Carr ph 1 0 0 0 DiPasqle 2b 2 0 0 0
McGovern 1b 2 2 2 4 Mrglwcz 2b 0 0 0 0
Partington 1b 0 0 0 0 Kndrsky 1b 2 0 1 0
Yursha cf 4 2 2 1 Korea p 1 1 0 0
Cornell p 0 0 0 0 Pegarella p 0 0 0 0
Bean 1b 0 0 0 0 Gulbierz ph 1 0 0 0
Paulausks dh 3 2 1 2 Stempien c 2 0 2 0
CoBarbacci c 3 1 0 0 Grzynski 3b 2 0 0 0
CuBarbacii 3b 3 3 1 2 Kittle cf 1 0 0 0
Shurites rf 3 3 2 1 Tomko cf 0 0 0 0
McAlarny rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 29231619 Totals 15 1 3 0
Lake-Lehman................................... 438 8 — 23
Northwest.......................................... 010 0 — 1
2B – Murphy 2, Paulauskas, Shurites, Stempien; HR
– Mathers 2, McGovern, CuBarbacci
IP H R ER BB SO
Lake-Lehman
Cornell (W, 7-0) ......... 2.0 2 1 0 0 1
McGovern................... 2.0 1 0 0 1 3
Northwest
Korea (L, 2-2)............. 2.1 8 13 9 4 1
Pegarella..................... 1.0 6 7 5 1 0
Gulbierz ....................... 0.2 2 3 3 2 1
Crestwood holds off Pittston Area, but Patriots still claim title
The Times Leader staff
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
SCRANTON—Dave McLean
had enough.
The Pittston Area1,600-meter
runner threw his shoe when he
heard the news Thursday that
the District 2 Class 3A Track
and Field Championships had
been postponed for the third
time.
McLean retrieved the shoe,
brushed aside the aggravation
and by Saturday morning he was
ready to compete.
“Mostly, it’s been a tough
week,” McLean said even after
beating out three higher-seeded
runners to win the district gold
medal. “I wasn’t happy Thurs-
day when they (postponed) it.
“It was not good.”
Saturday’s near-perfect
weather conditions, after rain
had kept the meet from starting
Tuesday and Thursday and stop-
ped it about the one-third point
on Wednesday, allowed the ath-
letes to perform at their best.
Whereas a handful of field
competitors in the shot put and
pole vault were hindered by try-
ing to advance in the worst of
the rain Wednesday, the condi-
tions Saturday helped make it a
big day for District 2 athletes
trying to meet the lofty state
qualifying standards.
All district champions ad-
vance along with those that
meet the state qualifying stan-
dard while finishing second or
worse. The district grabbed an
addition15 spots –11in girls and
four in boys – with all but one of
those coming in track events.
“I had a bad day in the long
jump in the rain Wednesday,”
said Tunkhannock sprinter Ga-
vin Colley, who excelled Satur-
day with three gold medals.
“You know when the meet’s sup-
posed to start and you try to get
yourself up for that. Then, we
were down and up all week.
“Giving us Friday off helped.
We got rest and this was a great
day.”
The district and state boys’
tennis tournaments were also
on the move all week with four
straight days of scheduled out-
door action, including three at
Kirby Park, moved to the indoor
courts at Birchwood Racquet
Club in Clarks Summit.
The move eliminated the ele-
ments from being a factor in
competition and minimized
their effect on the schedule, so it
was generally taken favorably by
the tennis competitors. But the
differences between outdoor
and indoor playing conditions
create varied opinions.
Even Wyoming Valley West’s
Class 3A championship doubles
team of Steve Brand and Tyler
Ryman were split on whether
they liked the move.
“I’d rather be outdoors,”
Brand said. “We spend the
whole season playing matches
outdoors.”
But, Ryman said he would
rather play at Birchwood.
“I love the outdoors, but ten-
nis should be indoors all the
time,” he said. “We’ve only been
able to have three outdoor prac-
tices the entire season.”
With much of the regular sea-
son disrupted by weather, it
seems only appropriate that the
championship weeks are as well.
District 2 moved its seeding
meetings for baseball and soft-
ball back to tonight to try to al-
low enough time Saturday and
today for teams to complete
postponed games and end the
regular season.
Good weather finally allows track athletes to shine
Things go smoothly after the
District 2 meet was disrupted
by rain earlier in the week.
By TOMROBINSON
For The Times Leader
T R A C K A N D
F I E L D
R E S U L T S
Boys
Team Scoring
Valley View (VV) 111, Tunkhannock (Tun) 110, Ho-
nesdale (Hon) 75, Dallas (Dal) 58, Hazleton Area
(HazA) 51, North Pocono (NP) 46
1
⁄2, Delaware Val-
ley (DV) 43.5, Pittston Area (PA) 37, Coughlin (Co)
31, Scranton Prep (SP) 28
1
⁄2, Scranton (Scr) 28,
Abington Heights (AH) 25, Wallenpaupack (Wall)
23, Crestwood (Cr) 14, Berwick (Ber) 13, West
Scranton (WScr) 4, Wyoming Valley West (WVW)
3, Wyoming Area (WyoA) ½.
Saturday's Finals
100Hurdles–Jimmy Hischar (Haz) 15.65; Matthew
Moorhead (Co) 15.92; Ronnie Deliseo (PA) 16.16;
Brandon Jackson (VV) 16.17; Garrett Rupe (VV)
16.26; Elijah Howard (Scr) 16.31; Cody Rydzy (PA)
19.97.
400 Relay – Tunkhannock (Ryan Karnopp, Mike
Baldwin, Nick Auriemma, Gavin Colley) 43.03
(meet record, breaking mark of 43.28 by Tunkhan-
nock’s Colley, Thomas, Gannon, Kresge, 2010);
Valley View 43.75; Coughlin 43.84; Hazleton Area
44.63; Scranton 44.77; North Pocono 44.99; Ho-
nesdale 45.41; Wyoming Valley West 45.73.
Shot Put – Pete Calderone (NP) 50-2 ½; Brandon
Clemons (DV) 49-0; Dalton Derrick (Hon) 48-2 ¼;
Dylan Berardelli (AH) 47-4 ¾; John Poli (PA) 46-6;
Jeremy Roberts (Dal) 44-10½; Garrett Groce(Haz)
44-9 ½; Guy Bruno (Wal) 44-8 ¼.
1,600 – Dave McLean (PA) 4:29.42; Jordan Sid-
dons (VV) 4:35.96; Alex Zubko (Dal) 4:36.27;
Reece Ayers (Tun) 4:36.28; David Novak (Tun)
4:37.54; Matt Werner (NP) 4:41.71; Tim Jurkowski
(Hon) 4:41.77; Paul LaBelle (SP) 4:42.36.
100 – Gavin Colley (Tun) 11.08; Matt Sandroski (Cr)
11.37; Nyeem Wartman (VV) 11.40; Kyle Rickard
(Hon) 11.43; Cruz Finnicum(Haz) 11.47; Tyler Phil-
lips (VV) 11.49; Russell Monroe (Co) 11.51; Mike
Baldwin (Tun) 11.60.
LongJump– Lionel Wilson (Hon) 22-8 ¼; Nick Au-
riemma (Tun) 20-9; Cody Rydzy (PA) 20-6; Damitri
Nelson (DV) 20-5 ½; Devon Strubert (NP) 20-5;
Philip Felker (Tun) 20-5;
400 – Lionel Wilson (Hon) 48.80; Kyle Rickard
(Hon) 49.34; Matt Sandroski (Cr) 50.20; DeivonBar-
low (Haz) 50.36; Malcolm Sweeting (WScr) 51.08;
Jon Sanborn (SP) 51.47; Joe Waldsmith (NP)
52.05; Pat Perih (SP) 52.38.
300 Hurdles – Brandon Jackson (VV) 40.13; Ron-
nie Deliseo (PA) 40.86; Garrett Rupe (VV) 41.34;
Colby Petrilia (Haz) 42.05; James Fruehan (AH)
42.07; Jesse Dunhom (Hones) 42.35; Wade West
(Hon) 42.57; Tom Salkoskas (Wall) 42.60.
800 – Tom Damiani (Tun) 1:55.49; Brandon Bed-
nash (VV) 1:56.30; Marty Kelly (NP) 1:59.36; Alex
Nole (Tun) 1:59.56; Jake Siegel (Tun) 2:00.06;
Chris Vito (AH) 2:00.70; Zack Dutter (Dal) 2:01.03;
Michael Frein (SP) 2:02.20.
200 – Gavin Colley (Tun) 21.79; Lionel Wilson
(Hon) 22.08; Mike Fazio (VV) 22.48; Russell Mon-
roe(Co) 22.54; Cruz Finnicum(Haz) 22.67; Paul Al-
meida (NP) 22.74; Nikolas Atkins (Tun) 23.14;
DeShawn Boone (VV) 23.48.
Triple Jump – Nikolas Atkins (Tun) 43-9 ¾; Jason
Simonovich (Dal) 42-7 ¾; Zack Korjeski (VV) 42-3
½; Chris Ossont (VV) 41-9 ¼; Ryan Kozloski (Dal)
41-4 ¾; Armon Lorning (Scr) 40-6 ¼; Sean Ridall
(Ber) 40-4 ¼; Devon Strubert (NP) 40-4 ¼.
3,200 – Sean Burke (AH) 9:38.91; Aaron Wilkinson
(VV) 9:41.18; Jess Adams (Dal) 9:48.94; Conor
Lyons (SP) 10:09.03; Chris Ehret (Dal) 10:14.25;
David Novak (Tun) 10:15.43; Frank Ferlenda (Dal)
10:23.29; Jordan Siddons (VV) 10:32.52.
1,600 Relay – Honesdale (Kyle Rickard, Carl Jur-
kowski, Wade West, Lionel Wilson) 3:24.62; Ber-
wick 3:30.20; Valley View 3:31.36; Tunkhannock
3:33.73; North Pocono 3:34.25; Hazleton Area
3:34.89; Dallas 3:36.57; Scranton Prep 3:36.60.
Javelin – Matt Defaria (Scr) 166-1; Jason Simonov-
ich (Dal) 158-8; Tom Steele (SP) 157-5; Ryan Ko-
zloski (Dal) 155-10; Bryan Schor (DV) 154-7; Antho-
ny Bouselli (Wall) 150-10; George Pachucy (SP)
149-3; Anthony Galantini (VV) 147-8.
Pole Vault – Sean Burns (DV) 13-9; Ryan Karnopp
(Tun) 13-9; Tyler Chesko (VV) 12-9; Garrett Rupe
(VV) 12-3; tie: Carl Jurkowski (Hon), Brian Camp-
bell (HazA), Michael Terwilliger (Hon), Matt Erfman
(PA), Ed Curtin (Ber) 11-9.
Girls
Team Scoring
Dallas (Dal) 101, Honesdale (Hon) 72, Western
Wayne (WW) 62, Abington Heights (AH) 60, Tunk-
hannock (Tun) 58, Coughlin (Co) 56, Valley View
(VV) 52, Crestwood (Cr) 36, Hazleton Area (HazA)
33, Wyoming Area (WyoA) 30, West Scranton
(WScr) 28, Wallenpaupack (Wal) 26, Scranton
Prep (SP) 25, Wyoming Valley West (WVW) 21,
North Pocono (NP) 20, Berwick (Ber) 16, Pittston
Area (PA 5, Delaware Valley (DV) 1.
Saturday's Finals
100 Hurdles – Shelley Black (Co) 14.26; Dannah
Hayward(Co) 15.50; Hilari Norris (WVW) 15.62; Kir-
by Szalkowski (Dal) 15.93; Jen Nagy (VV) 16.42;
Isabelle Clauss (AH) 16.71; Sarah Wildenstein
(WW) 16.87; Amanda Krenitsky (WW) 17.30.
100 – Sara Dubravcak (VV) 12.71; Destiny Distasio
(T) 12.77; Cierra Plesnar (Dal) 12.82; Catie Gawlas
(Dal) 12.91; Janna Wilson (Hon) 13.04; Amanda
Hunt (T) 13.09; Alex Mack (Cr) 13.18; Carli Lucke
(VV) 13.28.
400 – Janna Wilson (Hon) 57.81; Jessica Newak
(Cr) 58.02; Acacia Urian (WW) 58.65; Josie Bach-
man (Haz) 1:00.57; Aja Espinosa (SP) 1:01.49; Ste-
phanie Dosiak (Dal) 1:01.91; Melissa Cruz (WyoA)
1:02.12; Lindsey Schroth (SP) 1:02.87.
1,600 – Summer Hill (Hon) 5:05.74; Regan Rome
(Dal) 5:07.42; Erin Jaeger (AH) 5:08.95; Hannah
Coffin(Cr) 5:12.84; AlexandraPlant (WVW) 5:26.91;
Molly MacDonald (WScr) 5:31.78; Maggie Fannick
(Dal) 5:32.78; Morgan Gilhooley (Dal) 5:38.64.
Triple Jump – Courtney Kromko (WW) 35-4 ¾;
Crysta Hmelak (Ber) 34-11¾; Cortlyn Van Deutsch
(Dal) 34-8; Amanda Krenitsky (WW) 34-7 ¾; Hilari
Norris (WVW) 33-9; Kirby Szalkowski (Dal) 33-8 ½;
Sierra Pickney-Williams (Co) 32-10 ½; Carly
Thorpe (WW) 32-5 ½.
Pole Vault – Destiny Distasio (Tun) 9-6; Rachel
Stout (Ber) 9-0; C.J. Beury (Wall) 9-0; Taylor Culver
(Dal) 8-6; Maria Wolfel (VV) 8-6; Cora Orehek
(WW) 8-6; tie: Jaylin Cepeda (DV), Steph Blannard
(WVW) and Mia Gurganus (AH) 8-0.
Shot Put – Sabrina Coleman (WScr) 33-5; Megan
Holbert (Hon) 33-2 ½; Sarah Flaherty (Dal) 33-2;
Kaitlyn Mead (NP) 32-10; Elaine Bouselli (Wall)
32-0 ½; Jenn Slagus (NP) 31-7; Diana Hassan
(WW) 31-5; Maurissa Maurer (NP) 31-4.
400 Relay – Abington Heights (Kelsey O’Donnell,
Elisia Cadman, Isabelle Clauss, Sarah Gronsky)
50.42; Tunkhannock 51.05; Dallas 51.13; Valley
View 51.45; West Scranton 51.98; Western Wayne
52.11; Scranton Prep 52.42; Crestwood 52.80.
300 Hurdles – Shelley Black (Co) 42.80 (meet re-
cord, broke own mark of 44.43, 2010); Dannah Hay-
ward(Co) 44.63; ShaynaMiller (WScr) 45.54; Elisia
Cadman (AH) 46.83; Sarah Wildenstein (WW)
47.87; Rachel Marsili (SP) 49.05; Jordan Liptak
(WW) 49.51; Isabelle Clauss (AH) 49.52.
800 – Sara Radzwilka (WyoA) 2:17.53; Chelsea
Mann (Wall) 2:18.67; Hannah Coffin (Cr) 2:19.12;
Stephanie Lalos (AH) 2:19.58; Erin Craig (Hon)
2:22.09; Erin Jaeger (AH) 2:25.15; Katie Kravitz
(Dal) 2:27.21; Tory Legg (VV) 2:28.11.
200 – Sara Dubravcak (VV) 25.46; Jessica Newak
(Cr) 25.71; Amanda Hunt (Tun) 25.89; Catie Gawlas
(Dal) 25.94; Janna Wilson (Hon) 26.03; Josie Bach-
man (Haz) 26.48; Lindsay Danko (Dal) 26.53; Kel-
sey O’Donnell (AH) 26.54.
Long Jump – Shelley Black (Co) 17-11; Courtney
Kromko (WW) 16-8 ½; Kirby Szalkowski (Dal) 16-6
½; Samantha Shiner (WyoA) 16-1 ½; Unique Twy-
man (Co) 16-0 ½; Carly Thorpe (WW) 16-0; Cortlyn
Van Deutsch (Dal) 16-0; Alyssa Sitch (Haz) 15-9.
3,200 – Regan Rome (Dal) 11:10.31; Michelle Gold-
en (WyoA) 11:48.23; Summer Hill (Hon) 11:49.46;
Molly MacDonald (WScr) 11:54.82; Taylor Ross
(AH) 12:05.57; Jenn Burke (AH) 12:08.98; Bria Ed-
wards (HazA) 12:24.98; Chelsea Wooten (Tun)
12:25.91.
Discus – Jenn Slagus (NP) 127-11; Elena Stam-
bone (VV) 111-7; Amanda Krenitsky (WW) 105-3;
Sydney Engleman (WyoA) 101-10; Jackie Yurchak
(HazA) 99-3; Skylar Carmody (Hon) 97-2; Megan
Holbert (Hon) 96-0; Kayla Guerieri (Wall) 92-6.
High Jump – Anna Nole (Tun) 5-5 (ties record,
Brooke McMurray, Wallenpaupack, 2005); Audrey
Calkin (Hon) 5-3; Emily Holzman (SP) 4-11; Ashley
Temerantz (WVW) 4-11; Danielle Dalessandro (SP)
4-9; Lauren Smith (HazA) 4-9; tie: Amanda Krenit-
sky (WW), Justine James (Haz) and Courtney
Kromko (WW) 4-9.
1,600 Relay – Honesdale (Vanessa Bates, Erin
Craig, Summer Hill, Janna Wilson) 4:02.61; Abing-
ton Heights 4:06.97; Crestwood 4:07.14; Dallas
4:07.71; Coughlin 4:10.12; Valley View 4:10.14;
Western Wayne 4:13.61; Wallenpaupack 4:19.58.
he would be the best compe-
tition I had faced all season.
“I came off the curve and
something just took over.”
As a result, Colley set “by
far” his personal best and a
Tunkhannock school record.
Colley was also part of a
meet record effort in the 400
relay and also earned gold in
the 100.
The three medals the senior
sprinter produced helped
Tunkhannock stay in team
championship contention until
the final event of the day
when Valley View edged the
Tigers, 111-110.
All track competition had
been completed for more than
an hour while the pole vault
continued, ultimately settling
the championship. Valley View
rallied by getting 11 points in
the event on a third- and
fourth-place combination of
Tyler Chesko and Garrett
Rupe while Tunkhannock was
getting eight from Ryan Kar-
nopp’s second-place finish.
Colley won the 100 in
11.08.
Karnopp, Mike Baldwin and
Mike Auriemma turned the
400 relay over to Colley, the
anchor, to finish off a time of
43.03 that lowered the record
of 43.28 set by the Tigers last
year.
The Tigers won a total of
five events Saturday to add to
their 3,200 relay victory from
Wednesday.
Tom Damiani rallied down
the stretch to beat fellow
state qualifier Brandon Bed-
nash of Valley View in 1:55.49
in the 800.
Nikolas Atkins won the
triple jump with a leap of 43
feet, 9 ¾ inches.
Pittston Area’s Dave
McLean
(1,600) and
Hazleton Ar-
ea’s Jimmy
Hischar (110
high hurdles)
also won.
Connor Fla-
herty of
Coughlin had
taken the
high jump
Wednesday.
Delaware
Valley’s Sean Burns won the
pole vault on a tiebreaker,
ending Tunkhannock’s title
hopes.
Wilson won his gold medals
in the 400, long jump and
1,600 relay.
NOTES: Meet officials tried
to award Coughlin sophomore
Zach Evans a medal in the
shot put, but Evans would
not take it.
Evans pointed out a clerical
error that credited him with
the wrong distance, allowing
Dallas senior Jeremy Roberts
to pick up the sixth-place
medal he deserved.
The top six in each event
earn medals while seventh-
and eighth-place finishers also
score points for their teams.
Roberts had originally tried
unsuccessfully to tell meet
officials he should have been
listed sixth. When Evans inde-
pendently stepped forward the
error was discovered.
“Zach came over because
he knew there was a mess-
up,” Roberts said. “He said he
didn’t throw that distance.
“It was nice of him.”
Pittston’s Joe Curry served
as one of the starters in the
meet, making it the 40th and
final appearance at a District
2 meet for the veteran offi-
cial, who is retiring.
The 400 relay record by
Tunkhannock was the only
one set in the boys portion of
the meet.
BOYS
Continued from Page 1C
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Jason Simonovich of Dallas competes in the triple jump at the District 2 Class 3A meet. He fin-
ished in second place, a foot and two inches behind winner Nikolas Atkins of Tunkhannock.
“I came off
the curve
and some-
thing just
took over.”
Gavin Colley
Tigers sprinter
on winning the
200
time of 15.50 in the 100 hurdles
was fast enough to meet the
state standard, setting off anoth-
er rush of tears and a cheerful
dance through the infield.
Hayward later joined Black in
another 1-2 finish and state qual-
ification in the 300 meters.
Black held her status as the
meet’s premier performer even
with a disappointing result in
the 400 relay that contributed to
Coughlin dropping to sixth in
the team standings.
Dallas ruled the team compe-
tition, running away from the
pack to beat out Honesdale, 101-
72.
Black, the defending state
champion in both hurdles races
and the reigning Gatorade Fe-
male TrackAthlete of the Year in
Pennsylvania, gave up a near
certain repeat of her four indi-
vidual gold medals to try to
bring relay teammates with her
to Shippensburg.
The Crusaders came in seed-
ed first in the 400 relay and had
the lead until a handoff from
Unique Twyman to Black, the
anchor runner, went awry. The
baton wound up on the ground,
Black stepped into the next
lane, impeding the Dallas team.
Coughlin was disqualified from
the event, while Abington
Heights raced to the win.
“I wanted to do the 4 by 100,”
Black said. “It was probably the
event I was most excited for and
ready for.
“I wanted to take the relay
team with me. I was very disap-
pointed.”
Black handled the disappoint-
ment well.
She went out soon after and
posted a career-best in the 300
hurdles and finished with three
gold medals and three meet re-
cords.
“I was so mad and disappoint-
edabout that,” Black said. “I had
to take out all my anger in the
300 hurdles.”
Black finished in 42.80 sec-
onds while Hayward’s 44.63 ap-
proached Black’s previous re-
cord time of 44.43 from a year
ago. West Scranton’s Shayna
Miller also met the state qualify-
ing standard even though she
finished a distant third in 45.54.
After deciding not to try to re-
peat in the triple jump, Black
won the long jump with 17-11,
stretching her mark from a year
ago by another four inches.
Black’s record in the 100 hur-
dles came during Wednesday’s
qualifying with a time of 14.11.
She finished in 14.26 on Satur-
day.
While Black was putting on
another display of why she is
one of the greatest individual
athletes ever topass throughthe
district, Dallas was making it
equally clear which was the best
team.
The Mountaineers scored
points in 15 of 18 events to beat
Honesdale by 29 points. West-
ern Wayne and Abington
Heights, last year’s champions
in Class 2A and 3A, were 39 and
41 points back, followed by
Tunkhannock and Coughlin.
“The key is the events where
we got two girls in the finals,”
Dallas co-coach Ed Radzinski
said of the 100, 200, long jump
and triple jump.
Dallas also had two girls score
points in the 1,600, which does
not have a qualifying round.
Freshman Reagan Rome led
the way for Dallas, posting the
team’s only wininthe 3,200. She
also met the qualifying standard
while finishing second in the
1,600, but scratched from that
event at states to concentrate on
her specialty.
“I left that decision in her ca-
pable hands,” co-coach Matt Sa-
muel said. “She wants to con-
centrate on the two mile. That’s
more of her event.
“It gives her a shot down at
states.”
Dallas also had a second-place
relay team in the 3,200 Wednes-
day and took third and fourth in
the 400 and 1,600 relays Satur-
day.
“This title defines our pro-
gram,” Samuel said. “Every-
thing we do is about team.”
Tunkhannock’s Anna Nole
and Destiny Distasio won
events along with Wyoming Ar-
ea’s Sara Radzwilka.
Nole tied a district record in
the high jump by clearing 5-5.
She tried for 5-7 but was unable
to make the record all her own.
“Going for the district record
is something I never thought I’d
be doing,” Nole said.
Distasio, who added second-
place finishes in the 100 and 400
relay, won the pole vault at 9-6.
Radzwilka took charge early
and won the 800 in 2:17.53.
Hazleton Area’s Julia Franzo-
sa had the Wyoming Valley Con-
ference’s other win when she
took the javelin gold medal on
Wednesday.
Crestwood’s Jessica Newak
matched Hayward’s accomplish-
ment of qualifying through state
standards in two events. She fin-
ished second in the 200 and 400.
Teammate Hannah Coffin ad-
vanced with a fourth-place fin-
ish in a highly competitive
1,600.
Tunkhannock’s Amanda Hunt
moved on by finishing third in
the 200.
GIRLS
Continued from Page 1C
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Hazleton Area’s Angela Marchetti competes in the 1,600 run at
the D2 Class 3A meet. Honesdale’s Summer Hill won the race.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 7C

➛ S P O R T S
TAMPA, Fla. — Mike Smith
has joined Simon Gagne in hurt-
ing the Boston Bruins during the
postseason.
Smith was perfect in relief of
goalie Dwayne Roloson, and
Gagne snapped a tie in the third
period for the Tampa Bay Light-
ning, who erased an early three-
goal deficit and
evened the East-
ern Conference
finals with a 5-3
win in Game 4
over the Bruins
on Saturday.
Roloson was
pulledinthefirst
period after he
allowed three
goals on nine
shots. Smith
came on and
made 21saves as
the Lightning
avoided drop-
ping into a big
hole against the
surging Bruins.
Boston will host Game 5 on Mon-
day.
“There’s no time to think,”
Smith said. “It’s just one of those
things where we got behindthe 8-
ball there in the first. That’s why
I’m on the bench, to come in and
kind of settle the team down and
give them a little bit of a momen-
tum. It ended up working out.”
Gagne scored the winning goal
last season for Philadelphia when
the Flyers rebounded from a 3-0
series deficit and a 3-0 hole in
Game 7 to beat the Bruins in the
Eastern Conference semifinals.
“I think what happened last
year, it’s behind(us),” Gagnesaid.
“Things are different now. I’m
playing with a different team.
Boston is a different team. Right
now it’s just going out there and
trying to be the difference in the
game.”
Teddy Purcell scored twice in
the second period when the
Lightning tied it 3-3. Tampa Bay
also got a goal fromSean Bergen-
heim, who leads the NHL with
nine playoff goals after scoring14
times during the regular season.
Martin St. Louis sealed the win
inthe final minute withanempty-
net goal.
Gagne gave the Lightning a 4-3
lead when he beat Tim Thomas
fromthe right circle 6:54 into the
third period after Tampa Bay left
wing Ryan Malone stole the puck
near the blue line. The Lightning
outshot the Bruins 9-1 through
thefirst sevenminutes of theperi-
od after scoring three unanswer-
ed goals in the second.
“We got outworked,” Thomas
said. “They took over. They took
the play to us. They started get-
ting scoring chances and we stop-
ped getting scoring chances.”
Smith replaced Roloson with
two minutes to go in the first and
then made 13 saves in the second
en route to his first NHL playoff
win in his second career postsea-
son appearance — both this se-
ries in relief of Roloson.
Lightning coach Guy Boucher
said Saturday’s game doesn’t
change Roloson’s status.
“Wehaveour No. 1goaltender,”
Boucher said. “He’s taken us to
this placeright now, andthat’s the
reasonwhywe’rehere. Smittyhas
been terrific. So whenever it’s
time for himto help the teamand
try to change the momentum
around, I don’t hesitate. It was the
same in Boston. We put him in. I
don’t remember the last bad
game he’s played.”
N AT I O N A L H O C K E Y L E A G U E
Lightning strike to even series
Tampa Bay erases early
three-goal deficit as series
heads to Boston for Game 5.
The Associated Press
5
LIGHTNING
3
BRUINS
AP PHOTO
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing Martin St. Louis (26) celebrates with Nate Thompson (44) and
Brett Clark (7) after scoring a goal against the Boston Bruins during the third period Saturday.
WILKES-BARRE – As Born-
fase Nyandusi Omurwa leda pack
of runners to the finish line at last
week’s JewishCommunityCenter
of WyomingValley’sRiver Street 3
Mile Run in Wilkes-Barre, those
whowatchedhimforthefirst time
were in awe.
“It’s like he’s running on air,”
said Jonathan Chase, of Ply-
mouth.
“Heruns without shadow,” said
Florence Kiser, of Nuangola.
Unbeknownst to spectators is
that the 27-year old Kenyan trans-
plant has been a competitive run-
ner for less than two years.
Since picking up the sport,
Omurwa – or Dusi, as he’s known
in the racing community – has be-
come a fixture at the top of the
standings at area running events.
To name a few, he’s finishedat the
top in Wilkes-Barre’s Lupus Loop
5K Run, Hanover Township’s
AmericanRedCross (5K) Runfor
the Red, Nanticoke’s Cancer
Awareness 5KRun and the JCC3
mile run.
Omurwagrewupinthetownof
Kisii – one of two Kenyan tribes
noted for its runners – in south-
central Kenya where he never had
the chance to run competitively.
“I never raced in Kenya,” said
Omurwa. “I never ran in Kenya,
but I used to have that running
spirit.”
Growingupinahouseholdof17
children, his family struggled fi-
nancially. His father could not af-
ford to send all of his children to
school. Omurwa received an edu-
cation but could not join his high
school’s running team.
In Kenya, he says, secondary
education is not free. Students
fromeconomically disadvantaged
families who can
not paytuitionre-
ceive funding
from third-party
sources, such as
the government
and humanitar-
ian organiza-
tions. Omurwa’s
father “wasn’t in
a position” to pay
for Omurwa’s
education. Students who do not
paytheirfull tuitionreceiveabare-
bones education and can not par-
ticipate in extracurricular activ-
ities.
Not being able to participate in
track in high school put him“at a
disadvantage,” as he had“running
potential but couldn’t really do
anything with it.”
After graduating from high
school, college was not an option
for Omurwa. He was forced to
move toSudanandbecome a con-
struction worker to support his
younger siblings financially.
Omurwa graduated with high
honors in high school, but it’s dis-
couragedfor childreninpoor fam-
ilies toreceivehigher educationin
Kenya. “Even with good grades
you could go to college,” he says,
“but there’s no money.” College
was not an option for him so he
wasforcedtomovetoSudantobe-
come a construction worker to
support hisyounger siblingsfinan-
cially. What little money he made
was sent home to Kenya because
“my brothers and sisters needed
to go to school.”
He said he had the potential to
be“averygoodsports person” but
never “really had that chance.”
It was on a construction site in
Sudanwherehisroadtookadiffer-
ent turn. He met his wife, Megan
Ann Borsuk, while working to-
gether for an organization that
was building secondary schools.
They were married in Kenya but,
because jobs were scarce in the
east African country, they moved
to Kingston in July 2009.
Borsuk convinced her husband
to run his first race, the Susan G.
Komen Foundation Race for the
Cure 5K Run in Scranton. Omur-
waplacedsecond, postingan18:11
time –24seconds behindthe win-
ning runner.
“It livened my running spirit.”
Omurwa began a strict training
schedulewithlocal runningstand-
out Richard Chase. They tackle
10-mile hilly courses many morn-
ings before Omurwa begins his
classes at Luzerne County Com-
munity College and his second-
shift job at Home Depot.
Omurwa prides himself at over-
achieving. On top of the scores of
trophies he collects locally, he fin-
ished 60th at Philadelphia’s Broad
Street Run, finishing the ac-
claimed 10 miler in 56 minutes.
He has gottenhis mile time under
5:30. He also owns a 4.0 grade-
point average at LCCC and soon
plans on transfer-
ring to Temple
University in Phi-
ladelphia for actu-
ary sciences.
“To commit
myself to get un-
der a five flat, I re-
allyhavetotrain,”
said Omurwa.
“That’s the same
spirit I put intoev-
erything. If you want to be the
best, you always have to work
hard. It doesn’t just come from
within.”
The sixth of the 17 children,
Omurwa continues to support his
familybackinKenyasohis young-
er siblings can get an education.
Heusesthemashismotivationfor
hisrunningcareer, andhopesthat,
with hard work, he says he might
havethepotential togainfinancial
rewards through his running.
“If I really have to support my
family in Kenya, I really have to
put more hours in running-
.ThoughI can’t say(now) running
pays me back, but looking careful-
ly I really have the potential. If I
couldat least put more effort init,
I think something great can come
out of it.”
Omurwa said his biggest disad-
vantageisstayingconsistentlyfast
over a longperiodof time but that
is something he can overcome
with training.
“You’ll find everyone looks at
me when I run and even when I
feel myself running, I have the po-
tential. It’s just the energy. I just
have to build up that energy. You
see these guys running – they’re
smooth, I’m smooth – but I can’t
keep it up for a long time.”
With less than two years of
trainingunderhisbelt, Omurwais
at a huge disadvantage against
manyof his competitors whohave
been competing since they were
children. He notedhe uses his dis-
advantage as motivation to run
faster.
“Look at it like this: This guy
hasbeenrunningfor15yearsandI
can keep up with him,” Omurwa
said. “Right now, I never look to it
as a disadvantage. If I had been
running for those 15 years, I don’t
know where I could be. I’ve been
runningfor one year andI canrun
that strong.
“I don’t know what’s coming.
Let me keep on running.”
A R E A R U N N I N G
Kenyan makes up
for lost running time
Despite only taking up sport
in 2009, Kingston resident
Omurwa stars in area races.
By JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A native of Kenya now living in
Kingston, Bornfase Omurwa
won the JCC 3-miler last week
“If you want to be
the best, you always
have to work hard. It
doesn’t just come
from within.”
Bornfase Omurwa
ren’t due toa lackof hitting. Jorge
Vazquez, who leads the Interna-
tional League in home runs with
17 and RBI with 41, sat out the
game after being hit by a pitch in
Friday’s game.
WithVazquez out of the lineup,
catcher Jesus Montero came up
with a clutch two-run homer in
the first inning to help the Yan-
kees eventhe score at 2-2 after In-
dianapolis took a 2-0 lead in the
opening inning.
But his third long-ball of the
season was all Montero would
get in the game as he went 1-for-3
with an intentional walk.
The Indians opened the game’s
scoring by getting four hits, in-
cluding a single by Matt Hague
(2-for-3) with the bases loaded to
plate a pair.
Yankees starter D.J. Mitchell
(2-3) was effective after the
rough first inning until the top of
the sixth. He retired 15 of 16 bat-
ters after the two-run hit in the
first and before Indianapolis put
together a one-out rally in the
sixth.
In the sixth, after the Yankees
went up 3-2 in the previous half
inning, the Indians answered
right back with three runs. The
bighit was a two-rundouble from
Jason Jaramillo (2-for-4).
Mitchell threw six innings, al-
lowingeight hits andall fiveruns.
He walked one and struck out
one.
Indianapolis pitcher BrianBur-
ress (2-6) continued to have mild
success against Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre. He went 5
1
⁄3 in-
nings, allowing all three runs and
fanning three. He walked four
andgaveupsixhits, but got out of
trouble when he needed to. In his
career against SWB he is now3-2
while allowing 13 earned runs in
37 innings.
NOTES
• Right-hander Lance Pendle-
ton was recalled by NewYork be-
fore Saturday’s game, while out-
fielder AustinKrumwas addedto
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre from
Double-A Trenton.
This is Pendleton’s second
stint with the parent club this
season. He also spent time from
April 15 to May 11 in New York.
Krum hit leadoff for SWB and
was1-for-5 witha single anda run
scored in his Triple-A debut.
• Justin Maxwell’s five-game
hitting streak came to an end, as
he went 0-for-3. It was the longest
current streak for the team.
• The Yankees fell another
game behind Lehigh Valley in the
IL North standings. The IronPigs
defeated Gwinnett 4-3 and are
now four games ahead of SWB.
HOW THEY SCORED
INDIANS FIRST: Chase D’Arnaud singled and
moved to second on a single by Josh Harrison. Alex
Presley struck out. John Bowker singled to load the
bases. Matt Hague singled to score D’Arnaud and
Harrison. Andy Marte flied out. Jason Jaramillo
grounded out. INDIANS 2-0
YANKEES FIRST: Austin Krum grounded out.
RamiroPenasingled. Jesus Monterohomered. Jus-
tin Maxwell struck out. Brandon Laird singled. Kevin
Russo walked. Dan Brewer grounded into fielder’s
choice, Russo out at second. TIED 2-2
YANKEES FIFTH: Doug Bernier grounded out.
Austin Krum singled. Ramiro Pena grounded out,
Krum to second. Jesus Montero was intentionally
walked. Krumto third on a wild pitch. Justin Maxwell
walked to load the bases. Brandon Laird singled to
score Krum. Kevin Russo lined out. YANKEES 3-2
INDIANS SIXTH: Alex Presley flied out. John
Bowker singled. Matt Hague walked. Andy Marte
singled to load the bases. Jason Jaramillo doubled,
knocking in Bowker and Hague and moving Marte to
third. Andrew Lambo sacrifice fly to score Marte.
Gorkys Hernandez grounded out. INDIANS 5-3
SWB
Continued from Page 1C
Next Game: 1:05 p.m. today vs.
Indianapolis at PNC Field
Probable Pitchers: The Indians’
LHP Justin Wilson (4-3, 2.27) vs.
Yankees RHP Andrew Brackman
(2-3, 6.69)
On Deck: The four-game series
continues through Tuesday with
an evening start Monday and a
school-day special on Tuesday.
Radio: All games can be heard on
THE GAME (1340-AM) with Mike
Vander Woude.
L O O K I N G A H E A D
Indianapolis 5, SWB Yankees 3
INDIANAPOLIS SWB YANKEES
ab r h bi ab r h bi
d’Arnaud ss 5 1 1 0 Krum cf 5 1 1 0
Harrison 2b 4 1 1 0 Pena cc 4 1 1 0
Presley lf 4 0 1 0 Montero c 3 1 1 2
Bowker rf 4 1 2 0 Maxwell lf 3 0 0 0
Hague 1b 3 1 2 2 Laird 1b 4 0 2 1
Marte 3b 4 1 1 0 Russo 2b 2 0 0 0
Jaramillo c 4 0 2 2 Brewer rf 4 0 1 0
Lambo dh 3 0 0 1 Pilittere dh 3 0 0 0
Hernandez cf 4 0 0 0 Bernier 3b 4 0 0 0
Totals 35 5 10 5 Totals 32 3 6 3
Indianapolis ....................... 200 003 000 — 5
SWB Yankees................... 200 010 000 — 3
E– Bowker (1). DP– Indianapolis1. LOB– Indiana-
polis 5, SWB Yankees 7. 2B – Jaramillo (4).
HR – Montero (3). SF – Lambo.
IP H R ER BB SO
Indianapolis
Burres (W, 2-6) ....... 5.1 6 3 3 4 3
Thomas (H, 4) ......... 0.2 0 0 0 0 1
Meek (H, 2) .............. 1.0 0 0 0 0 2
Valdez (H, 4) ........... 1.0 0 0 0 0 0
Wood (S, 8) ............. 1.0 0 0 0 0 0
SWB Yankees
Mitchell. (L, 2-3) ...... 6.0 8 5 5 1 1
Carlyle ...................... 3.0 2 0 0 0 1
WP – Burres.
HBP – Russo (by Valdez).
Umpires – HP: Gerard Ascani. 1B: Alan Porter. 2B:
David Rackley. 3B: Toby Basner.
T – 2:35.
Att – 3,301
LAKEWOOD, N.J. – The Mi-
sericordia University baseball
season came to an end with a
3-1 loss to Kean Saturday in the
losers bracket final of the Mid-
Atlantic Regional Champion-
ships.
Ryan Cacchioli had two of
Misericordia’s five hits against
Kean and Chris Tuttle added an
RBI double.
Losing pitcher Ron Guido
and Mike Pena combined on a
four-hitter for Misericordia, but
Kean put together a five-run
rally in the sixth inning to ad-
vance to the championship
round against Alvernia.
Misericordia fell out of the
winners bracket in the early
hours of Saturday morning in a
3-1 loss to Alvernia.
Monarchs honor pair
King’s College celebrated the
2010-11 year with the 10th an-
nual Senior Awards Luncheon
Saturday afternoon in the Shee-
hy-Farmer Student Center.
King’s swimmer Rebecca
Smith was the recipient of
King’s 2011 Senior Female Ath-
lete of the Year award. Smith re-
cently concluded record-break-
ing career with the swim team.
At the 2011 Middle Atlantic
Conference Championships,
she set five new individual
school records for King’s, in-
cluding the 100, 200, 500,
1,000, and 1,650 freestyle
events.
In all, Smith capped off her
career with an outstanding se-
nior year in which she set, or
was part of, nine individual or
relay school records. She also
becomes the first swimmer to
win the Senior Athlete of the
Year Award.
Men’s basketball star Kevin
Conroy was named King’s 2011
Male Senior Athlete of the Year.
Conroy wrapped up an out-
standing career as a member of
the Monarch basketball team.
A three-time All-Freedom Con-
ference first-team selection,
Conroy concluded his career by
being named to the National
Basketball Coaches Associ-
ation Regional All-American
Team.
L O C A L C O L L E G E S
Misericordia knocked out of Mid-Atlantic tournament
The Times Leader staff
C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
2
8
6
6
3
1
June 1, 2011
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Northeastern Pennsylvania Council
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28th Annual
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“Iron” Mike Ditka
Featured Speaker
Football Legend
Charles E. Parente
Honoree
Thomas G. (Tim)
Speicher
Honoree
Matthew Cartwright
Dinner Co-Chair &
Master of Ceremonies
Greg Collins
Dinner Co-Chair
Purposes: To honor leading citizens and role models in our community. Raise the necessary funds to provide a
quality Scouting Program for over 4,500 youth.
MIAMI — Once Josh Johnson
fessed up that his throwing
shoulder hurt, he felt better.
Now the Florida Marlins ace
hopes a stint on the disabled list
will allow him to quickly heal.
Inflammation in Johnson’s right
shoulder sent him to the DL on
Saturday.
Although Johnson is tied for
the major league lead with a
1.64 ERA, the back of his shoul-
der has bothered him all season.
He didn’t tell the Marlins about
the extent of the soreness and
stiffness until Thursday after a
bullpen session.
“It took everything I had to go
and say something,” he said.
“Once I did, it was something
lifted off my shoulders. Let’s get
it right and get it back to feeling
like it did at the beginning of the
season.”
The move is retroactive to
Tuesday, meaning Johnson
might only miss two starts. The
Marlins hope he’ll be able to
pitch the first day he’s eligible to
come off the DL, which would
be June 1 at Arizona.
Johnson’s not sure he’ll hit
that target date.
Gary Carter diagnosed with
four small brain tumors
NEW YORK — Hall of Fame
catcher Gary Carter says doc-
tors discovered four “very small”
brain tumors
after he had an
MRI on Friday
in Florida.
Carter, 57,
said the tumors
were “very
small” and he
expects to
learn more
about his diagnosis when he is
examined again on Thursday at
Duke Medical Center.
“My wife, Sandy, and our
children and family thank you
for your thoughts and prayers,”
Carter said in a release issued by
the New York Mets and base-
ball’s Hall of Fame on Saturday.
“We ask that you please respect
our privacy as we learn more
about my medical condition.”
Carter hit .262 with 324
homers and 1,225 RBIs in 19
seasons in the majors. The 11-
time All-Star played his last
game with the Montreal Expos
in 1992 and was inducted into
the Hall of Fame in 2003.
Carter is perhaps best known
for helping the Mets win the
World Series in 1986. He had 24
homers and 105 RBIs that year,
then drove in 11 runs in the
postseason.
Orioles pitcher Simon
activated fromrestricted list
BALTIMORE — The Balti-
more Orioles have reinstated
right-hander Alfredo Simon
from the restricted list.
Simon has been charged with
involuntary manslaughter in his
native Dominican Republic. No
trial date has been set.
He had to be activated by
today from the restricted list,
but the Orioles made the move
early after playing a 15-inning
game on Wednesday and losing
17-5 to the Nationals on Friday
night.
Simon takes the roster spot of
Jason Berken, who was optioned
to Triple-A Norfolk after Friday’s
loss. Baltimore also transferred
infielder Cesar Izturis to the
60-day disabled list Saturday.
Simon will work out of the
bullpen. He was 4-2 with 17
saves and a 4.93 ERA in 49
games for the Orioles last sea-
son.
Due to elbow, Cubs’ Garza
won’t start today vs. Red Sox
BOSTON — Chicago Cubs
right-hander Matt Garza was
scratched from his scheduled
start for today’s series-finale
against the Boston Red Sox.
Manager Mike Quade said
before Saturday’s game that
Garza had a “little stiffness with
his elbow” and will be checked
out Monday.
The club was uncertain who
would start today, but Quade
indicated that left-handed reliev-
er James Russell was the leading
candidate. The manager also
said he may have to use a num-
ber of relievers.
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
Marlins ace heads to the DL
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Florida Marlins No. 1 starter Josh Johnson has been put on the
disabled list with inflammation in his right shoulder.
Carter
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 9C
➛ S P O R T S
he’s the favorite.”
Djokovic has wonall seventour-
naments he’s entered this season
and all seven matches he’s played
against Nadal —whomhe beat in
clay-court finals at Madrid and
Rome this month — and Federer.
The Serb also won his last two
matches of 2010, meaning he’s at
39 in a rowoverall.
So Djokovic is closing in on the
Open era records for most wins to
start a season (John McEnroe’s 42
in 1984) and longest winning
streak (Guillermo Vilas’ 46 in
1977).
“I don’t feel unbeatable,” said
Djokovic, whose two Grand Slam
titles came at the 2008 and 2011
Australian Opens. “Nobody is un-
beatable, even though I had an in-
credible run that keeps going.”
Nadal, meanwhile, has won 38
of his 39 matches at Roland Gar-
PARIS — It’s been eight years
since the last time Roger Federer
was not seeded No. 1 or 2 at a
Grand Slamtournament.
It’s also been that long since he
went more than 12 months with-
out winning any major title.
With the French Open starting
today, top-seeded Rafael Nadal’s
pursuit of a record-tying sixth
championship at Roland Garros
and second-seeded Novak Djokov-
ic’s 37-0 start to
the season are
dominating the
conversation.
The focus, for
a change, is not
on the third-
seeded Federer,
owner of a re-
cord 16 Grand
Slam titles, in-
cluding the
2009 French
Open. And he
sounds as if he is fine with that.
“This is definitely a year for me
where I can come into this tourna-
ment withjust a little less pressure
than, let’s say, the last six, seven
years,” said Federer, whose first-
round match against Feliciano Lo-
pez of Spain is scheduled for Mon-
day.
Djokovic, who could face Feder-
erinthesemifinals, alsoisslatedto
play Monday, while Nadal’s open-
ing match will be Tuesday. Men in
action today include No. 7 David
Ferrer and two-time major cham-
pion Lleyton Hewitt; 2009 French
Open champion Svetlana Kuznet-
sova and 2010 runner-up SamSto-
sur are among the women on the
Day1schedule.
“Last year, I was the defending
champ. Theyear before—andthe
years before that —I was trying to
win (in) Paris for the first time. So
I’ve always had that big cloud
hanging over, and the, ‘Am I ever
going to win the French?’ ques-
tion,” Federer said. “This year,
maybetheyexpect morefromRafa
and Novak, and that could be a
good thing for me — and more
pressure for them.”
For their part, Nadal and Djo-
kovic are more than willing to de-
clare the other the man to beat in
Paris.
Askedwhether he deserves that
label, Nadal rolled his eyes and
shook his head and replied: “No.
No, probably this year the favorite
is Djokovic.”
That was relayed to Djokovic,
who smiled and declared: “I say
ros, taking the title five of the past
six years. One more trophy would
match Bjorn Borg for most by a
man in French Open history.
The Spaniard turns 25 during
the tournament’s second week,
andif hewins, hewouldbethesec-
ond-youngest man—trailing only
Borg — to collect his 10th Grand
Slamtrophy.
Federer entered Wimbledon in
2003seededNo. 5andwithout any
major titles onhis resume. Hewon
that tournament, and by the Aus-
tralian Open in January 2004, he
was seededNo. 2. AsecondGrand
Slam championship there moved
Federer uptoNo. 1intherankings.
Hehas wonat least onemajor ti-
tle for eight consecutive seasons
— matching a mark previously
held by Borg and Pete Sampras —
and completed his career Grand
Slamby winningat RolandGarros
two years ago.
During that stretch, Federer re-
ached a record 23 straight Grand
Slam semifinals and never went
morethantwomajor tournaments
in a rowwithout winning a title.
Until now.
After winning the 2010 Austra-
lianOpen, Federerwasupsetinthe
quarterfinals of last year’s French
Open by Robin Soderling. That
was followed a month later by an-
other quarterfinal exit at Wimble-
don, against Tomas Berdych. So-
derling and Berdych went on to
lose in the finals to Nadal.
Then Federer lost in the semifi-
nalsattheU.S. OpeninSeptember,
and again in the semifinals at the
Australian Open — both times to
Djokovic. AlreadyovertakenatNo.
1intherankings byNadal, Federer
has been at No. 3, a spot behind
Djokovic, since March.
F R E N C H O P E N
Third-seed Federer out of spotlight
No. 1 Nadal, No. 2 Djokovic call
each other man to beat. Swiss
star has record 16 major titles
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer
AP PHOTO
Heading into the French Open, Serbia’s Novak Djokovic has won all seven tournaments he’s entered
this season and all seven matches he’s played against defending French champion Rafael Nadal.
“This is a
year where
I can come
in … with a
little less
pressure.’’
Roger Federer
CONCORD, N.C. —David Ra-
gan passed Brad Keselowski
with just over a lap remaining to
win The Sprint Showdown, the
qualifying event that moves
three drivers into the $1 million
Sprint All-Star Race.
Keselowski also moved into
Saturday night’s main event by
finishing second, while Dale
Earnhardt Jr. earned the final
spot as winner of the fan vote. A
record 2.4 million votes were
cast this year, the first Earnhardt
was not already qualified for the
All-Star race.
Earnhardt had a 10-year ex-
emption for the race for winning
it in 2000, but it’s expired and a
104-race losing streak meant he
needed the Showdown to get
himinto the All-Star race. He fin-
ished sixth in the 27-car field,
and insisted he didn’t take the
fan vote for granted.
“Anytime there’s a contest,
they don’t announce the winner,
there’s no guarantees,” he said.
“I knew my fans were working
really hard. They’ve done a great
job over the last several years of
locking up the most popular
driver award. All the credit goes
to them. They do all the work,
support us so much, really be-
lieve in what we’re trying to ac-
complish.”
Keselowski, meanwhile, used
a daring three-wide pass on an
earlier restart to take the lead.
He didn’t think the move had
won him the race, but he knew
he needed to get aggressive to
have any shot at moving into the
All-Star race.
“This race, you either make it
into the next race or you might
as well not have even came,” he
said. “I went throughthe grass to
do it. But that’s what you’ve got
to do. You’ve got to take chanc-
es.”
But Keselowski was run down
by Ragan as the laps ticked off on
the second 20-lap segment, and
Keselowski said that Ragan just
might be the driver to beat in the
All-Star race.
Ragan was just pleased to give
his Roush Fenway Racing crew
something to celebrate. He lost a
chance to win the Daytona 500
when he was penalized while
leading on a late restart.
“We’ve been so close to clos-
ing the deal and haven’t been
able to do it,” he said. “For a few
laps, I thought we were going to
have to run second. But we kept
fighting. It will give us some ex-
tra confidence just to be out here
in this All-Star Race. This is a
race we’ve had to watch the last
three years. It’s been pretty
tough to go back home and
watch it.”
N A S C A R
Ragan captures The Sprint Showdown
AP PHOTO
David Ragan (6)
and AJ Allmend-
inger (43) lead
the field at the
start of NAS-
CAR’s Sprint
Cup Series
Showdown auto
race in Concord,
N.C., Saturday.
Late-race pass of Keselowski
gives Roush Fenway driver a
shot at $1 million all-star race.
By JENNA FRYER
AP Auto Racing Writer
PARIS — A look at the French
Open, the year’s second Grand
Slam tennis tournament:
Site: Roland Garros.
Surface: Clay courts.
Schedule: The 15-day tourna-
ment begins today. The women’s
singles final is June 4; the men’s
singles final is June 5.
Today’s Forecast: Mostly sunny;
high of 70 degrees.
On Court today: No. 7 David
Ferrer of Spain vs. Jarkko Niemi-
nen of Finland, No. 14 Stanislas
Wawrinka of Switzerland vs. Augus-
tin Gensse of France, Lleyton He-
witt of Australia vs. Albert Mon-
tanes of Spain; No. 8 Sam Stosur of
Australia vs. Iveta Benesova of
Czech Republic, No. 10 Jelena
Jankovic of Serbia vs. Alona Bond-
arenko of Ukraine, No. 13 Svetlana
Kuznetsova of Russia vs. Mag-
dalena Rybarikova of Slovakia.
2010 Men’s Singles Champion:
Rafael Nadal of Spain.
2010 Women’s Singles Cham-
pion: Francesca Schiavone of Italy.
Last Year: Nadal beat Robin
Soderling of Sweden 6-4, 6-2, 6-4
to win his fifth French Open title. It
was Soderling’s second consec-
utive runner-up finish at Roland
Garros; he upset Roger Federer in
the quarterfinals. Schiavone be-
came the first Italian woman to win
a Grand Slam singles title by beat-
ing Sam Stosur of Australia 6-4,
7-6 (2). Less than a month shy of
30, Schiavone was the oldest wom-
an since 1969 to win her first major
tennis title.
Key Statistic I: 37-0 — Novak
Djokovic’s record in 2011, the best
start to a tennis season by a man
since John McEnroe went 42-0 to
begin 1984.
Key Statistic II: 38-1 — Nadal’s
career record at the French Open.
The only loss came to Soderling in
the fourth round in 2009. Nadal
will be trying to tie Bjorn Borg’s
record of six French Open titles.
Prize Money: Total is about $25
million, with about $1.7 million each
to the men’s and women’s singles
champions.
TV: ESPN2 (starts today), Tennis
Channel (starts today), NBC (May
28-29; June 3-5).
Online: http://www.rolandgar-
ros.com/index.html
FRENCH OPEN ’11: Tournament at a glance
The Associated Press
FORT WORTH, Texas —
Charlie Wi began the third
round at Colonial just hoping to
cut into playing partner David
Toms’ biglead. Wi certainlynev-
er expected to be leading at the
end of the day.
Toms blew a seven-stroke
margin Saturday, and Wi took
the lead with a 32-foot birdie
putt on the par-316th hole. At 13
under after a 4-under 66, Wi had
a one-stroke stroke edge over
Toms —and the 54-hole lead on
the PGA Tour for the first time
in his career.
“I’m very pleasantly sur-
prised. I playedreally well today
and David didn’t,” Wi said. “It’s
such a crazy game. I don’t know
what to say.”
Soon after weather delay of 1
hour, 20 minutes, Wi’s tee shot
at No. 16landedonthe backside
of the green and Toms pushed
his shot right into the rough. Wi
holed the birdie putt before
Toms’ 16-foot par chance just
missed for a two-stroke swing
that changed the top of the lead-
erboard.
“Tough day overall,” said
Toms, who shot 74 after build-
ing his huge lead with bogey-
free 62s.
Toms opened with a birdie
Saturday, but had three bogeys
in a five-hole stretch while Wi
got started with consecutive
birdies.
Even worse for Toms was a
three-putt from 7
1
⁄2 feet for dou-
ble bogey at No. 14, where Wi
chipped to12 feet to save par be-
fore the delay.
“Until thenI was still three be-
hind him, so I wasn’t even think-
ing about the lead or anything,”
Wi said. “Then it’s ‘Wow, I’mon-
ly one shot behind him.’ I knew
it was getting a lot more inter-
esting than how I envisioned
when I started the day.”
Wi made his 100th cut in 147
PGA Tour events this weekend,
but the 39-year-old South Ko-
rean has never won.
The 44-year-old Toms is a 12-
time winner, but is looking for
his first victory inmore thanfive
years. He is coming off a playoff
loss to K.J. Choi last weekend at
The Players Championship.
While Toms now has another
disappointment to overcome, at
least he still has one more round
to play at Hogan’s Alley.
“I’mright where I set out tobe
when I started this week,” Toms
said. “I certainlywouldliketobe
sittinghere witha10-stroke lead
and trying to break some record
or something like that. It’s all
about getting in position and
see howI do. I did well last Sun-
day with a chance, but didn’t
quite get there.”
John Senden, who began the
third round with Wi in a quartet
of players seven strokes back,
shot even par and was third
alone at 9 under. Stuart Appleby
(67), Paul Goydos (67) and
Mark Wilson (71) were 8 under.
After blasting out of a front-
side bunker at the par-4 14th,
Toms three-putted for his first
double bogey in a stretch of 343
holes at Colonial. That coupled
with Wi’s impressive up-and-
down at the same hole cut the
gap to one stroke.
Before Toms and Wi finished
No. 15, play was stopped be-
cause of an approaching storm.
Only a little bit of rain fell before
play resumed and both made
their par putts.
Toms got to17 under with his
opening birdie Saturday at the
565-yard first hole, chipping
from just short of the green to 6
feet. Then came a couple of bad
bounces and three bogeys.
His approach at the par-4 sec-
ond hit on the front of the green
but rolled back into the green-
side bunker. He blasted to about
19 feet and two-putted for his
first bogey in 38 holes.
“From there, he kind of lost
the momentum a little bit, but I
didn’t think I was going to be
able to close the gap like I did,”
Wi said.
After missing the fairway left
at No. 3 and hitting a low liner
approachthat stoppedjust short
of the green, Toms pushed a
5
1
⁄2-foot par chance just right of
the hole.
At the difficult 247-yard
fourth hole, his tee shot landed
in the frontside bunker so deep
that the 5-foot-10 Toms’ head
was barely visible fromthe back
of the green when he blasted to
9 feet. When he made that putt,
he had a slight fist pump that
was more relief than celebra-
tion.
P R O G O L F
AP PHOTO
Charlie Wi watches his tee shot on the 17th hole during the third
round of play at the Colonial golf tournament Saturday.
Wi takes advantage
to shoot into top spot
South Korean is sharp while
playing partner David Toms
squanders seven-stroke lead.
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
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row. Franchitti, a two-time win-
ner and the defending champ
from Scotland, was next at
226.379, putting him on the out-
side of Row1.
Still, Tagliani’s jump to the top
seemed fitting on one of the
INDIANAPOLIS — Alex Ta-
gliani was ready to mix things up
in the IndyCar world Saturday.
Did he ever.
On a day that two of the series
best-known teamowners —Rog-
er Penske and Michael Andretti
— struggled mightily, it was the
lesser-known 37-year-old Cana-
dian who stole the show.
Tagliani grabbed the early pole
for this year’s Indianapolis 500
with a four-lap qualifying average
of 226.954 mph. Target Chip Ga-
nassi’s two drivers, Scott Dixon
and Dario Franchitti, both Indy
winners, were the other two cars
to make the front row.
It was all part of Tagliani’s
grand plan.
“I’mgetting tired of the Penske
and Ganassi domination, here es-
pecially at the 500,” he said after
his qualifying run. “I think a lot of
people are craving for it, andif we
can do it, it would be nice.”
Andretti’s cars went 0 for 9 try-
ing to make the field, after all five
cars were bumped, including
John and Marco Andretti and
Danica Patrick.
If Tagliani holds onto the top
spot, it would be the crowning
achievement of his career. He has
won only one race and taken four
poles since2000—noneof which
carrythe prestige of Indianapolis.
Dixon, the 2008 race winner
fromNewZealand, hada226.701.
He’s in the middle of the front
strangest Pole Days in recent In-
dy history.
And only one driver from
Penske’s three-car stable, Austra-
lian Will Power, made it onto the
front three rows. He was seventh,
the inside of Row 3, after going
226.089. But that was still behind
three drivers makingtheir season
debuts — Dan Wheldon, Towns-
end Bell and Ed Carpenter.
Three-time Indy winner Helio
Castroneves also struggled in his
attempt to win an unprecedented
third straight pole. His four-lap
average of 225.216 put himon the
inside of Row 6, 16th. The Brazi-
lian still has two attempts re-
maining before the shootout
amongthe fastest nine drivers be-
gins.
If Castroneves can’t improve
his position, it will be his lowest
starting spot in11career starts at
Indy.
“I’m like a big question mark,”
Castroneves said. “We’ve got to
go back out so I can get it in the
topnine andcompete for the pole
position. We know we have it.”
And that wasn’t nearly as bad a
day as Penske teammate Ryan
Briscoe had.
Briscoe wrecked his primary
car inpractice Saturday morning.
After the crew scrambled to put
an engine in his backup car, Bris-
coe was one of 13 drivers to get
bumped from the field. Even
worse, he failed to requalify on
his second attempt.
Race organizers filled only 24
of the 33 starting spots for the
May 29 race Saturday. The re-
maining nine spots will be filled
Sunday.
Swiss driver Simona De Silves-
tro, who sustained burns on both
of her hands in a crash Thursday,
qualified, was bumped, failed to
qualify on her second attempt
andthenfinallyput the No. 78car
in the show with an average of
224.392. She’ll start from the
middle of row 8.
A U T O R A C I N G
Tagliani takes Indy 500 pole
Canadian will start alongside
two former race winners from
Ganassi Racing.
By MICHAEL MAROT
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
Alex Tagliani, of Canada, celebrates winning the pole on the final
qualification run on the opening day of time trials for the Indi-
anapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
BARCELONA, Spain —Mark
Webber edged Formula One
leader Sebastian Vettel in quali-
fying for the Spanish Grand Prix
on Saturday as Red Bull swept
its fifth consecutive pole posi-
tion of the season.
Webber got around the Cata-
lunya Circuit in1minute, 20.981
seconds to edge Vettel by two-
tenths.
Vettel had topped qualifying
in the season’s first four races,
winning three of those.
There was no doubting Red
Bull’s pace after it dominated all
three practice sessions, with
Webber enjoying nearly a 1-sec-
ond advantage over Lewis Ha-
milton of McLaren. Hamilton
held off Ferrari’s Fernando Alon-
soby0.003seconds inqualifying
to start third.
Red Bull has started from the
pole position in 20 of the last 24
races as Webber snappedVettel’s
five-race run frompole in a qual-
ifying session that really just
came down to two cars.
“We thought we were going to
battle for the pole between our-
selves. It was a nice lap, a good
battle with Seb,” said Webber,
whose winhere last year made it
10 straight victories for the pole-
sitter. “But today was my day.”
Vettel is hoping to have his
overtaking KERS boost system
in the car for Sunday’s 66-lap
race after being unable to use it
in qualifying.
“It’s not right to say that, be-
cause I didn’t have KERS, Mark
is on pole. I can’t talk of big dis-
appointment at the end of the
day. It looks like we like this
track and our car feels very com-
fortable,” Vettel said. “Hedidthe
better job today — but tomor-
row is a long race.”
Vettel holds a 34-point lead
over second-place Hamilton and
38 over third-place Webber in
the standings.
McLaren stayed closest to the
Red Bulls again in qualifying but
Hamilton never looked like
breaking the top-two monopoly
in the hot, dry conditions.
So dominant has Red Bull
been in Barcelona that Webber
couldaffordtowatchthecloseof
qualifyingfromthecool confines
of the garage.
“Lewis is a phenomenal driver
but it was pretty obvious he
wasn’t going to get us,” said
Webber, who kickstarted his
championshipbidat the Spanish
GP last year. “So we sat it out.”
Jenson Button of McLaren
and Renault’s Vitaly Petrov filled
out the third row, with Nico
Rosberg of Mercedes starting
seventh ahead of Ferrari’s Felipe
Massa.
F O R M U L A O N E R A C I N G
AP PHOTO
Red Bull F-1 driver Mark Webber, right, earned the pole for the
Spanish Grand Prix. At left is teammate Sebastian Vettel.
Webber nips Vettel
for Spanish GP pole
For the fifth consecutive
race, the Red Bull team will
start from the No. 1 spot.
By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer
INDIANAPOLIS — A new
public address stand honoring
the late Tom Carnegie was
unveiled Saturday at the Indi-
anapolis Motor Speedway.
The veteran broadcaster
known to generations as the
voice of the Indianapolis 500
died in February at age 91 fol-
lowing an illness. He began
announcing at the speedway in
1946, and continued for 61
years.
He broadcast for years from
what was called the “Fruit
Stand” for its modest appear-
ance, but the new Tom Carnegie
Public Address Stand is high-
tech.
Carnegie’s smooth voice and
signature lines became as much
a part of the track as cars and
drivers. The phrases he was best
known for were “Heeeeez-on-it!”
for the start of qualifying runs
and “It’s a new track record!”
Highlights of his career at the
speedway and interviews with
him were shown on the big
screens during the ceremony,
which took place near the start/
finish line.
Carnegie was born in Nor-
walk, Conn., as Carl Kenagy,
which was still his legal name.
He began his radio career in
1942 at WOWO in Fort Wayne,
where he took the name Tom
Carnegie because the station
manager thought it sounded
better.
The honor came on Pole Day,
which also has been named for
him.
BRISCOE CRASHES: Team
Penske scrambled to get Ryan
Briscoe’s backup car ready after
he crashed during Saturday
morning’s practice session less
than three hours before Indi-
anapolis 500 qualifying.
The rear end of Briscoe’s car
hit the wall hard Saturday morn-
ing. He was taken by ambulance
to the Indianapolis Motor
Speedway’s medical center. He
was diagnosed with a bruised
left knee and was cleared to
drive by track medical officials.
Briscoe said the crash was
caused by cold tires. But he
made it back on the 2.5-mile
oval in a backup car with about
20 minutes left in the final
scheduled practice before the
May 29 race.
Twenty-four spots on the
33-car starting grid were filled
on Saturday. Qualifying will
conclude today.
BACK ON TRACK: Simona
de Silvestro was cleared to drive
two days after a fiery crash
burned her hands and put her
availability for qualifying in
doubt.
The 22-year-old Swiss driver
was back on the track early
Saturday with a backup car. She
completed 32 laps in practice,
with a high speed of 223.357
mph, 39th among the 41 cars.
De Silvestro lost control of
the car Thursday and it flipped,
burst into flames and slid down
the track upside down. She has
second degree burns on the
back of her right hand and su-
perficial burns on the back of
her left hand and nose.
SLOWDANICA: Danica Pa-
trick said this week she’s doing
everything well except qualify-
ing this season, and that’s cost
her during races.
She hasn’t qualified higher
than 17th this year. She had
been in the middle of the pack
during Indy 500 practices until
Saturday morning, when she
posted a best time of 226.446
mph, good for 14th.
Perhaps Indianapolis is just
what she needs. She has started
and finished in the top 10 in five
of her six races at the 2
1
⁄2-mile
oval, leading 19 laps in 2005.
Track honors longtime public address announcer
By CLIFF BRUNT
AP Sports Writer
INDY 500
N O T E B O O K
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 11C
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
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➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Hanover star announces college
Matt Lukachinsky, a soccer star at Hanover Area High
School, recently signed a letter of intent to play soccer at
Chestnut Hill College, an NCAA Division II school in Phila-
delphia. Lukachinsky is Hanover’s career leading scorer
with 76 goals and 34 assists. Pictured are, from left, first
row: Maureen Lukachinsky, mother; Matt Lukachinsky Jr.;
and Matt Lukachinsky Sr., father. Second row: Russ Davis,
Hanover Area Athletic Director; Anthony Podczasy, School
District Superintendent, Robert Biscontini, Guidance Coun-
selor; John Nealon, Soccer Coach; Dave Fisher, Principal.
Spring horsemanship open house held at Freedom Farms
A spring horsemanship open house was recently held at Freedom Farms, Mountain Top. Riders interested in learning
more about equestrian sports participated in an afternoon of activities at the riding center. The open house was a prel-
ude to the summer camp program at Freedom Farms, which begins June 15 and continues through the summer, conclud-
ing with a camp horse show. For information, call 678-3658. Pictured are some of the participants at the open house.
From left: Gavin Ashman, Elaina Ashman, Joan O’Brien, Annie Hagenbuch, Taylor Josefowicz, Melody Josefowicz, Gabby
McElhattan, Paige Gatz, Cameron O’Neill, Leha Karassik and Karen Cleveland, with horses Mega Commander and Twist
Again.
The Crew soccer team reigns
The Crew U13 boys soccer team, which completed the
regular season at 8-2-1, won the boys ‘A’ Division champion-
ship. Pictured are team members. First row, from left:
Shane Searfoss, Frankie Castellana, Josh Wychock, Kaden
Washburn and Sammy Sebia. Second row: Coach Steve
Johnson, R.J. Kresge, Colin Tracy, Pavel Svintozelskiy, Nick
Stavinski and Steven Johnson.
Good Shepherd’s top athletes
Good Shepherd Academy, in Kingston, has announced its
athletes of the year. Jerry Busch was named male athlete
of the year, and Tara Judge was honored as female athlete
of the year. They received awards at the annual eighth
grade banquet held at Touch of Class in Wilkes-Barre. Pic-
tured, from left: Busch, Principal James Jones and Judge.
Good Shepherd trio honored
Good Shepherd Academy, in Kingston, recently honored
three basketball players on point-scoring milestones. Pic-
tured, from left: Jim Slavinski, 1,000 points; Jerry Busch,
1,500 points; and Tim White, 500 points.
Vipers capture softball crown
The Wyoming Valley Vipers won the softball champion-
ship at the Stoney Mountain Showdown Tournament In
Harrisburg. Pictured are team members: Courtney Cragle,
Faith Jones, Aubery Mytych,Tiana Wren, Hope Jones, Molly
Poray, Emily Elich, Kaylee Zatorski, Gwen Glatz, Nikki Cra-
gle, Morgan Bienkowski and Kaitlin Connolly.
Taekwondo Institute promotions
The Hapkido Taekwondo Institute of Kingston held a pro-
motion test. Promoted to Black Belt in the North American
Hapkdio Taekwondo Federation were Kasey Danko and
Megha Sarada. Promoted to 2nd Dan was Nicholas Jula. He
has been training at the school for the past 10 years and is
an assistant instructor. Pictured: Master Vince Sperduto,
Brian Kaschak, Megha Sarada, Nicholas Jula, Kasey Danko,
Senior Instructor Pete Canavan and Pete Shelp.
Royals named scholar-athletes
Two athletes from Holy Redeemer High School were re-
cently named to the Academic All American Team. Erin
Ryan, a senior member of the girls swimming team, and
Alex Bedrin, a senior member of the boys team, have been
recognized by the National Interscholastic Swimming
Coaches Association as scholar-athletes. To qualify for this
award, senior athletes must have a minimum of a 3.75
grade point average cumulative from freshman year to first
semester senior year and must be a varsity letter winner.
Ryan, a high honors student and the daughter of Joe and
Susan Ryan of Lehman, qualified with a grade point aver-
age of 4.2. Bedrin, also a high honors student and the son
of Mike and Karen Bedrin of Mountain Top, qualified with a
grade point average of 3.9.
Fundraiser for Comets football
The Crestwood Football Booster Club recently hosted a
Dodgeball Tournament at Crestwood High School. There
were a total of eight teams participating in a double-elim-
ination tournament. Pictured above, ‘Abusement Park’, was
the winning team. All funds generated support the Crest-
wood football program. First row, from left: Rachael Ritz,
Juliet Wotherspoon, Carina Mazzoni, Anna Kozelsky and
Kiana Thompson. Second row: Anthony Survilla, Captain
Rich Golden, Nick Aigeldinger, Chris Fazzini, Austin Powell,
Luke Bernardo and Alex Culver.
Crusader to wrestle at Wilkes
Coughlin’s Steve Turner will continue his academic and
wrestling career at Wilkes University. Steve won the
Bloomsburg and Tunkhannock tournaments during his
senior year and was a three-year starter for the Crusaders.
Pictured, from left, front row: Jim Turner, father; Steve
Turner; and Jane Turner, mother. Back row: Pat Patte, prin-
cipal; Cliff Jones, athletic director; Steve Stahl, head coach;
Rubin Prophete, assistant coach; and Brian Costello, assist-
ant principal.
Flames earn title in season debut
The Wyoming Valley Flames 14U team opened its 2011 soft-
ball season by capturing the USSSA Eclipse Spring Classic
in Lansdale. The Flames defeated the Tri-county Thunder
4-1 in the championship final. First row, from left: Brittany
Mcnair and Caitlin Bogart. Second row: Rachel Langen,
Rachel Roccograndi, Madison Perez, Amber Grohowski and
Kayla Cunningham. Third row: Katy Gushka, Haylee Bobos,
Baylee Steininger, Colleen Borum and Michelle Mcnair.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 13C
➛ S P O R T S
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
This is a formal
invitation to take
Jeanne E. on an
adventure with
all my friends for
the most exciting
week of her life.
Let me know
when is good for
you. Noble Scott
will take the
week off from
fishing to help
make this hap-
pen.
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
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*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
MAJOR GIFTS OFFICER
Binghamton Univer-
sity, State University
of New York, is
searching for a
highly motivated,
articulate self-
starter with a com-
mitment to public
higher education for
the position of Major
Gifts Officer. This is
a key institutional
advancement posi-
tion that serves as a
full partner with Divi-
sion of External
Affairs & Bingham-
ton University Foun-
dation colleagues to
further the mission
of Binghamton Uni-
versity. The Major
Gifts Officer is inte-
gral to establishing
and fostering impor-
tant relationships
with a vast range of
constituents and
assisting the Univer-
sity in securing pri-
vate support. The
Major Gifts Officer
will solicit individual
gifts of $25,000-
$249,999. For full
position description,
please see
http://binghamton.
interviewexchange.
com/jobofferdetails.
jsp?JOBID=24848.
For more informa-
tion about Bingham-
ton University,
please visit www.
binghamton.edu.
The State University
of New York & Bing-
hamton University
are Equal Opportu-
nity/Affirmative
Action Employers.
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513 Childcare
Education/
Child Care
Want to make a
Really
Significant
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in the lives of
children?
Consider Housep-
arenting employ-
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Hershey School!
Nurture, guide and
mentor children
and youth from
social and financial
need. Full and
part-time jobs
available. Learn
more at
www.mhs-pa.org/
careers/
houseparents
EOE
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
515 Creative/Design
INTERIOR DESIGN
Scranton based
design Firm seeks
part to full-time Inte-
rior Designer.
Candidates must
have Bachelors
degree, 5+ years
experience with
commercial proj-
ects, CAD and
drawing capabilities
and have proficient
computer skills.
Competitive salary
based on experi-
ence, healthcare,
401K and paid
vacation.
Resumes:
ddriscoll@
facilitydesignltd.com
522 Education/
Training
ASSISTANT MEN’S
BASKETBALL COACH
Primary duties
include: assisting
the head coach with
recruiting, schedul-
ing and related
administrative
duties involved with
the men’s basket-
ball program. 2-3
years of coaching
experience.
Bachelors Degree
required.
Knowledge of NCAA
rules preferred.
For additional details
please contact Dr.
Mary Jo Gunning,
Director of Athletics
and Recreation
(570)961-4724.
A completed
Marywood applica-
tion, cover letter,
resume & 3 refer-
ences are required.
Marywood Universi-
ty
2300 Adams
Avenue
Scranton, PA 18509
jobs@marywood.edu
AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY/
AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION EMPLOYER
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search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
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533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
WINDOW WINDOW
INST INSTALLER ALLER
5+ years experi-
ence; must have
own tools, must be
proficient in using a
metal brake to bend
coil; Background
check and Refer-
ences required;
Must be reliable;
Must possess
strong customer
relationship.
Contact #
(330) 351-9034
Email:
michaelhoffmeier
@live.com
542 Logistics/
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Drivers - CDL-A:
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New Terminal
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877-211-8682
551 Other
FOSTER PARENTING
HAVE YOU
CONSIDERED IT?
Call For Details
Call CONCERN
800-654-6180
www.concern4kids.org
573 Warehouse
OPEN HOUSE
THURSDAY 5/26
1:00 PM UNTIL 3 PM
We are a National
Convenience Store
Distribution Compa-
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3RD SHIFT ORDER
SELECTORS. We
also have a Full
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ing and offers the
potential to earn an
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top of base pay.
This is one of our
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with a generous
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programs! Apply @
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Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706
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background check.
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900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
VILLAGE
13 Hedge Road
20 year old Con-
temporary in
prime location. 3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, large
kitchen, unfin-
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hardwood floors
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attached 2 car
garage. Total
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$265,000
(570) 472-9660
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HARVEYS LAKE
LOG HOME
FOR SALE
38 Hemlock St.
Fireplace,
central air, finished
basement, deck,
hardwood floors
and ceramic tile
throughout.
$189,900. Call
570-696-5668 for
a private showing
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
6 Hill Street
SUNDAY MAY 22
11:30AM-1:00PM
DIRECTIONS:
Rte 309 onto East
Center St at
Burger King left
onto Ondish, left
onto Hill just
before Roosevelt.
Sense the harmony
of this cul-de-sac
3 bedroom, 2 bath
raised ranch
offering a mountain
view. Very enticing,
w/ newer carpeting,
hardwood flooring
and fresh interior
paint. 3 car garage,
swimming pool and
deck all on a 2.77
acre double lot.
MLS 11-637
$258,000
Michael Slacktish
570-760-4961
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
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944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
AFRAID TO MOVE?
Are you paying
too much for your
current office, but
dread the incon-
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We not only offer
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utilities, trash
removal, and
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parking at the the
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5000SF available.
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protected. Call
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570-822-8577
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950 Half Doubles
WILKES-BARRE
247 Barney St.
Recently remodeled
large 1/2 double. 3
large bedrooms, 1
bath, oil heat, par-
tially finished attic,
fridge & stove. Nice
place needs nice
tenants.
Absolutely no pets.
$600/ month + utili-
ties & 1 month
security. Refer-
ences checked.
Call Jeff
570-332-6815
953Houses for Rent
BENTON
Charming country
farm house. 3 bed-
room, 2 bath on 4.3
acres. Newly
remodeled. Full
basement and attic.
Large barn and
out buildings.
Horses welcome.
$950/month
904-673-6944
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The fans lined up three hours
before kickoff, awaiting their
chance to see America’s version
of football played for the first
time in Africa.
The locals in Arusha, Tanza-
nia, weren’t quite sure what,
when or who to cheer for dur-
ing the game between the
Drake Bulldogs and an all-star
team from Mexico. But the
12,000or sowhotookinthe col-
lege football game seemed to
enjoy it.
Drake, a non-scholarship pro-
gram from Des Moines, Iowa,
beat the CONADEIP All-Stars,
17-7, in the Global Kilimanjaro
Bowl on Saturday.
“It truly was a magical day,”
Drake coach Chris Creighton
told The Associated Press by
phone from Tanzania. “I think
everybody had the sense that
we were part of something way
bigger than ourselves, just big-
ger than a football game. It was
emotional, kind of the realiza-
tion of something very special
to all of us.”
The trip grew out of a vision
by Creighton and took more
than a year of planning by Glob-
al Football, a company that’s
been taking U.S. college foot-
ball teams around the world for
14 years.
The exhibition is part of a
two-week trip organized by
Drake that includes include
youth clinics, a safari, an or-
phanage project and a five-day
climb to the summit of the
19,340-foot Kilimanjaro.
Officials had hoped to fill the
20,000-seat Sheikh Amri Abeid
Memorial Stadium, which nor-
mally hosts soccer. But Creight-
on said tight security measures
held up lines of fans and kept
the stadium rather empty at
kickoff.
However, the seats were
quickly filled and the game
turned out to be entertaining
even for those who didn’t know
what they were watching. It al-
so proved that turnovers will
kill drives from Tijuana to Tan-
zania.
Jose Reyes gave CONADEIP
its first and only lead in the
fourth quarter on a TDrun that
put the Mexican team ahead
7-3. Drake freshman quarter-
back Nick Enis — making his
college debut in Africa — an-
swered with a crucial first-
down toss to Joey Orlando and
found Orlando with an 11-yard
touchdown that gave the Bull-
dogs a 10-7 lead.
CONADEIP quickly drove to
Drake’s 2. But the Bulldogs de-
fense raised its arms to pump
up the crowd just like they’d do
back at Drake Stadium. Bull-
dogs linebacker Tyler Moore-
head said that got the fans as
fired up as they’d been all day.
CONADEIPfollowedwithits
second botched field goal snap
of the day to help Drake stay
ahead.
A M E R I C A N F O O T B A L L
AP PHOTO
Drake players celebrate Patrick Cashmore’s touchdown in a 17-7 victory over the CONADEIP
All-Stars, from Mexico, in the Global Kilimanjaro Bowl in Arusha,Tanzania, on Saturday.
Drake earns historic win
In first U.S. football game in
Africa, program from Iowa
beats team from Mexico.
By LUKE MEREDITH
AP Sports Writer
JOHANNESBURG — Sepp
Blatter launched an impassioned
defense of FIFA’s integrity on Sat-
urday, insisting world soccer’s rul-
ing body was not institutionally
corrupt.
The 75-year-old FIFA president,
who is seeking re-election for a
fourthterminaJune1vote, saidhe
had not received any evidence
againstsixmembersof FIFA’sexec-
utive committee, who were last
week accused of corruption in a
votetodecidetheWorldCuphosts
for 2018and’22.
Last year, FIFAbannedsixother
officials for improper conduct in
the same bidding process for host-
ing rights following an investiga-
tionby Britishnewspaper the Sun-
day Times.
But speaking during a visit to
South Africa, Blatter said FIFA’s
ethics committee had “adequate-
ly” dealt with those problems —
andthelatest unprovenallegations
didnot constitute corruption.
“I do not accept it when some-
bodyinthisroomsaysthatFIFAisa
corrupt organization. I do not ac-
cept that,” Blatter said, raising his
voice and hammering his fist on a
table for emphasis. “FIFA is not a
corrupt organization.
“If there is no proven evidence
then it is not corruption. Our com-
mittee for ethics, they intervened
inOctoberinthemattersof sixpeo-
pleandtheymadetheadequatein-
vestigation and the adequate deci-
sions.”
Blatter’s visit included discus-
sions of the possibility of a first fe-
male member of FIFA’s executive
committee and the success of the
2010 World Cup in South Africa.
TheSwisswasregularlyapplauded
byreporters as well as delegates af-
ter meeting with leaders fromfour
of the five regional African soccer
federations.
A week ahead of his re-election
bid, the four bodies offered their
full support to Blatter inhis bidfor
re-election as president of world
football.
Blatter is being challenged by
Qatar’s Mohamed bin Hammam,
who was previously believed to
have widespread support among
Africa’s 53 national associations.
However, the continent’s all-en-
compassing Confederation of Afri-
can Football (CAF) has nowpubli-
clybackedBlatter, whohasheaded
FIFAsince1998.
Blatter, whoseappearanceat the
two-day meeting in Johannesburg
wasat short notice, saidhewasnot
campaigningfor votes.
“To be honest, I am not cam-
paigning. I amtrying to protect FI-
FA,” he said. “Stop, please, saying
FIFA is corrupt. FIFA is not cor-
rupt. Definitely not.”
The persistent corruption alle-
gations, however, will ensure the
focus leading up to the FIFApresi-
dential vote in Zurich next month
is onintegrity.
The former chairman of En-
gland’sFootball Association, David
Triesman, claimed last week dur-
inga Britishparliamentaryinquiry
that four FIFA executive commit-
tee members engaged in improper
conduct during bidding for the
2018WorldCup.
S O C C E R
FIFA has integrity,
says group’s leader
Sepp Blatter insists world
soccer’s ruling body is not
institutionally corrupt.
By GERALD IMRAY
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
FIFA’s Sepp Blatter says a whis-
tleblower fromQatar’s 2022
World Cup claims that bribes
were paid to African voters.
MOSCOW — Denis Lebedev
knocked out Roy Jones Jr. in the
final round of their non-title crui-
serweight fight in Moscow on
Saturday, handing the American
his third consecutive defeat.
With seconds remaining in the
10th round, Lebedev landed four
fierce lefts with Jones on the
ropes, where he had been for
muchof the bout. Jones, once the
world’s top pound-for-pound
fighter, bowed and shook his
head before taking one last right
hookfromthe Russianandfalling
deadweight to the canvas.
Many had predicted a much
quicker demise, but Jones man-
aged to stave off the Russian,
ranked the world’s top cruiser-
weight, with a combination of
swagger and counterattack that
has become the hallmark of this
late stage of the 42-year-old’s ca-
reer.
“I’mso happy with this win, we
put so much into this fight,” Le-
bedev said. “Jones was every-
thing we expected: quick, strong,
cheeky. ... But I pulled through.”
Jones is 54-8, while Lebedev
improved to 22-1.
“It was a great shot, I can’t take
nothing away from him,” Jones
said about the final punch that
knocked him out. “He was a
tough competitor.”
Jones, the biggest name to
have fought in Russia, said the
crowd’s reception at the Dynamo
Arena made it “one of the most
exciting bouts of my career.”
There was no title at stake, but
the win may give Lebedev a sec-
ond title shot. His only career de-
feat was a controversial points
loss against Marco Huck in Ger-
many last year.
The fight was Jones’ attempt to
salvage some glory in the twi-
light of his career. He had lost his
last two fights, against Danny
Green and Bernard Hopkins last
year. Observers have speculated
his retirement is imminent.
B O X I N G
Jones Jr.
suffers 3rd
loss in a row
By DAVID NOWAK
Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
OUTDOORS
➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
The Eastern Pennsylvania
Deaf Bass Anglers will hold
a pickerel tournament at
Harveys Lake today. Regis-
tration is at 5 a.m., and
weigh-in will be at 1 p.m. Entry
fee is $50 per boat, with an
optional $10 lunker fee.
The Factoryville Sportsmen
Club will hold its regular
monthly meeting on Wednes-
day at 7:30 p.m. at the club-
house. Those planning to
attend are advised that Lithia
Valley Road is closed at
Route 6, and to follow the
detour signs through the
town of Factoryville. Bridge
replacement at Little Rocky
Glen will keep the road closed
until November.
Co-chairmen John Grigas and
Jerry Pelka announce that
the horseshoe pits are now
open, with organized throw-
ing every Thursday at 6:30
p.m. Food, refreshments and
prizes are available to partici-
pants, and the activity is
open to the public.
Tickets for the Scholarship
Fund Raffle are still available.
Members are asked to make
their returns by the June
meeting, when the drawing
will be held. Call Paul at 561-
3748 for tickets or informa-
tion.
Nescopeck State Park will
host the following programs
in June (for information or to
register, call 403-2006):
Saturday, June 4 – PA Hiking
Week: Creekside Loop Trail
Hike, 10 a.m. to noon
Saturday, June 11 – Kayaking:
Level One, 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m.
and 1 p.m.
Sunday, June 12 – Junior Bird
Club: Cavity Nesters, 1 to 3
p.m.
Saturday, June 18 – Just for
Kids: American Beaver, 10 to
11:30 a.m.
B U L L E T I N B O A R D
The Factoryville Sportsmen
Club held its Scholastic Clay Tar-
get Shooting Challenge on May
14. Forty-six youths ranging from
9 to 17 years of age participated.
Shooters from Lehigh Valley,
Lambs Creek Mansfield, Bath
andFactoryvillecompetedonthe
100-clay target course comprised
of various target presentations.
Four teams from the Factory-
ville Sportsman Club placed in
the competition as follows:
• Rookie Class—first place.
Team: Hunter Vandorick, Mi-
chael Slowey and Jeremiah
Schwartz.
• Intermediate Advanced
Class—2nd place. Team: Kyle
Hegedty, Kyle Scala and Jericho
Hendershot
•Intermediate Entry
class—3rd place. Team: Kyle
Morgan, Nadia Davies and Greg
Tracy
•Junior Varsity Class—3rd
place. Team: Jimmy Lyons,
Casey Deaton and George
Schwartz.
The Factoryville team contin-
ues topractice at the clubinprep-
arationfor the Pennsylvania state
shoot, to be held at Rock Moun-
tain Sporting Clays, Springville,
on June 18. This annual event
brings together youth shooting
teams fromaroundthestate. Last
year at the state shoot, the team
of Jimmy Lyons, Kyle Hegedty
and Casey Deaton placed fifth
out of nineteams (27shooters) in
their class.
The coaches and team mem-
bers want to thank the Factory-
villeSportsmenClubfor theprac-
tice targets and those members
who contributed to their pro-
gram.
The coaches this year are: John
Hegedty, head coach; and assist-
ants Phil McCarthy, Butch Gor-
ko, Chet Layaou, George Heged-
ty and Rocco Grandi.
Scholastic Clay Target Shooting Challenge held
The Times Leader staff
WRIGHT TWP. – Tonya Mack-
ing waded into Wapwallopen
Creek and poured its future out of
a plastic bucket.
Inside were 50 brook trout –
each about two to three inches
long – that Macking and other
Crestwood High School students
raised during the past year as part
of the Trout in the Classroompro-
ject - a program administered by
Trout Unlimited and the Pennsyl-
vania Fish and Boat
Commission.
Under the program,
the PFBC supplies
trout eggs to participa-
ting schools. Students
care for the eggs in the
classroom, maintaining
optimal water condi-
tions for hatching and,
later, feeding and car-
ing for the trout as they
grow from fry to juve-
nile fish.
The program is in its second
year at Crestwood and students in
teacher FranGough’sscienceclass
were in charge of the fish.
And they did a remarkable job.
Last year the class reared 22
trout from 656 eggs, which isn’t
bad considering Gough said the
success for successfully rearing
trout from eggs is one to two per-
cent.
This school year, Gough’s class
successfully hatched and released
184 trout from441eggs.
“For us tohave a 30percent suc-
cess rate was way over the top,”
said Gough, who also serves on
the Trout Unlimited State Youth
Committee. “The kids were really
involved in this and committed.”
To improve this year’s results,
Gough did a little research during
the summer when he traveled to
the PFBC’s hatchery in Benner
Springs, Centre County. It was
there that Gough said he learned
about different ways to set up the
50 gallon tank where the trout are
kept and better methods to im-
prove water filtration and circula-
tion.
Gough relayed the new tech-
niques to his students, who spent
40 minutes each day cleaning the
tank and changing water.
“We had to keep everything
clean, even the stones at the bot-
tomof the tank,” said junior Brian
Filipczyk. “I enjoy trout fishing,
andit’sdefinitelyalot easier tofish
for trout than to raise them.”
The students didn’t know what
type of trout they had until after
the eggs hatched. That’s when
Macking, who is also a junior in
Gough’s class, saidtheysawanun-
deniable marking.
“We didn’t know what we had
until thetrout wereal-
most five months old
and could see the
white stripe on the
bottomof thefin, indi-
cating they were
brooktrout,” shesaid.
Last year the
Mountaintop Area
Joint Sanitary Au-
thority donated
$1,250 to Gough’s
class to purchase
equipment to start the program.
With the most expensive part out
of the way and the PFBC supply-
ing eggs and food, Gough said it
costs around $175 to conduct the
programeach year.
The sanitary authority picked
up that tab as well, and it hopes to
continue donating to the program
tokeepit goingfor the foreseeable
future.
“It’s a very worthwhile program
and we’d love to continue funding
it,” said Tom Mayka of the MAJ-
SA.
And the students would love to
continue raising trout in the class-
room.
With a remarkable 30 percent
success rate already achieved, the
bar has been raised for next year’s
program.
“We’re going for the same if not
morenext school year,” saidjunior
Ashley Hoch. “It’s amazing to
watch themgo fromeggs to being
released in a stream where they
should thrive. This program is a
good thing to get into.”
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Brian Filipczyk, Tonya Macking, Ashley Hoch and Shawn Weyhen-
meyer, from Crestwood High School, release trout into a stream.
Teens ace class
in raising trout
Crestwood students praised
for hatching and releasing 184
trout from 441 eggs.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timiesleader.com
“For us to
have a 30 per-
cent success
rate was way
over the top.”
Fran Gough
Crestwood science
teacher
Most anglers don’t need
a reason to go fishing.
But if you are one of the
few who need a little
enticement, the Penn-
sylvania Fish and Boat
Commission and Cabela’s
are offering one million
reasons to spend a day on
the water.
On Memorial Day, the
PFBC and Cabela’s are
teaming up to give anyone
a chance to fish for free
and an opportunity to
catch a prize-winning fish,
one of which might be
worth $1 million or more.
May 30 is the first of
two annual Fish for Free
Days held by the PFBC
when anyone can fish in
the state without a li-
cense. The second Fish for
Free Day will be held on
Labor Day, Sept. 5, and
the agency intentionally
scheduled each event
around a holiday weekend
to give those visiting from
out of state a chance to
fish during their vacation.
“Fish-for-Free days are a
convenient way to in-
troduce friends and family
to the sport of fishing,” said
PFBC Executive Director John
Arway. “Many families spend
the day at lakes and parks
throughout the state. Now they
can try fishing at no cost. We
know that once people try it,
particularly kids, they will see
that fishing is a great recre-
ational activity and they will
want to do it more.”
Waterways Conservation
Officer Aaron Lupacchini, who
covers southern Luzerne Coun-
ty, said the Fish for Free Days
are a good time for WCOs to
meet new and prospective
anglers and promote the sport.
“I’ll definitely be out there
talking to anglers and getting
their opinions and views, along
with assisting or answering
questions from anyone new to
the sport,” he said. “These
events have been pretty suc-
cessful over the years and they
attract vacationers as well as
kids who want to go fishing,
but their parents don’t have a
license. On these days they
don’t’ need one.”
Lupacchini recommended
Lily Lake and Lake Frances as
two public waterways that new
anglers might want to try on
Step-by-step in the tagging process to land a prize-winning fish
Step 1 A biologist
catches the appropriate
species for the contest.
Step 2 Once caught the
fish is measured and weighed.
Step 3 The fish is
tagged.
Step 4 Tag information
is recorded.
Reeling in anglers
PHOTOS COURTESY OF FISH AND GAME COMMISSION
Step 5 The fish is released back into the lake.
Free fishing days, cash rewards offered
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See FISHING , Page 15C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 15C
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Wilkes-Barre • 472-3590
May 30 because of their easy ac-
cess and good fish populations.
In his district of northern Lu-
zerne County, WCO Jim Cum-
mings said Harveys Lake usually
attracts a lot of new anglers dur-
ing the Fishfor Free days. He said
many people are inclined to take
a fishing rod to the lake with
them when they sit on the deck,
but not having a license prevents
them from doing it.
On the Fish for Free Day, that’s
not an issue.
“That’s why I see a lot of cou-
ples out fishing on these days.
Many times a boyfriend or hus-
band who already has a license
can now take their girlfriend or
wifeout fishingfor thedaytogive
the sport a try,” Cummings said.
“This really makes it easy for any-
one to give the sport a try.”
It can also turn out to be very
lucrative as well.
Cabela’s has released 1,000
tagged fish in 67 waterways
throughout 19 states. All of the
tags can be redeemed for a prize,
and one tag in particular is worth
$1 million with the potential to
increase to $2.2 million.
Pennsylvania is one of the 19
states where fish have been re-
leased. Sevenlakes andone creek
– all open to public fish – have
tagged fish, including Lake Wal-
lenpaupack in Pike and Wayne
counties, which has tagged wal-
leye and smallmouth bass.
To be eligible for the contest,
anglers have to register at the
PFBC or Cabela’s website. When
they catch a tagged fish, the suc-
cessful angler canlogontoeither
website, enter the tag number
and see which prize they won.
The contest began on May14 and
continues to July 14 and anglers
can register at any time. Accord-
ing to Matt Kettler, marketing
manager for Cabela’s, more than
60,000 anglers already have reg-
istered nationwide, including
8,100 in Pennsylvania.
Of those, seven tags already
have been redeemed in the state,
including one for a tagged small-
mouth bass caught in Lake Wal-
lenpaupack. Nationwide, 19 tags
have been redeemed but the
grand prize tag has yet to be turn-
ed in, meaning somewhere there
is a fish with a million dollar tag
waiting to be caught.
“This contest is outside of the
traditional fishing tournament,”
Kettler said. “It’s something that
the average angler can participa-
te in. So far the contest is off to a
great start andright nowit’s gear-
ing up for the summer fishing
season.”
Cummings’ previous district
included Lake Wallenpaupack
and he said it’s the perfect place
in the northeast to hold the con-
test as well as the Fish for Free
event that the PFBCis holdingon
selected waterways on May 30.
“It’s a great venue because it’s a
popular lake that sees a lot of an-
glers and you have a good num-
ber of people fromout of state va-
cationing there,” Cummings
said. The Fish for Free events in-
clude fishing tips from PFBC
staff, exhibits and free materials.
FISHING
Continued from Page 14C
director Sandy Mackay said.
“What the heck can you do?”
Jump and scream and raise the
roof about it.
It’s worked before in other
states.
Back in 2006, a vaulter named
Kristen Hafford from Warren
Hills was allowed into New Jer-
sey’s Meet of Champions after
missing three jumps in a qualify-
ing meet held under similar rainy
conditions. There were other cir-
cumstances in that particular sit-
uation, as an event official didn’t
clearly communicate Hafford’s
name, and as a result, she was
rushed through her attempts.
But inarareact of kindness, the
NewJersey State Athletic Associ-
ation allowed Hafford into that
state’s Meet of Champions.
Sothere’s precedent for making
wrong decisions turn out right.
It’s called common sense.
SOKOLOSKI
Continued from Page 1C
watched Shackleford finish
fourth in the Derby.
Shackleford’s pre-race antics
weren’t unusual. He often gets
nervous and sweats excessively,
not normally a good thing on a
day when temperatures hit the
80s in sunny Baltimore.
“He wasn’t acting that bad. It’s
ahot day, sothat wasn’t worrying
me too much. I was more con-
cerned at the quarter-pole if he
was going to hold on,” said Ro-
mans, who had one Breeders’
Cup victory and a win in the $6
million Dubai World Cup to his
credit in his long career.
“I’ve won some big races, but
none as exciting as that one,” he
said, meaning the Preakness,
where he finished second last
year with First Dude.
“For as hard as he ran in the
Derby and to come back, Dale
dida fantastic jobwithhim,” said
trainer Bob Baffert, a five-time
Preakness winner. “I’mhappy for
Dale because the poor guy ran
second last year with First Dude
and it looked like he had it won.
He did a great training job.”
Shackleford paid $27.20,
$10.20 and $6.80.
Animal Kingdom returned
$4.20 and $3.60. Astrology paid
$8 to show.
Dialed In was fourth after fin-
ishing eighth in the Derby as the
beaten favorite.
“They went fast enough early,
but then they slowed out,” train-
er Nick Zito said. “It didn’t work
out.”
Dance City was fifth, followed
by Mucho Macho Man, King
Congie and Mr. Commons. Isn’t
He Perfect was ninth, then came
Concealed Identity, Norman
Asbjornson, SwayAway, theBaff-
ert-trained Midnight Interlude
and Flashpoint.
Onceagain, fans’ hopes toseea
Triple Crown winner at long last
will have to wait until next year.
The last horse to sweep the
Derby, Preakness and Belmont
Stakes was Affirmed in1978. Big
Brown was the last to attempt a
Triple, in 2008.
Trainer GrahamMotion, full of
hope and expectation at the start
of the race, looked on glumly as
Animal Kingdom couldn’t catch
Shackleford in time.
“He ran huge. I was hoping he
was going to get there,” said Mo-
tion, who had kept the Derby
winner at his stable 60 miles
away in the Maryland country-
side until race morning.
Shaking off his jitters, Shackle-
ford broke alertly, as did another
speedy horse, Flashpoint. They
dueled through a quick opening
quarter-mile of 22.69 seconds,
just a fifth of a second off the
Preakness record.
“It was fast, but he kind of
pulled everyone else out of the
race,” Romans said.
As they sped along, Animal
Kingdom and Dialed In, the sec-
ond favorite, were running at the
back of the 14-horse field.
“I kindof hadtohustle himout
of there,” said John Velazquez,
riding Animal Kingdom. “We
lost a lot of ground in the first
turn.”
Velazquez tore through multi-
ple sets of goggles as the dirt
kicked back into Animal King-
dom’s face, which he clearly
didn’t like.
“He broke so far back the dirt
started hitting him,” the jockey
said. “He had to make up too
much ground.”
Castanon was able to get
Shackleford to relax into a com-
fortable rhythm as the pace
slowed going down the back-
stretch. That proved to be a key
moment.
“That kind of hurt us,” Motion
said. “That middle quarter really
affected the outcome of the
race.”
Midwaythroughthe final turn,
Flashpoint gave up, leaving
Shackleford as the lone target for
the closers. Animal Kingdom
started to pick up the pace enter-
ing the final turn. Unlike in the
Derby, he couldn’t find a clear
path and Velazquez had to pick
his way around traffic to get to
the outside.
“I can’t believe what Johnny
weaved through the last three-
eighths of a mile,” Motion said.
“But he was coming and coming.
I’m not sure what is better, if we
were that close or to be beaten
further.”
At the top of the stretch, Ani-
mal Kingdom emerged as the
main threat to Shackleford. He
passed horses in pursuit of the
leader while Astrology made a
strong run along the rail.
“I felt somebody coming at the
sixteenth-pole,” Castanon said.
“I knew that Animal Kingdom
was the only horse who was able
to come get me.”
He andAstrology hadShackle-
ford in their sights, but the win-
ner refused to give up through
the long run to the finish line.
Shackleford’s victory, along
with his participation in the
Fountain of Youth Stakes and a
top-three finish in the Florida
Derby, netted bonuses for the
owners and trainer.
Michael Lauffer andW.D. Cub-
bedge walkedaway with$1.1mil-
lion, including the $600,000
Preakness winner’s purse and a
$500,000 bonus. Romans earned
$50,000 in bonus money.
The biggest bonus went un-
paid. Dialed In could have won
$5.1 million if he had finished
first, including$5millionfor run-
ning in the Holy Bull Stakes and
winning the Florida Derby.
AP PHOTO
Shackleford (5), ridden by Jesus Castanon, moves through the finish line to win the 136th Preakness Stakes horse race at Pimlico
Race Course, Saturday. Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom, behind, ridden by John Velazquez, took second place.
PREAKNESS
Continued from Page 1C
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. — Bill
Tierney has beenhere before. His
Denver Pioneers haven’t.
Denver upset nine-time NCAA
lacrosse tournament champion
Johns Hopkins 14-9 Saturday to
reach the national semifinals for
the first time in school history.
“We’re not going there just be-
ing happy to play in it,” said Tier-
ney, whotookPrincetontosixna-
tional titles, startingin1992. “Not
tojinxtheguys, but it remindsme
so much of ’92.
“I used to tell people in ’92 ‘We
werecute.’ Wewerekindof every-
body’s favorite because they
knew it was going to be one shot
and we were out of there. Our
idea is this is the beginning of a
program.”
The Pioneers will play Virginia
in Baltimore with a spot in the ti-
tle game at stake. No school from
outside the Eastern time zone
has ever won the title, and Den-
ver only won its first tournament
game earlier this season.
Todd Baxter and Cameron
Flint each scored three goals for
the Pioneers (15-2). Goalie Jamie
Faus made eight saves.
Kyle Wharton scored three
goalsfor Hopkins, whichlast won
the NCAA tournament in 2007.
Coach Dave Pietramala said the
Blue Jays didn’t respect Denver
“It was very obvious that they
were a very good team,” Pietra-
mala said. “We just got beat to-
day.
“We dug ourselves too big a
hole. You can’t come back like
that. We spent so much energy
trying to come back and just
when we closed the gap, they get
one or two. Now you got to fight
back again.”
Tierney is in his second season
with the Pioneers after coaching
the Tigers from1988-2009.
C O L L E G E L A C R O S S E
Denver upsets Johns Hopkins to reach semifinals
The Associated Press
BALTIMORE — After Shackle-
ford lost the lead and finished
fourth in the Kentucky Derby,
trainer Dale Romans never
thought twice about giving Jesus
Castanona secondchancetowina
Triple Crown race.
At the Preakness on Saturday,
thetalentedjockeyjustifiedthede-
cision with an outstanding ride
that producedastunningupset vic-
tory.
Castanon kept Shackleford near
the front for muchof the race, then
heldoff alatechargebyDerby-win-
ner Animal Kingdom to win his
first Triple Crown race. When he
reached the finish line, Castanon
thought immediately about his fa-
ther, who died in November.
“It was very emotional,” Casta-
non said. “I know he was up there
watching me.”
At that point, Castanon became
chokedupandcouldn’tcontinueto
speak.
“It totallymeansalot,”hesaidof
the victory. “My dad used to have
horses in Mexico and that’s how I
became a jockey.”
And now he’s a Triple Crown
race winner. Castanon couldn’t
hold the lead in the Derby, but Ro-
mansknewtherewasnoonebetter
to ride his horse.
“If you ask anyone, they will tell
you he is one of the best riders we
have on the back side,” Romans
said of Castanon. “He’s like a crit-
ically acclaimed movie that didn’t
make it as a big hit. Everyone
knows hehas thetalent; hegaveus
the best chance to win a classic
race.”
In the Derby, Shackleford led
from the start before fading to
fourth. Inthe Preakness, Castanon
settled in behind pacesetting
Flashpoint, took the lead at the
back stretch and wouldn’t relin-
quish it.
“I knew that Animal Kingdom
was theonlyhorsewhowas ableto
get me,” Castanon said.
Twoweeks earlier, Animal King-
domcaught up to Shackleford.
Thistime, Castanonwouldn’t be
denied.
One year earlier, Romans sur-
prised almost everyone at the
Preaknessbyfinishingsecondwith
First Dude and sixth with Paddy
O’Prado. Intheencore, hedideven
better.
“It’s unbelievable. It’s phenom-
enal,” Romans said. “We had a lot
of claiming horses, the cheapest of
thecheap. If youkeepdoingit long
enough and you get the right
horses in your hands, anybody can
do it. It just takes everybody work-
ing together to get this done.”
AP PHOTO
Jesus Castanon reacts aboard Shackleford after winning the
136th Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course, on Saturday,.
Rider justifies decision
for a second chance
By DAVID GINSBURG
AP Sports Writer
C M Y K
PAGE 16C SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 76/50
Average 73/50
Record High 92 in 1934
Record Low 30 in 2002
Yesterday 0
Month to date 3
Year to date 15
Last year to date 35
Normal year to date 24
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was above 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00”
Month to date 3.14”
Normal month to date 2.47”
Year to date 20.09”
Normal year to date 12.98”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 12.86 4.06 22.0
Towanda 8.92 2.03 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 7.67 -0.44 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 70-75. Lows: 55-60. Mostly cloudy,
scattered showers in the afternoon.
The Poconos
Highs: 63-71. Lows: 56-62. Mostly cloudy
today, chance of showers late.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 75-80. Lows: 58-63. Cloudy,
scattered showers and thunderstorms.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 77-83. Lows: 59-60. Cloudy, chance
of scattered showers late.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 75-81. Lows: 62-66. Mostly cloudy,
chance of showers late.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 58/38/.00 56/42/sh 58/41/sh
Atlanta 89/65/.00 91/68/pc 89/65/pc
Baltimore 82/53/.00 85/64/t 87/65/sh
Boston 62/52/.00 56/49/c 65/59/sh
Buffalo 70/50/.00 77/63/t 79/62/t
Charlotte 85/55/.00 91/66/t 91/67/sh
Chicago 74/50/.01 84/63/t 81/49/sh
Cleveland 77/52/.00 81/64/t 82/56/sh
Dallas 87/60/.00 90/68/t 90/72/pc
Denver 68/44/.00 76/50/pc 67/46/t
Detroit 75/53/.00 77/64/t 77/61/sh
Honolulu 84/74/.01 88/75/s 88/74/s
Houston 87/73/.00 92/76/pc 92/76/pc
Indianapolis 80/62/.02 84/67/t 82/65/t
Las Vegas 88/64/.00 86/67/pc 83/64/pc
Los Angeles 66/56/.00 64/55/pc 65/55/s
Miami 90/77/.00 87/77/s 86/76/s
Milwaukee 63/48/.33 76/61/t 74/43/sh
Minneapolis 71/61/1.33 74/56/t 68/42/sh
Myrtle Beach 82/66/.00 82/70/s 86/69/pc
Nashville 88/61/.08 88/67/t 86/68/t
New Orleans 90/76/.00 87/74/pc 88/73/pc
Norfolk 75/61/.00 86/67/pc 89/70/sh
Oklahoma City 89/57/.00 87/69/t 86/64/t
Omaha 77/63/.08 81/57/pc 78/53/t
Orlando 94/71/.00 93/71/s 91/72/s
Phoenix 91/67/.00 92/70/pc 90/65/pc
Pittsburgh 79/50/.00 82/63/t 82/62/t
Portland, Ore. 60/50/.01 63/47/c 61/47/sh
St. Louis 84/66/.03 88/69/t 83/66/t
Salt Lake City 68/48/.00 69/49/sh 60/47/sh
San Antonio 90/74/.00 93/76/pc 95/73/pc
San Diego 68/62/.00 65/58/pc 66/56/s
San Francisco 62/53/.00 64/48/pc 63/48/s
Seattle 53/48/.02 59/48/c 60/48/sh
Tampa 89/70/.00 92/71/s 93/73/s
Tucson 89/56/.00 91/64/s 91/62/s
Washington, DC 81/57/.00 87/66/t 89/66/sh
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 70/46/.00 63/54/pc 64/52/pc
Baghdad 104/77/.00 101/79/s 95/78/s
Beijing 79/48/.00 86/62/s 85/58/pc
Berlin 73/55/.00 82/55/t 68/50/pc
Buenos Aires 73/57/.00 73/52/s 66/54/pc
Dublin 61/39/.00 57/45/sh 61/43/sh
Frankfurt 79/55/.00 79/46/c 72/50/pc
Hong Kong 88/77/.00 84/79/t 85/76/t
Jerusalem 81/57/.00 83/62/s 88/55/s
London 70/46/.00 61/46/pc 64/50/pc
Mexico City 86/63/.00 83/59/t 87/58/t
Montreal 75/59/.00 73/58/sh 78/60/t
Moscow 73/52/.00 68/45/pc 70/48/s
Paris 77/45/.00 70/45/pc 73/52/pc
Rio de Janeiro 79/63/.00 78/66/s 79/67/s
Riyadh 106/84/.00 105/88/pc 103/87/c
Rome 79/55/.00 77/57/t 75/56/pc
San Juan 86/69/.02 83/72/t 85/73/t
Tokyo 77/68/.00 77/61/sh 67/60/sh
Warsaw 77/59/.04 82/57/t 75/46/t
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
75/60
Reading
80/61
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
74/60
75/59
Harrisburg
83/63
Atlantic City
70/60
New York City
66/55
Syracuse
80/63
Pottsville
77/59
Albany
74/57
Binghamton
Towanda
75/58
75/58
State College
82/60
Poughkeepsie
70/52
90/68
84/63
76/50
90/61
74/56
64/55
62/50 84/65
64/46
59/48
66/55
77/64
91/68
87/77
92/76
88/75
60/44
56/42
87/66
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:39a 8:22p
Tomorrow 5:39a 8:23p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 12:18a 10:40a
Tomorrow 12:49a 11:43a
Last New First Full
May 24 June 1 June 8 June 15
After a fair
amount of sun-
shine yesterday,
the clouds will
return today. A
weak warm front
is moving in
from the west,
and that may
spark a few
showers later
today. Before the
showers arrive,
temperatures
should reach
into the mid 70s.
More showers
continue to dot
the forecast with
the threat for
rain each and
every day this
week. The
weather pattern
is setting up to
allow a stream of
moisture to pour
into the region
through mid-
week. But along
with that we get
some warm air,
as highs top out
in the 80s early
on in the week.
-Ryan Coyle
NATIONAL FORECAST: Widespread thunderstorms will be likely across the eastern United States.
Some storms from northern Texas to the Mississippi River and the Ohio River Valley could be strong
to severe. The Gulf and Atlantic Coast will likely stay dry. To the west, showers and possible thunder-
storms will be scattered across the Intermountain West.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Cooling Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Clouds return,
afternoon shower
MONDAY
Partly
sunny,
T-storms
83°
58°
WEDNESDAY
Partly
sunny,
shower
80°
58°
THURSDAY
Mostly
cloudy,
shower
75°
57°
FRIDAY
Periods
of light
rain
75°
57°
SATURDAY
Mostly
cloudy,
showers
80°
59°
TUESDAY
Partly
sunny,
shower
83°
62°
75
°
54
°
C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011
timesleader.com
BREAKUP FEES HAVE BEEN on my
mind lately, and I’m not referring to
what it may cost the Governator to end
his marriage to Maria Shriver.
Breakup fees, which in legalese are
termination fees, are a part of many
corporate acquisitions. They’re the
price for walking away from a deal.
You can see why buyers and sellers
want them. Who wants to spend all
that time evaluating and negotiating a
deal if the buyer can’t close it or the
seller opts for a better offer from some-
one else?
Because mergers and acquisitions
have picked up significantly this year, I
couldn’t help noticing the size of break-
up fees that are being written into the
legal documents.
For example, Stryker Corp. agreed to
buy Malvern’s Orthovita Inc. for $316
million, or $3.85 a share. Should the
deal, which is expected to close by
June 30, not happen, Orthovita would
be required to fork over $9,891,604.
That seems like a peculiar number
until you realize that termination fees
are usually determined by a percentage
of the overall transaction value. Simple
division tells us the breakup fee is 3.1
percent of transaction value of the
pending purchase of biomaterials-
maker Orthovita.
According to the investment banking
firm Houlihan Lokey, which annually
studies termination fees, the average
breakup fee was 3.5 percent in 2009.
Breakup fees ranged from 0.7 percent
to 7.6 percent during that year, the
most recent the firm studied.
So the bigger the deal, the bigger the
breakup fee.
Johnson & Johnson announced in
late April that it would gobble up Syn-
thes Inc. for $21.3 billion in cash and
stock. The breakup fee that was nego-
tiated is $650 million, or 3 percent of
the transaction value.
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.
is buying Frazer’s Cephalon Inc. for
$6.8 billion, or $81.50 a share. That
breakup fee is $275 million, or 4 per-
cent of the deal value. The higher per-
centage is probably warranted given
that Cephalon was fleeing an unwanted
suitor in Valeant Pharmaceuticals In-
ternational.
The other big-ticket local deal this
year is eBay Inc.’s pending $2.4 billion
purchase of King of Prussia’s GSI Com-
merce Inc. The $74 million breakup fee
is 3.1 percent of the deal value.
In April, debt-strained Tasty Baking
Co. found its rescuer in Flowers Foods
Inc., which agreed to buy the Philadel-
phia snack-foods baker for $34.5 mil-
lion. A normal 3 percent breakup fee
would be $1.04 million. But a desperate
Tasty Baking would pay $3.8 million,
or a whopping 11 percent of the trans-
action value.
I don’t know why breakup fees in-
trigue me. The money rarely changes
hands. Of the 99 transactions Houlihan
Lokey reviewed in 2009, only nine
deals did not close. Of those, only five
involved the payment of breakup fees.
Sometimes, that payoff can be quite
large. In 2008, Penn National Gaming
Inc. received $225 million from private-
equity firms that dropped plans for a
buyout of the Wyomissing, Pa., oper-
ator of racinos and casinos. Penn Na-
tional also got what amounted to a
$1.25 billion interest-free loan from
those nonbuyers.
What were the odds of hitting that
jackpot?
MIKE ARMSTRONG
F I N A N C I A L A D V I S O R
Big breakups
mean even
bigger fees
Contact columnist Mike Armstrong at 215-
854-2980 or marmstrongphillynews.com.
See his blog at www.phillyinc.biz.
CVSHASHOPPEDon
boardthe gas discount
train.
The pharmacy has a
twist onthe cents off a
gallondeal other retail-
ers, includingWeis,
Turkey Hill andPrice
Chopper, have beenofferingfor some
time. Startingthis week, if youbuy $30or
more of qualifyingpurchases andyouuse
your Extra Care card, you’ll get a coupon
printedonyour receipt that canbe re-
deemedfor a $10gas gift card. There is a
limit of one couponper weekper CVS
card.
The items deemed“qualifying” pur-
chases appear onthe front andbackpages
of the CVScircular foundintoday’s Times
Leader. See the store for complete details.
It’s gardeningtime andthat means
dirty hands andfinger nails, or cuts from
those thorny rose bushes. Unless, of
course, youwear gloves. Headtoyour
local Ace Hardware throughMay 31and
get a pair of women’s leather gardening
gloves. They’re onsale for $2.99and
there’s anin-store rebate formyoucanfill
out andmail intoget your entire pur-
chase price back. Gotohttp://acehard-
ware.shoplocal.com/acehardwarecircular
andviewthe circular for details andthe
item’s number.
Print this couponout andheadtoOld
Navy toget 15percent off andsingle item,
excludingclearance items. Youcanonly
use one couponper transactionbut it says
nothingabout howmany times youcan
use it ina day: http://cdn.oldna-
vyapps.com/fb/tab/may_baby_cou-
pon_index. The couponis goodthrough
Thursday.
Hey Phillies fans! Want a free Phillies
jersey? This monthYokohama is giving
away Phillies jerseys toany customer that
buys a set of four Yokohama tires from
JackWilliams. The deal runs through
June12but supplies are limited. Call your
local JackWilliams for more info.
Thomas’ Foodtownmarkets inDallas,
Hazleton, Shavertown, Kingstonand
Tunkhannockare offeringsenior citizens
aneight percent discount this Tuesday.
Milk, cigarettes, lottery tickets anda
handful of other items are not includedin
the offer.
Typically I’dreserve the final portionof
my columntothe best use of coupons
foundintoday’s Times Leader at local
retailers, but the best deal requires no
coupon.
HeadtoPrice Chopper tostockupon
your Memorial Day hot dogandham-
burger supply. Hatfieldmeat franks are on
sale, buy-one, get-twofree. If Oscar Mayer
is your brand, that’s OK. All varieties of
beef franks are buy-one, get-one free. And
a 24-ounce boxof Holtonbrandquarter-
poundbeef patties are buy-one, get-one
free.
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
CVS now offering gas discounts along with Turkey Hill, Price Chopper and Weis
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If
you know of any local steals or deals, send
them to aseder@timesleader.com.
P
LAINSTOWNSHIP—After sevenyears of tinkeringwithrecipes andper fect-
ingtheir brew, theowners of theBreaker BrewingCompanyarereadytomove
out of a basement and set up shop in a former church.
Chris Miller of Plains Township and Mark Lehman of Hanover Township
have pouredmuchof their free time andeffort totake a hobby of brewingbeer
first in Miller’s kitchen, then in his basement, to establishing a small business. The result is
that thepair’s uniqueflavorful beers arenowontapat several areabars andrestaurants anda
growing demand for themto brewmore.
That has led them to the
next logical step, and it’s not
Miller’s garage. They’re look-
ingtoexpandtheir brewingca-
pacity by buying and moving
into a larger location with
enough space not only brew
more beer but also enough
space so they can also open a
restaurant and gift shop.
During their search for that optimumlocation, one
spot has stood out to them: the former St. Joseph
Churchproperty at 783 E. NorthamptonSt. inWilkes-
Barre Township. The propertyhas twobuildings onit,
the former church and its school.
Sharing the same dream, Miller and Lehman said
the former church will be renovated into a family ori-
ented restaurant and gift shop whose atmosphere will
be centered on the Wyoming Valley’s rich coal mining
history.
“What I liketotell peopleis pictureafancygift shop,
likeamuseumgift shop, witharestaurant andbrewery
on site,” Miller said.
The former school will be used as the brewery giv-
ing themmore roomto meet their growing demands.
The simple but sturdy structure of the buildings along
with its central location and ample parking attracted
them, Lehman said.
“We heard the property was
going up for sale through some
friends,” Lehman said.
The move to expand would
give the two entrepreneurs the
ability to meet requests for
their product in two other east-
ern Pennsylvania markets.
“Wehadalot of inquiresfrom
bars and restaurants in Allentown and Philadelphia,”
Miller said. “But we need more space before commit-
ting ourselves.”
LookingaroundMiller’ssmall crowdedbasement, it
is easy to understand the need for a larger space.
White bags of varieties of oats, wheat, and hops are
stacked about 4-feet tall. A portion of the basement is
divided into cooling and fermenting rooms, while a
keg cleaner is on the opposite wall.
Their amber ales and darker malts are gaining pop-
ularity. Currently, they are providing their products to
Elmer Suds in Wilkes-Barre and Grotto Pizza at Har-
veys Lake, to name a few.
The restaurant, they believe, is a natural transition
and would be a welcomed amenity for the area. Leh-
man, a father of three, said the restaurant would be a
family-oriented facility, which would offer creative
foods as well as regular favorites for children.
Thenegotiations onpurchasingthechurchbuilding
areongoing, but Miller saidit’s lookinggood. Hesaida
closing could occur later this week.
BothMiller andLehmanare pleasedwithhowtheir
business, which started as a hobby, has grown. They
attributetheirrecipeforsuccesstohardwork, thinking
outsideof thebox, anddetermination. All, it shouldbe
noted, are traits of workers fromthe coal mining era.
The two longtime friends started their business in
Breaker Brewing tastes success
By EILEEN GODIN Times Leader Correspondent
See BREAKER, Page 3D
Lehman, a father of three,
said the restaurant would be a
family-oriented facility, which
would offer creative foods as
well as regular favorites for
children.
A pint of Breaker Brewing Company Pale Ale.
Chris Miller, left, and Mark Lehman stand in Miller’s house in Plains Township where they brew13 different kinds of beer for their Breaker Brew-
ing Company, which is found on tap at several taverns throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania.
S.JOHN WILKIN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Real Estate Briefs
–– Prepared by The Times Leader Advertising Department
ATLAS REALTYMAKES DONATION
FOR RESTORATION OF THE
PITTSTONAREASTAR
The former Stauffer Heights star was disassembled
and relocated to the grounds of Pittston Area High
School and restored by members of the Pittston
Area Honor Society. In order to assist in the fund-
ing of the project, the realtors of Atlas Realty do-
nated a portion of their commission from sales in
the Pittston Area School District.
Pictured are John Haas (Principal), Joyce Salve (National Honor Society Advisor), An-
thony Guariglia, Vincent Riggi, David McLean, John Lombardo, and John Poli, Honor
Society members being presented with a check from Charles Adonizio, Atlas Realty Bro-
ker along with Realtors Tom Salvaggio, Colleen Turant, Joseph Caprari, Michele Reap,
Keri Best, Fred Mecadon, Melissa Hudzinski, Phil Semenza, Nancy Bohn, Terry Guasto,
Angie Dessoye and Luann Sperrazza. Absent from photo: Bill Williams, Glen Gubitose,
Julio Caprari, and Kim Reilly.
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber:
Networking Mixer
The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
will hold a Networking Mixer
from 5-7 p.m. on Thursday, May
26 at Mr. Tony’s Martini Bar and
Restaurant, 70 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Attendance is free
for chamber members.
Reservations are required. To
reserve, contact Jean Kile at
823-2101 ext. 1 13 or by email at
jeankile@wilkes-barre.org.
Building Industry Association:
Annual Breakfast
The Building Industry Association
of Northeastern Pennsylvania
(BIA of NEPA) will hold its 5th
Annual Legislative Breakfast at
7:30 a.m. on Friday, May 27 at
The Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-
Barre. Cost is $15 per person.
The meeting agenda will include
discussion of the important
issues affecting the housing
industry.
Reservations are required. To
reserve, call 287-3331.
Greater Hazleton Chamber: Red
Carpet Breakfast
The Greater Hazleton Chamber of
Commerce will hold its monthly
Red Carpet Breakfast on
Wednesday, June 1 from 7:45-9
a.m. at Lobitz Catering, 1090
State Route 940, Hazleton. The
breakfast program is sponsored
by St. Luke Village, a Consulate
Health Care Facility. Cost is $15
for members or $20 for non
members.
Guest speaker will be State Repre-
sentative Tarah Toohil, 1 16th
District.
For a reservation, contact the
chamber office at 455-1509 or
register online at www.hazle-
tonchamber.org by Friday, May
27.
MAEA CEO Roundtable
The Northeast Pennsylvania Manu-
facturers and Employers Associ-
ation will hold a CEO Roundtable
from1 1 a.m.-1 p.m. on Thursday,
June 2 at the Top of the 80’s,
Hazleton. Lunch will be served at
noon. Cost is $36 per person for
members or $72 per person for
non-members.
Atty. Jill M. Lashay, of Buchanan,
Ingersoll, and Rooney, PC, will
give a presentation on new
developments regarding the
implementation of the Patient
Protection and Affordable Care
Act, the impact currently being
felt by the implementation of
this Act, and what American
employers and their workforces
can expect in the next year.
Specifically, Lashay will discuss
how provisions, effective in 201 1,
have directly impacted employ-
ers and their benefit plans; what
legislative proposals are being
advanced to modify or roll-back
the provisions of the Act; what
can employers expect beyond
201 1, and how employers can
manage their compliance obliga-
tions.
For more information or to register,
contact Darlene Robbins at
622-0992or by email at drob-
bins@maea.biz.
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber:
Networking Mixer
The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
will hold a Networking Mixer
from 5-7 p.m. on Friday, June 3
at Franklin Security Bank, 1065
Highway 315, Plains Township.
Attendance is free for Chamber
members.
Reservations are required prior to
the event. To reserve, contact
Jean Kile at 823-2101 ext. 1 13 or
by email at jeankile@wilkes-
barre.org.
BUSINESS AGENDA
TimO’Donnell, a registered profes-
sional engineer and president of
the Pennsylvania Waste Industri-
es Association
(PWIA), recent-
ly received a
Special Gover-
nor’s Award
fromthe Na-
tional Solid
Wastes Man-
agement
Association.
The award
recognizes O’Donnell’s five-year
record of outstanding service as
PWIA president, during which he
fought against trash taxes, pro-
moted free-market waste solu-
tions, publicized the industry’s
contributions to the Pennsylva-
nia economy, and helped orga-
nize two first-ever events, the
Pennsylvania Recycling Industri-
es Congress and the Philadelphia
Recycling Industries Congress.
Terry Wise, associate professor of
sports and recreation manage-
ment at Keys-
tone College,
was recently
named the
201 1 recipient
of the Marga-
retta Belin
Chamberlin
Chair Award
for Distin-
guished Faculty Service. The
award, established by the family
and friends of the late Margaret-
ta Belin Chamberlin, Keystone’s
sixth president, commemorates
her leadership and many ac-
complishments at the college. It
is presented annually to a faculty
member for outstanding
achievement in teaching, profes-
sional development, and contri-
butions to the Keystone commu-
nity. Wise is the thirty-second
recipient of the award.
James H. Van Wert Jr., a financial
advisor at Cross Valley Federal
Credit Union who is registered
through CUNA Brokerage Ser-
vices, Inc., was recently named to
CUNA’s Senior Advisor Lead-
ership Team. The distinction is
awarded to a limited number of
financial advisors who demon-
strate exceptional sales produc-
tivity success, leadership within
their credit union and peer
groups, and have a specific
seniority within the broker-
dealer. Van Wert is responsible
for being an ambassador for the
organization and for advisers
around the country.
Pennsylvania’s Center for Trade
Development recently earned
the President’s “E” Award for
making significant contributions
to the national export expansion
effort and creating American
jobs. The center was recognized
for demonstrating a sustained
commitment to export expansion
and its impressive performance
measures to chart the growth of
clients. The center, housed within
the Department of Community
and Economic Development’s
Office of International Business
Development, helps Pennsylva-
nia exporters expand their reach,
capacity and capability to sell
into newmarkets by providing
clients with access to market
research, partner search ser-
vices, grants, and a full schedule
of international trade shows and
missions.
Barbara Moody, sales manager in
Mortgage Network’s Clarks
Summit office, was recently
named
Affiliate of
the Year by
the Greater
Scranton
Board of
Realtors. She
has been an
active partic-
ipant in the
mortgage
financing industry in Lackawan-
na County for the past 14 years
and has partnered with many
local realtors to bring the dream
of home ownership to thousands
of first time homebuyers.
Brian Oram, Wilkes University’s
director of environmental engi-
neering and earth science, was
recently
awarded the
201 1 Stanley
M. Sowa, Jr.
Conserva-
tionist of the
Year Award.
The annual
award, pre-
sented by
the Luzerne
Conservation District, honors
individuals or organizations that
have made meaningful contribu-
tions to the conservation of land
and water resources in Luzerne
County.
Community Medical Center re-
cently earned the Joint Commis-
sion’s Gold Seal of Approval for
accreditation by demonstrating
compliance with the Joint Com-
mission’s national standards for
health care quality and safety in
hospitals. The Scranton hospital
was evaluated on standards of
care specific to the needs of
patients, including infection
prevention, control, leadership
and medication management.
The State Correctional Institute,
Waymart, was recently named a
finalist for the 201 1 Secretary of
Defense Employer Support
FreedomAward. The Freedom
Award, the Department of De-
fense’s highest recognition, is
given to employers for excep-
tional support of their employees
serving in the Guard and Re-
serve. The State Correctional
Institute, Waymart, is one of only
30 finalists selected from4,049
nominations received earlier this
year fromGuard and Reserve
service members or their fam-
ilies.
Mike Detter, of Hinerfeld Commer-
cial Real Estate, Scranton, re-
cently achieved the SIOR office
designation fromthe Society of
Industrial and Office Realtors, a
Washington, DC-based interna-
tional professional organization
of 3,000 commercial real estate
professionals. To achieve the
SIOR designation, Detter com-
pleted at least five years of
creditable experience in the
highly specialized field of office
real estate; met stringent educa-
tion requirements; and demon-
strated to SIOR professional
ability, competency, ethical con-
duct, and personal integrity. He is
nowone of only two SIOR’s in
Northeastern Pennsylvania.
Robert W. Munley III, a partner in
the regional lawfirmof Munley,
Munley & Cartwright, recently
earned the
distinctive
classification as
an “AV Rated
Attorney” by
Martindale-
Hubbell, the
authoritative
resource for
information on
the worldwide
legal profession. Munley’s “AV
Preeminent” certification is a
peer rating acknowledging his
legal skill set and is the highest
professional rating an attorney
can attain.
Choice One Community Federal
Credit Union, Wilkes-Barre,
recently received an Honorable
Mention in the Pennsylvania
Credit Union Association’s An-
nual Publications and Website
Awards. The awards honor out-
standing achievement in market-
ing efforts by credit unions for
their annual reports, newsletters,
and websites.
Julie McKelvey, owner of Miracle-
Ear Center, Wilkes-Barre, recently
earned the 2010 PlatinumClub
Award fromthe Miracle-Ear
franchise organization. The
award is presented to the top
franchisees for achievement in
adhering to compliance stan-
dards and excelling in four
weighted sales performance
categories.
BUSINESS AWARDS
O’Donnell
Wise
Moody
Oram
Munley
BORTON LAWSON
The local architectural engineering
and design firm recently an-
nounced the hiring of two new
employees.
Shannon Lord is an associate CAD
operator in the firm’s Civil Busi-
ness Unit. She will be based in
the firm’s Towanda office.
Lord was previously employed by
Bradford County Conservation
District as a private contractor
and pilot designer responsible
for GIS map-
ping, AutoCAD
operation and
technical
reporting.
James Kovalik is
a surveyor. He
will be based
in the firm’s
Wilkes-Barre
office.
Kovalik holds a bachelor’s degree
in surveying engineering from
Penn State Wilkes-Barre. He has
completed internships with
PennDOT District 4-0 and RCN
and has a working knowledge of
plane and boundary surveying
techniques.
DELUCA FRIGOLETTO
ADVERTISING INC.
Jeremie Musyt, Olyphant, was
recently promoted to the posi-
tion of creative director at the
Scranton agency.
Musyt joined the company in 2005
as a designer and has since
become an integral part in the
company’s creative department.
He has helped the agency com-
pete head-to-head with the
largest ad agencies in the na-
tion.
Musyt holds a degree in advertis-
ing design and graphic design
from Kutztown
University. He
serves on the
Board of Direc-
tor’s of the
American Ad-
vertising Feder-
ation of North-
east PA and
teaches ad-
vertising and graphic design at
Luzerne County Community
College.
THE HONESDALE NATIONAL
BANK
Richard C. Simmers, Mount Cobb,
was recently promoted to assist-
ant vice president and resi-
dential mortgage manager in
the bank’s HNB Mortgage Cen-
ter, Wilkes-Barre. He is respon-
sible for management of the
operations, including the proc-
essing, underwriting, closing
and servicing of residential
mortgages.
Simmers, who has been with the
bank since 2007, holds a bache-
lor’s degree in social science
from Wilkes College. He serves
on the Board of Directors of the
Mortgage Bankers Association
of NEPA and on the Board of
Governors of the PA Mortgage
Bankers Association.
CORPORATE
LADDER
Lord Musyt
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 3D
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WE SALUTE YOU.
LT. EDWARD A. DAUKSIS,
BRANCH:
Army
RANK:
Former Sgt. First Class,
recieved a battlefield
commission as Lieutenant
in Korea
YEARS SERVED:
21 - Enlisted in 1948
WAR FOUGHT:
Korean War
PARTICIPATED IN:
The Inchon landing,
Wonson landing and
Hungnam evacuation.
HIGH SCHOOL:
Graduated from Shickshinny
High School
EDWARD A.
DAY (DAUKSIS)
NUMBER
ONE
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NNEEWWWSSS NEWS
N RN IN LUZERN
A NEW JOKE IN
THE TIMES LEADER
EVERY SATURDAY.
JOKE OF THE WEEK:
JOKE OF THE WEEK:
Tell us your joke and mail this ad to: The Times Leader, Joke of the Week, 15 N. Main St.
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He beat the egg!
This week’s joke from: Madyson Pendolphi of Shavertown.
SATURDAY’S PUNCHLINE:
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Blue Cross NEPA honored
During the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association’s recent
national conference, Blue Cross of Northeastern Penn-
sylvania was recognized for using innovative speech ana-
lytics software to improve the customer experience and
raise first-call resolution rates in its call center. BCNEPA’s
project received honorable mention in the Customer Expe-
rience awards category. This was the third straight year
that BCNEPA received one of the association’s prestigious
Member Touchpoint Measures Best Practice Awards for
customer service. Pictured, from left, with the award are
Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania officials Brian
Rinker, senior vice president and chief administrative offi-
cer; John Sanders, director of performance improvement;
Cathy Stitzer, senior director of member services and De-
nise S. Cesare, president and CEO.
CLAYTON, Mo. —Rashonda
Thornton looked up at the me-
nu on the wall, ordered a Cae-
sar salad and dropped a $10 bill
in a box. Pretty generous, con-
sidering the meal at Panera
Bread Co.’s café in the St. Louis
suburb of Clayton sells for less
than $7.
It was a year ago that Panera
converted the Clayton restau-
rant into a nonprofit pay-what-
you-want restaurant with the
idea of helping to feed the
needy and raising money for
charitable work. Panera foun-
der and Chairman Ronald
Shaich said the café, operated
through Panera’s charitable
foundation, has been a big suc-
cess, largely because of people
like Thornton.
“Sometimes you can give
more, and sometimes you can
give less,” said Thornton, a
teacher’s assistant. “Today was
one of my ‘more’ days.”
Panera, based in suburban St.
Louis, has long been involved
in charitable giving, donating
millions of dollars and giving
away leftover food to the needy.
But Shaich sought more direct
involvement.
“We were doing this for our-
selves to see if we could make a
difference with our own hands,
not just write a check, but real-
ly make a contribution to the
community in a real, substan-
tive way,” Shaich told The As-
sociated Press.
What developed was the
largest example yet of a con-
cept called community kitch-
ens, where businesses operate
partly as charities. Panera’s
success in Clayton has led it to
open two similar cafes — one
in the Detroit suburb of Dear-
born, Mich., and one in Por-
tland, Ore. It plans to add a new
one every three months or so.
The majority of patrons pay
retail value or more. Statistics
provided by Panera indicate
that roughly 60 percent leave
the suggested amount; 20 per-
cent leave more; and 20 percent
less. One person paid $500 for a
meal, the largest single pay-
ment.
“From the day it opened, the
community has just gotten
stronger and stronger in their
support of this,” Shaich said.
“They got that this was a café of
shared responsibility.”
The Clayton restaurant
could pass for any of Panera’s
nearly 1,500 cafes. Soft jazz
plays as people chat quietly.
Men in suits sit at a table next
to women in tank tops. Fresh
breads and pastries entice from
behind a glass counter. The
smell of coffee fills the air.
The biggest difference is at
the checkout. The menu board
lists “suggested funding lev-
els,” not prices. Payments go
into a donation box, though the
cashiers provide change and
handle credit card payments.
“The lesson here is most peo-
ple are fundamentally good,”
Shaich said. “People step up
and they do the right thing.”
A year of success for Pay-What-You-Want Panera
By JIMSALTER
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Cash paid for food items sits in a box at the front counter inside
a Panera Bread Co. restaurant in Clayton, Mo.
2005 and took it to the commercial
level in2007, Miller said. It was not
a simple move to make. Miller said
fillingout thenecessarypaperwork
with the Liquor Control Board
combined with building a larger
brewing system took about a year
to complete.
Miller said their older system
was a55gallonstainless steal drum
system.
“We could not make enough
with it,” he said. “Last summer we
sold it and built this system.”
Building everything themselves
from their brewing system to the
wooden keg tab, Miller and Chris
rolled up their sleeves and built a
larger 120 gallon tank system.
“We could make more with this
but wedonot haveenoughfermen-
tationroom, not enoughcoolingca-
pacity. We really need to go with
140gallontanksandgowithdouble
brewdays. Kind of step things up a
bit to catch up with all the bars.”
Althoughtheir recipes arestored
safely away, the guys were willing
to share their recipe for success.
Miller said they built what they
needed instead of buying it.
For example, he said, the coolers
useLehman’sgrandmother’soldair
conditioners. With a smile he said
he tweakedit andchangedthe con-
trols, but it works.
“We even built the keg cleaner
controls,” he said.
Lehman said everything was
done in a non-traditional way.
“Brewing in these plastic poly
tanks is not traditional,” Lehman
said. “Lots of wineries use them.
We thought, ‘let’s try it’ and put in
the valves and wheels, and they
work.”
Thoughtheir methods areuntra-
ditional, the names of their beers
overflow with the region’s coal
mining tradition. Malty Maguire,
Olde King Coal Stout, Lunch Pail
Ale and Anthracite Ale are just a
fewof the aptly named brews.
BREAKER
Continued from Page 1D
CHICAGO — Pabst Blue Rib-
bon: the breakfast of Chicago
hipsters. Old Style: beer of the
Chicago Cubs. Schlitz: “The
beer that made Milwaukee fa-
mous.”
In Los Angeles?
It would be difficult to find a
more quintessentially Midwest-
ern pack of brews than those
owned by Woodridge, Ill.-based
Pabst Brewing Co., whose an-
nouncement last week that it
would move its headquarters to
LAtookstate officials andbrand-
ing experts by surprise.
“I do kind of want to grab
these guys by the ears and say,
‘Hey, do you not know what this
(group of beers) is?’ This is a
Midwest portfolio of beers, and
it makes no sense to plop them
in, of all places, LA,” said Kelly
O’Keefe, professor of brandstrat-
egy at the Virginia Common-
wealth University Brandcenter.
A lot has changed since food
industry magnate C. Dean Met-
ropoulos bought the company in
June and granted control to his
Los Angeles-based sons Daren
and Evan Metropoulos. The
change in power resulted in the
departures of its CEO and other
executives.
In an interview with Bloom-
berg Television last month, the
Metropoulos brothers, the
youngest of whom lives in Hugh
Hefner’s former LA mansion,
touted a newturn for the compa-
ny that would include a star-
studded cast of movie stars and
pro football players backing ev-
erything fromSchlitz to Colt 45.
Branding experts say such tac-
tics could backfire.
Theflagshipbrand, Pabst Blue
Ribbon, or PBR, has a cult fol-
lowing of young, hip urbanites
who say they enjoy the beer be-
cause it is unsexy, unpretentious
and blue-collar Midwest.
“I like PBR because it doesn’t
taste like beer,” said Brenna Ehr-
lich, 26, co-author of the blog
“Stuff Hipsters Hate” and a book
by the same name. Hipsters, she
said, are “people whodefine who
they are by who they aren’t,” and
they wouldn’t drink PBR if it
“looked like Urban Outfitters,”
she said. “PBR is like the nectar
of the hipster gods.”
Pabst’s shift to City of Angels could hurt Midwestern appeal
By JULIE WERNAU
Chicago Tribune
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
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MORE.
MOST.
timesleader.com
Northeast Pennsylvania’s
premier daily newspaper,
The Times Leader gives you
more of what you want
every day of the week.*
More responsible reporting.
More community commitment. More
automotive ads. More real estate listings.
More classified pages. More inserts and
coupons. It all adds up to being the most
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Q: I am extremely organized
and always plan my work careful-
ly. I know exactly which tasks I
must complete every day inorder
to meet my deadlines. The prob-
lem is that my boss constantly
comes up with ad hoc requests
and expects me to immediately
drop whatever I’mdoing to focus
on his latest whim.
Instead of rewarding this im-
pulsive behavior, I usually put his
requests aside until I can work
them into my schedule. He
doesn’t like this, so he has given
me a bad performance review. I
really can’t figure out how to
work with him.
A: As long as you’re in this job,
I’mafraid you will need to loosen
up a bit. Telling your boss that
you’ll get around to his requests
when your schedule allows is not
too politically bright. Although
you clearly believe you are right
and he is wrong, the fact is that
the two of you simply have differ-
ent work styles.
This particular personality dif-
ference is actually quite com-
mon. Highly structured people
like to create detailed plans well
inadvance, while more spontane-
ous folks come up with newideas
at the eleventh hour. These two
types routinely drive each other
crazy.
The key point here, however, is
that he’s the one doing your per-
formance review, not the other
way around. If he views youas ob-
structive, you are not likely to get
a good rating. Given your talent
for planning, the obvious solu-
tion is to start including time in
your schedule for his predictable
last-minute requests.
Q: I feel fairly certain that I’m
not being paid what I am worth.
When I was hired by this startup
company, the salary offer seemed
quite low for someone with a
master’s degree. I only accepted
because asking for money makes
me very uncomfortable.
Now I feel even more under-
paidbecause I have beengivenso
many responsibilities. I know
that start-up employees are ex-
pectedtoperforma wide range of
duties, and I’m certainly gaining
valuable experience. Neverthe-
less, I can’t help resenting my
minimal paycheck. How can I
correct this?
A: Fair or not, whenit comes to
pay, “squeaky wheels” usually get
the bigger bucks. This may be
particularly true in start-up com-
panies, where compensation pol-
icies tendtobe rather flexible. Al-
though your anxiety about ask-
ing for money is not unusual, you
will need to become more assert-
ive if you hope to rectify this sit-
uation.
Before requesting a salary re-
view, arm yourself with informa-
tion verifying that your pay is in-
deed below the market level. For
data specific to your industry and
geographic area, consult your
professional association or visit
salary comparison websites.
Because confidence sells, you
should also explain how your
work is adding value for the com-
pany. If you get turned down,
don’t slink away in embarrass-
ment. Instead, politely ask when
you might be considered for an
increase, then renew your re-
quest at the suggested time.
OFFICE COACH
Underling must adapt
to personality clash
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of “Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics.” Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com,
or follow her on Twitter officecoach.
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
NEWYORK—The suddenin-
terest-rate hikes, high fees and
steep penalties that last year’s
credit card regulations were de-
signed to eliminate are still lurk-
ing in one segment of the credit
card market: cards designated
for businesses.
As a result, consumers who
don’t carefully read the fine print
on card applications may learn
the hard way that when it comes
to such practices, “It’s just busi-
ness, nothing personal.”
The credit card law that took
effect a year ago has been
deemed successful at making
personal credit easier to under-
stand, while saving consumers
millions in interest charges, late
payment penalties and over-the-
limit fees. But the law that re-
stricts the way banks can change
rates or charge fees doesn’t apply
to cards labeled for business or
commercial use.
A study released Wednesday
by the Pew Charitable Trust’s
Safe Credit Card Project says
that consumers are still vulnera-
ble to these practices, because
more than 10 million offers for
business cards are sent to U.S.
households each month.
Pew examined business card
offers fromthe nation’s12 largest
credit card issuers, and found
that many of the practices are
still common. Only Bank of
America, for example, has elim-
inated penalty interest rate in-
creases — the kind of automatic
rate hike that comes as a result of
a late payment. And BofA and
Capital One now use payment
policies for business cards that
mimic those required for con-
sumers and apply payments to
the portion of a balance with the
highest rate first.
Interest rate hikes on existing
balances, barred under the con-
sumer regulations, are a big con-
cern. For someone carrying a
high balance, it could mean a dif-
ference of thousands of dollars
on just one card by the time the
balance is paid off if they carry a
business card rather than a per-
sonal card.
“Consumers have no idea how
significant that change is in
terms of their legal protection,”
said Nick Bourke, director of the
Safe Credit Cards Project.
Pewwants policymakers to re-
quire that the credit card restric-
tions apply whenever an individ-
ual is personally liable for the
balance on a card. Short of that
measure, Bourke said, applica-
tions should at least make it
clear whether consumer credit
card regulations apply to it.
The concern is especially high
because so many business card
applications are sent to homes.
That’s largely because many
small businesses, particularly
start-ups, are operated out of res-
idences.
It’s going to be difficult to get
any new legislation through the
current Congress, said Rep. Car-
olyn B. Maloney, D-N.Y., who
wrote the credit card legislation,
in an emailed response to a re-
quest for comment. Pointing to
efforts underway to repeal or de-
lay aspects of last year’s financial
overhaul, she said, “Congress is
not passing any new consumer
protections given the change in
control of the House.”
But Maloney said cards that
are used for personal or house-
holdexpenses shouldbe covered
by the existing rules. The Con-
sumer Financial Protection Bu-
reau, which begins operating in
July, will be able to respond to
threats to consumers regarding
risks, pricing and policies, she
added.
Pewstopped short of charging
that banks are trying to circum-
vent card regulations by shifting
consumers to business cards.
But it did note that higher-in-
come households and older
households are more apt to re-
ceive business offers in the mail
— including more than 12 per-
cent of the offers sent to house-
holds earning $100,000 or more
per year, and nearly11percent of
theoffers sendtothose65andol-
der.
The study says there are at
least 11 million small business
credit card accounts open, with
an average of 1.4 cards per ac-
count.
Consumers must watch for unregulated credit cards
By EILEEN AJ CONNELLY
AP Personal Finance Writer
FOTOLIA.COM PHOTO
NEW YORK — Sprint Nextel
Corp., once dead last in custom-
er satisfaction among the Big 4
national wireless carriers, now
has the happiest subscribers,
along withlong-time leader Veri-
zon Wireless, according to a sur-
vey released Tuesday.
The American Customer Sat-
isfaction Index also shows tenta-
tive declines in customer satis-
faction at the other two big carri-
ers, AT&T Inc. and T-Mobile
USA. That comes as AT&T has
agreed to buy T-Mobile USA for
$39 billion in a deal that could
close next year.
The acquisition could make
AT&T and T-Mobile customers
even less happy. Claes Fornell,
professor of Business Adminis-
tration at the University of Mi-
chigan and the designer of the
ACSI survey, said it is common
to find that customer satisfac-
tion drops after a merger.
Cellphone-company mergers
bring struggles to combine bill-
ing systems, customer support
and other functions. Snags can
frustrate consumers. One reason
Sprint had the worst score in the
industry for many years was its
disastrous merger withNextel in
2005.
Sprint and Verizon Wireless
both rate a 72 for customer satis-
factionintheACSI survey, which
polled 8,000 households in the
first quarter. For Sprint, that’s a
big jump froma score of 56 three
years ago, while Verizon’s score
has beensteady. Sprint CEODan
Hesse has made improvements
in customer service a center-
piece of his turnaround plan for
the troubled company.
Sprint’s score includes subsid-
iaries Boost Mobile and Virgin
Mobile, which sell plans without
two-year contracts.
ACSI gave AT&Ta score of 66,
down from 69 last year. It’s the
company’s worst score since
2006, the year before it started
carrying the iPhone. It’s the low-
est-ranked of the four national
carriers after being surpassed by
Sprint last year.
T-Mobile’s score was 70, down
from 73 points last year.
The survey was developed by
the University of Michigan but is
now run by a private company,
ACSI LLC.
Customer satisfaction with AT&T and T-Mobile services drops
By PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 5D
➛ B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
Francesca Levy, Kristen Girard • AP
INVESTORS
WITH
STYLE
When choos-
ing what stocks to buy,
are you aggressive? Contrarian?
Consistent? Or just looking for growth
stocks at a reasonable price? Russell
Investments has launched six stock
indexes that are customized for inves-
tors with an investing style. Instead of
targeting a type of stock, they com-
prise stocks that are most commonly
used by fund managers with specific
investment characteristics. The result:
indexes with names like the Large
Cap Contrarian index and the Large
Cap Aggressive Growth Index. Inves-
tors who know their style now have
an index to match it.
MONEY WORRIES
When stress is caused by tight finances, it has an espe-
cially adverse effect on health, according to research firm
Financial Finesse. The company studied calls to its finan-
cial help line to find out which workers were most
stressed out about money. The good news is that in gen-
eral, most people were less stressed in the first quarter
than they had been during the recession. Those who
were most stressed out were the ones having trouble
managing their money. Younger workers making less
than $35,000 a
year were less
stressed than their
older, better-off
counterparts. On
the whole, women
had the most mon-
ey anxiety. Ninety
percent said they
had financial stress.
EARNINGS HONOR ROLL
If earnings season were a class-
room, the consumer staples in-
dustry would get a gold star and
technology companies would be
sent to detention. Bespoke Invest-
ment Group measured how much
companies’ stocks rose or fell on
the day they reported quarterly re-
sults. Of the five stocks in the
S&P 500 index that performed the
best after they reported earnings,
three were from the consumer
staples industry. Supervalu and
Dean Foods were among the
worst performers of 2010, so they
had a lot of room to rise. The five
worst-performing S&P 500 com-
panies during earnings season
were tech companies. Source: Bespoke Investment Group
Best S&P 500 Companies based
on 1-day stock performance af-
ter earnings
16.9%
15.2
12.8
12.0
11.5
SUPERVALU (SVU) - BEAT EPS
BIOGEN IDEC (BIIB) - BEAT EPS
SLM (SLM) - BEAT EPS
GOODYEAR TIRE (GT) - BEAT EPS
DEAN FOODS (DF) - BEAT EPS
AKAMI TECH (AKAM) - BEAT EPS
LEXMARK (LXK) - MISSED EPS
TERADYNE (TER) - BEAT EPS
BROADCOM (BRCM) - BEAT EPS
NVIDIA (NVID) - BEAT EPS
Worst S&P 500 Companies
based on 1-day stock perfor-
mance after earnings
-14.7
-14.4
-12.4
-12.3
-11.0
S
os-
buy,
arian?
Will Muggia, portfolio manager for
the Touchstone Mid Cap Growth
fund (TEGAX), has been shifting
some his fund’s holdings out of en-
ergy and technology stocks and into
defensive areas like healthcare and
consumer staples. The reason is
simple: The S&P 500 has more than
doubled from its 12-year low
reached during the recession, and
investors are now overly optimistic,
he says. That makes these stocks,
which are seen as being the safest
in the market, more appealing.
Healthcare
stocks fell the
most of any in-
dustry in the
S&P 500 last
year. But, this
year, they’re
the best per-
formers. Why is
that?
Healthcare has
just horribly
lagged. Now
you’re seeing
very good earnings out of that
group, and very cheap valuations. ...
They made reasonable numbers
last year, but the healthcare reform
fears kept everyone away. No one
would touch the group. If you look at
the first-quarter reported earnings,
the healthcare (companies) had the
highest percentage of (earnings)
beats than any other sector.
How should investors handle
healthcare stocks?
Own the healthcare services names,
not necessarily biotech and
(pharmaceutical companies). Hospi-
tals, managed care and all sorts of
healthcare services: You’ve seen re-
ally good growth there as employ-
ment has come back.
How do those companies
benefit froman increase in em-
ployment?
Hospital admits and doctor visits all
were down huge (during the reces-
sion) because people lost their jobs.
So someone’s been out of work for
a year, and they get hired again, the
first thing they do is go to the doctor.
And any non-life threatening proce-
dure was put off in 2008 and 2009.
So as soon as someone gets a job,
they can go get that procedure
done.
Do you have any favorite compa-
nies in healthcare?
One name that we’ve owned for
quite a while is Mettler-Toledo
(MTD). What they do is provide very
high-end measurement instruments,
as well as supplies to labs and in-
dustrial markets. So these guys are
a play both in the recovery in health-
care and the industrial rebound.
One of the newer names in the
fund is a company called CareFu-
sion (CFN). These guys are a lead-
ing provider of (IV) infusion systems.
They also do medication manage-
ment and infection control, all for the
hospitals. The key in healthcare right
now, even when you have the slight
rebound in utilization, you still have
to save the system money. ... So
with medication management ...
you’re saving mistakes, you’re sav-
ing errors. There’s nothing worse
than making medication mistakes.
That can compound illness prob-
lems and add costs to the system.
Infusion systems, same thing; infec-
tion prevention, same thing. You’re
trying to save the system money.
Tell me about consumer staples.
Where do you see growth oppor-
tunities?
Normally, for growth managers, sta-
ples are difficult to find. The best-
performing staple by far has been
Green Mountain Coffee. They an-
nounced a deal with Starbucks that
has just been a home run for Green
Mountain. One of the newer names
... is Ralcorp. They’re the leader in
private-label cereals.
Is there a common theme you
look for when buying consumer-
staples companies?
One of the big themes we have in
the fund this year is “own price lead-
ers.” That’s a huge focus right now.
The other staple we bought in large
caps is Hershey, because we felt
they were a price leader. Literally,
three weeks after we bought it, they
had a 9 percent price increase
across the board.... We really have
thematic plays where people have
pricing power. I think that’s really
important for this year, because in-
put costs are going up everywhere.
As rally ages,
investors go on
the defensive
Muggia
InsiderQ&A
F a c sca L E G a li AP SOURCES FactS t Mo i sta
Small
caps
with
legs
Small caps are losing
some of their edge. The
large companies in the
S&P 500 have started to
fulfill forecasts that they’ll
surpass small caps as the
bull market progresses.
The S&P 500 is down 1
percent this month. The
Russell 2000 index that
tracks small caps is down
3 percent. Even if small
caps keep lagging, some
are expected to do better
than their counterparts.
Financial analysts suggest
these:
Innophos Holdings (IPHS)
Friday close $43.73
52-week range $24.20—47.64
Price-earnings ratio 16
(based on past 12 months)
Return this year 24%
3-year return (annualized) 23%
Innophos is still cheap after rising
for two years. It costs 11 times
what it’s expected to earn in the
next year. It makes phosphates,
additives used in everything from
fertilizer to food. Demand for its
products is up: Last quarter,
revenue rose 17 percent. The
company has raised its quarterly
dividend to 25 cents per share.
Encore Wire (WIRE)
Friday close $23.53
52-week range $17.77—28.50
Price-earnings ratio 19
Return this year -5%
3-year return (annualized) flat
Demand for copper building wire
has fallen since the housing
market slump began in 2006.
During the recession, Encore cut
costs and cleaned up its balance
sheet. It now has no debt. As
rivals went out of business,
Encore picked up market share.
The strategy is paying off. Last
quarter, it sold 29 percent more
pounds of wiring than it did a
year earlier.
Cabela’s (CAB)
Friday close $23.42
52-week range $12.83—32.37
Price-earnings ratio 13
Return this year 8%
3-year return (annualized) 16%
Cabela’s sells hunting and fishing
equipment to a more upscale clien-
tele than most outdoor supply com-
panies. Randy Bateman, portfolio
manager of the Huntington Situs
Small Cap fund, says Cabela’s
appeals to farmers with extra cash.
Farm income is forecast this year
to hit its second-highest level in 35
years. Bateman says farmers will
trade up to Cabela’s from Wal-Mart.
Alliance Resource Partners
(ARLP)
Friday close $72.39
52-week range $39.00—84.10
Price-earnings ratio 10
Return this year 13%
3-year return (annualized) 19%
Coal is in demand. China is con-
suming more and the nuclear crisis
in Japan has raised questions
about that source of energy. Ana-
lysts consider Alliance a good
value. It’s trading at only 9 times
what it’s expected to earn in the
next year. Takeovers in the energy
industry are increasing and
Alliance’s financial health makes it
a good candidate.
R t s th o h Ma 19 Oth data th o h Ma 20
Air Products APD 64.13 9 96.00 91.27 0.61 0.7 t t 0.4+41.37 2 9.2 18 2.5
Amer Water Works AWK 19.41 9 30.70 29.40 0.25 0.9 s s 16.3+51.78 113.6a 18 3.0
Amerigas Part LP APU 35.00 7 51.50 45.81 -0.34 -0.7 t t -6.1+30.43 2 15.4 30 6.5
Aqua America Inc WTR 16.52 9 23.79 22.61 -0.22 -1.0 s t 0.6+36.99 2 2.3 23 2.7
Arch Dan Mid ADM 24.22 6 38.02 31.26 -0.78 -2.4 t t 3.9+25.61 3 -3.3 10 2.0
AutoZone Inc AZO 177.66 9288.50 276.60 -9.70 -3.4 t s 1.5+53.96 1 25.0 16 ...
Bank of America BAC 10.91 2 16.75 11.58 -0.35 -2.9 t t -13.2—24.05 5-18.0 21 0.3
Bk of NY Mellon BK 23.78 6 32.50 28.19 0.12 0.4 t t -6.7 +3.40 4 -0.9 13 1.8
Bon Ton Store BONT 6.08 4 17.49 10.24 -1.32 -11.4 t t -19.1—22.05 5-16.1 79 2.0
CIGNA Corp CI 29.12 0 49.90 49.14 0.45 0.9 s s 34.0+50.72 1 9.7 9 0.1
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 26.84 0 38.71 38.40 0.27 0.7 s s 10.4+14.66 3 6.9 16 1.3
CocaCola KO 49.47 0 68.77 68.30 0.12 0.2 s s 3.8+35.99 2 11.7 14 2.8
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 16.30 9 27.16 25.12 -0.01 0.0 t t 14.9+51.99 1 4.5 18 1.8
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.33 4 28.95 24.35 0.16 0.7 s t -12.3+14.42 3 8.4 12 3.9
Community Hlth Sys CYH 22.33 3 42.50 28.23 -0.57 -2.0 t t -24.5—25.49 5 -5.1 9 ...
Entercom Comm ETM 4.97 5 13.63 9.26 0.09 1.0 t t -20.0—23.47 5-14.9 8 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 7.71 9 21.02 18.94 -0.94 -4.7 t t 21.3+95.06 1 0.2 13 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 6.96 7 9.84 8.81 0.15 1.7 s t -9.5+24.48 3 1.4 63 8.5
Genpact Ltd G 13.09 7 18.71 16.63 -0.36 -2.1 s s 9.4 —1.89 4 7.3a 26 1.1
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 8.39 1 15.84 8.44 -0.23 -2.7 t t -33.9—34.82 5-17.8 11 3.8
Heinz HNZ 42.88 0 53.89 53.89 1.39 2.6 s s 9.0+21.51 3 8.4 18 3.3
Hershey Company HSY 45.31 9 58.20 56.14 -1.20 -2.1 t s 19.1+23.19 3 2.1 25 2.5
Kraft Foods KFT 27.59 0 35.10 35.23 0.34 1.0 s s 11.8+24.92 3 5.3 20 3.3
Lowes Cos LOW 19.35 7 27.45 24.46 -1.30 -5.0 t t -2.5 +5.06 4 -3.6 17 1.8
M&T Bank MTB 72.03 7 96.15 88.04 1.65 1.9 s t 1.1+13.98 3 -2.5 15 3.2
McDonalds Corp MCD 65.31 0 82.63 82.33 1.59 2.0 s s 7.3 +25.11 3 21.8 17 3.0
NBT Bncp NBTB 19.27 5 24.99 21.65 -0.14 -0.6 t t -10.4 -+.18 4 2.8 13 3.7
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 3.64 7 9.26 7.15 -0.67 -8.6 t s 19.4 +6.08 4 6.0 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 49.43 8 66.49 61.67 -0.13 -0.2 s t 1.6 +2.92 4 0.3 9 2.3
PPL Corp PPL 24.00 0 28.27 28.28 0.35 1.3 s s 7.4+19.77 3 3.2 12 5.0
Penn Millers Hldg PMIC 11.98 0 17.72 17.40 -0.05 -0.3 s s 31.5+23.14 3 ... ... ...
Penna REIT PEI 10.03 9 16.45 15.71 -0.14 -0.9 s s 8.1+20.46 3 -9.7 ... 3.8
PepsiCo PEP 60.32 0 71.89 71.30 0.74 1.0 s s 9.1+14.66 3 6.3 19 2.9
Philip Morris Intl PM 42.94 0 70.77 70.19 1.88 2.8 s s 19.9+63.16 113.4a 17 3.6
Procter & Gamble PG 58.92 0 67.72 67.36 0.50 0.7 s s 4.7+12.53 3 6.9 18 3.1
Prudential Fncl PRU 48.56 8 67.52 63.61 0.48 0.8 s t 8.3+18.61 3 -2.4 9 1.8
SLM Corp SLM 9.85 0 16.86 16.34 0.47 3.0 s s 29.8+56.81 1-20.4 9 2.4
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMpB 32.41 0 59.04 57.92 0.12 0.2 s s 32.2 ... 0.0 ... 8.0
Southn Union Co SUG 20.00 0 30.00 29.57 1.70 6.1 s s 22.9+44.22 2 6.6 15 2.0
TJX Cos TJX 39.56 9 54.94 52.62 -1.95 -3.6 s s 18.5+22.61 3 18.1 17 1.4
UGI Corp UGI 24.30 9 33.53 32.48 0.27 0.8 s s 2.8+32.59 2 10.0 14 3.2
Verizon Comm VZ 25.79 9 38.95 37.15 -0.11 -0.3 s s 3.8+50.60 1 10.5 22 5.2
WalMart Strs WMT 47.77 8 57.90 55.29 -0.43 -0.8 s t 2.5+10.38 4 5.0 13 2.6
Weis Mkts WMK 32.56 9 41.82 40.62 -0.73 -1.8 s s 0.7+17.62 3 2.1 16 2.9
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
SOURCE: FactSet
Hitting highs and still cheap
Stock
Screener
Just because a stock is trading near its 52-
week high doesn’t mean it’s expensive.
This screen, powered by FactSet, identifies
companies in the S&P 500 that are close to their
highest level in a year. But, even though the com-
panies have had big gains, they still have price-
to-earnings ratios below that of the S&P 500,
which has a P/E of 15.
They also look cheap based on their revenue
figures; all of the companies have a price-to-sales
ratio below 1.5. That measures a company’s
stock price divided by its revenue per share.
Healthcare companies make up the bulk of the
list. Those stocks have risen 15 percent this year
as investors have moved into so-called defensive
stocks, which are seen as being the safest parts
of the market. The S&P 500 has risen 7 percent.
Healthcare companies have also benefited
from strong earnings in the first quarter.
Aetna, the top company on the list, said its net
income rose 4 percent in the quarter as its health
care costs fell. The company also raised its 2011
earnings forecast.
Humana, UnitedHealth Group and WellPoint
also reported better-than-expected results.
Data through May 19
PRICE/
EARNINGS
PRICE/
SALES CLOSE
52-WK
LOW
52-WK
HIGH COMPANY TICKER
Aetna AET $25.00 $46.01 $45.90 0.56 10.9 48.8% 12.8%
Humana HUM 43.17 80.16 79.44 0.40 12.4 46.2 66.9
WellPoint WLP 46.52 81.80 81.78 0.57 11.7 43.0 11.2
UnitedHealth Group UNH 27.13 51.46 50.55 0.61 12.3 40.2 11.7
Marathon Oil MRO 29.91 54.33 51.92 0.55 14.3 39.2 38.0
CIGNA Corp. CI 29.10 49.66 49.53 0.64 10.2 35.4 59.5
10.9
12.4
11.7
12.3
14.3
10.2
YTD 5-YR
DB Agr DoubLong DAG 14.23 1.42 11.1 -5.9 110.0
Barc iPath DJ Grains JJG 54.87 4.06 8.0 -0.6 60.9
Barc iPath Cotton BAL 86.71 6.19 7.7 -6.8 117.0
iPath ShtExt Rus1000 ROSA 29.14 2.08 7.7 0.7 ...
Dirx Dly NG Bull2x FCGL 69.89 4.88 7.5 -9.5 ...
Barc iPath Lead LD 62.90 3.90 6.6 -4.0 38.0
Barc iPath DJ Agr JJA 63.72 3.78 6.3 -2.8 64.4
Teucrium Corn Fund CORN 45.02 2.66 6.3 -1.8 ...
Dir Dly Gold Bull2x NUGT 31.22 1.70 5.8 -21.3 ...
iPath Beta Grains WEET 50.17 2.50 5.2 -1.0 ...
Direx SOX Bear 3X SOXS 57.54 2.85 5.2 5.2 64.7
DB Agri Long AGF 21.20 1.04 5.2 -2.3 49.4
Dirx DlyRtlBear2x RETS 23.05 1.09 4.9 -2.0 ...
iPath Beta Cmdty BCM 47.15 2.07 4.6 -6.2 ...
iPath ShtExt Rus2000 RTSA 27.52 1.22 4.6 10.9 ...
ProSh Ult Sh MSCI EWV 37.79 1.63 4.5 3.3 -20.6
Barc iPath Sugar SGG 71.94 3.06 4.4 -6.0 65.8
Mkt Vect JrGoldMin GDXJ 36.15 1.46 4.2 -13.6 43.8
E-Tracs Agric UAG 30.43 1.17 4.0 -3.7 64.1
Direxion TechBear 3x TYP 20.61 0.80 4.0 2.5 140.6
ProShs Ult China25 XPP 75.71 2.84 3.9 -10.0 32.1
ProShs Ultra Cmdty UCD 35.79 1.34 3.9 -13.9 59.8
FstTr South Korea FKO 30.29 1.13 3.9 -4.0 ...
Direx China Bear 3x CZI 14.57 0.54 3.8 20.3 -64.8
ETFs Phys Palladium PALL 73.09 2.62 3.7 -4.3 57.5
Gugg Airline FAA 38.85 1.32 3.5 13.5 19.4
DB Cmdty DblLg DYY 11.38 0.38 3.5 -15.4 69.5
CS VS InvVix STerm XIV 176.18 5.84 3.4 7.8 ...
SPDR Emg MidEastAfr GAF 73.79 2.39 3.3 -3.4 22.8
ProSh UltShtNasdBio BIS 37.16 1.17 3.3 -5.8 -46.8
iPath Beta Agri DIRT 49.10 1.58 3.3 -2.2 ...
Direx India Bear 2X INDZ 29.29 0.91 3.2 15.9 -33.2
Fact GoldBullSPBear FSG 26.53 0.80 3.1 0.5 ...
ProShs UltPro ShtQQQ SQQQ 24.59 0.72 3.0 2.1 -60.7
E-Tracs Food FUD 28.96 0.85 3.0 -3.5 55.3
Mkt Vectors Egypt EGPT 15.13 0.44 3.0 2.1 -15.9
GlobalX CopperMiners COPX 18.88 0.55 3.0 -5.9 72.0
FT ISE Copper Fd CU 42.10 1.22 3.0 -7.0 65.7
Direxion EngyBull 3x ERX 72.50 2.14 3.0 -16.8 123.7
Grail Interm Muni Bd GMMB 50.47 1.42 2.9 2.9 1.3
ProSh UltSh Semi SSG 45.66 1.29 2.9 -3.4 170.5
UBS 2x MoLevLong MLP MLPL 34.47 0.96 2.9 -7.7 ...
Mkt Vect Gold Miners GDX 55.76 1.55 2.9 -11.0 13.2
PowShs Global Coal PKOL 35.30 0.96 2.8 -5.4 40.5
DB Gold DoubLong DGP 47.49 1.31 2.8 0.6 49.1
Alps Jeff WildcatEx WCAT 51.16 1.38 2.8 -7.0 36.2
ProShs Ultra Gold UGL 78.70 2.06 2.7 0.7 48.5
Barc iPath DJ Copp JJC 54.15 1.40 2.7 -6.8 31.8
ProShs Ult Mexico UMX 39.11 1.04 2.7 -9.9 41.0
ProSh UltSh Tech REW 56.37 1.48 2.7 2.1 150.8
Exchange-Traded Funds
FRIDAY CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN
NAME TICKER CLOSE WK 1WK 1MO 1YR
Dow industrials
-0.7%
+0.1%
Nasdaq
-0.9%
-0.6%
S&P 500
-0.3%
-0.3%
Russell 2000
-0.8%
-2.0%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
q
p
p
q
q
p
q
q
p
q
q
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+8.1%
+5.7%
+6.0%
+5.8%
Treasury yields dip
Treasury yields fell this past week as investors put
money into safer assets because of concerns about
Greece’s debt. The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note fell to 3.15 percent from 3.17 percent the previ-
ous week. Mortgage rates fell to their lowest point of
the year. The average rate on a 30-year loan fell to
4.61 percent from 4.63 percent. That’s the lowest
level since mid-December.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxable—national avg 0.01
Taxable—national avg 0.02
Tax-exempt—national avg 0.02
Tax-exempt—national avg 0.02
Broad market Lehman 2.84 -0.04 t t -0.34 3.29 2.35
Triple-A corporate Moody’s 4.96 -0.06 t t 0.08 5.31 4.24
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.74 -0.04 t t -0.59 4.58 3.47
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 5.37 -0.04 t t 0.30 5.95 4.86
U.S. high yield Barclays 6.70 0.04 t t -2.27 9.53 6.61
Treasury Barclays 2.01 -0.02 t t 0.00 2.46 1.35
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.04 0.03 r t -0.11 0.17
1-year T-Bill 0.19 0.02 t t -0.17 0.42 0.17
6-month T-Bill 0.08 0.02 t t -0.12 0.22 0.05
2-year T-Note 0.50 -0.03 t t -0.22 0.86 0.31
5-year T-Note 1.79 -0.05 t t -0.23 2.39 1.02
10-year T-Note 3.15 -0.03 t t -0.11 3.72 2.38
30-year T-Bond 4.30 -0.02 t t 0.17 4.77 3.53
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
AMF
ARM b +.7 -1.0 7.51 7.35 7.42 ...
Acadian
EmgMkts d +.7 +8.0 21.65 14.99 20.34 -.09
AdvisorOne
AmerigoN +5.0 +3.9 14.44 10.72 14.01 -.01
Alger Group
CapApInsI +7.8 +9.2 23.01 16.35 22.33 -.03
CapApprA m +7.9 +9.2 16.12 11.44 15.63 -.02
MdCpGInsI +9.0 +3.5 16.21 10.83 15.48 -.01
SmCpGrthO +10.1 +6.6 36.82 24.61 35.28 -.26
SmCpInstI +10.0 +6.0 31.94 21.29 30.62 -.22
Allegiant
UltShtBdI +.2 +3.4 10.06 10.00 10.01 -.01
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrA m +7.8 +3.3 15.98 12.87 15.88 +.03
BalShrB m +7.4 +2.5 14.97 12.08 14.87 +.02
BalWlthStrA m +4.0 +3.5 12.55 10.22 12.25 -.01
BalWlthStrC m +3.8 +2.8 12.49 10.19 12.20 ...
CoreOppA m +9.9 +3.9 12.84 9.10 12.65 +.02
GlTmtcGA m +.3 +5.7 81.41 58.26 77.37 -.27
GlblBondA m +2.1 +8.0 8.58 8.16 8.43 +.01
GlblBondC m +1.8 +7.2 8.61 8.18 8.46 +.02
GrowA m +6.8 +2.0 40.02 29.24 39.09 -.17
GrowIncA m +10.0 +1.6 3.67 2.69 3.63 +.01
HighIncA m +5.5 +11.9 9.31 8.32 9.30 ...
HighIncC m +5.2 +11.0 9.41 8.41 9.40 ...
IntGrA m +1.0 +1.4 16.42 12.08 15.52 +.01
IntlValA m +1.0 -4.4 14.78 11.10 13.80 -.12
IntlValAdv +1.1 -4.1 15.06 11.32 14.08 -.11
LgCapGrA m +7.0 +6.2 27.62 19.67 26.51 -.08
LgCapGrAd +7.1 +6.5 28.91 20.58 27.77 -.09
MuInCAA m +3.9 +4.0 11.09 10.14 10.65 +.03
MuInNYA m +3.6 +4.2 10.12 9.39 9.80 ...
MuInNatlA m +3.9 +3.9 10.12 9.33 9.77 +.03
SMCpGrA m +12.7 +5.7 7.11 4.25 6.82 -.04
SmMidValA m +4.4 +6.3 19.24 13.41 18.44 -.12
TxMgdWlApStAd +4.0 +.1 13.16 9.94 12.71 -.04
WlthApprStr +4.5 +1.2 13.09 9.65 12.59 -.02
WlthApprStrA m +4.3 +.9 13.07 9.63 12.57 -.02
Allianz
NFJDivVlA m +8.3 +1.1 12.40 9.37 12.22 +.04
NFJDivVlC m +8.0 +.4 12.44 9.41 12.25 +.03
NFJEqIncD b +8.3 +1.1 12.42 9.39 12.24 +.03
NFJIntVlA m +4.7 +5.9 22.38 16.72 21.62 +.04
NFJSmCVlA m +7.3 +7.6 31.65 23.14 30.62 ...
NFJSmCVlC m +7.0 +6.8 30.29 22.14 29.30 ...
Alpine
DynDiv d +5.6 -1.6 5.14 3.90 4.91 -.04
InRelEstY d +1.4 -2.1 27.18 18.53 26.30 +.01
UlShTxAdv d +.7 +3.1 10.06 10.03 10.05 +.01
Amana
Growth m +4.2 +6.7 26.22 20.05 25.75 -.12
Income m +6.2 +7.5 34.50 26.30 33.76 -.04
American Beacon
BalAMR +4.3 +4.1 13.01 11.17 12.82 -.03
IntlEqAMR d +7.2 +2.2 18.52 13.44 17.65 -.10
IntlEqInv +7.0 +1.7 18.33 13.18 17.47 -.10
LgCpVlAMR +5.6 +2.1 20.86 15.91 20.35 -.08
LgCpVlInv +5.4 +1.6 20.02 15.29 19.53 -.07
SmCapAMR +5.8 +4.7 21.83 15.09 20.96 -.21
SmCpVlInv +5.6 +4.1 21.35 14.82 20.49 -.21
American Cent
BalInv +5.2 +4.5 16.37 13.65 16.19 -.03
CAInTFBdIv +4.1 +4.3 11.56 10.73 11.21 +.03
DivBdInv +2.5 +6.8 11.16 10.61 10.89 +.01
EmgMktInv d +1.0 +7.3 9.64 6.53 9.07 +.02
EqGrowInv +7.2 +2.2 22.85 17.04 22.34 -.08
EqIncA m +5.9 +4.4 7.66 6.21 7.61 -.01
EqIncC m +5.7 +3.7 7.66 6.21 7.61 -.01
EqIncInv +5.9 +4.7 7.66 6.21 7.61 -.01
Gift +7.0 +8.0 30.85 21.19 30.07 -.08
GinMaeInv +2.6 +6.6 11.10 10.72 11.01 +.02
GlGold d -10.3 +10.7 27.26 18.52 23.40 +.62
GovBdInv +2.1 +6.4 11.50 10.96 11.25 +.02
GrowthAdv m +5.9 +6.2 27.57 20.11 26.96 -.10
GrowthInv +6.0 +6.5 28.00 20.43 27.39 -.10
HeritA m +7.4 +9.7 22.51 14.84 21.93 -.11
HeritInv +7.5 +10.0 23.14 15.23 22.56 -.10
InTTxFBInv +3.6 +4.6 11.39 10.63 11.06 +.02
IncGrInv +7.1 +1.6 26.22 19.69 25.62 -.09
IncGroA m +7.0 +1.4 26.19 19.67 25.58 -.10
InfAdjAdv m +3.8 +6.2 12.40 11.52 12.22 -.03
InfAdjI +4.0 +6.4 12.45 11.56 12.27 -.03
IntlBd +4.3 +5.4 15.24 13.03 14.40 ...
IntlDisIv d +3.8 +2.5 11.78 7.62 11.12 -.07
IntlGrInv d +5.4 +3.3 12.19 8.39 11.56 +.04
LS2025Inv +4.8 +5.1 12.39 10.23 12.21 -.02
LgCoVlInv +6.3 +.3 5.95 4.56 5.85 -.02
MdCpValIv +6.1 +6.7 13.49 10.43 13.32 -.05
NTEqGrIns +7.1 +2.5 10.48 7.84 10.25 -.04
NTGrthIns +6.1 +6.8 12.87 9.40 12.59 -.05
NTLgCmVlI +6.2 +.3 9.09 6.96 8.93 -.03
OneChAgg +5.4 +5.0 13.01 10.06 12.71 -.02
OneChCon +4.4 +5.2 11.58 9.99 11.46 -.01
OneChMod +5.0 +5.1 12.34 10.03 12.13 -.01
RealEstIv +11.0 +1.9 20.80 14.57 20.37 +.09
SelectInv +7.2 +5.0 41.39 29.72 40.51 -.08
ShTmGovIv +.6 +3.9 9.89 9.71 9.78 ...
SmCpValAdv m +2.7 +6.4 9.59 6.99 9.22 -.06
SmCpValIv +2.8 +6.6 9.63 7.02 9.26 -.06
StrAlAgIv +5.3 +5.0 8.17 6.30 7.98 -.01
StrAlMd +4.9 +5.1 6.95 5.63 6.83 -.01
StrAlMd m +4.8 +4.8 6.94 5.62 6.82 -.01
UltraInv +6.9 +4.2 24.63 17.78 24.22 -.02
ValueInv +5.7 +2.7 6.14 4.77 6.04 -.04
VistaInv +6.2 +3.0 18.30 12.38 17.74 -.07
American Funds
AMCAPA m +6.6 +4.2 20.44 15.28 20.08 -.13
AMCAPB m +6.3 +3.4 19.49 14.67 19.14 -.13
BalA m +5.4 +4.6 19.07 15.49 18.79 -.02
BalB m +5.1 +3.8 18.99 15.44 18.71 -.03
BondA m +2.8 +3.9 12.56 12.02 12.37 +.01
BondAmerB m +2.5 +3.1 12.56 12.02 12.37 +.01
CapIncBuA m +6.0 +4.4 53.07 43.95 52.43 +.24
CapIncBuB m +5.7 +3.6 53.07 43.91 52.42 +.24
CapWldBdA m +3.8 +6.6 21.53 19.51 21.01 +.05
CpWldGrIA m +5.7 +4.5 38.88 29.35 37.61 +.05
CpWldGrIB m +5.4 +3.7 38.66 29.16 37.38 +.05
EurPacGrA m +3.7 +4.6 45.12 33.17 42.90 -.03
EurPacGrB m +3.4 +3.8 44.65 32.78 42.44 -.04
FnInvA m +6.5 +4.2 40.16 29.89 38.96 ...
FnInvB m +6.2 +3.4 40.03 29.81 38.82 ...
GrthAmA m +5.1 +3.1 32.93 25.00 32.00 -.02
GrthAmB m +4.8 +2.3 31.89 24.17 30.97 -.02
HiIncA m +5.6 +7.4 11.61 10.55 11.59 -.01
HiIncMuA m +2.8 +2.2 14.26 13.10 13.59 +.04
IncAmerA m +7.1 +4.7 17.74 14.61 17.55 +.04
IncAmerB m +6.8 +3.9 17.60 14.51 17.41 +.04
IntBdAmA m +1.6 +4.0 13.74 13.30 13.52 ...
IntlGrInA m +5.9 NA 34.29 25.76 32.90 +.07
InvCoAmA m +4.8 +2.6 30.12 23.39 29.37 -.12
InvCoAmB m +4.4 +1.8 29.99 23.30 29.22 -.13
LtdTmTxEA m +2.9 +4.2 16.04 15.29 15.73 +.03
MutualA m +7.1 +4.2 27.24 21.52 26.96 -.05
NewEconA m +6.6 +5.1 27.48 20.50 26.99 +.05
NewPerspA m +4.5 +5.6 31.04 23.12 29.90 +.01
NewPerspB m +4.2 +4.8 30.55 22.72 29.42 ...
NwWrldA m +1.4 +9.0 57.43 43.32 55.35 +.10
NwWrldB m +1.1 +8.2 56.42 42.55 54.36 +.09
STBdFdofAmA m +.6 NA 10.18 10.03 10.09 ...
SmCpWldA m +2.8 +5.4 41.61 30.53 39.94 -.27
SmCpWldB m +2.5 +4.6 39.45 28.95 37.85 -.26
TDR2010A m +4.6 NA 9.61 8.44 9.53 +.01
TDR2015A m +4.6 NA 9.70 8.33 9.57 ...
TDR2020A m +5.0 NA 9.67 8.08 9.52 ...
TDR2025A m +5.2 NA 9.84 7.89 9.64 ...
TDR2030A m +5.3 NA 10.11 7.94 9.88 ...
TaxEBdAmA m +3.5 +3.7 12.54 11.53 12.04 +.03
TaxECAA m +3.6 +3.4 16.63 15.19 15.89 +.06
USGovSecA m +1.9 +5.7 14.79 13.66 14.06 +.02
WAMutInvA m +8.0 +2.8 29.67 22.58 29.22 +.01
WAMutInvB m +7.7 +2.1 29.46 22.43 29.00 +.01
Aquila
HITaxFA m +2.7 +3.8 11.60 11.04 11.35 ...
Arbitrage
ArbtrageR m +1.0 +4.2 12.93 12.27 12.73 +.02
Ariel
Apprec b +8.6 +6.6 46.84 32.10 46.03 -.09
Ariel b +7.3 +3.3 53.61 35.47 52.11 -.52
Artio Global
GlobHiYldA b +6.5 +9.2 11.15 10.27 11.07 +.01
IntlEqA b +.4 +.5 31.51 23.84 29.54 -.15
IntlEqIIA b +.2 +1.3 13.28 10.01 12.42 -.07
Artisan
IntSmCpIv d +6.1 +6.1 21.58 14.85 20.95 +.07
Intl d +5.8 +2.5 24.23 17.10 22.96 -.09
IntlVal d +4.8 +5.9 29.31 21.18 28.42 -.13
MdCpVal +12.5 +7.9 22.79 16.84 22.58 -.01
MidCap +9.5 +9.4 37.48 24.84 36.83 -.10
SmCapVal +8.0 +7.4 18.61 13.37 18.19 -.09
Aston Funds
MidCapN b +4.4 +9.7 34.58 24.75 33.36 +.05
MtgClGrN b +5.3 +5.6 25.71 20.23 25.41 -.03
TAMROSmCN b +6.9 +6.7 23.56 15.56 22.63 -.12
BBH
BrdMktFxI d +.8 +4.6 10.47 10.27 10.44 ...
IntlEqN d +5.1 +2.5 14.21 10.78 13.72 +.01
TaxEffEq d +8.5 +8.1 15.69 12.05 15.55 ...
BNY Mellon
BalFd +4.3 +5.3 11.69 9.59 11.46 -.03
BondFd +2.5 +6.5 13.47 12.94 13.27 +.02
EmgMkts -1.2 +8.8 12.40 8.85 11.70 -.10
IntlM +5.0 -.3 11.86 8.78 11.31 -.07
IntmBdM +1.8 +5.9 13.24 12.81 13.02 +.02
LgCpStkM +6.7 +3.2 9.48 6.90 9.23 -.02
MidCpStM +8.2 +5.7 13.68 8.96 13.26 -.06
NtlIntM +3.6 +4.7 13.75 12.73 13.25 +.03
NtlShTM +1.1 +3.2 13.01 12.85 12.93 +.01
PAIntMu +3.2 +4.1 12.96 12.13 12.56 +.01
SmCpStkM +6.7 +2.1 12.97 8.70 12.50 -.08
Baird
AggrInst +3.5 +6.2 10.91 10.42 10.74 +.02
CrPlBInst +4.0 +7.9 10.88 10.40 10.77 +.02
IntBdInst +3.2 +6.5 11.31 10.80 11.09 +.02
IntMunIns +3.7 +5.4 11.79 11.21 11.63 +.01
ShTmBdIns +1.6 +4.4 9.81 9.62 9.76 +.01
Barclays Global Inv
LP2020R m +4.6 +3.5 16.01 13.29 15.78 ...
Baron
Asset b +7.1 +3.8 61.10 44.23 59.20 -.28
Growth b +7.9 +4.5 57.22 40.23 55.30 -.51
Partners b +7.7 +3.7 22.80 15.39 22.15 -.29
SmCap b +10.3 +5.4 26.93 18.53 26.23 -.06
Bernstein
CAMuni +2.9 +4.3 14.96 14.09 14.44 +.01
DiversMui +2.9 +4.4 14.84 14.14 14.49 +.02
EmgMkts -1.2 +7.4 35.25 25.01 32.90 -.06
IntDur +3.3 +6.9 14.27 13.54 13.97 +.02
IntlPort +.9 -3.6 16.62 12.58 15.76 -.01
NYMuni +2.7 +4.4 14.61 13.94 14.26 +.01
ShDurDivr +1.2 +2.8 12.72 12.53 12.65 +.01
ShDurPlu +.7 +2.8 11.96 11.80 11.93 ...
TxMIntl +1.0 -3.7 16.74 12.66 15.88 -.01
Berwyn
Income d +3.4 +8.8 13.68 12.76 13.61 -.04
BlackRock
BalCapA m +9.1 +3.7 23.51 18.95 23.25 -.05
BasicValA m +6.5 +3.0 27.93 20.96 27.24 -.08
BasicValC m +6.2 +2.2 26.17 19.64 25.51 -.08
Engy&ResA m +3.4 +5.7 44.83 26.49 40.62 +.82
EqDivA m +7.2 +4.7 19.12 14.48 18.71 +.01
EqDivR b +7.0 +4.4 19.21 14.55 18.79 +.01
EquitDivC m +6.9 +3.9 18.74 14.19 18.32 ...
GlbDynEqA m +3.2 +5.3 13.50 10.22 12.90 -.02
GlobAlcA m +3.5 +6.8 20.75 16.99 20.09 +.01
GlobAlcB m +3.1 +5.9 20.22 16.56 19.56 ...
GlobAlcC m +3.1 +6.0 19.34 15.85 18.71 ...
GlobAlcR m +3.3 +6.5 20.08 16.45 19.43 ...
GovtInIvA m +1.8 +5.0 11.23 10.55 10.91 +.03
HiIncA m +6.4 +7.8 4.97 4.41 4.96 -.01
HiYldInvA m +5.9 +8.6 7.95 7.10 7.92 -.01
HthScOpA m +13.9 +10.7 32.53 25.80 32.29 -.04
InflPrBndA m +3.4 +6.6 11.60 10.54 10.97 -.06
InflPrBndC m +3.1 +5.8 11.58 10.53 10.96 -.05
IntlOppA m +2.4 +3.9 36.24 26.06 34.30 -.01
LCCrInvA m +13.0 +1.6 12.52 8.95 12.29 -.05
LCCrInvC m +12.5 +.7 11.57 8.28 11.35 -.05
LatinAmA m -7.7 +14.9 77.62 52.98 69.16 +.22
LgCapValA m +11.2 +.9 16.58 11.95 16.25 -.01
LowDurSvc b +1.8 +3.6 9.75 9.55 9.73 ...
MidCpValEqA m +8.1 +5.0 12.57 9.18 12.37 +.02
NatMuniA m +3.7 +3.8 10.47 9.48 10.04 +.04
NatResD m +3.3 +7.2 72.62 47.67 66.38 +.92
S&P500A b +6.6 +2.7 16.72 12.57 16.37 -.04
TotRtrnA m +2.6 NA 11.47 10.83 11.24 +.02
USOppInvC m +5.9 +7.3 38.87 27.63 37.93 -.16
USOppsIvA m +6.3 +8.1 42.71 30.23 41.70 -.16
ValOpptyA m +7.2 +1.3 21.41 14.24 20.46 -.12
Brandywine
BlueFd +2.8 -.3 27.37 19.61 26.37 -.14
Brandywin +7.3 +.1 30.08 19.53 28.51 -.24
Bridgeway
UltSmCoMk d +2.7 -.8 16.00 11.20 15.17 -.26
Brown Cap Mgmt
SmCo Is d +12.7 +12.7 49.87 32.88 49.29 +.02
Buffalo
MidCap d +5.5 +6.3 18.21 13.25 17.84 -.23
SmallCap d +6.3 +5.5 28.58 20.78 27.85 -.45
CG Capital Markets
CrFixIn +2.7 +7.3 8.88 8.27 8.49 +.01
EmgMktEq -.9 +8.1 18.12 13.09 17.13 -.02
IntlEqInv +4.3 +1.6 11.61 8.22 11.02 -.02
LgCapGro +5.9 +4.7 16.09 11.42 15.63 -.10
LgCapVal +7.6 +1.0 9.64 7.28 9.44 -.01
CGM
Focus -7.8 +2.6 36.39 24.44 32.07 -.13
Mutual -5.7 +4.5 30.21 22.53 27.79 -.21
Realty +9.1 +9.9 29.83 19.95 29.18 +.12
Calamos
ConvC m +4.3 +5.3 20.92 17.92 20.35 -.06
ConvertA m +4.6 +6.1 21.03 17.99 20.46 -.07
GlbGrIncA m +4.5 +5.5 11.56 9.20 11.24 +.01
GrIncA m +5.9 +5.6 34.35 26.77 33.25 -.11
GrIncC m +5.5 +4.8 34.45 26.92 33.33 -.13
GrowA m +6.1 +3.7 58.70 41.56 56.65 -.41
GrowB m +5.8 +3.0 58.21 41.47 56.16 -.41
GrowC m +5.8 +3.0 53.27 37.95 51.40 -.38
MktNuInA m +2.4 +3.4 12.33 11.18 12.24 ...
Calvert
BalancedA m +4.8 +2.7 28.83 24.05 28.52 -.14
BondA m +2.4 +5.0 16.05 15.37 15.76 ...
EquityA m +8.2 +5.4 39.20 28.43 38.71 +.03
IncomeA m +3.1 +4.4 16.25 15.64 16.22 +.02
ShDurIncA m +1.9 +5.1 16.71 16.36 16.58 +.01
Cambiar
OppInv +7.7 +3.5 20.38 13.98 19.76 ...
Champlain Investment
ChSmlComp b +9.5 +8.8 16.46 11.28 15.96 -.06
Clipper
Clipper +8.8 0.0 67.75 51.94 67.40 +.99
Cohen & Steers
Realty +11.1 +4.8 65.86 46.42 64.67 +.21
RealtyIns +11.2 +5.1 42.81 30.13 42.05 +.15
Colorado BondShares
COBdShrs f +1.8 +4.3 9.20 8.95 9.05 +.01
Columbia
AcornA m +6.4 +5.7 32.30 22.85 31.12 -.17
AcornC m +6.1 +4.9 29.58 21.11 28.49 -.16
AcornIntA m +2.3 +6.3 43.72 31.37 41.82 -.27
AcornIntZ +2.4 +6.7 43.82 31.44 41.92 -.27
AcornSelA m -.7 +4.8 29.34 21.15 27.75 -.50
AcornSelZ -.6 +5.2 30.20 21.72 28.57 -.51
AcornUSAZ +8.4 +4.6 32.21 21.26 30.96 -.23
AcornZ +6.5 +6.0 33.38 23.54 32.16 -.18
BondZ +2.7 +6.2 9.62 9.14 9.38 +.01
CntrnCoreA m +6.0 +6.6 15.44 11.18 15.13 -.03
ComInfoA m +5.1 +9.6 48.80 35.02 47.00 -.87
ComInfoC m +4.8 +8.8 40.48 29.19 38.91 -.73
DivBondA m +3.1 +5.9 5.12 4.91 5.10 ...
DivBondI +3.3 +6.3 5.13 4.92 5.11 +.01
DivIncA m +6.7 +4.9 14.06 10.95 13.85 +.01
DivIncZ +6.7 +5.2 14.07 10.95 13.86 +.01
DivOppA m +10.3 +5.8 8.58 6.29 8.52 +.05
DivrEqInA m +5.8 +2.2 10.96 7.97 10.65 -.03
EmMktOppA m -2.0 +9.1 10.33 7.47 9.69 -.01
EnrNatRsZ +1.1 +6.0 26.05 16.96 23.43 +.33
EqValueA m +5.9 +2.3 11.35 8.21 11.00 -.04
FlRateA m +3.3 +3.7 9.11 8.44 9.08 -.01
GlblTechA m +3.4 +8.0 22.24 16.79 21.57 -.34
HYMuniZ +2.9 +1.9 10.11 9.18 9.53 +.03
HiYldBdA m +5.8 +8.1 2.88 2.58 2.87 -.01
IncBldA m +5.1 +6.3 10.95 9.81 10.91 +.01
IncOppA m +5.7 +8.1 10.16 9.28 9.84 -.01
IntlOpZ -.4 +1.1 12.67 9.17 11.93 -.03
IntlVaZ +5.0 +.9 15.39 12.11 14.83 -.06
IntmBdZ +3.2 +6.6 9.25 8.91 9.19 ...
ItmMunBdZ +4.0 +4.4 10.72 10.02 10.44 +.01
LarCaCorZ +5.8 +3.5 14.17 10.58 13.89 -.01
LgCpGrowA m +7.1 +4.7 25.60 18.39 24.85 -.16
LgCpGrowZ +7.2 +5.0 26.18 18.81 25.42 -.16
LgCrQuantA m +7.9 +2.0 5.95 4.39 5.84 -.01
LtdDurCrdA m +2.4 +5.2 10.11 9.75 10.07 ...
MAIntlEqA m +1.9 -.1 12.97 9.44 12.25 -.02
MAIntlEqZ +2.1 +.2 13.15 9.56 12.42 -.02
Mar21CA m +3.5 +2.7 14.61 10.63 14.07 -.07
Mar21CC m +3.2 +1.9 13.61 9.95 13.08 -.07
Mar21CZ +3.7 +2.9 14.94 10.85 14.39 -.07
MarFocEqA m +2.0 +3.1 24.39 17.36 23.17 -.10
MarFocEqZ +2.1 +3.4 24.94 17.74 23.69 -.11
MarGrIA m +4.6 +2.7 22.06 15.54 21.27 -.05
MarGrIZ +4.7 +3.0 22.47 15.80 21.66 -.06
MdCapGthZ +11.3 +8.1 30.40 19.75 29.63 -.14
MdCapIdxZ +9.2 +6.7 12.93 8.96 12.58 -.08
MdCpValOppA m +8.3 +4.3 8.63 5.98 8.52 +.02
MdCpValOppR4 +8.2 +4.5 8.68 6.02 8.56 +.01
MdCpValZ +8.3 +4.3 14.81 10.46 14.56 +.02
MdCpVlA m +8.1 +4.0 14.79 10.45 14.54 +.02
MidGrOppA m +6.3 +7.0 12.42 8.51 12.03 -.06
PBAggA m +5.6 +3.9 11.00 8.38 10.73 -.03
PBModA m +5.0 +5.4 11.22 9.30 11.06 -.01
PBModAggA m +5.2 +4.7 11.11 8.82 10.89 -.02
PBModConA m +4.4 +5.4 10.99 9.50 10.88 -.01
PBTtlEqA m +6.0 +3.0 10.85 7.89 10.52 -.04
SIIncZ +1.5 +4.6 10.03 9.89 9.97 +.01
SelSmCapZ +.3 +2.9 18.98 12.85 17.82 -.09
ShTmMuZ +1.1 +3.4 10.60 10.46 10.53 +.01
SmCaVaIIA m +8.3 +4.2 15.40 10.17 14.82 -.15
SmCaVaIIZ +8.5 +4.4 15.51 10.25 14.93 -.15
SmCapCrZ +6.1 +5.7 17.49 11.92 16.87 -.18
SmCapIdxZ +6.9 +4.4 19.08 13.35 18.47 -.16
SmCpGthIZ +11.8 +7.9 36.99 23.42 35.34 -.17
SmCpValIA m +3.0 +4.1 47.76 34.92 46.10 -.30
SmCpValIZ +3.1 +4.4 50.13 36.63 48.40 -.31
StLgCpGrA m +11.1 NA 14.04 9.38 13.92 +.03
StLgCpGrZ +11.3 +8.6 14.15 9.43 14.03 +.04
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
InvGradeA m +3.8 +5.9 9.92 9.26 9.71 +.01
OpportA m +9.2 +4.7 30.52 20.56 29.70 -.18
TaxEA m +3.8 +4.1 10.11 9.18 9.63 +.02
TotalRetA m +6.0 +4.8 15.95 13.18 15.80 -.01
FrankTemp-Franklin
AZ TF A m +3.4 +3.8 11.11 9.93 10.53 +.04
AdjUSA m +.6 +3.6 8.94 8.84 8.84 -.01
AdjUSC m +.4 +3.2 8.93 8.84 8.84 ...
BalInv m +3.3 +.6 50.62 36.40 48.78 -.28
CA TF A m +3.2 +3.6 7.25 6.48 6.81 +.02
CA TF C m +2.9 +3.0 7.24 6.47 6.80 +.02
CAHY A m +3.4 +2.8 9.73 8.68 9.07 +.03
CAInTF A m +4.1 +3.3 12.40 11.08 11.77 +.03
CAInt A m +3.1 +3.9 11.81 10.93 11.32 +.01
CO TF A m +4.5 +3.7 12.01 10.65 11.41 +.06
CaTxFrAdv +3.2 +3.7 7.22 6.47 6.80 +.02
China A m +3.4 +14.8 42.33 29.94 41.18 +.04
ChinaAdv +3.5 +15.2 42.61 30.13 41.46 +.05
CvtSc A m +6.6 +6.4 16.51 12.86 16.19 +.02
DynaTechA m +7.8 +7.8 33.26 23.50 32.51 +.07
EqIn A m +5.0 +1.6 17.94 13.78 17.54 -.10
FL TF A m +3.9 +4.0 11.69 10.75 11.30 +.03
FLRtDAAdv +2.4 +3.4 9.26 8.88 9.22 -.01
Fed TF A m +4.5 +4.1 12.16 10.93 11.66 +.05
Fed TF C m +4.4 +3.5 12.16 10.93 11.66 +.05
FedIntA m +3.8 +4.5 12.08 11.19 11.66 ...
FedLmtT/FIncA m +1.8 +3.8 10.49 10.25 10.42 +.01
FedTxFrIA +4.6 +4.2 12.16 10.94 11.67 +.05
FlRtDAC m +2.3 +2.8 9.25 8.87 9.22 -.01
FlRtDAccA m +2.4 +3.2 9.25 8.87 9.22 ...
FlxCpGr A m +6.0 +5.2 52.42 37.91 51.10 -.07
FlxCpGrAd +6.1 +5.5 53.26 38.44 51.93 -.08
GoldPrAdv -11.0 +17.0 53.67 34.89 47.35 +1.16
GoldPrM A m -11.1 +16.7 51.50 33.53 45.39 +1.12
GoldPrM C m -11.4 +15.9 49.28 32.21 43.28 +1.06
GrowAdv +6.1 +5.4 48.18 36.66 47.36 -.20
GrowB m +5.7 +4.3 46.05 35.11 45.24 -.19
GrowC m +5.7 +4.3 45.56 34.74 44.76 -.19
Growth A m +6.0 +5.1 48.13 36.62 47.31 -.19
HY TF A m +4.7 +3.8 10.39 9.31 9.84 +.04
HY TF C m +4.5 +3.2 10.53 9.44 9.98 +.04
HighIncA m +6.1 +8.2 2.06 1.87 2.06 ...
HighIncC m +5.3 +7.5 2.08 1.88 2.07 ...
InSCGrAd +2.9 +6.5 17.81 13.07 17.28 +.08
Income A m +7.3 +6.4 2.30 1.97 2.28 ...
Income C m +7.0 +5.9 2.32 1.99 2.30 ...
IncomeAdv +7.0 +6.6 2.29 1.96 2.26 ...
IncomeB m +7.0 +5.5 2.29 1.97 2.27 ...
IncomeR b +6.8 +6.1 2.27 1.95 2.25 ...
InsTF A m +4.3 +3.6 12.19 10.93 11.66 +.04
LoDurTReA m +2.0 +5.3 10.48 10.16 10.45 +.01
MATFA m +4.7 +3.6 11.95 10.64 11.37 +.04
MD TF A m +3.2 +3.5 11.73 10.58 11.10 +.04
MITFA m +4.0 +3.8 12.22 11.12 11.72 +.03
MNTFA m +4.6 +4.5 12.55 11.47 12.16 +.02
MO TF A m +4.3 +3.9 12.33 11.14 11.80 +.05
NC TF A m +4.3 +4.1 12.51 11.29 12.00 +.05
NJ TF A m +3.2 +4.0 12.36 11.13 11.72 +.05
NY TF A m +3.7 +4.2 12.01 10.72 11.44 +.04
NY TF C m +3.5 +3.6 11.99 10.71 11.43 +.04
NYIntTFA m +4.0 +4.4 11.57 10.72 11.19 +.01
NatResA m +4.1 +9.6 45.14 27.63 41.36 +.68
OHTFA m +4.3 +4.0 12.78 11.50 12.24 +.03
OR TF A m +4.5 +4.4 12.22 11.08 11.73 +.04
PA TF A m +4.0 +4.1 10.57 9.49 10.11 +.05
PR TF A m +2.6 +3.8 12.16 10.77 11.36 +.04
RealRetA m +2.8 +5.7 11.53 10.62 11.36 +.02
RisDv A m +8.1 +3.3 35.75 27.54 35.50 ...
RisDv C m +7.8 +2.6 35.26 27.18 35.01 ...
SmCpGI C m +7.2 +5.3 37.10 25.18 35.86 -.30
SmCpValA m +2.7 +3.7 48.15 33.28 45.81 -.49
SmCpVlAd +2.8 +4.0 49.53 34.23 47.13 -.50
SmMCpGAdv +7.6 +6.3 42.73 28.77 41.33 -.34
SmMdCpGrA m +7.5 +6.0 41.47 27.98 40.11 -.33
StrInc A m +4.5 +7.7 10.71 9.93 10.70 +.03
StrIncAdv +4.5 +8.0 10.72 9.94 10.71 +.03
Strinc C m +4.2 +7.2 10.70 9.92 10.69 +.03
TotRetAdv +3.9 +6.8 10.42 9.80 10.32 +.02
TotalRetA m +3.9 +6.6 10.40 9.79 10.31 +.02
US Gov A m +2.6 +6.3 6.88 6.63 6.82 +.02
US Gov C m +2.4 +5.7 6.84 6.59 6.78 +.02
USGovtAdv +2.6 +6.4 6.90 6.65 6.84 +.02
Utils A m +10.6 +7.4 12.72 10.12 12.72 +.07
Utils C m +10.4 +6.9 12.66 10.09 12.66 +.06
VA TF A m +4.5 +4.0 11.93 10.77 11.47 +.04
FrankTemp-Mutual
Beacon A m +6.5 +1.2 13.15 10.67 13.03 ...
Beacon Z +6.7 +1.5 13.25 10.78 13.13 ...
Discov A m +6.1 +5.8 31.31 25.55 30.98 +.01
Discov C m +5.9 +5.1 31.00 25.28 30.66 ...
Discov Z +6.3 +6.2 31.71 25.88 31.38 +.01
DiscovR b +6.0 +5.6 31.01 25.31 30.68 ...
Euro A m +6.0 +5.5 22.76 18.75 22.33 -.12
Euro Z +6.1 +5.8 23.22 19.12 22.79 -.12
QuestA m +6.2 +5.0 18.76 15.15 18.64 +.06
QuestC m +5.8 +4.3 18.53 15.06 18.40 +.05
QuestZ +6.3 +5.3 18.92 15.24 18.80 +.06
Shares A m +7.0 +1.8 22.28 18.05 22.09 -.01
Shares C m +6.8 +1.1 22.03 17.83 21.84 -.01
Shares Z +7.2 +2.1 22.47 18.20 22.28 ...
FrankTemp-Templeton
BricA m -4.3 NA 15.97 11.33 14.53 -.08
DvMk A m -1.6 +6.5 26.96 18.79 25.12 +.05
EmgMktIs -2.0 +6.9 17.50 12.28 16.37 +.05
Fgn A m +8.6 +4.4 7.89 5.52 7.58 -.01
Frgn Adv +8.5 +4.7 7.80 5.47 7.50 -.02
Frgn C m +8.2 +3.6 7.71 5.40 7.40 -.02
GlBond A m +4.4 +11.8 14.08 12.62 13.93 +.05
GlBond C m +4.2 +11.3 14.10 12.64 13.96 +.06
GlBondAdv +4.4 +12.1 14.04 13.28 13.89 +.05
GlOp A m +7.6 +3.5 19.77 14.76 19.06 -.03
GlSmCo A m +2.4 +4.3 7.91 5.62 7.62 -.03
Growth A m +9.2 +.3 20.04 14.70 19.42 ...
Growth Ad +9.3 +.5 20.05 14.71 19.43 ...
Growth C m +8.8 -.5 19.54 14.31 18.92 -.01
IncomeA m +5.4 +7.1 3.01 2.41 2.95 ...
IncomeC m +5.3 +6.7 3.01 2.41 2.95 +.01
World A m +7.1 +2.7 16.39 12.25 15.89 -.04
Franklin Templeton
ConAllcC m +3.1 +5.1 14.04 12.35 13.90 +.02
ConAllctA m +3.4 +5.8 14.27 12.54 14.13 +.03
CoreAll A m +7.0 +3.0 13.55 10.22 13.28 -.02
FndAllA m +7.6 +2.6 11.43 9.05 11.26 ...
FndAllC m +7.4 +1.9 11.25 8.94 11.08 ...
GrAllcA m +4.6 +5.5 16.21 12.91 15.88 +.01
HYldTFInA +4.8 +4.0 10.42 9.34 9.87 +.04
TemHdCurA m +4.0 +5.7 10.40 8.25 10.16 +.05
TemMdTaC m +3.7 +5.3 14.58 12.37 14.38 +.03
TemMdTarA m +4.0 +6.1 14.90 12.63 14.70 +.03
GE
ElfunTr +7.9 +4.5 45.57 35.00 44.63 -.14
ElfunTxE +3.6 +4.6 12.06 11.02 11.53 +.04
S&SInc +3.5 +5.7 11.51 10.96 11.50 +.03
S&SProg +5.5 +4.1 43.40 33.17 42.43 -.14
GMO
DomBdVI +1.9 +6.0 4.63 4.24 4.24 ...
EmgDbtIII +5.5 +10.1 9.60 7.87 9.60 +.05
EmgDbtIV +5.5 +10.2 9.59 7.86 9.59 +.05
EmgMktII +1.6 +8.2 15.87 10.88 14.90 -.03
EmgMktIII +1.7 +8.2 15.91 10.91 14.94 -.02
EmgMktIV +1.6 +8.3 15.81 10.84 14.84 -.03
EmgMktV +1.7 +8.3 15.79 10.83 14.83 -.02
EmgMktsVI +1.8 +8.4 15.82 10.85 14.86 -.02
ForIII +4.5 +.3 13.43 9.87 12.71 -.06
ForIV +4.6 +.3 13.76 10.10 13.02 -.06
ForSmCaS +5.1 +6.0 15.11 10.14 14.40 -.08
InCorEqIV +5.9 +1.1 32.18 22.83 30.74 -.10
IntCEqIII +5.9 +1.0 32.20 22.84 30.75 -.11
IntCEqVI +5.9 +1.1 32.15 22.81 30.71 -.11
IntGEqIII +5.4 +3.4 25.36 17.75 24.41 -.04
IntGEqIV +5.3 NA 25.37 17.76 24.42 -.05
IntIVlIII +5.8 +.2 24.29 17.38 23.11 -.12
IntItVlIV +5.8 +.3 24.28 17.37 23.10 -.12
IntlSmIII +6.0 +4.0 9.00 6.04 8.67 -.02
QuIII +7.9 +4.5 21.78 17.16 21.59 -.06
QuIV +7.9 +4.5 21.80 17.17 21.60 -.06
QuVI +7.9 NA 21.79 17.17 21.59 -.06
StFxInVI +4.0 NA 15.78 14.93 15.73 +.05
TxMdIEIII +6.2 +1.7 16.22 11.52 15.46 -.06
USCorEqVI +8.1 +2.4 12.51 9.63 12.39 -.05
Gabelli
AssetAAA m +7.3 +6.5 53.83 38.79 52.49 -.09
EqIncomeAAA m +7.8 +5.5 22.30 16.60 21.94 +.02
GoldAAA m -9.1 +12.7 36.71 25.97 32.47 +.79
GrowthAAA m +1.8 +2.3 33.47 24.66 31.97 +.01
SmCpGrAAA m +4.8 +7.2 36.89 25.80 35.54 -.28
UtilA m +7.6 +7.1 6.71 5.86 6.62 ...
UtilAAA m +7.7 +7.2 6.66 5.83 6.58 +.01
UtilC m +7.4 +6.4 6.00 5.34 5.93 +.01
Value m +9.0 +5.3 17.32 12.68 17.00 +.04
Gartmore
LrgCapA m +6.7 +3.2 16.07 12.35 15.77 ...
Gateway
GatewayA m +3.3 +2.8 26.98 24.00 26.83 -.01
Goldman Sachs
BalStrA m +3.4 +3.7 10.76 9.32 10.54 -.02
CapGrA m +5.0 +3.1 22.67 17.33 22.24 -.06
CorFixIA m +2.7 +4.7 10.07 9.63 9.98 +.01
G&IStrA m +4.4 +2.4 11.30 9.23 10.98 -.02
GovtIncA m +1.8 +5.5 15.90 14.78 15.18 +.02
GrIncA m +5.1 +1.2 22.50 17.40 22.07 +.02
GrOppA m +7.0 +8.4 25.09 18.37 24.57 -.06
GrStrA m +5.1 +1.1 11.72 9.09 11.30 -.03
HiYieldA m +5.4 +7.0 7.47 6.80 7.46 -.01
LgCapValA m +5.3 +1.8 12.67 9.68 12.42 +.01
MidCapVaA m +7.0 +5.3 39.04 27.65 38.40 +.15
ShDuGovA m +.5 +4.8 10.50 10.21 10.28 ...
SmCpValA m +6.5 +5.3 43.38 30.34 42.06 -.20
StrIntEqA m +3.5 +.3 11.22 8.19 10.59 -.07
Greenspring
Greensprretl d +2.9 +5.4 25.20 22.58 24.89 -.05
GuideStone Funds
AggAllGS4 +5.6 +2.1 12.87 9.50 12.45 -.03
BlcAlloGS4 +4.4 +4.9 12.83 10.93 12.65 -.01
GrAlloGS4 +5.0 +3.6 13.20 10.51 12.90 -.01
GrEqGS4 +4.6 +3.3 20.26 14.50 19.77 -.05
IntEqGS4 +3.6 +1.7 14.65 10.65 13.92 -.01
LowDurGS4 x +1.3 +4.6 13.49 13.20 13.37 +.01
MedDurGS4 x +3.0 +7.0 14.48 13.51 13.98 ...
SmCapGS4 +10.2 +3.5 16.54 10.87 15.93 -.08
ValEqGS4 +7.8 +1.1 15.59 11.41 15.22 -.03
Harbor
Bond +3.0 +8.2 12.45 11.74 12.37 +.02
CapApInst +7.2 +5.2 40.02 29.37 39.38 -.20
CapAprAdm b +7.1 +4.9 39.82 29.22 39.17 -.20
CapAprInv b +7.1 +4.8 39.56 29.06 38.92 -.20
HiYBdInst d +4.8 +7.7 11.33 10.46 11.26 ...
IntlAdm m +5.3 +5.7 66.94 46.33 63.36 +.18
IntlGr d -.4 +1.5 13.07 9.49 12.32 -.01
IntlInstl d +5.4 +5.9 67.42 46.64 63.82 +.18
IntlInv m +5.3 +5.5 66.74 46.17 63.16 +.18
SmCpGr +8.1 +6.7 14.38 9.86 13.91 -.13
SmCpVal +9.0 +2.4 22.00 15.62 21.36 ...
Harding Loevner
EmgMkts d -3.5 +8.0 52.86 39.03 49.97 -.43
Hartford
AdvHLSFIB b +4.5 +3.8 20.77 16.86 20.44 -.07
AdvHLSIA +4.6 +4.1 20.55 16.69 20.22 -.07
AdviserA m +4.4 +3.6 15.65 12.65 15.39 -.06
BalAlA m +4.8 +4.4 12.07 9.82 11.85 -.02
CapAppIIA m +5.8 +5.5 15.27 10.84 14.77 -.10
CapApr C m +1.9 +1.9 32.29 24.42 31.32 -.16
CapAprA m +2.2 +2.6 36.47 27.43 35.39 -.18
CapAprB m +1.9 +1.8 32.09 24.29 31.12 -.16
StrInvZ +5.1 +4.6 20.96 14.82 20.12 -.16
StratAllocA m +5.4 +2.9 10.04 8.17 9.90 -.02
StratIncA m +4.7 +7.3 6.28 5.81 6.18 +.01
StratIncZ +4.9 +7.6 6.21 5.75 6.11 +.02
TaxEA m +4.4 +4.0 13.79 12.35 13.07 +.03
TaxEBdA m +3.8 +3.7 3.89 3.51 3.71 +.02
TaxEZ +4.5 +4.2 13.79 12.35 13.07 +.03
USGovMorA m +5.0 +6.8 5.45 5.14 5.45 +.01
ValRestrZ +3.2 +3.0 54.18 37.85 52.06 +.17
ValueA m +4.3 +1.0 12.23 9.27 11.99 -.05
ValueZ +4.5 +1.2 12.25 9.28 12.02 -.04
Commerce
Bond +3.2 +7.8 20.44 19.61 20.20 +.02
Constellation
SndsSelGrII +5.4 +7.0 10.83 7.46 10.55 +.01
DFA
1YrFixInI +.5 +3.2 10.38 10.31 10.35 ...
2YrGlbFII +.5 +3.3 10.30 10.13 10.20 +.01
5YearGovI +1.2 +4.7 11.17 10.69 10.89 +.02
5YrGlbFII +2.3 +4.9 11.75 10.78 11.13 +.02
EMktsSoCo -1.0 NA 15.50 11.41 14.61 -.07
EmMkCrEqI -.9 +12.4 23.21 16.37 21.97 -.10
EmMktValI -1.9 +12.9 38.10 27.82 35.47 -.24
EmMtSmCpI -1.1 +14.0 25.24 17.79 23.80 -.27
EmgMktI ... +11.3 32.37 22.98 30.65 +.02
GlEqInst +5.6 +3.6 14.76 10.65 14.22 -.05
Glob6040I +4.5 +4.8 13.69 11.08 13.38 -.01
InfPrtScI +4.5 NA 11.90 11.09 11.75 -.02
IntGovFII +2.2 +7.0 12.91 12.09 12.49 +.04
IntRlEstI +8.6 NA 5.59 3.67 5.45 +.07
IntSmCapI +4.4 +3.3 18.94 13.30 17.96 -.14
IntlValu3 +4.1 +2.5 18.91 13.45 17.84 -.03
LgCapIntI +4.3 +2.0 21.80 15.92 20.72 ...
RelEstScI +10.6 +3.4 24.43 17.26 23.85 +.05
STMuniBdI +1.4 +3.0 10.41 10.21 10.32 +.01
TMIntlVal +4.0 +2.8 16.56 11.75 15.61 -.02
TMMkWVal +8.3 +2.0 16.73 11.84 16.25 +.01
TMMkWVal2 +8.4 +2.1 16.11 11.39 15.65 +.01
TMUSEq +7.0 +3.3 14.81 10.91 14.47 -.05
TMUSTarVal +5.1 +1.4 23.61 16.00 22.57 -.20
TMUSmCp +6.3 +2.3 25.49 17.19 24.37 -.26
USCorEq1I +7.3 +4.0 12.09 8.71 11.78 -.05
USCorEq2I +7.1 +3.6 12.07 8.62 11.73 -.05
USLgCo +6.8 +3.3 10.76 8.07 10.54 -.03
USLgVal3 +9.1 +2.2 17.21 12.26 16.77 +.05
USLgValI +9.1 +2.1 22.48 16.02 21.90 +.06
USMicroI +4.9 +2.8 15.13 10.30 14.44 -.16
USSmValI +4.3 +2.4 28.21 18.50 26.66 -.34
USSmallI +6.7 +4.9 23.76 15.89 22.77 -.24
USTgtValI +5.2 +3.7 18.31 12.42 17.50 -.15
USVecEqI +6.7 +3.0 12.00 8.39 11.59 -.06
DWS-Investments
DrSmCpVlA m +3.7 +5.0 39.85 28.99 38.17 -.27
BstSmCpVl +4.1 +3.2 25.11 18.32 23.98 -.14
CAAMTBdZ +3.9 +3.6 14.90 13.35 14.13 +.05
DiscStkR b +6.7 +3.8 33.52 24.46 32.63 -.10
Dreyfus +6.8 +3.8 9.80 7.21 9.58 -.04
EmergMarI d -2.8 +8.7 13.95 10.31 13.17 -.13
EmgLead +4.0 -2.0 22.39 15.03 ...
EmgMkts m -2.9 +8.4 13.87 10.23 13.08 -.14
GNMA Z b +2.8 +6.2 15.83 15.25 15.81 +.04
GrowInc +6.5 +3.7 15.40 11.14 15.04 -.05
GrtChinaA m -2.6 +16.8 55.00 36.76 48.90 -1.63
HiYldI +6.3 +7.9 6.84 6.17 6.83 -.01
IntBndA f +3.8 +10.5 17.20 16.53 16.71 -.03
IntIncA f +3.7 +6.5 13.43 12.82 13.38 +.01
IntMuBd +4.0 +4.3 13.89 13.00 13.53 +.01
IntlStkI +4.1 NA 14.75 11.01 14.26 +.01
IntlStkIx +4.2 +.9 16.44 11.91 15.55 -.12
MidCapIdx +9.1 +6.4 31.27 21.87 30.41 -.22
MuniBd +3.3 +3.3 11.58 10.53 11.01 +.02
NJMuniA f +3.1 +3.5 13.10 11.86 12.42 +.04
NYTaxEBd +3.6 +4.1 15.22 13.92 14.58 +.03
OppMdCpVaA f +10.3 +8.9 38.37 25.47 37.69 -.19
SIMuBdD b +1.7 +3.7 13.33 13.02 13.19 +.02
SP500Idx +6.6 +2.7 37.66 28.92 36.87 -.10
SmCapIdx +7.0 +4.3 22.56 15.98 21.84 -.19
SmCoVal +4.4 +12.0 32.83 21.96 31.48 -.35
StratValA f +5.9 +3.5 30.96 22.81 30.19 -.08
TechGrA f +5.4 +7.6 34.86 23.69 34.24 +.01
WldwdeGrA f +10.1 +5.7 44.68 33.26 43.72 +.24
Driehaus
ActiveInc +2.4 +6.5 11.35 10.71 11.25 -.01
EmMktGr d +1.6 +10.4 34.42 23.49 32.73 -.09
Dupree
KYTxFInc +4.2 +4.7 7.92 7.33 7.67 ...
Eagle
CapApprA m +4.5 +3.4 29.72 22.76 29.17 -.19
MidCpStA m +3.6 +4.5 29.41 21.40 28.57 -.29
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m +5.1 +4.0 10.68 8.45 10.41 +.02
Floating-Rate A m +2.9 +3.8 9.41 8.91 9.40 ...
FltRateC m +2.7 +3.1 9.09 8.60 9.08 ...
FltRtAdv b +3.0 +3.8 9.10 8.61 9.09 ...
GovOblA m +1.4 +5.8 7.65 7.39 7.48 +.01
GtrIndiaA m -12.5 +5.4 29.97 21.43 24.66 -.35
HiIncOppA m +6.0 +6.7 4.52 4.07 4.51 ...
HiIncOppB m +5.7 +6.0 4.52 4.08 4.52 ...
IncBosA m +5.6 +7.7 6.00 5.47 5.99 -.01
LrgCpValA m +3.3 +1.8 19.26 15.13 18.78 ...
LrgCpValC m +3.0 +1.0 19.25 15.14 18.76 -.01
NatlMuniA m +3.7 +.5 10.03 8.44 9.04 +.04
NatlMuniB m +3.4 -.2 10.03 8.44 9.04 +.04
NatlMuniC m +3.4 -.2 10.03 8.44 9.04 +.04
PAMuniA m +4.5 +2.4 9.25 8.22 8.78 +.03
PaTxMgEMI d +.3 +11.6 53.81 39.18 51.29 -.16
LgCapValA m +7.3 +3.6 18.76 14.73 18.66 +.07
LgCapValS +7.4 +3.9 18.77 14.73 18.66 +.07
DWS-Scudder
BalA m +3.9 +3.0 9.59 7.98 9.41 ...
CATFIncA m +3.8 +3.9 7.47 6.70 7.10 +.02
CapGrA m +3.8 +4.5 58.29 43.03 56.55 -.32
CapGrS +3.9 +4.8 58.70 43.36 56.95 -.33
EnhEMFIS d +.7 +6.0 11.53 10.28 10.82 +.06
Eq500S +6.7 +3.0153.28 114.86 150.08 -.44
GNMAS +3.5 +6.7 15.65 15.04 15.56 +.04
GlbTS d +4.7 +1.9 25.90 19.11 24.95 -.27
GrIncS +8.9 +3.3 18.10 13.35 17.72 -.01
GvtSc m +3.5 +6.6 9.00 8.62 8.95 +.02
HiIncA m +5.5 +7.1 4.96 4.51 4.95 ...
HlthCareS d +16.1 +7.6 28.50 21.24 28.27 -.05
IntTFrS +3.8 +4.6 11.76 10.91 11.41 +.02
IntlS d +1.8 -1.2 49.01 37.27 46.08 -.05
LAEqS d -8.7 +9.2 53.68 39.22 48.50 +.27
MgdMuniA m +3.6 +4.5 9.25 8.39 8.82 +.03
MgdMuniS +3.7 +4.7 9.26 8.40 8.83 +.02
SPInxS +6.6 +2.9 18.13 13.58 17.76 -.05
ShDurPS +2.0 +4.4 9.64 9.49 9.58 ...
StrHiYldTxFA m +3.0 +3.5 12.52 11.18 11.79 +.06
StrHiYldTxFS +3.1 +3.8 12.53 11.19 11.80 +.06
StrValA m +5.0 -2.1 35.44 26.65 34.27 -.12
TechA m +4.4 +5.1 14.76 10.37 14.09 -.19
Davis
FinclA m +3.1 +.4 33.73 26.45 32.73 +.20
NYVentA m +4.9 +2.0 36.90 28.46 36.03 +.12
NYVentB m +4.5 +1.1 35.33 27.23 34.47 +.11
NYVentC m +4.6 +1.2 35.60 27.44 34.74 +.10
Delaware Invest
CorpBdIs +4.7 +9.1 6.35 5.76 6.01 +.01
DiverIncA m +3.4 +8.8 9.84 9.14 9.36 +.01
EmgMktA m +.1 +11.7 17.03 11.99 16.03 -.03
GrowOppA m +16.2 +9.0 25.30 16.72 24.81 -.14
LgValA m +10.6 +2.3 16.67 12.15 16.51 +.01
LtdDvIncA m +1.8 +6.0 9.05 8.83 8.98 +.02
OpFixIncI +3.3 +7.9 9.87 9.26 9.73 +.02
OptLgCpIs +6.0 +3.5 13.16 9.44 12.77 -.02
OptLgValI +8.5 +3.0 11.42 8.49 11.28 -.03
TaxFIntA m +2.9 +4.1 12.12 11.26 11.66 +.02
TaxFMNA m +3.7 +4.1 12.74 11.67 12.23 +.03
TaxFPAA m +3.0 +4.2 8.13 7.36 7.72 +.03
TaxFUSAA m +3.3 +3.9 11.64 10.62 11.12 +.04
Diamond Hill
LngShortA m +3.8 +.9 17.32 14.67 16.87 ...
LngShortI +3.9 +1.3 17.52 14.79 17.06 +.01
LrgCapI +6.7 +3.5 16.12 12.40 15.82 -.01
SmCapA m +4.8 +4.3 27.74 21.10 27.03 -.01
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEqI +4.3 +2.6 12.33 8.79 11.71 -.01
IntlSCoI +4.1 +3.8 18.73 13.00 17.87 -.03
IntlValuI +4.0 +2.3 20.21 14.38 19.07 -.03
Direxion
DynHYBdI b +4.2 +1.3 14.95 14.09 14.82 +.05
Dodge & Cox
Bal +6.6 +2.6 75.65 59.93 74.47 -.19
GlbStock +5.4 NA 9.72 7.14 9.38 -.03
Income +3.3 +7.1 13.53 13.15 13.53 +.03
IntlStk +3.5 +3.1 38.80 27.90 36.95 -.02
Stock +7.5 +.4 118.20 87.05 115.44 -.49
Domini Social Invmts
SocEqInv m +8.5 +3.5 32.81 24.27 32.14 -.16
Dreyfus
Apprecia +7.8 +4.5 42.06 31.31 41.17 +.08
AtvMdCpA f +9.0 +.2 36.88 26.58 35.80 -.20
BasSP500 +6.7 +3.1 27.98 20.96 27.28 -.08
BondIdxIn b +2.3 +6.0 10.85 10.38 10.66 +.01
BstSMCpGI +10.1 +7.0 15.90 10.86 15.46 -.09
StrIncA m +2.4 +7.3 8.26 8.10 8.25 +.01
StratIncC m +2.3 +6.5 7.80 7.64 7.79 +.02
TMG1.0 +5.8 +2.8574.45 435.73 563.32 -2.34
TMG1.1A m +5.6 +2.4 25.66 19.51 25.16 -.11
TMGlbDivIncA m +6.9 +2.2 10.51 8.44 10.20 +.01
TMGlbDivIncC m +6.5 +1.4 10.49 8.43 10.18 +.02
TaxMgdVlA m +3.5 +1.3 17.94 14.12 17.49 -.01
WldwHealA m +12.1 +7.6 10.53 8.15 10.48 -.01
FAM
Value +7.2 +3.0 48.92 38.16 48.61 +.28
FBR
FBRFocus m +.4 +5.8 51.90 38.90 50.04 -.62
FMI
CommStk +8.0 +8.9 27.49 20.91 27.09 +.02
Focus +9.4 +8.9 33.81 23.07 33.18 -.12
LgCap +7.9 +5.7 17.00 13.23 16.84 -.05
FPA
Capital m +10.8 +7.2 47.08 30.86 45.67 +.29
Cres d +5.8 +6.7 28.71 23.99 28.34 -.07
NewInc m +1.5 +4.2 11.07 10.82 10.90 +.01
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d -7.9 +6.7 36.53 28.24 32.76 -.52
Federated
CapAprA m +1.3 +3.1 20.00 15.48 19.26 +.02
ClvrValA m +7.2 +2.6 15.75 11.60 15.41 +.04
HiIncBdA m +5.2 +8.3 7.77 7.11 7.74 ...
InterConA m +3.8 +3.7 55.09 37.18 51.82 -.01
KaufmanA m +4.2 +4.3 5.89 4.37 5.72 -.05
KaufmanB m +4.0 +3.8 5.56 4.13 5.41 -.04
KaufmanC m +3.8 +3.7 5.56 4.13 5.40 -.05
KaufmanR m +4.0 +4.3 5.89 4.38 5.72 -.05
KaufmnSCA m +6.0 +4.3 28.37 19.09 27.77 -.20
MuniSecsA f +3.9 +3.0 10.34 9.34 9.85 +.02
MuniUltA m +.7 +2.2 10.05 10.01 10.04 +.01
PrdntBr m -8.5 -1.6 5.65 4.26 4.33 +.04
StrValA m +9.7 +2.8 4.80 3.75 4.77 +.02
StratIncA f +3.8 +8.1 9.45 8.54 9.25 -.03
TotRetBdA m +2.6 +6.4 11.48 11.01 11.28 +.01
USGovSecA f +2.1 +5.4 7.93 7.66 7.83 +.02
Fidelity
AstMgr20 +2.8 +4.8 13.17 12.01 13.08 ...
AstMgr50 +4.0 +5.0 16.27 13.52 15.99 -.02
AstMgr85 +4.8 +4.3 14.51 10.85 14.04 -.05
Bal +5.0 +4.4 19.40 15.94 19.09 -.02
BlChGrow +7.0 +6.5 49.64 34.78 48.53 -.11
BlChVal +6.5 -.8 11.88 9.04 11.51 -.06
CAMuInc d +3.9 +3.9 12.37 11.33 11.88 +.03
CASITxFre d +2.1 +4.3 10.81 10.49 10.66 +.01
CTMuInc d +3.9 +4.6 11.84 11.01 11.50 +.01
Canada d +3.1 +8.3 63.77 46.30 59.97 +.83
CapApr +5.6 +2.9 27.33 20.41 26.75 -.03
CapInc d +6.4 +10.5 9.95 8.47 9.84 -.02
ChinaReg d +1.3 +12.9 34.07 24.62 32.94 +.04
Contra +4.7 +5.2 72.91 54.99 70.83 -.07
ConvSec +7.2 +6.9 27.62 21.07 27.11 +.04
DiscEq +6.7 +.9 24.96 19.05 24.05 -.09
DivGrow +5.3 +4.6 31.04 21.79 29.94 -.12
DivStk +6.3 +3.3 16.30 12.06 15.90 -.10
DivrIntl d +2.8 +1.0 32.85 23.93 30.99 -.09
EmergAsia d +3.6 +9.4 32.86 22.93 31.73 -.04
EmgMkt d -.3 +6.7 27.86 19.80 26.26 -.02
EqInc +6.0 +1.4 48.11 35.94 46.81 -.09
EqInc II +6.1 +.8 19.84 14.86 19.31 -.03
EuCapApr d +4.5 +1.2 21.27 14.36 19.89 ...
Europe d +4.5 +2.0 35.01 23.88 32.74 -.01
ExpMulNat d +4.8 +2.6 23.65 17.70 22.86 -.05
FF2015 +4.2 +4.4 12.05 10.07 11.77 ...
FF2035 +4.9 +3.3 12.45 9.53 11.99 -.01
FF2040 +5.0 +3.1 8.71 6.64 8.38 ...
Fidelity +7.4 +3.9 35.76 25.78 34.51 -.08
Fifty +6.6 +1.3 19.26 13.85 18.79 -.07
FltRtHiIn d +1.9 +4.8 9.91 9.37 9.88 -.01
FocStk +8.9 +6.5 15.26 10.30 14.87 -.06
FocuHiInc d +4.8 +6.8 9.57 8.79 9.44 -.01
FourInOne +5.6 +3.7 29.24 22.66 28.51 -.07
Fr2045 +5.0 NA 10.33 7.83 9.93 -.01
Fr2050 +5.1 NA 10.23 7.66 9.82 -.01
Free2000 +2.9 +4.4 12.37 11.34 12.25 +.01
Free2005 +3.6 +4.2 11.38 9.77 11.16 ...
Free2010 +4.1 +4.6 14.42 12.11 14.09 ...
Free2020 +4.5 +4.1 14.75 11.96 14.35 ...
Free2025 +4.7 +4.0 12.40 9.81 12.01 -.01
Free2030 +4.8 +3.4 14.86 11.61 14.37 -.01
FreeInc +2.8 +4.5 11.65 10.74 11.55 +.01
GNMA +3.1 +7.2 11.94 11.30 11.67 +.02
GlbCmtyStk d -.4 NA 18.55 12.22 17.08 +.19
GlobBal d +4.5 +6.2 24.07 18.76 23.30 -.07
GovtInc +2.0 +6.3 10.97 10.26 10.55 +.01
GrDiscov +8.0 +5.5 15.24 10.46 14.78 -.05
GrStr d +5.8 +4.1 22.26 15.60 21.62 -.08
GrowCo +9.9 +7.7 93.53 64.17 91.39 +.03
GrowInc +5.9 -4.1 19.75 14.60 19.34 -.09
HiInc d +5.4 +8.8 9.24 8.31 9.21 -.02
Indepndnc +6.0 +5.7 26.75 18.16 25.81 -.06
InfProtBd +3.9 +5.7 12.21 11.39 11.99 -.03
IntBond +2.8 +5.8 10.86 10.38 10.72 +.01
IntGovt +1.7 +5.8 11.21 10.58 10.83 +.01
IntMuniInc d +2.9 +4.5 10.48 9.89 10.17 +.01
IntSmOpp d +3.9 -2.7 11.28 7.87 10.80 -.06
IntlCptlAppr d +2.6 +1.1 14.03 9.92 13.22 -.03
IntlDisc d +2.0 +2.0 35.83 25.96 33.71 -.06
IntlSmCp d +3.3 +2.7 23.10 15.98 21.97 -.06
InvGrdBd +3.3 +5.5 7.56 7.23 7.54 +.01
Japan d -9.4 -6.9 11.87 9.65 10.13 -.25
LargeCap +5.9 +4.5 19.10 13.84 18.65 -.13
LatinAm d -3.6 +11.7 60.50 43.25 56.90 +.44
LevCoSt d +8.0 +4.8 31.59 21.30 30.68 +.02
LgCpVal +7.1 -.8 11.52 8.87 11.27 -.02
LowPriStk d +8.4 +5.7 42.57 30.93 41.59 -.30
MAMuInc d +3.6 +4.5 12.32 11.38 11.87 +.01
MIMuInc d +3.2 +4.5 12.24 11.45 11.84 +.02
MNMuInc d +3.6 +4.5 11.79 11.08 11.49 +.01
Magellan +4.1 +.7 77.46 58.10 74.53 -.27
MdCpVal d +7.9 +4.4 17.57 12.44 17.21 +.06
MeCpSto +5.5 +3.0 10.79 8.05 10.54 -.07
MidCap d +7.5 +4.3 31.78 22.04 31.00 -.07
MtgSec +2.7 +5.0 11.03 10.69 10.99 +.01
MuniInc d +3.7 +4.3 12.97 11.94 12.52 +.03
NJMuInc d +2.7 +4.2 11.94 11.03 11.43 +.02
NYMuInc d +3.4 +4.5 13.36 12.28 12.84 +.01
NewMille +7.8 +5.6 32.26 23.28 31.39 -.05
NewMktIn d +3.8 +9.4 16.63 14.84 15.90 +.05
Nordic d +7.2 +5.3 38.84 24.46 36.82 +.35
OHMuInc d +3.6 +4.5 11.97 11.11 11.61 +.02
OTC +9.7 +10.3 62.30 41.75 60.24 -.26
Overseas d +3.1 -.2 35.56 25.84 33.48 -.20
PacBasin d +.5 +4.6 27.12 19.64 26.21 -.34
Puritan +5.3 +4.9 19.18 15.52 18.79 -.01
RealInv d +10.2 +3.1 28.93 20.33 28.30 +.11
RelEstInc d +5.4 +5.3 10.95 9.60 10.91 +.01
Series100Index +5.3 NA 9.45 7.23 9.20 -.04
ShIntMu d +1.9 +4.0 10.82 10.54 10.70 +.01
ShTmBond +1.3 +2.7 8.53 8.39 8.52 +.01
SmCapRetr d +8.5 +9.8 22.78 15.40 22.21 -.14
SmCapStk d +8.1 +6.6 21.72 14.68 21.18 -.15
SmCpGr d +9.1 +6.1 17.84 11.86 17.11 -.18
SmCpOpp +8.0 NA 12.24 7.90 11.72 -.06
SmCpVal d +4.0 +6.1 16.78 12.35 16.24 -.03
StkSelec +6.1 +3.3 28.16 20.13 27.30 -.13
StrDivInc +9.9 +2.8 11.61 9.11 11.54 +.03
StratInc +4.6 +8.4 11.67 10.72 11.35 +.01
StratRRet d +3.7 +4.5 10.11 8.48 9.89 +.03
StratRRnI d +3.7 +4.4 10.09 8.46 9.87 +.03
TaxFrB d +3.8 +4.6 11.19 10.27 10.76 +.03
Tel&Util +10.7 +5.3 17.63 13.39 17.61 +.10
TotalBd +3.3 +6.8 11.16 10.64 10.92 +.01
Trend +8.9 +6.7 75.18 51.59 73.39 -.14
USBdIdxInv +2.5 +5.9 11.71 11.16 11.48 +.01
Value +7.2 +2.7 75.87 53.86 73.64 -.16
ValueDis +6.6 +1.8 16.04 11.82 15.60 -.03
Worldwid d +5.6 +4.7 20.56 14.47 19.71 -.06
Fidelity Advisor
AstMgr70 +4.5 +4.4 17.52 13.68 17.07 -.04
BalT m +4.9 +3.7 15.99 13.11 15.73 -.01
CapDevO +7.8 +4.1 12.00 8.35 11.52 -.06
DivIntlA m +3.1 -.8 17.47 12.66 16.54 -.04
DivIntlC m +2.7 -1.6 16.74 12.15 15.84 -.05
DivIntlIs d +3.3 -.6 17.75 12.86 16.81 -.04
DivIntlT m +3.0 -1.1 17.31 12.55 16.39 -.04
EmMktIncI d +3.7 +9.4 13.89 12.40 13.31 +.05
EqGrowA m +7.9 +3.9 60.10 41.10 58.23 -.21
EqGrowI +8.0 +4.3 64.02 43.77 62.04 -.22
EqGrowT m +7.8 +3.8 59.82 40.93 57.96 -.21
EqIncA m +7.3 +1.0 25.01 18.61 24.50 -.03
EqIncI +7.4 +1.3 25.77 19.16 25.25 -.02
EqIncT m +7.2 +.8 25.37 18.87 24.85 -.03
FltRateA m +1.8 +4.5 9.92 9.38 9.89 -.01
FltRateC m +1.5 +3.7 9.92 9.38 9.89 -.01
FltRateI d +1.9 +4.8 9.90 9.36 9.88 ...
Fr2010A m +3.9 +4.4 12.21 10.22 11.95 -.01
Fr2015A m +3.9 +4.2 12.17 10.14 11.90 -.01
Fr2020A m +4.2 +3.7 12.80 10.34 12.47 -.01
Fr2020T m +4.2 +3.5 12.79 10.33 12.47 -.01
Fr2025A m +4.5 +3.7 12.46 9.81 12.08 -.02
Fr2030A m +4.5 +3.0 13.11 10.19 12.70 -.01
Fr2035A m +4.6 +3.0 12.51 9.51 12.07 -.02
Fr2040A m +4.7 +2.8 13.38 10.14 12.90 -.02
GrowIncI +6.0 +2.4 18.69 13.76 18.30 -.09
GrowOppT m +10.0 +4.0 38.91 26.08 37.85 +.04
HiIncAdvA m +6.9 +7.8 10.50 8.99 10.44 ...
HiIncAdvI d +7.0 +8.1 9.98 8.57 9.91 ...
HiIncAdvT m +6.9 +7.8 10.55 9.03 10.48 ...
IntrDiscA m +1.9 +1.7 35.58 25.77 33.47 -.06
LeverA m +8.0 +5.1 38.29 25.91 37.16 +.03
LeverC m +7.6 +4.3 36.42 24.75 35.33 +.02
LeverI +8.1 +5.4 38.73 26.22 37.60 +.04
LeverT m +7.9 +4.9 37.60 25.46 36.49 +.03
LrgCapI +5.9 +4.5 20.29 14.73 19.81 -.14
Mid-CpIIA m +4.5 +5.9 19.17 14.07 18.70 -.15
Mid-CpIII +4.5 +6.1 19.42 14.22 18.94 -.15
MidCapA m +5.1 +2.1 21.62 15.48 21.06 -.10
MidCapT m +5.0 +1.9 21.81 15.64 21.24 -.11
MidCpIIT m +4.3 +5.6 19.03 14.00 18.56 -.15
NewInsA m +4.3 +4.7 21.40 16.21 20.79 -.02
NewInsC m +4.0 +3.9 20.39 15.50 19.80 -.03
NewInsI +4.4 +4.9 21.62 16.37 21.00 -.03
NewInsT m +4.2 +4.4 21.15 16.04 20.54 -.03
OverseaI d +3.9 +2.0 20.39 14.13 19.23 -.04
ShFixInI +1.4 +3.1 9.29 9.14 9.28 +.01
SmCapA m +9.6 +7.3 27.83 20.76 27.03 -.27
SmCapI +9.8 +7.7 29.15 21.65 28.32 -.28
SmCapT m +9.5 +7.1 26.86 20.11 26.09 -.25
StSlctSmCp d +8.4 +3.5 20.94 13.43 20.07 -.10
StratIncA m +4.5 +8.3 13.09 12.02 12.68 ...
StratIncC m +4.2 +7.5 13.06 12.00 12.66 +.01
StratIncI +4.5 +8.6 13.22 12.14 12.82 ...
StratIncT m +4.5 +8.3 13.08 12.01 12.68 +.01
TechA m +5.4 +8.4 27.46 18.34 26.36 -.32
TotBondA m +3.1 +6.4 11.17 10.64 10.92 +.01
TotBondI +3.3 +6.7 11.15 10.62 10.91 +.01
ValStratT m +6.8 +3.9 28.43 19.76 27.66 -.11
Fidelity Select
Banking d -3.8 -8.0 19.65 14.67 17.80 -.05
Biotech d +19.2 +8.3 87.37 58.55 86.97 -.09
BrokInv d -3.5 -1.4 55.95 42.21 50.63 -.66
Chemical d +9.0 +13.5 111.04 63.99 104.03 -.59
CommEq d +9.1 +7.0 30.20 19.74 28.92 -.43
Computer d +5.5 +10.4 62.42 42.57 59.51 -.77
ConsStpl d +8.7 +10.4 73.92 57.47 73.64 +.31
DefAero d +10.5 +5.4 82.73 59.81 80.76 -1.05
Electron d +9.2 +3.9 54.98 34.61 52.81 -1.03
Energy d +9.6 +5.9 62.56 37.16 57.23 +.71
EnergySvc d +7.4 +4.5 88.76 46.90 79.87 +.67
FinSvc d -3.0 -8.7 65.17 51.47 59.77 -.79
Gold d -7.1 +13.3 55.28 39.69 47.46 +1.18
HealtCar d +16.2 +8.3145.90 100.51 144.84 -.37
IndustEq d +7.0 +6.4 37.56 24.62 36.15 -.41
Industr d +7.2 +7.4 26.12 17.59 24.94 -.30
Materials d +3.0 +11.3 74.58 47.18 69.93 -.14
MedDeliv d +22.7 +8.3 61.69 39.12 60.97 -.31
MedEqSys d +15.6 +11.2 31.96 21.95 31.71 +.12
NatGas d +5.5 +2.3 37.23 25.57 35.03 +.33
NatRes d +6.9 +8.5 40.76 24.65 37.13 +.55
Pharm d +14.2 +9.2 13.97 10.20 13.81 -.08
SelctUtil d +10.1 +5.4 53.22 41.59 53.16 +.19
SoftwCom d +7.1 +12.5 89.73 63.21 87.71 -.64
Tech d +5.5 +10.2105.02 70.10 100.89 -1.22
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxInv +6.8 +3.1 48.31 36.36 47.31 -.13
ExtMktIdI d +7.6 +6.1 41.87 29.12 40.57 -.21
FdSpIntIv +2.8 +7.3 11.39 10.41 10.83 +.02
IntlIdxIn d +4.5 +1.3 38.58 28.13 36.64 -.10
TotMktIdI d +7.0 +3.8 39.77 29.40 38.87 -.12
First American
RealA m +10.4 +5.9 20.19 14.20 19.76 +.08
First Eagle
FndofAmY b +9.1 +7.9 28.62 20.85 28.25 -.02
GlbA m +4.4 +7.7 49.61 38.82 48.40 -.01
Gold m -3.5 +14.3 35.84 25.36 32.77 +.90
OverseasA m +2.8 +6.8 24.05 18.88 23.29 -.02
USValueA m +6.9 +6.3 17.64 14.38 17.45 +.03
First Investors
BlChipA m +6.8 +1.9 22.89 17.70 22.55 -.10
GrowIncA m +8.4 +2.9 15.79 11.56 15.52 -.03
IncomeA m +5.2 +4.6 2.58 2.34 2.57 ...
PERCENT RETURN
SPECIALTY FUNDS YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
BALANCED
INTERNATIONAL
BOND FUNDS
Mutual Fund Categories
Conservative Allocation (CA) 3.98 14.17 3.53 4.38
Moderate Allocation (MA) 4.79 19.52 2.18 3.99
Health (SH) 16.18 32.14 8.90 7.14
Natural Resources (SN) 1.45 37.59 -5.76 6.81
Real Estate (SR) 9.88 32.99 0.55 2.86
Technology (ST) 6.48 34.19 6.33 6.99
Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) 3.80 15.72 1.98 4.13
Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) 4.38 18.82 1.07 3.81
Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE) 4.37 19.64 1.01 3.59
Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) -1.25 31.33 -2.07 8.17
Europe Stock (ES) 5.90 35.65 -5.52 2.15
Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) 3.51 34.14 -0.36 3.39
Foreign Large Blend (FB) 3.67 30.91 -5.06 1.25
Foreign Large Growth (FG) 3.64 33.87 -3.62 2.80
Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) 3.30 39.55 -0.61 3.21
Foreign Large Value (FV) 4.71 28.97 -5.27 0.85
World Allocation (IH) 3.72 22.23 0.88 4.72
World Stock (WS) 5.06 29.56 -1.35 2.97
Interm-Term Bond (CI) 3.02 6.73 6.08 5.95
Interm. Government (GI) 2.20 3.97 5.16 5.68
High Yield Muni (HM) 2.64 1.46 1.40 1.10
High Yield Bond (HY) 5.58 17.56 8.65 7.16
Muni National Interm (MI) 3.30 3.14 4.10 4.04
Muni National Long (ML) 3.63 1.98 3.28 3.19
Muni Short (MS) 1.60 2.08 2.80 3.15
9.6
42.4
7.1
5.7
11.1
41.8
2.6
6.2
8.3
28.5
-2.6
0.9
9.8
38.3
4.5
6.0
8.0
33.1
6.7
5.0
6.6
23.1
1.4
4.1
6.1
28.4
8.7
5.7
9.0
29.1
5.1
4.1
4.2
26.5
0.2
3.9
SV SB SG
MV MB MG
LV LB LG YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
L
A
R
G
E
-
C
A
P
M
I
D
-
C
A
P
S
M
A
L
L
-
C
A
P
VALUE GROWTH BLEND
*– Annualized
FundFocus
This fund has a volatile but strong long-term record. It takes an
aggressive approach to investing in government-backed mortgage
securities, including Ginnie Mae mortgages.
Intermediate Government CATEGORY
MORNINGSTAR
RATING™
ASSETS
EXP RATIO
MANAGER
SINCE
RETURNS 3-MO
YTD
1-YR
3-YR ANNL
5-YR-ANNL
★★★★★
$1,289 million
+3.3
+3.4
+5.6
+9.1
+8.3
0.85%
Michael Salm
2007-05-31
TOP 5 HOLDINGS PCT
Gnma Gii30 Tba 41.23
Gnma Gii30 Tba 27.99
GNMA 5% 6.02
GNMA 4% 5.15
Swptn 5yx10y R 5.32 Usd 01/05/ 3.24
Putnam USGovtInA m PGSIX
Fund Focus
C M Y K
PAGE 6D SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ M U T U A L S
NORTH AMERICAN
WARHORSE
Exit 1 off Rt. 380
1000 DUNHAM DR.
DUNMORE, PA
www.nawarhorse.com
(570) 346-2453
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 7D
➛ M U T U A L S
CapAprI +2.3 NA 36.51 27.39 35.43 -.18
ChksBalsA m +3.9 NA 10.04 8.27 9.88 -.02
CpApHLSIA +4.6 +4.6 45.67 33.13 44.32 -.21
CpApHLSIB b +4.5 +4.3 45.25 32.82 43.90 -.21
DivGrowA m +6.3 +4.5 20.65 15.66 20.15 -.08
DivGrowI +6.4 NA 20.59 15.61 20.09 -.08
DsEqHLSIA +8.5 +3.2 13.02 9.59 12.80 -.04
DvGrHLSIA +6.6 +4.8 21.31 16.18 20.79 -.08
DvGrHLSIB b +6.5 +4.6 21.25 16.13 20.73 -.07
EqIncA m +7.8 +4.8 13.87 10.54 13.71 +.01
FloatRtA m +2.8 +3.5 9.01 8.48 8.95 -.01
FloatRtC m +2.6 +2.7 9.00 8.47 8.95 ...
FloatRtI +2.9 NA 9.01 8.49 8.96 -.01
GlbGrthIA +4.6 +.7 17.09 12.01 16.34 -.02
GrAlA m +5.1 +4.0 12.45 9.54 12.13 -.03
GrOpHLSIA +9.2 +4.9 28.94 20.00 28.25 -.09
GrOppA m +8.9 +4.5 29.88 20.77 29.15 -.09
GrOppL m +8.9 +4.7 30.70 21.32 29.95 -.10
HiYdHLSIA +6.4 +9.0 9.74 8.10 9.74 +.01
InOpHLSIA +1.9 +5.3 13.31 9.62 12.70 -.05
IndHLSIA +6.7 +2.9 28.54 21.47 27.95 -.08
InflPlC m +3.5 +5.7 12.20 10.95 11.45 -.05
InflPlusA m +3.8 +6.5 12.32 11.08 11.58 -.05
MCVlHLSIA +7.0 +5.2 11.26 7.92 11.04 -.01
MdCpHLSIA +7.8 +6.9 28.80 20.62 28.05 -.11
MidCapA m +7.5 +6.1 24.30 17.48 23.65 -.11
MidCapC m +7.2 +5.4 21.25 15.36 20.67 -.09
Sm-CpGrHLSIA +12.7 +6.3 24.81 15.28 24.09 -.11
SmCoHLSIA +13.3 +5.2 20.65 13.32 20.02 -.21
StkHLSIA +5.6 +3.0 44.46 32.79 43.27 -.25
TRBdHLSIA +3.2 +5.4 11.54 10.81 11.24 +.02
TRBdHLSIA b +3.1 +5.1 11.46 10.76 11.18 +.02
TotRetBdA m +2.9 +5.0 10.76 10.36 10.65 +.01
USHLSIA +1.5 +3.3 11.17 10.36 10.61 +.02
ValHLSIA +5.9 +4.5 11.68 8.77 11.41 -.05
Heartland
SelectVal m +5.9 +6.2 31.69 23.25 30.89 ...
Value m +5.8 +3.6 48.48 33.76 46.35 -.27
ValuePlus m +3.1 +9.7 32.39 22.65 30.75 -.24
Henderson
IntlOppA m +7.3 +4.0 23.63 17.57 22.62 -.06
IntlOppC m +6.9 +3.2 22.36 16.63 21.40 -.06
Homestead
Value d +9.3 +2.7 34.22 25.45 33.57 -.26
Hotchkis & Wiley
LgCapValA m +4.2 -2.3 17.55 13.12 16.96 -.15
Hussman
StrTotRet d +1.1 +7.3 12.86 12.04 12.25 +.04
StratGrth d +.6 -.7 13.53 11.84 12.36 -.06
ICON
Energy +7.3 +7.2 23.11 14.53 21.50 +.19
ING
CorpLeadB +11.1 +6.5 23.25 16.10 22.55 +.11
GNMAIncA m +3.1 +6.4 8.99 8.71 8.97 +.04
GlREstA m +6.1 +2.5 17.50 13.21 17.16 +.14
IntlVal A m +4.1 +.1 12.72 9.85 12.11 -.02
RussiaA m -1.4 +7.6 46.06 28.36 40.13 -.44
TRPGrEqI +5.2 +4.6 58.73 42.62 57.30 -.12
INVESCO
AmerValA m +8.9 +5.9 30.05 21.92 29.60 -.12
AsPacGrA m +4.4 +12.7 32.41 22.94 31.46 +.12
BasicValA m +4.6 -1.8 22.70 17.35 21.92 -.23
CapDevA m +8.6 +2.7 18.51 12.71 17.81 -.07
CharterA m +7.7 +5.5 17.60 13.78 17.42 ...
ComstockA m +6.9 +2.4 17.20 12.78 16.76 -.10
ComstockB m +6.9 +2.2 17.20 12.78 16.76 -.10
ComstockC m +6.6 +1.7 17.20 12.78 16.75 -.10
ConstellA m +5.2 -.2 24.89 18.32 24.49 -.08
ConstellB m +4.8 -1.0 22.32 16.53 21.94 -.08
CorpBondA m +4.0 +6.7 6.95 6.50 6.88 +.01
CpGrA m +6.0 +7.2 14.64 10.63 14.30 -.03
DevMkt A m +.6 +11.3 34.78 25.75 33.29 -.04
DivDivA m +7.2 +4.7 13.18 10.32 13.09 +.06
DivDivInv b +7.1 +4.8 13.18 10.32 13.08 +.05
DivGrowB m +8.1 +1.3 14.01 10.82 13.90 +.06
DynInv b +10.9 +4.6 25.36 16.86 24.69 -.11
EnergyA m +5.4 +8.3 47.82 29.13 43.63 +.48
EnergyInv b +5.4 +8.3 47.65 29.02 43.48 +.49
EnterprsA m +5.9 +7.3 18.99 13.82 18.55 -.03
EqIncomeA m +5.4 +4.6 9.17 7.32 9.01 -.01
EqIncomeB m +5.3 +4.4 9.00 7.18 8.84 -.01
EqIncomeC m +5.1 +3.8 9.04 7.21 8.88 -.01
EqWSP500A m +8.9 +5.0 33.96 24.54 33.49 -.07
EuroGrA m +9.7 +4.1 34.74 24.00 33.69 +.23
FloatRtA m +2.9 +3.1 7.88 7.34 7.83 -.02
GlHlthCrA m +17.1 +6.0 31.40 23.28 31.29 +.10
GlHlthCrI m +17.1 +6.0 31.41 23.28 31.29 +.09
GlS&MGrA m +6.1 +4.7 21.01 15.20 20.20 -.09
GlobEqA m +7.5 +.3 11.88 8.65 11.55 +.02
GlobFranA m +11.7 +8.2 19.98 14.76 19.84 -4.25
GovtSecsA m +1.6 +3.4 9.87 9.44 9.65 +.01
GrowIncA m +6.0 +3.0 20.86 15.61 20.32 -.04
HiYldA m +5.2 +8.5 4.35 3.96 4.35 ...
HiYldMuA m +2.8 +2.1 9.67 8.64 9.01 +.03
HiYldMuC m +2.5 +1.3 9.65 8.63 8.99 +.03
InsTaxFA m +3.5 +1.7 16.79 15.24 15.96 +.02
IntlGrA m +5.6 +4.6 30.19 21.92 29.11 +.06
LrgCapGrA m +5.7 +3.6 13.01 9.53 12.70 -.02
MidCapGrA m +7.2 +7.6 33.16 22.79 31.91 -.15
MidCpCrA m +7.4 +6.2 25.34 19.97 24.88 -.07
MuniIncA m +3.3 +2.5 13.56 12.23 12.78 +.05
PacGrowB m -1.7 +3.4 22.83 17.66 21.94 -.06
RealEstA m +9.5 +3.6 23.95 17.40 23.41 +.10
SP500IdxA m +6.6 +2.8 14.74 11.04 14.43 -.04
SmCapEqA m +9.7 +5.3 13.91 9.20 13.43 -.08
SmCapGrA m +11.7 +6.7 32.98 21.79 31.93 -.21
SmCapValA m +6.3 +8.1 19.72 14.03 19.15 -.16
SmCpGrA m +10.6 +5.1 12.67 8.61 12.26 -.06
Summit b +6.2 +2.4 12.76 9.42 12.55 -.04
TaxESecY +3.6 +3.6 11.21 10.05 10.57 +.03
TechInv b +9.0 +5.6 36.18 24.41 35.33 -.40
TxFrInmA3 m +3.5 +4.8 11.59 10.92 11.34 +.03
USMortA m +2.7 +4.7 13.22 12.84 13.17 +.02
USSmValY d +6.4 +8.6 27.58 18.89 26.79 -2.14
Ivy
AssetSTrB m +5.5 +8.1 26.09 19.43 24.92 -.01
AssetStrA m +5.9 +9.0 27.05 20.02 25.84 -.02
AssetStrC m +5.5 +8.1 26.22 19.51 25.04 -.02
AssetStrY m +5.9 +9.0 27.10 20.06 25.89 -.01
GlNatResA m +4.4 +4.9 24.76 15.21 22.56 +.24
GlNatResC m +4.1 +4.1 21.47 13.26 19.55 +.20
GlNatResI d +4.5 NA 25.26 15.47 23.03 +.25
GlbNatrlY m +4.4 +5.1 25.06 15.38 22.84 +.24
HiIncA m +5.6 +9.5 8.69 8.11 8.51 -.01
HiIncC m +5.4 +8.7 8.69 8.11 8.51 -.01
IntlValA m +3.2 +5.6 17.98 12.71 17.11 -.01
LgCpGrA m +4.8 +4.3 14.05 10.40 13.62 -.03
LtdTmBdA m +1.4 +5.5 11.37 11.00 11.15 +.01
MdCpGrA m +8.3 +9.1 18.85 12.90 18.44 -.04
PacOppA m +3.3 +10.1 17.89 12.97 17.26 -.12
ScTechA m +9.7 +10.3 35.64 26.06 34.59 -.26
ScTechY m +9.8 +10.4 37.12 27.12 36.03 -.26
JPMorgan
CoreBondA m +2.4 +6.9 11.75 11.33 11.60 +.02
CoreBondC m +2.1 +6.2 11.81 11.38 11.65 +.02
DiversMidCapGrA m+8.8 +6.2 23.81 16.11 23.38 -.12
EqIdxA m +6.6 +2.8 30.96 23.22 30.31 -.09
GovtBdA m +2.6 +6.5 11.32 10.65 11.02 +.02
HighStatA m +1.7 +.8 15.50 14.95 15.27 -.03
HighYldA m +5.4 +8.7 8.39 7.61 8.37 ...
InvBalA m +4.0 +5.3 12.83 10.95 12.64 -.02
InvBalC m +3.7 +4.7 12.68 10.83 12.49 -.01
InvConGrA m +3.2 +5.3 11.53 10.44 11.44 ...
InvConGrC m +3.0 +4.8 11.50 10.41 11.40 ...
InvGrInA m +4.5 +4.6 13.60 10.99 13.32 -.03
InvGrowA m +5.2 +3.8 14.55 11.14 14.15 -.04
MidCapVal m +8.4 +5.1 25.35 18.63 25.08 +.02
SmCapEqA m +9.5 +8.4 37.65 27.07 37.01 -.18
SmCapEqR5 +9.7 +8.9 41.02 29.41 40.33 -.19
USEquityA m +4.8 +5.3 10.99 8.23 10.70 -.04
James Advantage
GoldRainA b +3.3 +6.5 20.86 18.22 20.66 ...
Janus
BalC m +5.1 NA 26.68 22.89 26.26 -.07
BalJ +5.5 +7.5 26.72 23.33 26.32 -.06
BalS b +5.4 NA 26.72 22.91 26.32 -.06
ContrJ -.3 +2.1 15.36 12.32 14.58 -.03
EntrprsJ +7.7 +8.1 65.02 44.79 63.65 -.33
FlxBdJ +3.4 +8.2 11.06 10.34 10.62 ...
FortyA m +3.1 +6.2 35.77 28.15 34.79 -.24
FortyS b +3.1 +6.0 35.28 27.80 34.32 -.23
Gr&IncJ +7.4 +1.2 33.60 25.62 32.73 -.15
HiYldJ d +5.6 +8.6 9.35 8.31 9.34 -.01
J +4.3 +3.9 31.19 23.93 30.38 -.15
OrionJ d +.5 +6.6 12.81 9.24 11.93 -.03
OverseasJ d -3.6 +8.9 53.66 39.62 48.80 +.04
PerkinsMCVJ +7.0 +6.8 24.66 18.87 24.14 -.03
PerkinsSCVJ +5.4 +8.4 25.96 20.61 25.26 -.06
RsrchJ +5.9 +6.9 31.84 22.92 31.17 -.07
ShTmBdJ +1.5 +5.3 3.14 3.07 3.10 ...
TwentyJ +1.9 +7.0 68.99 54.09 66.99 -.32
WorldwideJ d +2.6 +2.5 49.99 37.38 47.79 -.10
Janus Aspen
Bal Is +5.7 +7.9 30.37 25.49 29.90 -.07
FortyIs +3.1 +6.7 37.85 29.55 36.86 -.22
IntlGrIs -4.6 +10.2 59.90 43.12 54.47 +.06
JanusI +4.4 +4.4 26.02 19.97 25.33 -.13
MidCpIs +7.9 +8.3 42.69 29.34 41.78 -.24
WldWGrIs +2.8 +2.8 32.36 24.19 30.96 -.06
Jensen
J b +7.9 +5.8 29.42 22.57 29.16 -.03
John Hancock
BalA m +3.0 +7.4 16.07 13.44 15.74 -.09
BondA m +4.2 +8.0 15.88 14.93 15.86 +.01
ClsscValA m +5.8 -2.8 18.18 13.47 17.64 -.10
HiYldA m +5.8 +5.3 4.08 3.51 4.03 +.01
LgCpEqA m +3.0 +8.5 27.84 21.04 26.79 -.29
LgCpEqC m +2.7 +7.7 25.76 19.46 24.77 -.27
LifAg1 b +5.4 +3.0 13.36 9.89 12.94 -.03
LifBa1 b +5.0 +5.0 13.73 11.31 13.49 -.01
LifCo1 b +4.1 +6.3 13.22 12.16 13.18 +.01
LifGr1 b +5.1 +4.1 13.85 10.84 13.50 -.03
LifMo1 b +4.7 +5.6 13.24 11.53 13.12 ...
RegBankA m -1.2 -4.5 15.50 12.04 14.47 -.02
SmCapEqA m +9.3 +4.5 27.78 17.16 26.98 -.20
SovInvA m +5.7 +2.9 17.12 13.24 16.56 -.08
StrIncA m +4.5 +8.6 6.88 6.27 6.85 ...
StrIncC m +4.2 +7.8 6.88 6.26 6.85 ...
TaxFBdA m +3.4 +3.8 10.19 9.28 9.70 +.02
Keeley
SmCapVal m +5.7 +2.0 27.77 18.33 26.40 -.19
Kinetics
Paradigm d +4.0 +2.2 25.22 18.31 24.24 +.04
LKCM
SmCpEqI d +12.2 +4.6 24.94 15.68 24.12 -.09
Laudus
GrInvUSLCGr d +7.7 +8.6 13.87 9.84 13.55 +.04
InMktMstS d +3.7 +5.3 20.78 14.57 19.95 -.04
IntlFxInc d +3.4 NA 12.37 10.66 12.15 -.02
IntlMstrI d +3.6 +5.1 20.78 14.56 19.95 -.04
Lazard
EmgMktEqO m -2.5 +10.5 22.82 16.90 21.63 -.09
Legg Mason/Western
AggGrowA m +10.1 +2.4124.09 82.78 122.07 -.18
AggGrowB m +9.7 +1.5106.37 71.52 104.60 -.16
AggrsvGrC m +9.8 +1.8108.34 72.65 106.55 -.16
ApprecA m +6.1 +4.4 14.82 11.52 14.55 -.04
CAMncpA m +4.1 +3.9 16.41 14.85 15.78 +.10
EqIncBldA m +6.8 +2.3 13.71 10.94 13.53 +.02
EquityO +4.6 +2.9 13.34 10.17 12.96 -.04
FdmACValA m +3.7 +1.6 14.87 10.75 14.19 -.08
GovtSecsA m +3.6 +6.5 10.59 10.12 10.59 +.03
LSAllc70A m +5.9 +3.7 13.61 10.70 13.34 -.03
LSAllc85A m +6.6 +2.5 14.05 10.59 13.69 -.05
LgCpGrA m +5.2 +3.5 25.94 19.52 25.53 -.11
MdCpCoA m +8.9 +5.9 23.56 16.28 23.19 -.09
MgdMuniA m +4.1 +4.7 16.13 14.47 15.43 +.10
MgdMuniC m +3.9 +4.1 16.14 14.48 15.44 +.10
MuBdLtdA m +3.7 +4.1 6.55 6.00 6.29 +.02
MuBdLtdC b +3.5 +3.4 6.56 6.01 6.29 +.01
MuBdNYA m +3.9 +4.7 13.87 12.49 13.32 +.05
MuHiIncA m +2.5 +3.3 14.24 12.82 13.34 +.11
OpportntC m -3.1 -4.9 11.81 8.51 10.68 +.07
SmCpGrA m +9.0 +5.7 19.16 12.91 18.71 -.09
SpecInvC m +5.9 +1.3 34.33 25.20 33.54 -.09
ValueC m +3.9 -6.1 42.42 31.94 40.39 -.20
Leuthold
AssetAl m +4.8 NA 11.35 9.13 10.99 -.02
CoreInv d +6.4 +5.4 18.39 14.75 17.95 -.01
Longleaf Partners
Intl +1.4 +1.9 16.21 12.35 15.56 +.03
LongPart +9.8 +1.7 31.42 23.47 31.04 +.05
SmCap +12.8 +6.9 30.04 21.32 29.91 -.10
Loomis Sayles
BondR b +6.6 +8.4 14.93 13.34 14.91 +.04
GlbBdR b +4.4 +7.1 17.25 15.22 16.99 +.03
SmCpVaR b +6.7 +5.3 29.10 19.73 28.14 -.14
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m +4.2 +.7 12.45 9.21 12.04 ...
AffiliatC m +4.0 0.0 12.44 9.21 12.03 ...
AlphaA m +6.1 +6.5 26.82 18.28 25.61 -.18
BalA m +5.1 +5.0 11.31 9.20 11.08 ...
BondDebA m +6.1 +7.9 8.12 7.25 8.10 ...
BondDebB m +5.9 +7.2 8.15 7.27 8.13 ...
BondDebC m +5.8 +7.2 8.14 7.27 8.12 ...
ClsscStckA m +1.6 +4.0 31.31 23.51 30.05 -.11
CptStrcA m +5.6 +4.7 12.63 9.92 12.36 ...
DevGrowA m +10.2 +9.9 24.70 15.15 23.48 -.17
FdmtlEqtyA m +6.2 +5.4 14.05 10.18 13.72 +.04
FdmtlEqtyC m +6.0 +4.7 13.34 9.69 13.03 +.04
FltRateF b +2.5 NA 9.44 9.30 9.38 -.01
GrOpportA m +8.2 +8.4 25.24 16.65 24.48 -.17
HYMuniBdA m +1.5 -1.0 11.88 10.64 10.92 +.04
HiYldA m +6.0 +8.8 8.04 7.27 8.02 -.02
IncmA m +4.9 +8.6 2.92 2.73 2.92 +.01
IntlCorEqA m +5.7 +2.0 13.57 9.59 12.91 ...
MidCpValA m +8.3 +3.2 18.20 12.60 17.81 +.04
NatlTaxFA m +3.6 +2.8 10.89 9.71 10.24 +.03
ShDurIncA m +2.3 +6.6 4.68 4.57 4.63 ...
ShDurIncC m +1.8 +5.8 4.71 4.60 4.65 -.01
SmCpBlnA m +10.0 +2.5 17.50 11.71 16.69 -.13
SmCpValA m +6.0 +6.7 34.93 23.99 33.33 -.29
TotRetA m +3.3 +7.0 11.45 10.58 10.87 +.02
MFS
AggGrAlA m +5.9 +4.0 15.49 11.44 15.10 +.01
BondA m +4.4 +7.9 13.76 12.82 13.69 ...
ConAlocA m +4.2 +6.3 13.18 11.58 13.09 +.01
CoreEqA m +6.5 +4.7 19.19 14.18 18.89 -.02
CoreGrA m +5.3 +3.3 18.85 14.14 18.53 -.01
GlTotRtA m +5.7 +5.4 14.26 11.77 14.01 +.01
GovtSecA m +2.0 +6.2 10.46 9.99 10.24 +.02
GrAllocA m +5.6 +5.0 14.99 11.63 14.70 +.02
GrAllocB m +5.2 +4.2 14.80 11.48 14.51 +.01
GrAllocC m +5.2 +4.2 14.76 11.45 14.47 +.02
GrowA m +5.2 +6.4 44.89 32.94 44.05 -.01
HiYLDOpA m +6.3 +6.8 6.60 5.89 6.60 ...
HighIncA m +5.6 +6.9 3.56 3.20 3.56 ...
HighIncI +5.7 +7.2 3.56 3.20 3.56 ...
IntDivA m +4.4 +4.0 14.66 10.56 14.12 ...
IntlNDisA m +4.9 +5.7 23.72 16.64 22.94 -.01
IntlNDisI +4.9 +6.0 24.37 17.09 23.56 -.01
IntlValA m +5.9 +3.5 26.76 20.11 26.05 +.02
LtdMatA m +1.4 +3.8 6.27 6.17 6.20 ...
MAInvA m +6.2 +4.7 20.83 15.86 20.42 -.04
MAInvC m +6.0 +4.0 20.11 15.32 19.71 -.04
MAInvGrA m +6.6 +5.4 16.47 12.17 16.26 -.06
MdCpValI +8.9 +4.9 14.70 10.35 14.52 +.05
MidCapGrI +6.4 +1.6 10.23 7.15 10.00 -.01
ModAllocA m +5.0 +5.8 14.23 11.74 14.05 +.02
ModAllocC m +4.7 +5.1 14.06 11.58 13.87 +.01
MuHiIncA f +2.6 +2.9 7.78 7.03 7.28 +.03
MuIncA m +2.8 +4.1 8.59 7.79 8.11 +.03
MuLtdMtA m +2.2 +4.0 8.10 7.84 7.99 +.01
NewDiscA m +11.4 +10.1 27.05 17.54 26.56 +.02
NewDiscI +11.5 +10.5 28.39 18.37 27.88 +.03
ResBdA m +3.4 +6.7 10.68 10.21 10.63 +.01
ResBondI +3.4 +6.9 10.69 10.21 10.63 +.01
ResIntlA m +5.4 +2.4 16.73 11.86 16.04 +.01
ResIntlI +5.5 +2.7 17.27 12.24 16.56 +.01
ResearchA m +5.8 +4.8 26.84 19.94 26.42 ...
ResearchI +5.9 +5.1 27.35 20.31 26.91 ...
TotRetA m +5.1 +4.0 14.85 12.61 14.71 -.01
TotRetB m +4.7 +3.3 14.85 12.61 14.71 -.01
TotRetC m +4.8 +3.3 14.92 12.66 14.78 ...
UtilA m +11.5 +11.1 18.25 13.49 18.16 +.16
UtilC m +11.1 +10.2 18.19 13.45 18.09 +.16
ValueA m +7.1 +3.5 24.78 19.03 24.36 -.06
ValueC m +6.8 +2.8 24.55 18.86 24.12 -.06
ValueI +7.2 +3.8 24.89 19.11 24.47 -.06
MainStay
ConvertA m +5.8 +7.6 17.35 13.31 16.94 -.07
FltgRateA m +2.0 +3.9 9.55 9.14 9.52 -.01
HiYldCorA m +5.0 +7.0 6.04 5.61 6.04 +.01
HiYldCorC m +4.5 +6.2 6.01 5.59 6.01 +.01
LgCapGrA m +7.5 +6.5 7.79 5.45 7.58 -.03
Mairs & Power
GrthInv +6.5 +4.2 78.14 61.08 76.84 -.31
Managers
AMGFQGlAA m +3.3 +1.7 10.84 9.58 9.90 -.06
Bond +5.4 +8.0 26.58 24.82 26.57 +.09
MgrsPIMCOBd +3.3 +8.1 10.76 10.15 10.62 +.01
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS +3.7 +6.3 13.55 12.41 13.34 +.01
PBExtTrmS +5.9 +5.8 16.56 13.45 16.42 +.01
PBMaxTrmS +5.7 +4.9 17.76 13.34 17.42 -.02
PBModTrmS +5.0 +5.6 13.57 11.72 13.50 +.01
WrldOppA +7.4 +5.8 9.62 7.00 9.25 -.01
Marshall
SmCpGrInv d +6.4 +8.5 21.58 13.55 20.22 -.11
Marsico
21stCent m +3.5 +2.4 15.35 11.14 14.76 -.07
FlexCap m +4.6 NA 14.70 10.07 14.25 -.04
Focus m +1.8 +2.8 19.41 13.80 18.42 -.09
Grow m +5.2 +2.7 21.11 14.86 20.37 -.05
MassMutual
PremIntlEqtyS +6.8 +5.3 16.02 11.24 15.41 +.06
SelFundmtlValS +5.9 +4.2 11.36 8.58 11.11 -.05
SelGlAlcS +3.3 NA 11.51 9.41 11.15 +.01
SelIndxEqS +6.7 +2.8 12.75 9.59 12.49 -.03
SelIndxEqZ +6.7 +3.0 12.75 9.59 12.48 -.04
SelMdCpGrEqIIA m+8.3 +7.3 16.64 11.55 16.20 -.07
SelMdCpGrEqIIL +8.3 +7.5 17.11 11.85 16.65 -.08
SelMdCpGrEqIIS +8.5 +7.8 17.56 12.14 17.10 -.07
SlSmGrEqS +10.1 +5.4 19.91 13.39 18.99 -.22
MassMutual Inst
PremCoreBndS +3.2 +6.8 11.32 10.61 11.31 +.03
Masters’ Select
IntlIntl d +5.0 +4.6 16.61 11.32 15.81 -.02
Matthews Asian
China d +2.3 +19.4 31.71 22.71 30.03 +.15
GrInc d +1.5 +9.5 18.68 15.25 18.31 -.08
India d -9.0 +12.8 23.02 16.54 19.56 -.17
PacEqInc d +.5 NA 14.60 11.85 14.29 ...
PacTiger d +1.1 +12.8 24.40 17.70 23.69 +.09
Merger
Merger m +3.0 +4.3 16.27 15.31 16.26 +.01
Meridian
MeridnGr d +6.9 +8.9 48.43 33.72 47.67 -.07
Value d +3.9 +3.9 30.70 22.54 30.02 -.18
Merk
HrdCurInv b +4.1 +6.9 13.17 10.84 12.70 +.06
Metropolitan West
Hi-YldBdM b +5.6 +9.7 11.02 10.07 10.95 -.02
LowDurBd b +1.9 +3.4 8.68 8.29 8.66 ...
TotRtBd b +3.3 +8.6 10.79 10.26 10.55 +.01
Morgan Stanley
FocGrA m +8.0 +7.9 39.73 26.34 38.53 ...
StrategiA m +4.2 +4.5 17.31 13.74 16.81 +.01
USGovSecB m +2.7 +3.4 9.58 8.43 8.69 +.02
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp +5.7 -3.4 58.49 46.64 56.88 -.31
Munder Funds
MdCpCrGrA m +8.5 +5.4 30.86 21.78 30.27 -.04
Nations
LgCpIxZ +6.8 +3.1 26.48 19.85 25.93 -.08
Nationwide
DesModSvc b +4.6 +3.9 9.98 8.27 9.80 -.02
FundD m +7.1 +1.4 14.84 11.06 14.49 -.05
IDAggSrv b +5.9 +2.8 9.35 6.96 9.06 -.03
IDModAgSv b +5.4 +3.4 9.86 7.69 9.60 -.03
IntlIdxA m +4.2 +.7 8.11 5.92 7.71 -.01
S&P500Svc m +6.5 +2.6 11.38 8.55 11.14 -.04
Natixis
CGMTgtEqA m -2.5 +4.3 11.46 8.53 10.84 -.02
InvBndA m +4.8 +8.7 12.76 11.86 12.51 +.03
InvBndC m +4.6 +7.9 12.68 11.78 12.42 +.03
StratIncA m +7.0 +8.6 15.57 13.81 15.55 +.03
StratIncC m +6.7 +7.8 15.66 13.89 15.63 +.03
Neuberger Berman
FocusInv +6.0 -.2 21.34 16.07 20.80 -.15
GenesAdv b +8.8 +7.2 31.08 21.93 30.03 +.08
GenesisInv +8.9 +7.6 37.44 26.35 36.19 +.10
GenesisTr +8.9 +7.5 53.67 37.80 51.87 +.14
GuardnInv +8.8 +4.4 16.40 11.95 16.14 +.05
PartnerTr b +5.4 +2.1 22.96 16.51 22.31 -.11
PartnrAdv b +5.4 +2.0 19.80 14.26 19.24 -.09
PartnrInv +5.5 +2.3 29.93 21.51 29.08 -.14
SmCpGrInv +9.4 +4.2 20.28 13.49 19.56 -.05
SocRespInv +8.4 +4.9 28.13 20.55 27.60 +.07
SocRespTr b +8.3 +4.7 19.27 14.10 18.90 +.04
New Covenant
Growth +6.2 +1.9 33.62 24.97 32.87 +.01
Income +2.3 +3.0 23.20 22.35 22.89 +.02
Nicholas
Nichol +8.9 +5.7 49.52 37.40 49.15 +.03
Northeast Investors
Northeast +3.6 +3.7 6.42 5.79 6.21 -.09
Northern
BdIndx +2.4 NA 10.88 10.35 10.64 +.02
FixedIn +2.9 +5.9 10.72 10.02 10.31 +.01
GlbREIdx d +4.5 NA 8.90 6.57 8.68 +.04
HYFixInc d +6.2 +7.2 7.55 6.77 7.54 -.01
HiYMuni +3.2 +.7 8.46 7.64 8.01 +.04
IntTaxE +3.8 +4.2 10.74 9.76 10.24 +.01
IntlIndex d +5.6 +1.2 11.58 10.10 10.99 -.03
MMIntlEq d +1.7 NA 10.60 7.94 10.11 -.01
MMMidCap +8.4 NA 12.98 9.06 12.63 -.06
MMSmCp +6.4 NA 11.40 7.76 10.95 -.09
MdCapIndx +9.2 +6.5 13.43 12.32 13.06 -.09
ShIntUSGv +.9 +4.4 10.73 10.24 10.41 +.01
SmCapIdx +6.0 +3.9 9.52 6.50 9.13 -.07
SmCapVal +4.3 +3.3 16.45 11.64 15.86 -.14
StkIdx +6.7 +3.0 16.89 12.66 16.54 -.05
TaxE +4.6 +4.4 10.95 9.68 10.31 +.03
Nuveen
HiYldMunA m +3.1 -1.9 16.07 13.77 14.57 +.06
HiYldMunC m +2.9 -2.4 16.06 13.76 14.56 +.06
IntlValA m -.4 +2.7 27.27 21.58 25.95 -.05
LtdTmMuA m +2.6 +4.1 11.09 10.68 10.95 +.02
LtdTmMuC m +2.5 +3.8 11.05 10.64 10.91 +.02
NWQVlOppA m +2.4 +10.1 36.81 29.40 35.91 +.18
NWQVlOppC m +2.1 +9.3 35.93 28.70 35.04 +.17
Oakmark
EqIncI +5.5 +7.1 29.68 24.50 29.27 +.01
GlSelI d +8.4 NA 12.39 9.18 12.00 -.11
Global I d +3.5 +4.8 23.93 18.07 23.26 -.14
Intl I d +4.4 +4.9 21.01 15.47 20.26 -.18
IntlSmCpI d +1.4 +4.1 15.20 10.99 14.57 -.13
Oakmark I d +8.3 +5.3 45.29 34.67 44.71 -.19
Select I d +10.7 +3.0 30.73 23.12 30.40 +.04
Old Mutual Advisor F
FocusedZ d +6.1 +5.1 22.80 17.52 22.37 -.01
Old Westbury
FixedInc +1.8 +6.4 12.00 11.47 11.70 +.02
GlbSmMdCp +6.9 +9.3 16.95 12.18 16.54 -.08
LgCapEq +3.5 +1.2 13.05 10.01 12.61 -.04
MuniBd +2.4 +4.7 12.43 11.56 11.87 +.01
NonUSLgCp +3.2 +1.1 11.63 7.99 10.96 -.03
RealRet +2.8 +5.1 11.60 8.74 11.21 +.34
Olstein
AllCpVlC m +5.4 +.5 13.43 10.16 13.25 -.08
Oppenheimer
AMTFrMunA m +4.4 -3.4 6.64 5.63 6.05 +.02
ActAllocA m +4.7 +1.0 10.29 8.06 10.04 -.01
ActAllocC m +4.4 +.2 10.08 7.89 9.83 -.01
AmtFrNYA m +1.9 +1.8 12.06 10.25 10.71 +.05
BalA m +5.8 -1.3 10.69 8.76 10.64 +.02
CAMuniA m +3.5 -1.7 8.31 7.11 7.53 +.04
CapApA m +5.0 +1.7 46.92 35.13 45.76 -.12
CapApB m +4.6 +.9 41.33 31.16 40.29 -.11
CapApC m +4.7 +1.0 41.05 30.93 40.01 -.11
CapApprY +5.2 +2.1 49.10 36.63 47.89 -.12
CapIncA m +6.0 -.2 8.99 7.90 8.97 +.01
ChampIncA m +6.6 -19.7 2.02 1.79 2.01 -.01
CmdtStTRA m +4.9 -8.8 4.25 2.90 3.84 +.02
CmdtStTRY +5.2 -8.4 4.26 2.91 3.86 +.02
CoreBondY +4.2 -2.3 6.62 6.27 6.59 +.01
DevMktA m -2.1 +12.6 37.42 26.36 35.71 +.12
DevMktN m -2.2 +12.2 36.17 25.55 34.51 +.11
DevMktY -2.0 +13.0 37.05 26.09 35.36 +.12
DevMktsC m -2.3 +11.8 35.91 25.44 34.26 +.11
DiscoverA m +14.5 +7.1 67.85 41.54 64.58 -.26
EqIncA m +7.0 +5.8 26.53 19.30 26.13 -.02
EquityA m +6.6 +2.4 9.59 7.08 9.41 -.03
GlobA m +8.1 +4.0 67.42 48.55 65.26 -.37
GlobC m +7.8 +3.2 63.28 45.61 61.24 -.35
GlobOpprA m +6.1 +4.9 32.57 24.99 31.54 -.12
GlobOpprC m +5.8 +4.1 30.08 23.08 29.12 -.11
GlobY +8.2 +4.4 67.57 48.68 65.42 -.37
GoldMinA m -9.5 +18.2 51.45 32.54 45.09 +1.16
GoldMinC m -9.8 +17.3 48.74 31.03 42.67 +1.08
IntlBondA m +2.9 +8.5 7.04 6.06 6.65 +.02
IntlBondC m +2.6 +7.7 7.01 6.04 6.63 +.02
IntlBondY +3.0 +8.9 7.04 6.06 6.65 +.02
IntlDivA m +2.4 +5.4 13.03 9.60 12.56 +.02
IntlDivC m +2.1 +4.6 12.75 9.41 12.29 +.02
IntlGrY +6.8 +6.0 30.92 21.63 29.79 +.12
IntlGrowA m +6.6 +5.5 31.05 21.73 29.92 +.12
IntlSmCoA m -5.1 +6.4 24.84 15.75 23.40 +.14
IntlSmCoY -4.9 +6.9 24.68 15.60 23.28 +.14
LmtTmMunA m +2.4 +2.9 14.70 13.88 14.26 +.02
LmtTmMunC m +2.0 +2.1 14.64 13.82 14.20 +.02
LtdTmGovA m +1.1 +3.4 9.47 9.35 9.41 ...
LtdTmGovY +1.3 +3.6 9.46 9.34 9.41 +.01
LtdTmNY m +1.8 +3.6 3.34 3.14 3.22 ...
LtdTmNY m +1.5 +2.9 3.32 3.13 3.21 +.01
MainSSMCA m +7.3 +3.1 22.56 15.89 21.93 -.20
MainSSMCC m +7.0 +2.4 20.39 14.44 19.80 -.20
MainSSMCY +7.5 +3.5 23.71 16.70 23.05 -.22
MainStSelA m -.3 +1.7 13.18 10.25 12.73 -.09
MainStrA m +3.3 +2.0 34.21 25.88 33.45 -.05
MainStrC m +3.0 +1.2 33.00 24.99 32.26 -.06
ModInvA m +4.7 +.1 9.27 7.66 9.11 +.01
PAMuniA m +3.2 +1.8 11.37 9.89 10.42 +.01
QuBalA m +3.3 +2.4 16.43 13.29 15.97 +.03
QuOpportA m +5.4 +5.3 28.00 23.73 27.82 -.01
RisDivA m +7.0 +4.4 16.89 12.81 16.55 -.02
RisDivY +7.2 +4.7 17.28 13.10 16.94 -.02
RocMuniA m +1.7 +2.1 16.91 14.49 15.13 +.07
RocMuniC m +1.4 +1.2 16.88 14.47 15.10 +.06
RochNtlMC m +3.8 -5.4 7.36 6.25 6.69 +.01
RochNtlMu m +4.1 -4.6 7.37 6.27 6.71 +.02
SmMidValA m +8.3 +2.8 35.48 24.73 34.71 -.16
SrFltRatA m +3.5 +4.6 8.42 8.05 8.42 ...
SrFltRatC m +3.3 +4.0 8.43 7.97 8.43 ...
StrIncA m +5.0 +7.6 4.45 3.99 4.40 +.01
StrIncY +5.1 +7.8 4.44 3.99 4.39 ...
StratIncC m +4.7 +6.8 4.44 3.98 4.39 +.01
USGovtA m +2.4 +5.3 9.65 9.23 9.45 +.02
ValueA m +8.2 +2.7 24.01 17.37 23.62 -.08
ValueY +8.4 +3.1 24.49 17.73 24.10 -.08
Osterweis
OsterStrInc d +3.4 +8.0 11.92 11.32 11.91 +.02
Osterweis d +6.6 +5.2 29.59 23.18 28.88 -.10
PIMCO
AllAssetA m +4.8 +6.7 12.77 11.67 12.49 +.02
AllAssetC m +4.4 +6.0 12.63 11.55 12.34 +.01
AllAssetsD b +4.8 +6.9 12.79 11.69 12.51 +.02
AllAuthA m +4.5 +7.5 11.28 10.43 10.92 +.03
AllAuthC m +4.1 +6.7 11.19 10.34 10.81 +.02
CmRlRtStA m +3.8 +3.6 10.04 7.15 9.26 +.14
CmRlRtStC m +3.6 +2.9 9.84 7.03 9.08 +.14
CmRlRtStD b +3.9 +3.7 10.07 7.17 9.29 +.14
EmgMktA m +3.5 +8.4 11.66 10.36 11.27 +.03
ForUnhgD b +3.8 +8.3 11.62 9.72 10.86 -.01
GNMAA m +3.0 +7.4 11.69 11.25 11.68 +.03
Hi-YldD b +5.3 +7.6 9.54 8.68 9.54 ...
HiYldA m +5.3 +7.6 9.54 8.68 9.54 ...
HiYldC m +5.0 +6.8 9.54 8.68 9.54 ...
LowDrA m +2.0 +5.5 10.77 10.27 10.52 +.01
LowDrC m +1.9 +5.1 10.77 10.27 10.52 +.01
LowDurD b +2.1 +5.6 10.77 10.27 10.52 +.01
RealRetD b +4.0 +6.8 11.91 11.02 11.64 -.03
RealRtnA m +4.0 +6.8 11.91 11.02 11.64 -.03
RealRtnC m +3.8 +6.3 11.91 11.02 11.64 -.03
ShtTermA m +.9 +3.3 9.95 9.85 9.92 ...
ShtTermD b +1.0 +3.4 9.95 9.85 9.92 ...
TotRetA m +2.9 +8.3 11.77 10.69 11.04 +.01
TotRetB m +2.6 +7.5 11.77 10.69 11.04 +.01
TotRetC m +2.6 +7.5 11.77 10.69 11.04 +.01
TotRetrnD b +3.0 +8.5 11.77 10.69 11.04 +.01
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr d +10.2 +9.0 18.79 13.54 18.15 -.14
Growth d +9.2 +6.3 17.24 12.44 16.81 -.11
Stock d +7.4 +4.7 15.48 11.83 15.22 -.05
Pacific
PortOptCA m +4.7 +4.9 12.21 10.04 12.01 ...
Parnassus
EqIncInv +6.2 +7.7 28.61 22.33 27.87 -.03
Parnassus +5.2 +7.0 45.09 31.93 42.59 -.49
Pax World
Bal b +6.0 +3.2 24.21 18.74 23.70 +.08
Payden
CoreBd +2.6 +5.7 10.75 10.31 10.61 +.02
EmMktBd d +4.1 +8.9 15.02 13.40 14.60 +.08
GNMA +2.9 +7.0 10.60 10.14 10.45 +.02
HighInc d +5.2 +6.2 7.43 6.80 7.43 ...
ShortBd +1.3 +4.3 10.25 10.04 10.17 ...
Permanent
Portfolio +4.8 +9.8 49.73 39.10 47.99 +.16
Perritt
MicroCap d +1.4 +2.5 29.58 21.04 27.82 -.41
Pioneer
CulValA m +5.1 +2.0 19.73 15.23 19.07 -.07
CulValC m +4.7 +1.2 19.53 15.05 18.86 -.08
EqInc A m +9.4 +3.5 28.03 20.80 27.64 -.07
GlobHiYA m +5.9 +7.7 10.95 9.61 10.87 ...
GlobHiYC m +5.6 +6.9 10.91 9.58 10.83 ...
GrOppA m +10.9 +4.1 31.08 21.40 30.24 -.22
HiYldA m +6.9 +8.2 10.82 8.86 10.67 -.02
HiYldC m +6.5 +7.4 11.00 9.00 10.84 -.02
IndependA m +7.1 +1.6 12.41 8.74 12.03 -.07
MidCpValA m +7.5 +4.2 23.06 17.02 22.72 ...
MuniA m +3.8 +3.5 13.69 12.07 12.79 +.06
PioneerA m +5.1 +3.1 43.93 32.45 42.97 -.11
SmCapEq m +9.9 +7.4 33.07 21.94 31.85 -.24
StratIncA m +4.0 +8.3 11.17 10.45 11.16 +.01
StratIncC m +3.6 +7.5 10.93 10.22 10.92 ...
ValueA m +3.6 -2.0 12.26 9.50 11.80 +.01
Principal
BdMtgInst +4.3 +5.3 10.65 9.98 10.64 +.01
CaptApprtnA m +5.6 +4.2 41.71 32.20 40.70 -.20
DivIntI +3.2 +1.0 11.00 7.75 10.44 +.01
EqIncA m +7.6 +3.0 18.88 14.67 18.64 -.02
HiYldA m +5.6 +9.1 8.24 7.62 8.19 ...
HiYldC m +5.3 +8.3 8.30 7.67 8.24 -.01
HiYldII +6.0 +10.1 11.77 10.33 11.36 ...
InfProI +3.7 +1.1 8.28 7.77 8.12 -.03
IntIInst +3.5 +1.0 12.63 8.92 11.94 -.02
IntlGrthI +3.6 -1.1 9.76 6.98 9.30 +.02
L/T2010I +5.1 +3.5 11.92 9.90 11.74 ...
L/T2020I +5.6 +3.7 12.56 10.02 12.31 -.01
L/T2020J m +5.4 +3.2 12.51 9.97 12.26 -.01
L/T2030I +5.9 +3.6 12.53 9.72 12.25 -.01
L/T2030J m +5.7 +3.0 12.51 9.69 12.22 -.02
L/T2040I +5.9 +3.3 12.79 9.70 12.47 -.02
L/T2050I +6.1 +3.1 12.31 9.21 11.98 -.02
L/TSIInst +4.1 +3.1 11.09 9.98 11.02 +.01
LCBIIInst +5.6 +3.4 10.36 7.79 10.11 -.03
LCGIIInst +6.2 +5.4 8.97 6.74 8.79 -.03
LCGrIInst +6.9 +6.8 10.11 7.21 9.91 -.04
LCIIIInst +6.7 -1.1 11.15 8.41 10.88 -.05
LCVlIInst +6.6 +.3 11.53 8.77 11.31 ...
LgCGrInst +3.1 +3.4 8.70 6.42 8.44 -.04
LgCSP500I +6.7 +3.0 9.58 7.18 9.38 -.03
LgCValI +8.4 +1.3 10.37 7.59 10.10 +.01
MCVlIInst +7.5 +5.8 14.30 10.22 14.03 +.03
MGIIIInst +10.4 +5.7 11.99 7.92 11.74 -.05
MidCapBleA m +12.2 +7.9 15.07 11.31 14.88 +.03
PrSecInst +6.5 +7.1 10.31 8.99 10.31 +.02
ReEstSecI +11.2 +4.6 18.20 12.98 17.90 +.08
SAMBalA m +4.9 +5.0 13.54 11.10 13.33 -.02
SAMBalC m +4.6 +4.2 13.40 11.00 13.19 -.02
SAMConGrA m +5.5 +3.9 14.65 11.40 14.32 -.02
SAMConGrB m +5.2 +3.1 14.12 10.97 13.80 -.02
SAMConGrC m +5.3 +3.1 13.93 10.84 13.61 -.02
SAMFleIncA m +4.2 +5.9 11.70 10.59 11.66 +.01
SAMStrGrA m +5.9 +3.1 16.18 12.13 15.74 -.04
SCGrIInst +11.4 +6.7 12.54 7.74 12.03 -.10
SCValIII +4.9 +2.2 10.63 7.25 10.13 -.10
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m +6.4 +5.9 17.34 12.68 16.91 +.08
2020FocC m +6.2 +5.1 15.56 11.44 15.17 +.08
2020FocZ +6.5 +6.2 17.95 13.09 17.50 +.08
BlendA m +6.6 +4.5 18.87 13.74 18.34 -.05
EqIncC m +7.4 +7.3 13.79 10.50 13.54 +.05
EqOppA m +7.4 +4.3 15.19 11.12 14.91 +.06
GovtIncA m +2.1 +5.9 9.83 9.44 9.69 +.01
HiYieldA m +5.3 +8.7 5.65 5.14 5.64 -.01
HlthSciA m +17.8 +10.9 27.85 18.60 27.43 -.22
IntlEqtyA m +5.3 -1.4 6.85 4.92 6.52 +.01
IntlValA m +5.1 +1.8 22.79 16.48 21.66 -.05
JenMidCapGrA m+10.0 +7.3 30.53 22.15 30.13 -.12
JenMidCapGrZ +10.2 +7.6 31.67 22.91 31.25 -.13
JennGrA m +7.0 +4.7 19.65 14.42 19.32 -.10
JennGrZ +7.2 +5.0 20.41 14.94 20.07 -.11
NatlMuniA m +3.7 +3.6 15.05 13.73 14.42 +.04
NaturResA m -1.7 +10.0 62.22 39.53 56.09 +1.02
ShTmCoBdA m +2.1 +6.1 11.72 11.38 11.54 +.01
SmallCoA m +8.8 +6.1 22.83 15.67 22.09 -.07
SmallCoZ +9.0 +6.2 23.86 16.37 23.09 -.07
StkIndexI +6.9 +3.1 30.18 22.68 29.55 -.09
UtilityA m +9.0 +3.7 11.30 8.45 11.10 +.08
ValueA m +6.7 +2.4 16.32 12.03 15.71 -.07
ValueZ +6.8 +2.6 16.34 12.05 15.73 -.07
Purisima
TotReturn b +3.2 +2.0 21.99 15.64 20.92 -.09
Putnam
AmGovtInA m +3.1 +7.9 9.88 9.44 9.64 -.02
AstAlBalA m +5.1 +3.8 11.69 9.63 11.44 -.01
AstAlConA m +4.0 +4.4 9.57 8.67 9.47 -.01
AstAlGrA m +5.2 +3.3 13.36 10.47 12.94 -.02
AstAlcCoY +4.1 +4.7 9.59 8.69 9.49 -.02
CATxEIncA m +2.7 +3.2 8.12 7.22 7.54 +.02
ConvInGrA m +6.2 +6.5 21.47 17.05 21.25 +.03
DivIncTrC m +4.4 +4.7 8.17 7.76 8.10 -.04
DivrInA m +4.6 +5.5 8.28 7.86 8.21 -.04
EqIncomeA m +9.2 +5.0 16.67 12.17 16.37 +.03
EqIncomeY +9.2 +5.2 16.67 12.16 16.37 +.03
GeoPutA m +5.8 -.3 12.69 10.54 12.57 -.01
GlbEqA m +11.2 +1.4 9.94 7.07 9.61 +.04
GlbHltCrA m +14.8 +5.1 51.66 38.52 51.41 +.20
GlobNatA m +4.6 +4.6 25.20 15.70 23.13 +.18
GrowIncA m +5.4 +.1 14.68 10.83 14.24 -.07
GrowIncB m +5.1 -.7 14.41 10.64 13.98 -.07
HiYldA m +5.6 +8.1 8.00 7.16 7.99 ...
HiYldAdvA m +5.5 +8.5 6.16 5.57 6.12 -.04
IncomeA m +4.7 +7.8 6.97 6.68 6.91 -.04
IntlCpOpA m +2.6 +4.2 38.57 26.65 36.59 ...
IntlEqA m +4.0 -.4 21.83 15.39 20.84 +.11
InvestorA m +6.6 +.3 13.95 10.30 13.60 -.06
MidCapVal m +5.9 +3.0 13.49 9.47 13.15 -.03
MultiCapGrA m +6.5 +3.2 55.41 38.86 53.90 -.25
NYTxEIncA m +3.0 +3.9 8.74 7.98 8.34 +.01
TaxEIncA m +3.3 +3.8 8.73 7.29 8.34 +.02
TaxFHYldA m +2.1 +2.7 12.07 10.96 11.31 +.03
USGovtInA m +3.4 +8.3 14.44 13.94 14.31 -.06
VoyagerA m +.5 +7.3 25.49 18.17 23.82 -.38
VoyagerY +.6 +7.6 26.54 18.93 24.83 -.38
RS
GlNatResA m +3.6 +6.0 41.60 28.23 38.92 +.48
PartnersA m +4.7 +3.3 36.00 25.15 34.66 -.11
SmCpGrthA m +13.5 +6.7 48.62 31.25 47.29 -.41
ValueA m +3.6 +3.7 27.62 20.34 26.84 -.24
RS Funds
CoreEqA m +3.6 +7.1 45.58 35.06 44.03 -.41
EmgMktsA m -4.5 +10.2 27.44 20.37 25.53 -.04
Rainier
CoreEq b +5.0 +2.4 27.05 19.62 26.23 -.07
SmMidCap b +8.3 +2.9 36.86 24.52 35.38 -.09
RidgeWorth
CapAprI +6.8 +5.1 11.89 8.30 11.58 -.03
HiIncI +7.0 +10.5 7.41 6.42 7.38 -.01
HighYI +6.5 +7.6 10.19 9.05 10.18 -.01
IntlEIxI +5.4 0.0 14.44 10.43 13.52 -.09
IntmBndI +2.2 +6.6 11.03 10.27 10.50 +.01
InvGrBdI +3.4 +5.3 12.56 11.51 11.97 +.02
LgCpVaEqI +5.2 +4.3 13.79 10.31 13.46 -.03
MdCpVlEqI +7.8 +9.6 13.15 9.20 12.76 -.05
SmCapEqI +6.4 +6.3 14.96 10.74 14.57 -.13
SmCapGrI +11.2 +2.8 17.87 11.41 17.12 -.22
TtlRetBndI +2.8 +7.1 11.17 10.28 10.57 +.01
USGovBndI +.7 +4.0 10.11 10.05 10.10 ...
RiverNorth
CoreOpp m +5.5 NA 12.99 11.85 12.82 ...
RiverSource
ShDurUSA m +.9 +3.5 4.81 4.74 4.79 +.01
TxExHiIncA m +3.5 +3.6 4.39 3.96 4.17 +.02
Royce
LowStkSer m +3.5 +8.2 19.92 13.10 18.90 -.07
MicrCapIv d +3.0 +7.7 19.30 13.18 18.10 -.15
OpportInv d +3.0 +4.6 13.10 8.66 12.44 -.17
PAMutCnslt m +6.9 +4.3 11.80 8.20 11.34 -.09
PAMutInv d +7.3 +5.4 13.00 9.00 12.50 -.10
PremierInv d +8.5 +9.1 22.95 15.59 22.08 -.22
SpecEqInv d +3.7 +7.6 22.54 16.60 21.64 -.34
TotRetInv d +5.7 +4.7 14.28 10.49 13.89 -.08
ValPlSvc m +5.1 +3.3 14.72 10.56 14.11 -.03
ValueSvc m +7.8 +7.7 14.21 9.58 13.64 -.04
Russell
EmgMktsS -.5 +10.2 21.93 15.76 20.72 -.02
GlRelEstS +5.8 +2.6 38.66 29.56 37.89 +.37
GlbEqtyS +5.1 NA 9.68 7.05 9.33 -.02
InvGrdBdS +2.8 NA 22.89 21.41 22.06 +.04
ItlDvMktS +3.7 NA 34.64 25.14 32.86 -.02
ShDurBdS +1.6 +4.7 19.51 19.02 19.39 +.01
StratBdS +3.3 NA 11.32 10.68 11.01 +.02
TaxExBdS +2.8 +4.4 22.80 21.61 22.19 +.03
TxMgdLgCS +6.4 +3.0 21.38 15.52 20.87 -.07
USCoreEqS +5.5 NA 30.16 22.31 29.42 -.11
USQntvEqS +9.7 NA 31.96 23.47 31.42 -.06
USSmMdCpS +7.0 NA 25.30 17.14 24.43 -.16
Russell LifePoints
BalStrA m +4.4 +4.2 11.09 9.21 10.85 ...
BalStrC b +4.2 +3.4 11.00 9.14 10.76 ...
BalStrE +4.4 +4.2 11.12 9.23 10.88 ...
BalStrS +4.4 +4.4 11.18 9.29 10.94 ...
BlStrR3 b +4.3 +3.9 11.12 9.23 10.88 ...
EqGrStrC b +4.6 +1.1 9.39 7.07 9.06 ...
GrStrA m +4.7 +3.2 10.69 8.39 10.37 ...
GrStrC b +4.5 +2.4 10.55 8.30 10.23 ...
GrStrR3 b +4.7 +2.9 10.73 8.42 10.40 ...
Rydex
Nsdq100Iv +5.9 +7.6 15.71 11.31 15.33 -.17
Rydex/SGI
MCapValA m +5.4 +6.1 35.77 26.44 34.11 -.05
MgFtrStrH b ... NA 26.76 23.75 25.79 +.15
SEI
DlyShDurA +1.2 +4.7 10.72 10.53 10.67 +.01
SSGA
EmgMkts b +.1 +8.0 23.98 17.07 22.60 +.12
EmgMktsSel b +.2 +8.3 24.06 17.13 22.68 +.12
IntlStkSl b +4.9 +.2 11.17 8.10 10.58 -.03
S&P500Idx b +6.7 +3.1 22.42 16.82 21.96 -.06
Schwab
1000Inv d +6.9 +3.4 40.64 30.66 39.76 -.12
CoreEqInv d +7.6 +2.9 18.63 13.72 18.11 -.09
DivEqSel d +8.1 +3.3 14.09 10.70 13.84 -.06
FUSLgCInl d +6.8 NA 10.51 7.80 10.30 -.03
FUSSMCIns d +5.2 NA 11.78 7.99 11.30 -.12
GNMA +2.9 +6.6 10.45 10.04 10.38 +.03
HlthCFoc d +15.8 +6.6 18.52 13.49 18.37 -.02
IntlIndex d +5.3 +1.5 19.10 13.92 18.14 +.03
MktTrAlEq d +6.3 +3.0 13.06 9.58 12.63 -.03
MktTrBal d +4.7 +3.6 16.16 13.43 15.90 -.01
PremInc d +2.2 NA 10.54 10.16 10.37 +.01
S&P500Sel d +6.8 +3.2 21.33 16.07 20.90 -.05
SmCapIdx d +7.2 +5.7 23.44 16.02 22.64 -.17
TaxFreeBd +3.7 +4.8 11.72 10.95 11.38 +.02
TotBdMkt +2.3 +3.6 9.45 9.05 9.30 +.01
TotStkMSl d +7.1 +3.9 24.91 18.46 24.36 -.08
Scout
Interntl d +4.0 +5.5 35.42 25.58 33.68 +.05
Selected
AmerShS b +5.0 +2.2 44.52 34.31 43.51 +.15
American D +5.1 +2.5 44.53 34.33 43.54 +.16
Seligman
MuniNatA m +3.8 +4.2 8.05 7.20 7.63 +.02
Sentinel
CmnStkA m +7.2 +4.6 34.23 25.50 33.58 -.06
GovtSecA m +2.2 +6.7 11.24 10.34 10.64 +.03
ShMatGovA m +1.1 +4.5 9.38 9.17 9.27 +.02
SmallCoA m +11.6 +6.7 8.91 6.12 8.65 -.04
Sequoia
Sequoia +10.8 +5.1147.36 112.47 143.26 -2.50
Sit
LrgCapGr d +5.0 +4.1 45.42 34.58 44.38 -.11
USGovSec +1.7 +6.1 11.36 11.12 11.35 +.02
Sound Shore
SoundShor +5.8 +2.4 34.47 25.73 33.66 -.01
Spectra
Spectra A m +8.0 +11.6 13.59 9.47 13.16 -.04
Stadion
MgdPortA m -3.3 NA 11.00 9.41 9.95 -.08
State Farm
Balanced +4.0 +5.3 57.34 48.83 56.23 -.17
Growth +5.1 +4.3 57.76 44.03 55.74 -.25
MuniBond +4.1 +5.3 8.91 8.35 8.68 ...
Stratton
SmCapVal d +8.7 +3.3 55.63 38.32 53.94 -.15
T Rowe Price
Balanced +5.2 +5.3 20.55 16.65 20.23 -.01
BlChpGAdv b +5.9 +4.5 41.32 29.78 40.36 -.06
BlChpGr +6.0 +4.7 41.37 29.79 40.43 -.06
CapApprec +6.5 +6.5 21.79 17.72 21.62 +.04
CorpInc +4.1 +6.7 10.11 9.39 9.84 ...
DivGrow +7.5 +4.2 24.86 18.76 24.53 +.03
DivrSmCap d +11.6 +7.7 18.27 11.50 17.65 -.09
EmEurMed d -5.0 +2.1 24.84 16.30 22.27 -.15
EmMktBd d +4.1 +8.9 13.86 12.37 13.47 +.07
EmMktStk d -1.5 +8.2 36.99 26.50 34.75 -.02
EqIndex d +6.7 +3.0 36.77 27.55 36.00 -.10
EqtyInc +5.8 +3.0 25.53 19.42 24.98 -.03
EqtyIncAd b +5.8 +2.8 25.49 19.39 24.93 -.03
EurStock d +9.9 +4.6 17.41 11.42 16.48 +.06
ExtMktIdx d +7.8 +5.8 18.09 12.31 17.50 -.11
FinSer -.1 -2.8 15.40 11.94 14.15 -.09
GNMA +2.5 +6.4 10.10 9.76 10.03 +.02
GlbTech +10.8 +11.2 10.79 7.10 10.44 -.12
GloStk d +1.8 +1.5 19.20 14.47 18.39 -.02
GrStkAdv b +5.1 +4.6 34.38 24.96 33.53 -.07
GrStkR b +5.0 +4.4 33.98 24.72 33.13 -.07
GrowInc +6.9 +3.8 21.84 16.40 21.54 +.01
GrowStk +5.2 +4.9 34.67 25.15 33.83 -.07
HealthSci +19.7 +12.1 36.50 24.60 36.26 -.02
HiYield d +5.9 +8.5 7.00 6.33 6.99 ...
HiYldAdv m +5.8 +8.3 6.99 6.32 6.98 ...
IntlBnd d +4.0 +6.5 10.66 9.07 10.25 -.02
IntlBndAd m +4.0 +6.2 10.65 9.06 10.24 -.02
IntlDisc d +3.8 +4.8 47.45 33.49 45.55 -.17
IntlEqIdx d +5.0 +1.8 13.08 9.40 12.40 -.02
IntlGrInc d +6.2 +1.8 14.86 10.56 14.14 -.06
IntlStk d +3.1 +3.5 15.35 11.12 14.67 -.02
IntlStkAd m +3.1 +3.3 15.29 11.10 14.62 -.02
LatinAm d -7.8 +14.5 57.59 40.39 52.32 -.16
MDTaxFBd +3.0 +4.2 10.77 9.89 10.29 +.04
MdCpVlAdv b +6.9 +6.5 25.58 19.51 25.24 -.01
MediaTele +9.8 +12.8 58.18 39.43 56.81 +.34
MidCapVa +7.0 +6.7 25.71 19.62 25.37 ...
MidCpGr +8.8 +8.5 65.35 46.81 63.69 -.20
MidCpGrAd b +8.7 +8.3 64.12 46.05 62.48 -.20
NewAmGro +6.7 +7.8 35.86 25.64 35.19 -.04
NewAsia d +1.7 +14.4 20.17 14.91 19.50 -.05
NewEra +1.8 +6.5 58.14 37.45 53.08 +.67
NewHoriz +11.5 +7.6 38.26 25.10 37.33 -.21
NewIncome +2.5 +6.9 9.81 9.36 9.60 +.01
OrseaStk d +5.8 NA 9.24 6.61 8.82 -.02
PerStrBal +5.3 +5.7 20.30 16.30 19.97 +.01
PerStrGr +5.9 +4.6 24.84 18.93 24.27 -.01
PerStrInc +4.4 +6.1 16.86 14.34 16.68 +.01
R2015 +5.0 +5.2 12.72 10.30 12.49 ...
R2025 +5.4 +4.8 12.99 10.06 12.69 -.01
R2035 +5.7 +4.5 13.28 9.97 12.93 -.01
Real d +10.7 +3.4 19.58 13.79 19.27 +.06
Ret2020R b +5.0 +4.5 17.43 13.78 17.07 -.01
Ret2050 +5.6 NA 10.58 7.94 10.29 -.01
RetInc +4.1 +5.5 13.71 11.91 13.53 -.01
Retir2005 +4.5 +5.6 12.00 10.28 11.85 -.01
Rtmt2010 +4.8 +5.3 16.31 13.60 16.07 -.01
Rtmt2020 +5.2 +5.0 17.67 13.96 17.30 -.01
Rtmt2030 +5.6 +4.6 18.71 14.24 18.25 -.01
Rtmt2040 +5.6 +4.5 18.92 14.18 18.40 -.02
Rtmt2045 +5.6 +4.5 12.60 9.45 12.26 -.01
SciTecAdv b +9.5 +8.9 29.88 20.31 29.27 -.19
SciTech +9.6 +9.0 30.02 20.37 29.40 -.19
ShTmBond +1.3 +4.7 4.91 4.83 4.87 ...
SmCpStk +8.7 +6.7 38.67 26.31 37.43 -.14
SmCpVal d +5.0 +4.8 39.53 28.50 37.93 -.26
SmCpValAd m +4.9 +4.6 39.27 28.31 37.67 -.26
SpecGrow +5.9 +4.4 19.27 14.14 18.74 -.02
SpecInc +4.0 +7.1 12.70 11.74 12.66 +.01
SpecIntl d +4.5 +3.9 11.78 8.43 11.23 -.03
SumMuInc +3.3 +4.2 11.40 10.39 10.87 +.04
SumMuInt +3.7 +4.8 11.64 10.91 11.35 +.02
TaxFHiYld +2.9 +2.7 11.09 10.04 10.48 +.04
TaxFInc +3.4 +4.2 10.17 9.29 9.73 +.04
TaxFShInt +2.2 +4.2 5.66 5.51 5.61 +.01
TotMktIdx d +6.8 +3.6 15.50 11.46 15.14 -.06
TrRt2010Ad b +4.6 +5.1 16.23 13.54 15.99 -.01
TrRt2010R b +4.5 +4.8 16.14 13.46 15.89 -.01
TrRt2020Ad b +5.1 +4.7 17.56 13.88 17.19 -.01
TrRt2030Ad b +5.5 +4.4 18.59 14.15 18.12 -.01
TrRt2030R b +5.4 +4.1 18.49 14.07 18.02 -.01
TrRt2040Ad b +5.6 +4.3 18.79 14.08 18.28 -.01
TrRt2040R b +5.4 +4.0 18.70 14.02 18.19 -.02
TxFIncAdv b +3.2 +3.9 10.18 9.29 9.73 +.03
USBdEnIdx d +2.4 +6.5 11.43 10.95 11.24 +.01
USTrInt +2.5 +7.2 6.26 5.74 5.94 +.01
VATaxFBd +4.1 +4.3 11.91 10.87 11.45 +.03
Value +7.2 +3.2 25.63 19.05 25.02 +.03
ValueAd b +7.1 +3.1 25.36 18.88 24.76 +.03
TCW
DivFocN b +7.9 +1.9 11.63 8.27 11.40 -.01
EmgIncI +5.9 +12.3 8.99 7.81 8.95 +.05
RltvVlLCI +7.0 +1.3 14.92 10.64 14.46 -.09
SelEqI +6.8 +5.3 18.90 13.43 18.48 +.04
SmCapGrI +8.4 +10.8 33.27 22.23 31.81 -.21
TotRetBdI +3.1 +9.2 10.44 9.87 10.00 +.01
TotRetBdN b +3.0 +8.9 10.79 10.21 10.34 +.01
TFS
MktNeut d +5.0 +8.8 15.63 13.58 15.46 ...
TIAA-CREF
EqIxRtl b +7.0 +3.4 10.62 7.85 10.38 -.03
Gr&IncRmt +7.8 +6.1 10.11 7.40 9.87 -.02
Gr&IncRtl b +7.8 +6.2 12.11 8.86 11.83 -.02
IntEqIdxRet d +4.5 +1.1 18.45 13.36 17.53 -.04
IntlEqRmt d +2.4 +2.2 11.12 7.45 10.47 -.06
Life2010 b +4.4 +4.5 11.66 9.92 11.50 -.02
Life2015 b +4.6 +4.3 11.75 9.76 11.55 -.02
Life2020 b +4.9 +3.9 11.71 9.50 11.49 -.02
Life2025 b +5.2 +3.5 11.64 9.22 11.38 -.03
Life2030 b +5.5 +3.1 11.55 8.93 11.26 -.03
Life2035 b +5.8 +3.1 11.68 8.82 11.35 -.03
Life2040 b +5.7 +3.3 11.91 8.98 11.56 -.04
LrgeCapVal +5.4 +2.0 14.16 10.43 13.74 -.04
MdgAllRtl b +4.9 +4.3 10.47 8.61 10.29 -.02
MidCapGrwthRe +9.6 +6.2 21.40 14.24 20.73 -.19
MidValRmt +8.5 +5.2 18.75 13.30 18.43 +.09
SPIndxRmt +6.6 +2.9 15.30 11.55 14.98 -.04
ScChEqR +6.3 +3.7 11.77 8.89 11.55 -.03
SmCapEqRe d +7.3 +3.3 15.95 10.66 15.32 -.13
SmCpBlIdxRet d +6.1 +3.9 15.30 10.47 14.67 -.12
Target
SmCapVal +7.2 +6.0 22.86 16.32 22.08 -.11
Templeton
InFEqSeS +6.4 +4.3 22.33 16.36 21.33 -.07
Thomas White
ThmsWIntl d +2.6 +3.3 18.61 13.62 17.67 +.06
Thompson Plumb
Bond +3.3 +8.5 11.64 11.26 11.64 +.01
Thornburg
IncBldA m +6.2 +7.9 20.23 16.76 19.83 +.03
IncBldC m +5.9 +7.2 20.23 16.76 19.83 +.02
IntlValA m +5.4 +5.7 30.95 22.32 29.52 -.04
IntlValC m +5.1 +4.9 29.10 21.05 27.75 -.04
LtdTMuA m +2.8 +4.5 14.34 13.83 14.19 +.03
LtdTMuC m +2.7 +4.2 14.37 13.85 14.22 +.03
LtdTmIncA m +3.2 +6.2 13.51 13.02 13.34 +.01
Value A m +5.6 +3.9 37.64 27.99 35.75 -.23
Thrivent
HiYieldA m +5.6 +8.0 4.97 4.47 4.96 -.01
LgCapStkA m +4.8 +1.5 23.91 18.12 23.30 -.04
MidCapA m +7.6 +4.7 16.67 11.32 16.14 -.10
MuniBdA m +3.8 +4.2 11.53 10.57 11.06 +.02
Tocqueville
Gold m -3.7 +18.0 91.56 60.44 83.27 +2.09
Tocquevil m +5.4 +3.3 24.34 18.49 23.78 -.12
Touchstone
MdCpGrA m +9.5 +5.7 25.74 17.45 25.18 -.14
Transamerica
AssAllCvA m +4.2 +4.9 11.79 10.30 11.66 ...
AssAllCvC m +4.0 +4.3 11.71 10.25 11.58 ...
AssAllGrA m +5.5 +2.3 13.00 9.68 12.65 -.03
AssAllGrC m +5.4 +1.7 12.71 9.47 12.37 -.03
AstAlMdGrA m +4.8 +3.6 12.77 10.16 12.47 -.01
AstAlMdGrC m +4.5 +2.9 12.72 10.11 12.41 -.02
AstAlModA m +4.6 +4.5 12.40 10.38 12.20 -.01
AstAlModC m +4.4 +3.9 12.35 10.33 12.14 -.01
TransEqA m +5.2 +1.3 10.36 7.47 10.04 -.08
Transamerica Partner
CoreBd b +2.7 +6.3 11.17 10.68 10.97 +.01
CrBond b +2.6 +6.0 13.19 12.69 13.01 +.02
StockIdx b +6.7 +3.0 9.12 6.84 8.93 -.03
Trust for Credit Un
TCUShDur +.7 +3.9 9.79 9.69 9.76 ...
TCUUltrShGov +.3 +3.3 9.62 9.59 9.61 ...
Turner
MidGrInv +9.8 +5.9 39.73 25.89 38.68 -.06
Tweedy Browne
GlobVal d +5.0 +4.4 25.26 20.15 25.00 -.04
Tweedy, Browne
Value +4.6 +4.6 20.15 16.20 19.81 -.04
UBS
GlobAllA m +2.9 +2.7 10.59 8.65 10.27 -.03
UBS PACE
AltStrP d +1.6 +.7 9.91 9.03 9.57 -.01
GlFxIP d +3.7 +6.3 12.43 10.54 12.09 ...
GvtSecP d +2.5 +6.9 13.84 12.94 13.28 +.04
IntlEqP d +5.6 -.2 14.17 10.46 13.50 -.01
LgCoVlP d +6.1 +2.2 18.21 13.68 17.76 -.10
LrCoGrP d +5.9 +4.1 19.68 14.07 19.16 -.12
PcIntFIP d +2.2 +5.3 12.24 11.79 12.08 +.01
SmMdGrP d +10.5 +6.3 18.26 11.79 17.65 -.12
SmMdVlP d +6.8 +4.0 18.95 13.34 18.45 -.15
StrFInP d +3.5 +8.8 15.06 13.94 14.38 +.04
US Global Investors
EastEuro m -1.6 +.5 11.94 7.92 10.64 -.08
GlobRes m -1.7 +4.7 13.01 8.17 11.71 +.02
WrldPrcMnr m -13.3 +8.7 22.94 14.74 19.32 +.25
USAA
AggGrow +6.5 +2.9 36.18 25.76 35.14 -.22
BalStrat +6.7 +4.4 14.37 11.77 14.18 ...
CABond +3.8 +2.7 10.51 9.13 9.73 +.06
CapGrowth +4.3 +.9 7.30 5.42 7.01 -.03
Cornerst +5.3 +4.4 24.31 19.93 23.80 +.01
EmergMkt -2.9 +8.2 22.33 16.37 21.00 -.11
ExtMktIdx +7.4 +5.5 14.01 9.87 13.57 -.08
GNMA +2.4 +6.4 10.33 10.03 10.28 +.02
Grow +5.6 +1.6 15.87 11.64 15.53 -.11
GrowInc +6.4 +2.7 16.29 12.03 15.97 -.06
HYOpp +6.9 +8.6 8.80 7.81 8.80 +.01
Income +3.0 +6.9 13.09 12.57 12.97 +.01
IncomeStk +9.4 +.6 13.29 9.76 13.04 -.08
IntermBd +5.1 +7.6 10.63 9.88 10.62 +.01
Intl +5.8 +4.2 26.98 19.10 25.72 -.08
PrcMtlMin -9.1 +18.2 43.83 31.25 38.97 +1.13
S&P500M +6.7 +3.0 20.43 15.33 20.00 -.06
ShTmBond +1.4 +5.3 9.27 9.13 9.21 ...
SmCapStk +6.5 +3.9 15.13 10.45 14.59 -.16
TaxEInt +3.7 +4.4 13.28 12.34 12.86 +.03
TaxELgTm +4.1 +3.4 13.32 11.87 12.59 +.05
TaxEShTm +1.9 +3.8 10.77 10.57 10.70 +.01
TgtRt2030 +4.8 NA 12.17 9.91 11.92 -.02
TgtRt2040 +4.9 NA 11.89 9.17 11.55 -.04
VABond +4.3 +3.6 11.21 10.20 10.82 +.04
Value +8.4 +3.6 14.82 10.89 14.57 -.01
WorldGro +7.5 +5.5 20.62 15.01 20.10 -.02
Unified
Wntergrn m +4.8 +7.2 14.87 11.04 14.68 +.09
VALIC Co I
ForgnVal +7.7 +3.8 10.37 7.38 9.95 -.02
GlobStrat +7.0 +7.8 12.31 9.76 12.04 +.04
IGrowth +6.5 +5.2 12.01 8.69 11.72 -.04
IntlEq +3.7 +.2 7.04 5.14 6.67 -.02
IntlGrI +5.6 +4.1 12.34 8.64 11.75 +.01
LgCapGr +4.8 +3.9 12.45 9.17 12.11 -.03
MdCpIdx +9.2 +6.5 23.03 15.91 22.40 -.16
Scie&Tech +8.6 +8.5 17.81 12.11 17.41 -.11
SmCpIdx +6.1 +4.0 15.90 10.85 15.24 -.12
StockIdx +6.7 +2.9 27.02 20.61 26.46 -.07
VALIC Co II
IntSmCpEq +2.3 +.2 14.60 10.20 13.92 -.07
MdCpVal +5.6 +4.1 18.23 13.11 17.82 -.06
SmCpVal +6.7 +3.7 14.93 10.17 14.29 -.14
SocResp +7.6 +3.5 12.10 9.10 11.93 ...
StratBd +4.8 +6.9 11.45 9.94 11.45 +.02
Van Eck
GloHardA m +.7 +11.2 57.73 35.75 52.72 +1.05
IntlGoldA m -8.3 +18.9 25.83 16.96 22.65 +.64
Vanguard
500Adml +6.8 +3.2125.74 94.17 123.14 -.35
500Inv +6.7 +3.1125.72 94.17 123.12 -.35
AssetA +6.3 +2.1 26.44 20.82 25.99 -.06
AssetAdml +6.3 +2.2 59.37 46.75 58.35 -.16
BalIdx +5.2 +5.3 22.62 18.76 22.38 -.03
BalIdxAdm +5.3 +5.4 22.62 18.76 22.39 -.02
CAIT +3.8 +4.1 11.33 10.51 10.96 +.03
CAITAdml +3.9 +4.2 11.33 10.51 10.96 +.03
CALT +3.8 +3.4 11.48 10.40 10.94 +.03
CALTAdml +3.8 +3.5 11.48 10.40 10.94 +.03
CapOp d +5.7 +5.7 36.17 26.50 35.14 -.24
CapOpAdml d +5.7 +5.8 83.55 61.22 81.19 -.55
CapVal +6.6 +4.4 12.21 8.32 11.75 -.03
Convrt d +5.6 +8.0 14.20 11.18 14.06 -.02
DevMktIdx d +4.2 +1.3 11.03 8.04 10.48 -.02
DivAppInv +7.7 +4.7 22.97 17.53 22.57 -.04
DivEqInv +7.4 +3.0 22.43 16.31 21.90 -.11
DivGr +8.2 +6.1 15.67 12.11 15.56 +.03
EmMktIAdm d -.4 NA 42.03 30.20 39.70 -.04
EmerMktId d -.5 +9.5 31.97 22.95 30.20 -.03
EnergyAdm d +8.4 +7.4141.63 96.08 131.13 +1.65
EnergyInv d +8.4 +7.3 75.42 51.16 69.83 +.88
EqInc +9.6 +4.1 22.40 16.93 22.19 +.01
EqIncAdml +9.6 +4.2 46.95 35.49 46.52 +.03
EurIdxAdm d +8.6 +2.5 70.05 49.10 66.28 +.16
EuropeIdx d +8.5 +2.4 30.06 20.92 28.43 +.06
ExMktIdSig +8.0 NA 39.55 26.97 38.30 -.21
ExplAdml +9.7 +4.6 76.59 51.04 74.44 -.44
Explr +9.7 +4.4 82.27 54.82 79.95 -.48
ExtdIdAdm +8.0 +5.8 46.03 31.39 44.58 -.25
ExtndIdx +8.0 +5.6 45.99 31.37 44.54 -.25
FAWeUSInv d +3.0 NA 20.32 14.76 19.28 ...
FLLTAdml +4.0 +4.4 11.74 10.74 11.31 +.03
GNMA +2.9 +6.9 11.16 10.57 10.92 +.02
GNMAAdml +3.0 +7.0 11.16 10.57 10.92 +.02
GlbEq +5.7 +2.0 19.58 14.38 18.88 -.07
GrIncAdml +7.2 +1.6 47.06 35.26 46.07 -.25
GroInc +7.1 +1.5 28.82 21.60 28.21 -.15
GrowthEq +6.4 +2.2 11.73 8.66 11.48 -.05
GrowthIdx +6.3 +5.2 34.10 24.93 33.50 -.11
GrthIdAdm +6.3 +5.3 34.11 24.93 33.51 -.10
GrthIstSg +6.3 NA 31.58 23.08 31.03 -.10
HYCor d +5.8 +7.2 5.88 5.35 5.87 ...
HYCorAdml d +5.9 +7.3 5.88 5.35 5.87 ...
HYT/E +3.4 +3.9 10.76 9.82 10.26 +.03
HltCrAdml d +15.1 +6.8 59.40 46.51 58.98 +.07
HlthCare d +15.0 +6.8140.74 110.19 139.74 +.15
ITBond +3.3 +7.6 11.87 10.98 11.37 +.02
ITBondAdm +3.3 +7.7 11.87 10.98 11.37 +.02
ITGradeAd +3.8 +7.4 10.51 9.79 10.02 +.01
ITIGrade +3.7 +7.2 10.51 9.79 10.02 +.01
ITTsry +2.4 +7.1 12.08 11.11 11.50 +.03
ITrsyAdml +2.5 +7.3 12.08 11.11 11.50 +.03
InfPrtAdm +3.9 +6.4 26.84 25.02 26.36 -.06
InflaPro +3.9 +6.3 13.66 12.74 13.42 -.03
IntlExpIn d +2.5 +3.3 17.92 12.37 17.09 -.04
IntlGr d +3.8 +4.4 21.17 14.85 20.07 +.06
IntlGrAdm d +3.8 +4.6 67.38 47.27 63.88 +.20
IntlStkIdxAdm d +3.0 NA 28.57 25.19 27.13 -.02
IntlStkIdxISgn d +3.0 NA 34.29 30.22 32.56 -.02
IntlVal d +2.0 +1.8 34.50 25.74 32.79 -.15
ItBdIdxSl +3.3 NA 11.87 10.98 11.37 +.02
LTBond +3.9 +7.8 13.22 11.53 12.28 +.03
LTGradeAd +4.7 +7.8 10.04 8.99 9.57 +.02
LTInvGr +4.7 +7.7 10.04 8.99 9.57 +.02
LTTsry +2.9 +7.1 12.80 10.46 11.23 +.03
LTsryAdml +2.9 +7.3 12.80 10.46 11.23 +.03
LgCpIdxAdm +7.0 +3.7 31.62 23.51 30.99 -.08
LgCpIdxSg +7.0 NA 27.58 20.51 27.03 -.07
LifeCon +3.9 +4.8 17.10 14.93 16.93 ...
LifeGro +5.3 +3.7 23.83 18.44 23.24 -.04
LifeInc +3.2 +5.3 14.47 13.42 14.43 +.01
LifeMod +4.8 +4.5 20.85 17.11 20.50 -.01
MATxEx +4.2 +4.4 10.56 9.72 10.21 +.01
MdGrIxInv +9.6 NA 27.29 18.26 26.81 -.08
MdPDisInv +5.1 NA 17.34 14.59 16.92 -.07
MdVlIxInv +9.0 NA 23.09 16.99 22.72 +.01
MidCapGr +9.3 +6.5 21.27 14.43 20.76 -.11
MidCp +9.3 +5.3 22.57 15.82 22.19 -.03
MidCpAdml +9.4 +5.4102.47 71.79 100.78 -.12
MidCpIst +9.3 +5.4 22.64 15.87 22.26 -.03
MidCpSgl +9.3 NA 32.34 22.66 31.80 -.04
Morg +6.7 +4.2 19.74 14.17 19.23 -.15
MorgAdml +6.7 +4.3 61.21 43.95 59.65 -.47
MuHYAdml +3.5 +4.0 10.76 9.82 10.26 +.03
MuInt +3.7 +4.6 13.99 13.04 13.56 +.03
MuIntAdml +3.7 +4.7 13.99 13.04 13.56 +.03
MuLTAdml +3.7 +4.2 11.37 10.39 10.88 +.02
MuLong +3.6 +4.2 11.37 10.39 10.88 +.02
MuLtd +1.7 +3.8 11.20 10.95 11.09 +.01
MuLtdAdml +1.7 +3.9 11.20 10.95 11.09 +.01
MuSht +.8 +3.0 15.98 15.84 15.91 +.01
MuShtAdml +.8 +3.1 15.98 15.84 15.91 +.01
NJLTAdml +2.8 +4.1 12.03 11.05 11.44 +.03
NYLT +3.5 +4.1 11.43 10.52 11.02 +.02
NYLTAdml +3.5 +4.2 11.43 10.52 11.02 +.02
OHLTte +3.3 +4.4 12.34 11.27 11.80 +.03
PALT +3.7 +4.1 11.38 10.48 10.97 +.02
PALTAdml +3.7 +4.2 11.38 10.48 10.97 +.02
PacIdxAdm d -3.5 -.6 73.70 57.99 68.10 -.75
PacificId d -3.6 -.7 11.35 8.86 10.48 -.12
PrecMtls d -2.1 +8.8 28.35 17.88 26.14 +.56
Prmcp d +7.1 +5.8 71.63 53.02 70.44 -.17
PrmcpAdml d +7.1 +5.9 74.34 55.03 73.11 -.17
PrmcpCorI d +7.3 +6.2 15.02 11.11 14.78 -.03
REITIdx d +10.4 +4.2 20.65 14.75 20.15 +.06
REITIdxAd d +10.4 +4.3 88.12 62.93 85.99 +.25
STBond +1.4 +5.2 10.77 10.48 10.61 +.01
STBondAdm +1.4 +5.3 10.77 10.48 10.61 +.01
STBondSgl +1.4 NA 10.77 10.48 10.61 +.01
STCor +1.7 +5.0 10.91 10.66 10.79 ...
STFed +1.1 +5.0 11.03 10.69 10.83 +.01
STFedAdml +1.1 +5.1 11.03 10.69 10.83 +.01
STGradeAd +1.7 +5.1 10.91 10.66 10.79 ...
STTsry +.9 +4.5 10.95 10.62 10.75 +.01
STsryAdml +1.0 +4.6 10.95 10.62 10.75 +.01
SelValu d +9.2 +6.2 20.68 15.39 20.48 +.10
SmCapIdx +7.7 +5.6 38.92 26.38 37.42 -.30
SmCpIdAdm +7.7 +5.7 38.97 26.40 37.47 -.30
SmCpIndxSgnl +7.8 NA 35.11 23.80 33.76 -.27
SmGthIdx +9.9 +7.1 25.10 16.13 24.08 -.21
SmGthIst +9.9 +7.2 25.15 16.16 24.14 -.20
SmValIdx +5.4 +3.9 17.52 12.54 16.88 -.13
Star +5.0 +5.0 20.35 16.71 20.04 -.02
StratgcEq +11.5 +2.1 20.96 14.34 20.42 -.17
TgtRe2005 +3.8 +5.4 12.27 11.00 12.18 ...
TgtRe2010 +4.3 NA 23.54 20.24 23.26 -.01
TgtRe2015 +4.5 +5.1 13.18 11.03 12.98 -.01
TgtRe2020 +4.8 NA 23.57 19.27 23.15 -.02
TgtRe2030 +5.3 NA 23.37 18.26 22.82 -.03
TgtRe2035 +5.5 +4.1 14.18 10.88 13.81 -.02
TgtRe2040 +5.5 NA 23.31 17.83 22.68 -.05
TgtRe2045 +5.6 +4.2 14.64 11.25 14.25 -.02
TgtRe2050 +5.5 NA 23.21 17.88 22.58 -.04
TgtRetInc +3.6 +5.9 11.71 10.56 11.63 ...
Tgtet2025 +5.0 +4.5 13.53 10.82 13.25 -.01
TotBdAdml +2.4 +6.5 10.94 10.43 10.72 +.01
TotBdMkInv +2.4 +6.4 10.94 10.43 10.72 +.01
TotBdMkSig +2.4 NA 10.94 10.43 10.72 +.01
TotIntl d +2.9 +2.9 17.08 12.34 16.22 -.01
TotStIAdm +7.1 +3.9 34.44 25.37 33.66 -.11
TotStISig +7.1 NA 33.24 24.48 32.49 -.11
TotStIdx +7.0 +3.8 34.43 25.36 33.65 -.11
TxMBalAdm +5.4 +4.9 21.02 18.15 20.92 -.01
TxMIntlAdm d +4.2 +1.5 12.70 9.22 12.06 -.03
TxMSCAdm +7.1 +4.5 30.03 20.91 29.10 -.25
USGro +7.3 +3.2 20.00 14.60 19.59 -.12
USGroAdml +7.4 +3.4 51.79 37.83 50.74 -.30
USValue +9.2 +.9 11.27 8.37 11.03 -.01
ValIdxAdm +7.7 +2.0 22.78 17.23 22.27 -.04
ValIdxSig +7.7 NA 23.70 17.93 23.17 -.05
ValueIdx +7.6 +1.9 22.78 17.23 22.26 -.05
VdHiDivIx +8.9 NA 18.28 13.87 18.09 +.01
WellsI +5.7 +7.3 22.79 20.27 22.73 +.05
WellsIAdm +5.7 +7.4 55.21 49.10 55.08 +.13
Welltn +5.5 +6.0 33.11 27.37 32.59 -.05
WelltnAdm +5.5 +6.1 57.18 47.28 56.29 -.08
WndsIIAdm +7.8 +2.4 50.09 37.70 49.13 -.11
Wndsr +6.1 +1.2 14.68 10.78 14.33 -.05
WndsrAdml +6.1 +1.3 49.54 36.35 48.38 -.16
WndsrII +7.8 +2.3 28.22 21.24 27.68 -.06
Vantagepoint
AggrOpp +7.0 +5.3 12.34 9.12 12.13 -.03
AllEqGr +6.5 +3.4 21.64 16.04 21.09 -.05
BrMktIx +6.7 +3.6 11.21 8.32 10.96 -.03
ConsGro +3.9 +4.6 24.77 21.73 24.54 -.02
CorBdIxI +2.4 +6.0 10.40 9.95 10.22 +.02
EqInc +8.8 +3.6 9.53 7.19 9.40 ...
GrInc +6.5 +3.5 10.50 7.87 10.30 -.05
Growth +3.8 +1.5 9.36 7.02 9.11 -.04
InfltnPrt +3.4 +6.4 11.64 10.75 11.25 -.02
Intl +6.0 +1.3 10.32 7.53 9.90 ...
LgTmGro +5.5 +4.3 23.01 18.31 22.58 -.04
LoDurBd +1.4 +4.4 10.18 9.98 10.11 +.01
TradGro +4.7 +4.4 23.56 19.53 23.21 -.03
Victory
DivrStkA f +3.0 +2.9 16.59 12.43 16.06 -.12
SpecValA f +6.0 +3.9 17.70 12.70 17.25 -.05
Virtus
BalA m +5.0 +4.6 14.27 11.30 14.02 -.03
ForOppA m +6.2 +3.5 24.23 18.56 23.69 +.18
MulSStA m +3.5 +6.6 4.91 4.60 4.89 ...
MulSStC b +3.6 +6.3 4.96 4.64 4.94 ...
MulSStT m +3.4 +5.8 4.95 4.63 4.93 ...
RealEstA m +11.0 +3.9 31.45 22.20 30.84 +.12
Waddell & Reed
DivOppsA m +4.3 +2.8 16.11 11.48 15.43 -.01
Waddell & Reed Adv
AccumA m +5.2 +3.4 8.09 5.90 7.88 -.01
AssetStrA m +5.8 +9.3 10.34 7.75 9.87 ...
BondA m +2.1 +5.1 6.46 6.13 6.28 +.01
ContIncA m +6.0 +6.7 8.81 6.83 8.68 +.01
CoreInv A m +7.4 +5.2 6.54 4.68 6.40 +.01
GlbBondA m +2.2 +6.2 4.08 3.93 4.06 +.01
HiIncA m +6.1 +8.0 7.31 6.58 7.30 -.01
IntlGrowA m +5.9 +4.9 10.62 7.34 10.21 +.02
MuniBondA m +3.0 +4.8 7.45 6.88 7.14 +.03
MuniHiInA m +2.1 +3.6 4.89 4.50 4.60 +.01
NewCncptA m +8.4 +9.9 12.47 8.71 12.17 -.04
SciTechA m +8.9 +9.3 11.67 8.54 11.31 -.10
SmCapA m +10.4 +8.3 17.80 11.65 17.08 -.19
ValueA m +5.2 +3.6 12.96 9.69 12.65 -.03
VanguardA m +5.1 +3.8 8.75 6.47 8.48 -.02
Wasatch
CoreGr d +9.3 +3.8 38.36 26.83 37.60 -.25
LgCpVal d +5.7 +4.8 15.12 11.33 14.65 -.03
Lng/Sht d +5.9 +6.5 13.76 10.81 13.38 -.04
SmCapGr d +6.2 +6.3 43.05 29.34 41.94 -.31
Weitz
PartVal +6.8 +3.3 22.43 16.73 21.98 -.08
PrtIIIOpp +8.2 +6.5 12.84 9.34 12.60 -.04
ShtIntmInc +1.7 +5.9 12.54 12.33 12.52 +.01
Value +6.9 +.2 30.87 23.68 30.40 -.11
Wells Fargo
AstAlcA f +5.4 +3.2 20.05 15.98 19.70 -.05
AstAlllcA f +4.8 +4.6 12.76 10.67 12.53 -.02
AstAlllcB m +4.6 +3.9 12.63 10.55 12.39 -.03
AstAlllcC m +4.6 +3.9 12.36 10.33 12.13 -.03
CATxFA f +3.1 +3.5 11.02 10.11 10.50 +.04
CmnStkInv +7.6 +8.0 22.56 16.57 22.24 -.08
CrEqA f +7.9 +6.1 29.35 20.99 28.98 -.02
DiscovInv +10.5 +8.7 27.37 17.75 26.40 -.16
DvrCpBldA f +6.9 +3.0 7.43 5.40 7.28 +.01
EmgMktEqA f -.3 +12.6 23.83 16.94 22.78 -.01
GovSecInv +2.0 +6.0 11.20 10.72 10.99 +.01
GrowInv +12.7 +10.2 37.58 24.51 36.11 -.33
MidGrA f +4.9 +6.1 6.66 4.68 6.39 -.03
OmgGrA f +7.0 +9.3 41.19 28.05 39.63 -.16
OpportInv +8.1 +5.4 42.61 30.42 41.95 -.16
PrecMetA f -7.3 +15.2 93.72 67.29 81.62 +2.26
PrecMetC m -7.6 +14.3 85.79 61.84 74.67 +2.06
PrmLrgCoGrA f +7.1 +7.9 10.15 7.26 9.91 -.04
SCpValInv +.6 +5.8 34.38 26.00 32.75 +.24
STMuBdInv +1.6 +3.9 9.98 9.84 9.94 +.01
SmCapValA f +.6 +5.7 33.83 25.59 32.23 +.24
SpMdCpValIv +9.2 +5.0 23.31 16.74 22.97 -.01
SpSmCpValA f +2.8 +2.7 23.46 16.91 22.43 -.27
UlSTMInA f +.7 +3.3 4.82 4.80 4.82 +.01
UlSTMInIv +.7 +3.2 4.83 4.80 4.82 ...
UltSTInIv +.7 +2.4 8.58 8.48 8.58 ...
WBGrBl m +5.4 +2.7 12.02 9.17 11.68 -.04
WlthConAl m +2.8 +4.5 11.05 9.97 10.95 ...
WlthModBl m +3.9 +3.8 11.60 9.72 11.40 -.01
WlthTactEq m +6.1 +1.5 14.14 10.23 13.70 -.07
Westcore
PlusBd d +3.1 +6.0 11.03 10.61 10.90 +.02
Select d +9.3 +10.9 23.81 15.68 23.03 -.19
Westwood
MtyMteAAA m +1.0 +8.9 18.39 14.02 17.52 -.21
William Blair
IntlGrN m +.9 +1.8 22.99 16.87 22.04 ...
Yacktman
Focused d +8.8 +11.8 19.37 15.30 19.24 -.01
Yacktman d +9.4 +10.9 18.21 14.49 18.09 ...
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
C M Y K
PAGE 8D SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
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C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011

timesleader.com
THE FIRST might be
the hardest. Perhaps
that is true of the first
countywide election
under the auspices of
the new county home
rule charter.
On Tuesday, voters
had the unenviable task of sorting
through 49 candidates to nominate 11
of 16 Republicans and 11 of 33 Demo-
crats for Luzerne County Council. The
successful 22 will compete in Novem-
ber for the 11 seats at the table.
In addition to the mayoral, municipal
and many school board races, a very
busy electorate had to choose among 16
cross-filed judicial aspirants (four Re-
publicans and 12 Democrats) to nomi-
nate six in each party for the half dozen
judgeships to be decided on Nov. 8.
All things considered those people
who voted did a good job sorting
through the clutter and making cred-
ible decisions.
While candidates were sensitive to
the perception of raising large amounts
of campaign cash for wall-to-wall ad-
vertising, and many hesitated to do so,
news media coverage was plentiful and
informative.
Most illustrative were The Times
Leader’s online videos of in-depth en-
dorsement interviews with judicial,
county council and Wilkes-Barre may-
oral candidates. In these contests there
was no excuse for not knowing the
players, positions, strengths and weak-
nesses. I hope the newspaper can keep
these interviews up on its website for
readers to visit, revisit and more closely
observe the candidates nominated.
In the relatively low-budget race for
six seats on the Luzerne County Court
of Common Pleas, five Democrats were
nominated by both parties. Attorneys
Lesa Gelb, Jennifer Rogers, Fred Pieran-
toni, Michael Vough and Joseph Skla-
rosky Jr. captured Democratic and
Republican nominations, placing them
beyond prohibitive favorites to claim
five of six judicial seats come fall.
Realistically, that leaves attorney
Richard Hughes, nominated only on
the Republican ballot, and Molly Han-
lon Mirabito, nominated only on the
Democratic ticket, to compete for the
sixth and final spot on the bench.
Hughes, considered among the most
respected and qualified of the 16 judi-
cial candidates, was a top vote-getter
and the only Republican to be nomi-
nated. That the GOP failed to nominate
distinguished Republican attorneys
such as Jim Haggerty of Kingston, Joe
Saporito Jr. of Pittston and James
McMonagle of Shavertown will be
discussed with much angst in Repub-
lican settings, large and small, public
and private, for many months to come.
The first charter election of 2011 was
a positive campaign, void of visible
mudslinging. Attempts to unnecessarily
influence voters appeared to fall flat.
Several labor unions formed an 11-
person ticket to take the 11 Democratic
nominations for county council. Seven
were defeated.
At the last minute, eight other “clev-
er” Democrats reportedly sent out an
unattributed mailing. Only two of
them, Tim McGinley and Michelle
Bednar, were nominated and they fin-
ished eighth and ninth respectively.
Your continued vigilance is required.
There is little more than five months
remaining to learn more about the 22
nominees for county council. On Nov.
8, you must select the best from among
the Democrats, the finest of the Repub-
licans, maybe an independent or two,
and elect the first and most qualified
11-member council possible.
After all, it is they who are entrusted
with the profound responsibility to
search, find and appoint the most tal-
ented, ethical and independent county
manager imaginable.
Happily, you will not be electing six
judges again anytime soon. And in two
years, only five need be elected to coun-
ty council. The top six vote-getters on
Nov. 8 will get a four-year term, while
the others receive an initial stint of only
two years. That way you will be able to
change half the board at every munici-
pal election.
It gets easier.
IN THE ARENA
K E V I N B L A U M
First home rule
election brings
wave of change
Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life
and politics appears every Sunday. Contact
him at kblaum@timesleader.com.
APERSONHAS a
better chance of pick-
ing the winner in the
next and final leg of
horse racing’s Triple
Crown than prognosti-
cating on some politi-
cal contests.
In most elections the odds are not bad
if you’re a gambling man. Usually there’s
a 50 percent chance of being right.
So, I’mfeeling slightly smug at Mayor
TomLeighton’s victory running in the
primary for re-election to lead our city of
Wilkes-Barre.
My personal endorsement last week of
his candidacy stirred up the people in
the cheap seats, the ones who rail on and
spit venombehind their email anonym-
ity.
Actually, I do not read those com-
ments but my friends take great delight
in telling me of the rancor when I write
something controversial.
Lots of emails and online comments
are proof I see that there is no better
read newspaper in this area than The
Times Leader. Our residents pay little to
no attention to the pretenders who try to
compete with us in this business.
The Times Leader was recently
ranked for total audience growth as the
ninth fastest growing daily and Sunday
newspaper in the country. We are the
second fastest growing in Pennsylvania
just behind The Morning Call of Allen-
town.
So, when we offer a strong opinion on
our pages, the odds are better than good
that there will be a huge response.
Actually, in the mayor’s race Leight-
on’s chief opponent, Charlotte Raup, was
a good candidate simply based on her
community service work helping to
improve our neighborhoods through the
Crime Watch groups.
But this city needed a person, such as
Leighton, with strong government man-
agement experience. He has improved
this city in many, many ways but still
there is more to be done.
Leighton will have general election
competition but I can call this one al-
ready and jump to 2-0 picking mayoral
winners.
TomLeighton will be the mayor of
our city for the next term.
What will happen with the newLu-
zerne County Council is largely un-
known. We will have 11persons govern-
ing the county as opposed to the three-
commissioner rule that has been in
place. In the November general election
there will be 22 candidates –11Repub-
licans and11Democrats -- running for
those seats as well as Independent and
third party candidates.
We can expect to get just the opposite
of what resulted in the Wilkes-Barre
mayoral race. There we ended up with
experience winning and most likely to
win in the fall.
The county will be run mostly by
many persons with little or no public
office experience. There is no question
we should expect high entertainment
with what will certainly be some early
fumbling and missteps. Let’s just hope
we also get some good government from
everyday citizens grabbing the reins and
steering us into the future.
We almost certainly will have one
seasoned political leader on that govern-
ing body: Stephen A. Urban, a current
county commissioner and the only one
to seek a seat on the council.
Tired of being snubbed by his own
local Republican Party leaders he be-
came a Democrat and won the primary
as one. He was the top vote-getter in the
county vote with more than12,000
votes. He has 11years of experience.
Another top vote-getter was his son,
Stephen J. Urban who received more
than 9,000-votes. Linda Urban, Steve A.’s
wife did not win in the primary, keeping
the Urbans frombeing a family political
trifecta.
Here’s my prediction: Both Urbans
will win in the fall.
And here’s one more prediction: Ex-
pect one of two things to happen. The
younger Urban -- who ran on the Repub-
lican ticket so that the father-son duo
would not take votes fromone another --
will either switch parties like his father,
or the local Republicans will reach out,
make amends to the dad, and stop favor-
ing only those in their small clique.
RICHARD L. CONNOR
O P I N I O N
When it comes
to progress, odds
are in our favor
Richard L. Connor is editor and publisher of
The Times Leader. Reach him at rcon-
nor@timesleader.com.
P
IKESVILLE, Md. — As
he slouches toward a
possible White House
run, Mitch Daniels is the
GOP’s unlikeliest savior.
He governs a Midwestern state that
few consider cutting-edge. His
bland persona can leave audiences
cold. Balding and short, he makes a
fetish of self-deprecation.
Whena stranger approaches after
a speech in Pikesville, Md., eager to
“shake the hand of a future presi-
dent,” Daniels gamely obliges.
Then he mutters under his
breath: “Not much chance of that.”
The Indiana governor is this pres-
idential campaign’s Hoosier Ham-
let, musing openly about his ambiv-
alence toward becoming a candi-
date even as the Republican estab-
lishment, fearful that the current
crop of 2012 candidates hasn’t a
chance of success, yearns for his en-
trance into the race.
If he does jump in —a decision is
expected soon — history suggests
his would be an uphill quest.
No Republican candidate in the
modern era has started forming a
presidential campaign this late in
the game and gone on to win the
nomination. It takes time to get or-
ganized, collect money, hone a
message and build support around
the country. Mitt Romney, the front-
runner in early polls, has essentially
been running since his 2008 cam-
paign faltered.
Daniels, though, sees a path to
victory. A surprisingly large num-
ber of Republican officials have pri-
vately signaled their eagerness to
endorse him, he says. (New Jersey
Gov. Chris Christie, a rising GOP
star, said recently he’d give “serious
consideration” to backing Daniels.)
Such support, he insists, could give
him the fundraising heft to get
through Iowa’s make-or-break cau-
cuses in eight months.
In contrast to the rest of the field,
Daniels would come to the race as a
MCT FILE PHOTO
Mitch Daniels signs autographs and talks to constituents at a minor league baseball game in Indianapolis,
Ind., in 2005. The Indiana governor is considering a possible White House run.
GAME FOR RUN?
Indiana governor Mitch Daniels ponders presidential bid
By PAUL WEST
Tribune Washington Bureau
See DANIELS, Page 7E
DANIELS WOULD COME to the race as a serious executive
with high-level Washington experience — from his turn as a
political strategist for President Ronald Reagan to a stint
as President George W. Bush’s budget director.
WASHINGTON—If congressional
oversight is a good thing, then the
Homeland Security Department may
be suffering from too much of a good
thing.
The department, cobbled together
quickly out of 22 other agencies after
the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, an-
swers to 108 congressional commit-
tees, subcommittees, caucuses and
the like, about four times as many as
the departments of State and Justice
combined.
Officials and staff spent about 66
work years responding to questions
from Congress in 2009 alone. That
same year, Homeland Security offi-
cials say they answered11,680 letters,
gave 2,058 briefings and sent 232 wit-
nesses to 166 hearings. All this at a
cost to taxpayers of about $10 million.
“There’s no good reason,” said Rep.
Peter King, R-N.Y., chairman of the
House Homeland Security Commit-
tee. “It’s disgraceful.” His committee
would become the primary House
oversight panel were the situation to
change.
And while many in Congress and at
the department agree, there doesn’t
seemto be an appetite to do anything
about it.
The department was created to fo-
cus efforts on keeping the country se-
cure under the direction of one Cabi-
net-level leader, sharing resources,
goals and an overall mission. But
what decision makers didn’t take into
account was the volume of oversight
from Capitol Hill that would come
with realigning 22 agencies into one
massive department.
The 9/11 Commission, in its 2004
report, concluded that Congress
should cut oversight fromthe then-88
committees and subcommittees to “a
single, principal point of oversight
and review.” Instead, another 20
groups have been added to the num-
Homeland Security most overseen department
Editor’s note: An occasional look at how
Washington works — or doesn’t.
By ALICIA A. CALDWELL
Associated Press
See OVERSEEN, Page 6E
K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
“If this race ever proves
anything, it’s that ballot position
means nothing.”
Rick Morelli
The Republican contender for Luzerne County
Council, who was listed 11th on the ballot amid 16
GOP challengers, came in second during Tuesday’s closed primary.
Several other candidates whose names appeared at or near the bottom
of their respective party’s lists also won voters’ approval.
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
PRASHANT SHITUT
President/
Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
PRASHANT SHITUT
President
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
RICHARD DEHAVEN
Vice President/Circulation
RACHEL PUGH
Vice President/Marketing
ALLISON UHRIN
Vice President/Chief Financial Officer
C
ONGRESS SHOULD
put the brakes on the
latest attempt to
thwart the repeal of
the policy banning openly gay
individuals from the military.
The repeal of “don’t ask,
don’t tell” was signed into law
by President Obama in De-
cember. But several amend-
ments tacked onto the de-
fense spending bill would re-
quire all five military service
chiefs to certify that repealing
the ban would not impact
combat readiness and effec-
tiveness.
That’s an unnecessary step,
since such certification is al-
ready required by the presi-
dent, the defense secretary
and the chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff. The heads of
the Army, Navy, Air Force,
Marines and Coast Guard
have said their job is to pro-
vide for a smooth transition,
not todecidewhenthat transi-
tion begins.
The services have been giv-
en time to draft new regula-
tions and brief service mem-
bers about the changedpolicy.
It’s time to move forward.
Congress should stand by the
law it passed and start letting
gay and lesbian soldiers and
sailors who want to honorably
servetheir countrydosowith-
out having to also hide who
they are.
The Philadelphia Inquirer
OTHER OPINION: ENACT POLICY
Start accepting
gays in military
BACK IN October of 2003,
I witnessed a remarkable
spectacle at a San Diego
rally for gubernatorial
candidate Arnold Schwar-
zenegger. As I talked to
people about allegations
that Schwarzenegger had crudely groped
women against their will, using his celebri-
ty and power to have his way, they were
outraged.
Not at Schwarzenegger, but at the Los
Angeles Times, for reporting the stories.
Even after Schwarzenegger stepped to
the stage in San Diego and admitted that
“where there’s smoke, there’s fire,” GOP
women who espoused family values came
to Schwarzenegger’s defense. They insisted
that either all Arnold’s accusers were mak-
ing it up, or that they wanted to be groped.
“It doesn’t matter,” one woman told me.
Some accused The Times of delving into
ancient history to deliver a knockout punch
solely because Schwarzenegger was a Re-
publican. I thought then and I think now
that the newspaper had a responsibility to
investigate the character of a man who
wanted to be governor.
Later that day, at the Orange County
fairgrounds, I watched as Schwarzenegger
staged a crowd-pleasing stunt. As the teem-
ing crowd roared its approval, he dropped a
wrecking ball from the sky, destroying an
Oldsmobile to symbolize that he was going
to crush the vehicle tax if elected governor.
It was such a good show, nobody noticed
the deception. Schwarzenegger didn’t ex-
plain how he’d make up the $4 billion in lost
revenue, and not long after he took office
and slashed the tax, the state’s deficit had
grown by $4 billion. What a surprise.
California never climbed out of that hole.
In fact, the gap would only deepen as
Schwarzenegger failed to deliver on his
promise to “tear up the credit card” and
instead borrowed huge sums. After vowing
to get the money out of Sacramento poli-
tics, he set fundraising records.
It didn’t help that the economy crashed
while he was in office, but make no mistake:
Schwarzenegger was a flop as governor
despite fleeting flashes of leadership. Even
his once-adoring fans turned on him when
they realized they’d been had, driving his
poll numbers to embarrassing depths.
In January, as one of his final acts as
governor, Schwarzenegger further sullied
himself – in addition to outraging the family
of a homicide victim – by commuting the
murder sentence of the son of former As-
sembly Speaker Fabian Nunez, a Schwar-
zenegger friend.
Given this backdrop, I can’t say I was
surprised by Tuesday’s news that Schwar-
zenegger had fathered a child with a long-
time member of his household staff. Yeah,
the details were sensational, but the whole
mess fits the narrative of a man who always
has seemed to live in his own celebrity
world by his own twisted rules of privilege
and entitlement, his life an orgy of self-
glory.
There’s been no allegation that Schwar-
zenegger’s attentions were unwelcome, but
I can’t help but wonder exactly how willing
the female employee was in this case. With
this tryst, Schwarzenegger risked not just
having his own insatiable appetites re-
vealed, but forever destroying the relation-
ship between the employee and Arnold’s
wife and children. And then there’s the child
he fathered, who asked for none of this and,
one can only hope, will be able to build a
life that’s not defined by the parents’ lies.
To make it even more mortifyingly awk-
ward, Schwarzenegger kept this under his
hat while his wife, Maria Shriver, gave up
her TV reporting job to serve his political
ambitions, and she did it with grace, using
the title of first lady to advocate for families
and women’s empowerment.
No wonder she moved out of the Brent-
wood house and into a hotel when she
found out the husband she defended, amid
all the groping allegations, had kept an even
bigger secret from her all these years.
It’s beyond fiction, this tale of greed and
deceit.
There’s a familiar ring to Schwarzenegger’s deception
Steve Lopez is a columnist for The Los Angeles
Times. Readers may send him email at steve.lo-
pez@latimes.com.
COMMENTARY
S T E V E L O P E Z
WE COULD definitely use
another Abraham Lincoln
to emancipate us all from
being slaves to words. In
the midst of a historic
financial crisis of unprece-
dented government spend-
ing, and a national debt that outstrips even
the debt accumulated by the reckless gov-
ernment spending of previous adminis-
tration, we are still enthralled by words and
ignoring realities.
President Barack Obama’s constant talk
about “millionaires and billionaires” needi-
ng to pay higher taxes would be a bad joke,
if the consequences were not so serious.
Even if the income tax rate were raised to
100 percent on millionaires and billionaires,
it would still not cover the trillions of dol-
lars the government is spending.
More fundamentally, tax rates – whatever
they are – are just words on paper. Only the
hard cash that comes in can cover govern-
ment spending. History has shown repeat-
edly, under administrations of both political
parties, that there is no automatic correla-
tion between tax rates and tax revenues.
When the tax rate on the highest incomes
was 73 percent in 1921, that brought in less
tax revenue than after the tax rate was cut
to 24 percent in 1925. Why? Because high
tax rates that people don’t actually pay do
not bring in as much hard cash as lower tax
rates that they do pay. That’s not rocket
science.
Then and now, people with the highest
incomes have had the greatest flexibility as
to where they will put their money.
Buying tax-exempt bonds is just one of
the many ways that “millionaires and billio-
naires” avoid paying hard cash to the gov-
ernment, no matter how high the tax rates
go.
Most working people don’t have the same
options. Their taxes have been taken out of
their paychecks before they get them.
Even more so today than in the 1920s,
billions of dollars can be sent overseas elec-
tronically, almost instantaneously, to be
invested in other countries – creating jobs
there, while millions of American are unem-
ployed. That is a very high price to pay for
class warfare rhetoric about taxing “million-
aires and billionaires.”
Make no mistake about it, that kind of
rhetoric wins votes for political dema-
gogues – and votes are their bottom line.
But that is totally different from saying that
it will bring in more tax revenue to the
government.
Time and again, at both state and federal
levels, in the country and in other coun-
tries, tax rates and tax revenue have moved
in opposite directions many times. After
Maryland raised its tax rates on people
making a million dollars a year, there were
fewer such people living in Maryland – and
less tax revenue was collected from them.
In 2009, many people specializing in high
finance in Britain relocated to Switzerland
after the British government announced
plans to take 51 percent of high incomes in
taxes.
Conversely, reductions in tax rates can
lead to more tax revenue being collected.
After the capital gains tax rate was cut in
the United States in 1997, the government
collected nearly twice as much revenue
from capital gains taxes in the next four
years as in the previous four years.
Similar things have happened in India
and in Iceland.
There is no automatic correlation be-
tween the direction in which tax rates move
and the direction in which tax revenues
move. Nor is this a new discovery.
Despite political demagoguery about “tax
cuts for the rich,” in human terms the rich
have less at stake than working people.
Precisely because the rich have so many
ways of avoiding taxes, a high tax rate is
likely to do them far less harm than it does
to the economy, on which millions of people
depend for jobs.
Working people are most taxed by warfare of words
Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover
Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.
COMMENTARY
T H O M A S S O W E L L
W
HY NOT Wilkes-
Barre?
Rather than
question whether
this once-downtrodden city
can bounce back, it’s time that
more people withinits borders
– and far beyond – recognize
the place has vastly improved
in the past decade and can
again vie for great things. Why
not?
Why not choose it as the site
in which to build a major man-
ufacturing plant? Why not
transfer professional offices to
its center city high-
rises from more ex-
pensive East Coast
cities? Why not pick
it as the place to
conduct sizable con-
ferences, seminars
or festivals? Why
not select it as the
spot for a national
retail outlet? Or two? Or a su-
permarket? Or an art studio?
Or a think tank?
Hey, why not?
This city, situated between
Interstate 81 and the Susque-
hanna River, lacks few of to-
day’s urban amenities – with
the possible exception of a
Dallas, Texas-like sense of civ-
ic pride/self-importance. Or
Philly fanaticism.
Why not adopt some of that
type swagger?
Wilkes-Barrecontains acou-
ple private colleges, state and
federal offices, scores of shops,
a handful of marvelous bed
and breakfasts, many new eat-
eries, lots of established res-
taurants, a cinema complex, a
regal theater, multiple neigh-
borhood playgrounds and tre-
mendous public parks includ-
ing the stately Kirby Park and
the newer, sophisticated River
Common.
Why not appreciate it more
fully?
Why covet the situation of
some “other place,” real or
mythical, when Wilkes-Barre
already offers so much? Near-
by, people can enjoy a casino
with adjacent harness racing,
outdoor recreation areas and
concert andsports venues, the
latter boasting franchises affil-
iated with the Pittsburgh Pen-
guins and the New York Yan-
kees. Yeah, those Yankees.
Why not expect big things
to happen here?
No, we’re not blind to the ar-
ea’s problems; The Times
Leader frequently spotlights
the social and economic ills
that impede progress in
Wilkes-Barre, indeed, the
Wyoming Val-
ley: public cor-
ruption, pock-
ets of poverty,
perceptions
about crime,
lackluster levels
of education
and lingering
racism. These
troubling issues, however, are
not unique to the Valley, nor
are they insurmountable if
confronted by a coalition of
concerned residents.
Why not you? Why not
here?
Why not anticipate that
someone visiting Wilkes-
Barre – a parent of an out-of-
state college student, perhaps,
or a retiree making the tour of
minor league baseball parks –
will recognize the city’s poten-
tial and make an entrepreneu-
rial move?
Taxpayer-funded projects,
including the ongoing Coal
Street redesign, have primed
the city for growth. But pri-
vate investment in Wilkes-
Barre remains one of the final
hurdles in its recovery. Pro-
jects such as the planned, $2
millionoverhaul of PennPlaza
on South Main Street suggest
even that could change.
Why not envision that
hordes of developers will en-
ter the local scene? Why not
Donald Trumpian ambitions?
Why not grand dreams?
Why not Wilkes-Barre?
OUR OPINION: WHY NOT W-B?
It’s time to get
our swagger on
Why covet the
situation of some
“other place,” real
or mythical, when
Wilkes-Barre already
offers so much?
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 3E
➛ F O R U M
HEREWITH
President
Obama’s May
19 Middle
East speech,
annotated:
“It will be
the policy of
the United States to promote
reform across the region, and
to support transitions to de-
mocracy.”
With this Barack Obama
openly, unreservedly and with-
out a trace of irony or self-
reflection adopts the Bush
Doctrine, which made the
spread of democracy the key
U.S. objective in the Middle
East.
“Too many leaders in the
region tried to direct their
people’s grievances elsewhere.
The West was blamed as the
source of all ills.”
Note how even Obama’s
rationale matches Bush’s. Bush
argued that because the roots
of 9/11 were to be found in the
deflected anger of repressed
Middle Eastern peoples, our
response would require a dem-
ocratic transformation of the
region.
“We have a stake not just in
the stability of nations, but in
the self-determination of indi-
viduals.”
A fine critique of exactly the
kind of “realism” the Obama
administration prided itself for
having practiced in its first two
years.
How far did this concession
to Bush go? Note Obama’s
example of the democratization
for which we’re aiming. He
actually said:
“In Iraq, we see the promise
of a multiethnic, multisectarian
democracy. There, the Iraqi
people have rejected the perils
of political violence for a demo-
cratic process ... Iraq is poised
to play a key role in the re-
gion.”
Hail the Bush-Obama doc-
trine.
“President Assad now has a
choice: He can lead that transi-
tion (to democracy), or get out
of the way.”
The only jarring note in an
otherwise interesting, if convo-
luted, attempt to unite all cur-
rent “Arab Spring” policies
under one philosophical rubric.
Convoluted because the Bah-
rain part was unconvincing and
the omission of Saudi Arabia
was unmistakable.
Syria’s Assad leading a transi-
tion to democracy? This is
bizarre and appalling. Assad
has made all-out war on his
people – shooting, arresting,
executing, even using artillery
against cities.
“A lasting peace will involve
... Israel as a Jewish state and
the homeland for the Jewish
people, and the state of Pal-
estine as the homeland for the
Palestinian people.”
Meant to reassure Israelis
that the administration rejects
the so-called right of return of
Palestinian refugees. They
would return to Palestine, not
Israel – Palestine being their
homeland, and Israel (which
would cease to be Jewish if
flooded with refugees) being a
Jewish state. But why use code
for an issue on which depends
Israel’s existence?
“The borders of Israel and
Palestine should be based on
the 1967 lines with mutually
agreed swaps.”
A new formulation favorable
to maximal Arab demands.
True, that idea has been the
working premise for negotia-
tions since 2000. But no presi-
dent had ever before publicly
and explicitly endorsed the
1967 lines.
Even more alarming to Israel
is Obama’s omission of previ-
ous American assurances to
recognize “realities on the
ground” in adjusting the 1967
border, meaning U.S. agree-
ment that Israel would incorpo-
rate the thickly populated,
close-in settlements in any land
swap. By omitting this, Obama
leaves the impression of indif-
ference to the fate of these
settlements. This would be a
significant change in U.S. pol-
icy and a heavy blow to the
Israeli national consensus.
“The Palestinian people
must have the right to govern
themselves ... in a sovereign
and contiguous state.”
Normal U.S. boilerplate
except for one thing: Obama
refers to Palestinian borders
with Egypt, Jordan and Israel.
But the only Palestinian territo-
ry bordering Egypt is Gaza.
How do you get contiguity with
Gaza? Does Obama’s map force
Israel to give up a corridor of
territory connecting the West
Bank and Gaza? This is an old
Palestinian demand that would
cut Israel in two. Is this simply
an oversight? Or a new slicing
up of Israel?
Finally, in calling for both
parties to “come back to the
table,” the Palestinians have to
explain “the recent announce-
ment of an agreement between
Fatah and Hamas. ... How can
one negotiate with a party that
has shown itself unwilling to
recognize your right to exist?”
Not a strong statement about
Washington rejecting any talks
involving Hamas. A mere place-
holder.
On the other hand, Obama
made no mention here of Is-
raeli settlements. A mere over-
sight? Or has Obama finally
realized that his making a
settlement freeze a precondi-
tion for negotiations – some-
thing never demanded before
he took office – was a disas-
trous unforced error? One can
only hope.
Obama on Mideast:
What he really means
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammer’s email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
L
et’s meet at mid-afternoon beneath the apple tree. Bring a quilted blanket;
I’ll supply iced tea. We’ll count the fallen blossoms, study the pollinating
bee and pretend to remember what it meant to be carefree.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Don Carey and
words by Mark E. Jones
JOHN Han-
nah slept
many nights
on a floor of a
homeless
shelter. Now,
for his final
sleep, he lay
inside a metal casket, his thin
body draped in a blue suit, his
graying hair, once scraggly
and long, now groomed and
combed back.
“At peace,” someone ob-
served.
At last.
Until a few days ago, Han-
nah had been a man un-
claimed, a body dead from
cancer in a Detroit hospital,
no next of kin listed, no one
to collect his remains. His
corpse was in danger of cal-
lous disposal, until a man
named Joseph Norris stepped
in and said, “I will take him.”
Norris owns the Gates of
Heaven Funeral Home in
Detroit. It’s not the best
neighborhood. He must keep
his doors locked. But Norris
maintains a pleasant, welcom-
ing operation, and he wel-
comed the body of a stranger.
His reward was the expense
of keeping that body – poten-
tially for weeks. If he cremat-
ed the remains before family
came forth, a lawsuit would
be likely.
So Norris waited. And oth-
ers tried to help.
Earlier this month, in this
space, a call was sounded for
anyone who knew Hannah, or
wanted to say good-bye. All
we had was a birthday, four
digits from a Social Security
number and his final ranking
in the Navy.
It proved to be enough.
Early Sunday morning,
when the column appeared,
the phone began ringing at
the funeral home.
And then, four days later, a
family gathered in the chapel
to pay respects – two broth-
ers, two sisters-in-law, a neph-
ew and a daughter of Hannah,
55.
After 15 years of searching,
they finally had found him,
even as they lost him.
“It’s a mixture of emo-
tions,” said Ernie Hannah,
one of five siblings. “When I
saw him, of course, I was
upset because he died.
There’s a lot of baggage there.
But this does give us closure.”
John Hannah, it turns out,
spent 20 years in the Navy. He
was honorably discharged. He
had a pension. He had health
insurance.
You’d never have known it.
In his final year, he was a
coughing, sickly, homeless
man who arrived at Detroit’s I
Am My Brother’s Keeper Min-
istries and announced he had
come to die.
Night after night he slept
on a vinyl mat under a gray
blanket. Nobody knew the
memories he kept tucked
there as well. Memories of a
wife who left him when the
kids were young. Memories of
his battles with alcohol. Me-
mories of the last time he saw
his daughters – two children
he never spoke about.
“It was a father-daughter
Girl Scout dance,” Ernie re-
called. “We weren’t sure if he
was going to show up, be-
cause he’d been disappearing
off and on. I was ready to take
Erin” – his younger daughter,
who was 10 at the time – “just
in case. But a half-hour before
it started, John showed up, all
dressed and ready.”
He took his little girl to the
dance.
That was the last time they
saw him.
A man helped in life and
death by strangers.
Who knows what goes on
inside a man? Who knows
why John Hannah hit the
skids, why he never again – in
15 years – tried to contact his
family? Hannah was well-
liked by the other homeless
men with whom he shared
space. They described him as
an intelligent man, who walk-
ed to a Wayne State Universi-
ty library every day.
“It turns out he was blog-
ging,” said Valerie Hannah,
Ernie’s wife. “He’d been post-
ing things for years. He had
all kinds of people who knew
him. Pages and pages.”
Yet not an e-mail or letter
to his loved ones.
Perhaps he was ashamed.
Perhaps he was heartbroken.
Whatever the reason, John
Hannah disengaged from
what life had given him, even
its benefits. He died alone.
I wrote this month that
Hannah was about to die a
second death, the death of
being forgotten.
But it turns out he was not
forgotten, he was simply not
found.
Thanks to the kindness of
strangers – Norris at the fu-
neral home, Annette Coving-
ton from the church, Tyrone
Chatman from the Michigan
Veterans Foundation and
countless readers who offered
money, support, even burial
plots – Hannah was sent off
properly, with singing,
prayers and a family crying
around his casket.
No man should live alone.
No man should die alone.
Hannah’s ashes will be buried
at sea, a request he once
made to his brothers. “Clo-
sure” is what they call that,
but this says it better: at
peace, at last.
Homeless veteran goes home the right way
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the
Detroit Free Press. Readers may
write to him at: Detroit Free Press,
600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or
via e-mail at malbom@freepress.com.
Who knows what goes on inside
a man? Who knows why John
Hannah hit the skids, why he
never again – in 15 years – tried
to contact his family?
Shopper thanks
wallet returner
W
hile shopping in Weis
Market, I lost my check-
book. Returning to the
store, they told me someone
turned it in.
Whoever you are, you have
my sincere thanks.
Gert Binker
Plains Township
Letter carriers
feed the hungry
T
he Commission on Eco-
nomic Opportunity/Wein-
berg Food Bank sincerely
appreciates the participation
of local letter carriers, the
National Association of Letter
Carriers and the U.S. Postal
Service in “Stamp Out Hunger
2011,” the nation’s largest
single-day food drive.
Without the willingness of
letter carriers to collect donat-
ed food while delivering mail
on May 14, this charitable
food drive would not be pos-
sible. We are grateful to hun-
dreds of families along the
mail routes who contributed
nonperishable food.
Volunteer food drives make
an enormous impact on hun-
ger in Northeastern Penn-
sylvania. As the local affiliate
of Feeding America, the na-
tion’s largest network of food
banks, the CEO/Weinberg
Food Bank fights hunger year
round. With a continuation of
challenging economic condi-
tions, thousands of our neigh-
bors, including far too many
children, are hungry or lack a
dependable supply of food.
On their behalf, we extend
our boundless thanks to our
local letter carriers and food
donors in their generous ef-
forts to “Stamp Out Hunger.”
Judge Hugh F. Mundy
Board president, Commission
on Economic Opportunity
Wilkes-Barre
Drum major
bids farewell
P
lease pass on my heartfelt
thanks to the members,
parents, staff and commu-
nity of the Hanover Area High
School Band.
Over the past 17 years it has
been my honor and pleasure
to work with the recently
retired band director, Mr. Joe
Baranoski, and the band stu-
dents. During that time we
made history, capturing three
Atlantic Coast Marching Band
championships and creating a
new half-time entertainment
concept called “Fusion,”
which uniquely combined the
talents of the band, color
guard, dance team and cheer-
leaders into one dynamic
show.
During my 17 years trav-
eling north to work with the
students, I was welcomed into
your very special community
– where family values, respect,
honesty and hard work reign
supreme.
I can’t begin to express my
thanks to each and every per-
son in the Hanover Area com-
munity who touched the pro-
gram, and although I am dis-
appointed that I will not be
returning in the fall season,
the memories that we made
will have a very special place
in my heart.
Chief Master Sgt. Ed Teleky
Drum major
The United States Air Force
Band
Moran family
grateful for care
T
he Regina Moran family
thanks the staff and resi-
dents at Timber Ridge and
Hospice of the Sacred Heart
for all of their care, comfort,
counseling, strength and love
when our mother (grand-
mother, great-grandmother)
and our family needed it.
The family would not have
survived without all of you.
Words cannot express the
appreciation we have.
Lori Adams
On behalf of the
Regina Moran family
City helps correct
contractor issue
W
e thank Wilkes-Barre
Mayor Tom Leighton
and his code enforce-
ment staff for their exception-
al service with a problem
contractor.
We contracted to have our
driveway paved. While per-
forming the work, the contrac-
tor ripped our electrical box
off of our house, leaving us
without power at 6 p.m. The
crew also laid the asphalt over
the downspouts for our gut-
ters and dumped excess as-
phalt in our neighbor’s drive-
way.
We contacted the city, and
officials immediately took
action. They contacted the
contractor and put a stop to it
doing work in the city. As a
result of the city’s interven-
tion, the contractor took ac-
tion to correct the problem at
our home.
The prompt action by the
mayor and his team gave this
nightmare a happy ending for
us.
Cliff and Colleen Hannagan
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters fromreaders conveying
thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.
MOUNTAIN LAURELS
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Auctioning skills
devalues workers
I
am livid at the emergence
of Nearbid.com, celebrated
(May 6) in the business
section. In my opinion, all
unemployed or underemploy-
ed readers, as well as small-
service businesses, should
view this venture with great
distrust.
I have seen this concept
before. Several skills-for-auc-
tion online sites already exist,
for example, in the world of
freelance writing and editing.
They pit people needing work
to bid each other down, deva-
luing their work to next to
nothing.
That’s wonderful for busi-
nesses that want something
for virtually nothing. Toss a
bone and let the hungry peo-
ple fight over it.
Recently, I watched a com-
pany request bids for a set of
thousand-word articles. The
eventual winner offered to do
them for free, presumably a
young writer seeking to get
some professional notice.
Other simultaneous projects
were bid down from hundreds
of dollars for a job to a few
bucks. And that’s how this will
work.
Just watch. If you’re a house
painter and normally charge
$500 for a basic job, you’ll be
bid down to $50 for the work.
Leave it to a Pennsylvania
business to find a new and
creative way to keep local
have-nots with as little as
possible – and grateful for the
chance.
John Castagna
Drums
Forgiveness key
in a faithful life
I
wish people would learn to
forgive the way I did. As a
child, I was taught many
things and forgiveness was
one thing that stayed with me
– and will until the day I die.
Christ taught us how to
forgive, but died for us on the
cross. Every day I ask Jesus
for forgiveness, and he is there
for me. He will be back in the
blink of an eye in all his glory.
People who believe in Jesus
and love him will know who
he is and will be forgiven of
their sins. I don’t know what
will happen to the people who
do not believe in Jesus.
I wonder about those people
who are saying they are going
to blow up trains on Sept. 11.
Do they believe in Jesus? I
also wonder why they must do
things that destroy people’s
lives.
Jason R. Carey
Wilkes-Barre
Reject drilling
in Dallas Twp.
A
llison Friedman’s letter to
The Dallas Post (April 24)
hopefully might provide a
wake-up call to those Dallas
Township residents still some-
how unaware of the threat
that the natural gas industry is
posing to the quality of our
lives.
Irreversible damage might
soon be done to our pristine
community, and all that we
value might be sacrificed. I
have found that reading the
overview of the zoning board
hearings in the newspaper and
watching the circus in person
are dramatically different
experiences. I watch gas com-
pany solicitors and trail bosses
skilled in beating down com-
munity resistance chip away
at the objections of concerned
residents using a game plan
that they’ve employed in so
many locations before.
The irony is that Friedman
is completely correct. This
situation is far from hopeless.
Saying “no” to this absurd
devastation of Dallas Town-
ship is painless and simple.
We must first vote a resound-
ing “no” to the revised ordi-
nance that would open the
floodgates to these profiteers
and we must then impose an
immediate moratorium on all
gas-industry activities in our
township until further studies
on impact and safety are com-
pletely reviewed.
If our zoning officials and
township supervisors are too
timid or too blind to under-
stand the overwhelming opin-
ion of their constituency, then
we must begin raising our
voices louder and bringing
those in charge to the fore-
front.
Please attend the upcoming
hearings and be heard.
JimSkrypek
Dallas Township
Festival contest
disappoints parent
A
few weeks ago, my 8-year-
old daughter brought
home an entry form to
take part in the West Pittston
Cherry Blossom Festival’s
“Idol Contest.”
She had never taken part in
a competition. I feel, as a
parent, 8 years old is far too
young to have to learn that
she might not be good enough
to win. While I can, I want to
shield her from the realities of
life, especially one that might
make her feel less than excel-
lent.
Being on the fence, I placed
a call to the contact number
on the registration form. I was
informed that, although there
would be a first-place winner,
all children would receive
prizes for participating.
Based on that information, I
felt confident that this contest
would be held in a manner
that would not judge or upset
my child. I presented the idea
to my child and she wanted to
be a part of it. She practiced
for 14 days. Every chance she
got. As soon as school let out
for the day, my daughter
would listen to the song on
repeat, over and over again.
She and I had talks of what
might happen regarding win-
ning and/or losing. I ex-
pressed to my child that every-
one has an opinion, and some
people’s opinions might be
different than mine. I in-
formed her that although I
feel she is the very best, some-
one judging might not.
I also assured her that ev-
eryone leaves a winner. She
was very excited. We talked
about different ways to calm
her nerves. This was a big
deal for her, which in turn was
a big deal for me. She knew
which outfit she’d wear days
before the show.
Well, we reported to the
stage at noon. We registered,
obtained our number and gave
our CD to the sound tech-
nician. Everything was a go.
I sat with my video recorder
ready and my child stood in
line awaiting her turn. Her
number was called. She began
by announcing her name and
the song she’d be singing. She
began. I was so proud of my
little gal, having the courage
to sing in front of all of those
faces. As proud as a mother
could be!
For reasons I am not aware
of, her song began to skip.
Constantly and repeatedly.
She kept up with the confu-
sion, but I could see in her
eyes the nervousness. Thank-
fully, it was announced that
due to the equipment malfunc-
tioning, my child would be
given a second chance. She
had her second chance. The
song repeatedly skipped. She
did a great job keeping up, but
the skipping made her per-
formance a bit difficult.
All in all, she did a fantastic
job; she smiled, kept her chin
up.
After every child sang, the
judges judged. From the very
first negative comment, I
knew that I should not have
allowed my child to participa-
te. “Your performance lacked
choreography,” “you should
have smiled,” “you should
have used your diaphragm,”
etc.
And when it was all said
and done, the winners were
chosen and the children who
were not winners were not
acknowledged. No consolation
prizes were given; the children
left the stage and the event
was over.
I am deeply disappointed in
myself for allowing my child
to be taught her very first
lesson in competitiveness by
The West Pittston Cherry
Blossom Festival’s “Idol Con-
test.” She was hungry for
acknowledgement, but clearly
learned in the wrong manner
that giving her best had very
little impact on the events that
day.
She, as well as the other
children, should have been
given endless praise for the
courage they mustered. They
should have been acknowl-
edged for the good they did,
rather than being left to stand
in the backdrop, behind the
winners.
Lisa Caruthers
West Pittston
Reader fears
vigilante smears
C
andidate Tom Corbett
promised us he’d behave as
a “cop” toward the gas
industry. As governor, he’s
consistently behaved like a
cop – like some bought-off
Texas sheriff policing a Big
Gas town.
Speaking out against “the
company” in company towns
forcefully teaches you whose
side the law is on. It ain’t your
average citizen.
I should know. Even under
Sheriff Ed Rendell, “company
town” policing already pre-
vailed. Last year, I phoned the
Gibson state police barracks
to ask if police would help
protect peaceful protesters at
the Cabot Oil and Gas picnic.
Their response was essential-
ly: “If you can’t stand the heat,
stay out of the kitchen.” Ca-
bot, however, apparently had
no trouble shipping in troop-
ers from Reading, as well as
numerous “rent-a-cops” with
sidearms and Tasers.
Then there’s the Pennsylva-
nia Homeland Security scan-
dal. Again, I should know. My
wife received the email from
Homeland Security Director
James Powers admitting state
government was spying on
peaceful dissenters for the
benefit of Big Gas. A tad scary
when merely criticizing an
industry lands you on a terror-
ist watchlist.
But Sheriff Corbett, who’s
vowed to make us “the Texas
of natural gas,” mustn’t think
company-town policing is
enough. He and his Big Gas
sponsors seem to endorse
vigilante justice.
To egg on vigilantes, fron-
tier honchos would denounce
any “low-down sidewinders”
that interfered with their
schemes. Kind of riled up the
townsfolk, incited them to
form posses. Enter Depart-
ment of Conservation and
Natural Resources staffer Ted
Borawski, who compared
filmmaker Josh Fox – of Jew-
ish heritage – to Nazi propa-
gandist Joseph Goebbels,
saying he “deserved a Nazi
award.”
And the townsfolk apparent-
ly are forming posses. A blog-
ger on PA Gas Lease, ever so
delicately avoiding names, left
just the right hints – though
zero evidence – to suggest
Josh Fox and Dimock drilling
victims Craig and Julie Sautn-
er torched a barn on Cabot
property. Western film – and
history – mavens know this is
how lynch mobs start.
Sheriff Corbett and his “Big
Gas posse” clearly rode into
town with an agenda. Will
they condone base vigilante
smears to promote it?
Patrick Walker
Factoryville
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12
Trash buildup
troubles writer
T
he good people of Wilkes-
Barre might have a reality
TV hit on their hands. It’s
name: Garbage Wars.
In my two years as a resi-
dent, I have encountered the
most complex and mystifying
trash collection system known
to man. I thought Latin was
tough, but it’s nothing com-
pared to deciphering this
town’s secret code for deter-
mining when recycling, yard
waste and household garbage
will be removed from my curb.
My best guess is that it’s based
on a mix of the Mayan calen-
dar and the Pennsylvania
Lottery’s Daily Number.
I’ve sought enlightenment
from my neighbors, but each
of my inquiries has produced
the same conclusion. Looking
flabbergasted and defeated,
they point to a pile of their
unwanted junk and retort,
“Why do you think our house
looks like this?”
Take a swim in the irony.
This election year, candidates
are promising to “clean up
Wilkes-Barre.” They blame
absentee landlords. I blame
absentee trash collection.
Plenty of residents want a
better-looking city, and we are
gladly willing to do the work
ourselves, but we literally
cannot get rid of the trash we
clean up. Any help from City
Hall, whether in the form of a
spring cleaning program or
just a place we can take our
refuse, would be more than
welcomed. All we’re asking for
is basic sanitation.
Robin Shudak-Catanza
Wilkes-Barre
Casey continues
pro-life stance
A
letter in Tuesday’s paper
contained a number of
inaccuracies about Sen.
Robert P. Casey’s record.
Sen. Casey is dedicated to a
consistent ethic of life. He
believes that life begins at
conception and ends when we
draw our last breath. And he
believes that the role of gov-
ernment is to protect, enrich
and value life for everyone, at
every moment, from begin-
ning to end.
Sen. Casey’s voting record
shows long-standing support
for pro-life policies. He has
been focused on reducing the
number of unintended preg-
nancies and abortions. That is
why he has supported family
planning and passed into law
his Pregnancy Assistance
Fund and secured an increase
in the adoption tax credit.
Sen. Casey created a new
program that became law, the
Pregnancy Assistance Fund,
which will reduce the number
of abortions by providing
support for pregnant women.
To encourage adoptions,
Sen. Casey successfully ex-
tended and increased funding
for adoption by $1.2 billion
over two years, by extending
and increasing the Adoption
Tax Credit.
Sen. Casey will remain
focused on reducing the num-
ber of unintended pregnancies
and abortions while valuing
life at every stage.
Larry Smar
Deputy chief of staff
Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr.
Washington, D.C.
Kingston Twp.
refutes letter
O
n Tuesday, a letter to the
editor from Harveys Lake
resident Neil Turner ap-
peared in The Times Leader.
To say the letter was “filled
with emotion and light on the
facts” is an understatement.
To say it was a personal attack
on the board of supervisors of
Kingston Township is prob-
ably more accurate.
Mr. Turner begins his letter
by blasting the supervisors,
stating that it was “rubber
stamping” an ordinance
pushed by the Pennsylvania
State Association of Township
Supervisors and that the orga-
nization’s annual meeting was
primarily sponsored by “gas
industry corporate interests.”
It is true that the PSATS an-
nual members meeting is
sponsored by several compa-
nies involved with natural gas
drilling, and that Kingston
Township is a member. But
the whole truth is that there
are just as many, if not more,
engineering, accounting and
public sector supplier vendor
companies that sponsor
booths and educational ses-
sions at the annual affair. This
situation is no different than
the annual job fair at the Mo-
hegan Sun Arena, where cor-
porations of all kinds sponsor
the event, with a vested pro-
fessional interest in making
personal contact with people
who will attend, so that they
might sell their services or
products.
The second issue in Mr.
Turner’s letter, concerning the
township using a PSATS web-
site sample ordinance, was
completely wrong! It is not
the township using PSATS’
ordinance as an example, but
rather just the opposite. The
PSATS sample ordinance was,
in fact, a much earlier version
of the Kingston Township
ordinance that an unknown
party provided to PSATS,
which then placed it on the
website. The actual Kingston
Township ordinance that was
passed was a much more
evolved and comprehensive
document.
For the record, the town-
ship’s Board of Supervisors,
Planning Commission, code
enforcement officer, township
manager and township solic-
itor all worked together over
an almost three-year period on
this extensive and encompass-
ing piece of legislation. Dur-
ing the process, not only did
the parties attend numerous
public meetings on the issue,
listening to all sides of the
issues from state and local
experts and activists, but also
investigated many other ordi-
nances from across the state –
as well as some ordinances
that were disallowed by the
courts and had cost other
townships expensive legal
battles.
It was the intent of the
township leadership to put
together an ordinance that
was pro-active and encom-
passing; protects and coor-
dinates the management of
public safety and community
health conditions; manages
and monitors pre-drilling
issues, actual construction
and post-construction effects
of drilling and related oper-
ations within the township;
includes both “natural gas and
oil” drilling requirements;
covers aspects of compressor
station and gas manufacturing
projects; sets a minimal devel-
opment acreage requirement
for all aspects of the ordi-
nance; requires pre-permit
land planning and develop-
ment reviews by the township
Planning Commission; pro-
vides provisions for public
input into the permitting
process; provides for a means
to recoup monetary reim-
bursement for damaged road-
ways and other capital in-
frastructure; and, lastly, pro-
vides the utmost chance of
avoiding costly legal litigation
that could force the township
into substantially raising taxes
or even being forced into
bankruptcy.
Finally, contrary to Mr.
Turner’s objection, the ordi-
nance was designed as a con-
ditional use so that it would
be the Board of Supervisors
members – the people’s elect-
ed representatives – who
would decide these issues, and
not put this type of decision in
the hands of any township
board staffed with appointed,
voluntary, civic-minded town-
ship citizens. These boards
would still be an important
part of the process, but it
would be the Board of Super-
visors that ultimately would
be responsible to the people.
Ironically, this letter was
published days after the town-
ship held a public hearing on
this ordinance, a hearing at
which Mr. Turner was allowed
to speak openly, and put forth
his concerns and recommen-
dations. The Board of Super-
visors even voted to amend
the proposed ordinance to
include changes suggested by
Mr. Turner.
The bottom line to this
issue is that townships have a
responsibility to their resi-
dents – to work to their ful-
lest, within the existing legal
conditions, and try to provide
the best solutions to compli-
cated problems while uphold-
ing all the rights of its citi-
zens.
The Kingston Township
Board of Supervisors always
has tried to maintain a profes-
sional and thorough approach
in initiating and maintaining
its ordinances. We believe that
our gas and oil drilling ordi-
nance is a leading-edge piece
of legislation that will become
a foundation for many other
municipalities in Pennsylva-
nia.
It will undoubtedly be
amended as new legal cases
and legislative laws and pol-
icies are enacted by the state
and the federal governments;
but until then, Kingston
Township residents will now
be better protected with this
new ordinance.
Ultimately, we believe that
the hard work of all the in-
volved township parties has
resulted in the best available
ordinance in the state. It pro-
vides public input, maximizes
public safety and health condi-
tions allowed by state and
federal law, while also provid-
ing freedom to township resi-
dents who might wish to
exercise their land rights and
become involved in the nat-
ural gas boom in Pennsylva-
nia.
James V. Reino Jr.
Chairman
Jeffrey Box
Vice chairman
Shirley Moyer
Secretary
Frank Natitus
and
John Solinsky
Kingston Township
Board of Supervisors
Readers deserve
informative news
A
graphic regarding the
changes in gas prices from
2008 to 2011 appeared in
the May 1 edition, but was
only somewhat informative.
It would have been much
more informative if the graph-
ic also had shown the cost of a
barrel of oil in relationship to
the price being charged at the
pump. When oil was $140 a
barrel the cost at the pump
was a little more than $4.
Presently, with oil being $113
a barrel, the cost at the pump
is $3.95. The question is:
Why?
It would have been nice to
get a deeper perspective on
the subject rather than all this
superficial jargon that really
does not provide the reader
with enough information to
draw an informed conclusion.
With regard to jargon, I
think the news industry has to
write articles that are of signif-
icant concern for the further
development of our nation,
not articles that have no
meaning to building a better
society. Examples of wasted
journalism: Was our president
born in the United States? The
question should have been
this: Does our political system
ensure a person’s birth origins
before allowing him or her to
run for a high political office
such as president? If yes, then
why the stupidity; if no, then
where are the articles ques-
tioning why there is no such
safety valve in place?
I wonder why the news
industry does not show the
American people where the
government has invested
money in energy since the gas
shortage in the early 1970s,
some 30 to 35 years ago.
The public might be sur-
prised, one way or the other,
but at least it would be some-
thing of importance to the
American people.
Stanley Halas
Hanover Township
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
C M Y K
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ber overseeing the department.
In a 2010 letter to King respon-
ding to questions about the over-
sight, DHS Secretary Janet Na-
politano wrote that the volume
of oversight often meant depart-
ment officials and staff were
“spending more time respon-
ding to congressional requests
and requirements than execut-
ing their mandated homeland
security responsibilities.”
Former DHS Secretary Mi-
chael Chertoff wrote to King in
2007 that responding to count-
less congressional panels re-
quired “a very significant
amount of DHS senior leader-
ship time, which must be bal-
anced with meeting operational
mission demands.”
King said it’s clear to him that
there is simply too much over-
sight. “It definitely takes away
from the job they should be do-
ing, and that’s protecting the
country,” he said.
But lawmakers whose turf
might be threatened by consoli-
dating oversight defend the sta-
tus quo.
Rep. Lamar Smith, a Texas Re-
publican and chairman of the
House Judiciary Committee,
which oversees part of Home-
land Security, said Congress in-
tended a “purposeful redundan-
cy” when it created the depart-
ment.
“Many of our immigration pol-
icies are enforced outside of the
jurisdiction of the Department
of Homeland Security by federal
agencies, including the Justice
and State departments,” Smith
said. “Just as multiple agencies
are involved in the enforcement
of our immigration laws and the
security of our border, multiple
congressional committees are
involved in overseeing the gov-
ernment’s efforts to keep our
country safe.”
But King and others say there
are too many powerful commit-
tees that claim jurisdiction and
no one is willing to cede control.
“I think it’s because of turf bat-
tles within the Congress,” said
Rep. Michael McCaul, a Texas
Republican who is on King’s
committee. “We complain about
howthe executive branch has all
these turf battles, and then
you’ve got those same battles in
the Congress.”
Former committee chairman
Bennie Thompson, a Mississippi
Democrat, said there is wide-
spread agreement that DHS has
too much oversight but little en-
thusiasm to change the situa-
tion.
“When you talk to think tanks,
people who have looked at this
situation, almost to the organi-
zation and the individual they
say jurisdiction should be vested
in one committee, just like you
do it with other departments,”
Thompson said. “I tried for four
years when I was chairman with
very little success.”
Chertoff, who left DHS in
2009, said he’s never objected to
congressional oversight. But the
disparate nature of committees
and subcommittees that claim
jurisdiction — everything from
the Financial Services and Over-
sight and Government Reform
committees in the House to the
Agriculture, Nutrition, Forestry
and Environmental and Public
Works committees in the Senate
— can pull department priori-
ties in different directions.
Without a principal oversight
committee, the department gets
“inconsistent guidance and dif-
ferent interpretations for how
homeland security programs
should be implemented and im-
proved,” Chertoff said. That, he
added, hurts its ability to protect
the country.
OVERSEEN
Continued from Page 1E
“It definitely takes away from the
job they should be doing, and that’s
protecting the country.”
Rep. Peter King
Chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee
WASHINGTON — Newt Gin-
grich’s words onMedicarecontin-
ue to haunt the GOP — and are
the basis for the first of-
ficial ad of the 2012
presidential cycle. The
place: South Carolina,
one of the early pri-
mary states. The tar-
get: Mitt Romney.
Priorities USA Ac-
tion, a new big-money
political organization
foundedbyDemocrats,
is running a TV ad in
South Carolina this
week to coincide with
Romney’s visit. And it
seeks to use Gingrich’s
criticism of Rep. Paul
Ryan’s Medicare re-
vampandSouthCaroli-
na Gov. Nikki Haley’s
praise for the plan as
means totry andboxin
both Romney and the
GOP.
“Newt Gingrich says
the Republican plan that would
essentially end Medicare is too
‘radical,’” the ad intones. “Gov.
Haley thinks the plan is coura-
geous, and Gingrich shouldn’t be
cutting conservatives off at the
knees. Mitt Romney says he’s ‘on
the same page’ as Paul Ryan, who
wrote the plan to essentially end
Medicare.
“But with Mitt Romney, you
have to wonder ... which page is
he on today?”
Democratic operatives have
seized upon Gingrich’s critique of
the Ryan plan earlier this week,
trying to use it as evidence that
the plan goes too far in
transformingMedicare
into a private-insur-
ance program for
Americans 54 and
younger. The former
House speaker has
since disavowed the
statement, even going
so far as saying any ad
quoting his words di-
rectlywouldbea“false-
hood.”
Priorities USA is an
organization set up by
former White House
aides Bill Burton and
Sean Sweeney that is
intended to compete
with deep-pocketed
Republican-centric in-
dependent groupssuch
as American Cross-
roads. Both groups
have a separate off-
shoot group that can raise unlim-
ited funds from undisclosed do-
nors for political ads.
First ad of 2012 campaign
uses Gingrich to belt Romney
By JAMES OLIPHANT
Tribune Washington Bureau
Democratic group uses
Gingrich’s criticism of
Medicare plan against GOP.
Priorities
USA Action,
a new
big-money
political
organization
founded by
Democrats, is
running a TV
ad in South
Carolina this
week to
coincide with
Romney’s
visit.
C M Y K
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serious executive with high-level
Washington experience — from
his turn as a political strategist
for President Ronald Reagan to a
stint as President George W.
Bush’s budget director.
The Princeton-educated gov-
ernor has another advantage.
Like2008nomineeJohnMcCain,
his work at the national level has
given him ease with both politi-
cal insiders and reporters for dec-
ades. He’s drawn positive cover-
agefor his non-candidacyfroman
unusually broad range of outlets,
from the Weekly Standard and
National Review on the right to
NPR, which dubbed him“Woody
Allen’s Hoosier cousin.”
But he still has to decide
whether to run. His prolongedin-
ternal debate recalls former New
York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo, who
tortured aides and supporters
with his indecision before finally
saying “no” in 1991. Daniels says
he can’t ask the country to make
him its next leader unless he can
convince his wife and four grown
daughters first.
The 62-year-old points out, ac-
curately, that he wouldn’t be leap-
ing solo into a national contest.
“I have some women to check
with at home first,” he told a din-
ner audience of 75 conservative
Republicans in suburban Balti-
more recently, after someone
asked about his plans.
His wife, Cheri, is saidtobe un-
comfortable with a candidacy.
The granddaughter of Chicago
Cubs great Billy Herman didn’t
participate in her husband’s 2004
gubernatorial campaign and has
kept her public role to a mini-
mum.
Speculation about her resist-
ance to a Daniels run centers on
their unusual marital history. In
1993, she filed for divorce after 15
years of marriage, moved to Cali-
fornia and wed a doctor, leaving
Daniels to care for four daugh-
ters, ages 8 to 14. Then she di-
vorced again, and she and Da-
niels remarried in 1997.
“If you like happy endings,
you’ll love our story,” Mitch Da-
niels told the Indianapolis Star in
2004. “Love and the love of chil-
dren overcame any problems.”
But the couple has kept a tight lid
on personal details, which would
inevitably be priedopenina pres-
idential campaign.
His wife’s decision to edge into
thespotlight last Thursdaynight,
by keynoting an Indiana Republi-
can Party gala, led some to con-
clude that Daniels would be run-
ning. She didn’t discuss his presi-
dential ambitions in the speech,
and all he told the crowd was,
“I’m not saying I won’t do it.”
Like other governors, Daniels
would campaign for president on
his record. “Not to impress any-
body,” he said, sounding apol-
ogetic, before rattling off home-
state accomplishments for 20
minutes totheHarbour League, a
fledgling conservative think
tank. Amongtheapplauselines: a
constitutional cap on “the lowest
property taxes inAmerica”; a per-
manent ban on collective bar-
gaining by state employees,
which led 92 percent of them to
quit paying union dues; a teacher
certification overhaul that ended
licensing for those with only an
education major; and the coun-
try’s largest state school voucher
program.
“We believe in government
that is limited, but active,” Da-
niels said.
Acerebral manner, dry wit and
occasional theatrics —he rides a
Harley—helpsoftenDaniels’ im-
age. His views are firmly conser-
vative, though he has drawn fire
from some on the right. A flash
point was his suggestion of a
“truce” on social issues in order
to attract independent swing vot-
ers needed to win the presidency.
Daniels hasn’t exactly retreated
from that, but he recently signed
a law that ends state funding for
Planned Parenthood and bans
abortions after 20 weeks of preg-
nancy.
Although Daniels is praised by
establishment Republicans for
his tenure in Indiana, his earlier
years as Bush’s budget director
have opened him to criticism.
America’s decade of debt, now at
the center of the 2012 debate, be-
gan in the Bush era, with an ex-
pensive Medicare drug benefit, a
big tax cut and two costly wars,
financed with deficit spending.
Daniels will likelycounter with
more Indiana examples: how he
paid down the debt while other
states were increasing theirs and
slashed spending to the third-
lowest level in the country, on a
per capita basis.
Re-elected easily to a second
four-year term in 2008, when Ba-
rack Obama carried the state, he
would leave office with a legacy
that includes, according to him,
the fewest state government em-
ployees per capita in the U.S.;
“the biggest deregulation of tele-
communications in the country”
at the state level; and “the largest
privatization of infrastructure in
American history,” as a result of
leasing the Indiana Toll Road.
But it is his demeanor, more
than anything else, that voters
wouldhave toembrace. Ina party
dominated by loud and dramatic
voices, Daniels would be the no-
nonsense manager with a sharp
budget knife, offering sobriety in-
stead of excitement.
Daniels says that by the time
the primary contests begin next
winter, he will know whether his
candidacy would click with the
GOP electorate.
Or as he puts it, in another self-
put-down, “whether they’ll eat
the dog food.”
DANIELS
Continued from Page 1E
AP FILE PHOTO
Gov. Mitch Daniels, R-Ind., speaks during the Ronald Reagan Ban-
quet at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington.
C M Y K
PAGE 8E SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
When Jodie Foster was casting
“The Beaver,” her third film as a di-
rector, she never considered anyone
else for the starring role except Mel
Gibson, her friend of 15 years.
“I just thinkhe’s anamazingactor,”
she says. “I loved working with him
(on ‘Maverick’). Mel and Chow Yun
Fat are my two favorite actors that
I’veever workedwith. But I thinkthat
everybody feels that way about Mel.
It’s pretty universal in Hollywood.”
That might be
a bit of an over-
statement. After
all, when Foster
cast Gibson, he
already had suf-
fered though a
career-damag-
ing scandal. In
2006, after he
was pulled over
for drunkendriv-
ing, he reported-
ly unleashed an
anti-Semitic
rant. Then, last
year, after pro-
duction on “The
Beaver” wrap-
ped, a number of
telephone calls
were leaked on-
line in which
Gibson used rac-
ist and sexist
slurs. Last
month, he also
received three years’ probation after
he was charged with misdemeanor
spousal abuse stemming froma case
involving ex-girlfriend Oksana Grigo-
rieva.
Despite all that, Foster has never
wavered in her support.
“I’m not defending his behavior,”
shetoldtheAssociatedPress. “I’mde-
fending the man that I know. And I
knowhe’s kind and loyal and is an in-
credible professional.”
As for whether she thinks “The
Beaver” will rehabilitate Gibson’s im-
age, Foster says, “Oh, I have no idea,
no idea. As far as priorities and prob-
lems in his life, I would say that’s at
least thirdor fourthonhis list. Hehas
other things that he has to handle
first.
“Look, he’s an amazingly talented
man and a great filmmaker. He will
find a way to tell stories because he’s
one of the greatest filmmakers that
we have, I think. I’mmore excited to
see what he’s going to do next as a
director.”
In an eerie, reel/real life parallel,
Gibson stars in “The Beaver,” open-
ing in large markets Friday and pos-
sibly later locally. He plays Walter, a
deeply troubled man feeling increas-
ingly isolated from everyone around
‘Beaver’ a
Mel-Jodie
love story
See FOSTER, Page 4F
By AMY LONGSDORF
For The Times Leader
“I just think
he’s an
amazing
actor. I
loved work-
ing with him
(on ‘Maver-
ick’). Mel
and Chow
Yun Fat are
my two fa-
vorite ac-
tors that
I’ve ever
worked with.
Arcade Fire, freshoff one of the
most shocking Grammy wins of
all time, is touring middle Amer-
ica. Drummer Jeremy Gara talk-
ed about the rising indie band.
Q: What was the band’s first re-
action when Barbra Streisand an-
nounced your win for “The Sub-
urbs”?
A: The funny thing is, she stut-
tered. We were by the stage be-
cause we knew we would be per-
forming a second song, and she
stuttered. We look at it now and
we see she did screw up. We
thought she reread the nominees
again. Then it sunk in. It was a to-
tal shock, and amazing.
Q: Who did you think would
win the award?
A: I would have bet with the
odds. The Eminem record was
good, and people thought it
would win. But the Grammys are
kind of a world we’re not superfa-
miliar with. I didn’t know how
the Grammys work or how peo-
ple vote on the records.
Q: Howhas life changed for Ar-
cade Fire since the Grammy?
A: Not at all (laughs). It was
kind of perfect. We weren’t on
tour when it happened, we went
directly to the Brit Awards after-
ward, flewhome for three weeks,
and went to Haiti to check out
things there playing music for
people who don’t necessarily see
rock-’n’-roll. We didn’t get a
chance to get caught up in what-
ever it is that means.
Q: Some people heard of Ar-
cade Fire for the first time thanks
to the Grammys. What do you
want them to know about the
band?
A: People who watched the
showcantell we’re just a straight-
up, real band. We play music; no
lip synching. The Grammys for
me were refreshing. We’ve done
TV stuff before where it felt
canned. But here was Katy Perry
on a swing, and it was kind of a
nice night. It felt like real popmu-
sic.
Q: Why did “The Suburbs”
connect the way it did?
A: It’s hard to say. I feel like
hopefully people connect with its
coming froma real place. There’s
a really organic process we go
through. We write songs, record
songs and play songs in an artful
way, and I believe people can re-
late to that. It’s real.
Q: Is there new pressure with
the follow-up record after win-
ning a Grammy?
A: I feel like the pressure was
after “Funeral” (2004) and with
that tour. We’d show up and peo-
ple would be like, “When does
thebandget here?” I feel likeif we
could get through that, then eas-
ily nothing will affect us. We’ll
just keep acknowledging how
lucky we are, make the music we
feel like making and at a bare
minimum we’ll be happy.
Arcade Fire as real as they come
MCT PHOTO
Arcade Fire nabbed Album of the Year at the 53rd Annual Grammy Awards show at the Staples
Center in Los Angeles, Calif.
By KEVIN C. JOHNSON
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
fter Angela Abatemarco Becker got married in 1952, her mother asked a
favor. Would she lend her gown to her cousin Marie? • The bride declined,
fearing she’d never see her wedding dress again. • Gradually, the request dwin-
dled, but it didn’t go away. If not the gown, how about the headpiece? No? If not the
“Juliette-cap” headpiece, how about just the veil? • Very well, Becker agreed. Cousin Marie
could borrow the veil. • Did she ever get it back? Of course not.
“She’s 86, and she is still angry about it,” said her daughter, Laura Becker Stearns of Dallas.
Stearns recently lent her mother’s gown to a group she’s confident will return it – the women
of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Dallas, who are staging a fashion show of wedding gowns
through the decades.
“Everyone’s been digging through
their attics,” said Jean Grube, the pas-
tor’s wife, who has arranged for about
20 models to wear some 30 gowns on
Thursday evening at the church.
Admission is $10, and proceeds will
benefit the Lutheran Synod’s youth
service trips to Germany and to Ar-
gentina, where St. Paul’s has a sister
church.
“I didn’t think I was going to be as
excited about this as I am,” said
Stearns, who is supplying jewelry to
complement the dresses various
models will wear.
“It’s a really cool idea and ties in to
the whole royal-wedding thing,” she
said, referring to the international in-
terest in the recent “I do’s” of Prince
William of England and his bride,
Kate Middleton.
“They are such a nice couple, very
down to earth. I loved how they rode
off in a convertible,” said Dottie Hen-
ry of Dallas, whose granddaughter
will model her tulle-skirted1955 wed-
ding gown in the fashion show.
Henry’s gown and veil were com-
mercially sealed for preservation af-
ter her wedding, and, while the gown
did survive the test of time, the veil
did not fare as well. “It crumbled,” she
said.
Nevertheless, the memories the
bridal finery brings back are still spar-
kling.
During a recent photo shoot, Henry
reminisced about meeting her future
husband, Frank, while both were va-
cationing on the Riviera.
Faythe Roberts of Dallas talked
about finding an antebellum-style
Clockwise from left: Old wedding
photographs, dating from the 1890s
through the 1920s, will be on dis-
play during the bridal fashion show.
Dottie Henry of Dallas, right, ad-
justs her 1955 wedding gown, which
her granddaughter Olivia Marquart,
20, of Dallas, tried on during a
fashion shoot at St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church in Dallas.
Faythe Roberts of Dallas fixes her
1982 wedding gown, which her
daughter, Amy, will model during
the fashion show at St. Paul’s Luth-
eran Church in Dallas.
Carleigh Thomas, 5, of Dallas mod-
els a contemporary flower-girl
dress that will be shown at the
fashion show. Consider it practice
for her Aunt Debbie’s wedding later
this year.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com
See DRESSES, Page 4F
“I didn’t think I was going to be as excited
about this as I am. It’s a really cool idea and
ties in to the whole royal-wedding thing.”
Laura Becker Sterns of Dallas
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
DIAGRAMLESS
CRYPTOGRAMS
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Money is an energy, but
you can only feel the
energy when it is moving.
This is a lucky day to let it
pass in and out of your life
without holding on. The
exchange will warm you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
You know yourself, and
yet there is also a wide
range of choices under
the umbrella of who you
are. Strategize and decide
what role you’ll play
before you walk into a situ-
ation. A stellar opportunity
will be offered to you.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Opinions won’t matter to
you unless you agree to
accept them. If you don’t
agree, the opinion, regard-
less of from where and
whom it comes, cannot
touch you.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
A relationship is develop-
ing in unexpected ways.
It’s as though an alien
force has taken the wheel
and is steering things in a
direction you never meant
to go. Take back the power.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). It will
be exciting to meet new
people — maybe too excit-
ing. To counter the adrena-
line rush that comes with
entering a foreign environ-
ment, calm yourself down
with an activity that puts
you at ease.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
You have been in a stoic
mood lately, and the issue
on your mind isn’t going
anywhere until you open
up and express yourself.
You’ll talk about your
concerns and put them in
their proper perspective.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Perhaps what the other
person is doing has noth-
ing to do with you. It is
more a function of who
the other person is and
what he or she wants.
You’ll be as successful as
you are objective.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
You’ll keep thinking about
the benefits of changing
a habit or adding a new
activity to your life. As you
dwell in the good feelings
that arise from this, cre-
ative impulses surface that
are worth acting upon.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). Everyone is waiting
for the leader to step in
and take charge. If no
one assumes the role, it’s
up for grabs. Consider tak-
ing it on yourself — you
have the skills, confidence
and vision needed to pull
this off.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Avoid conflict — it
will only drag you down.
Most of the problems you
neglect will solve them-
selves or at least diminish
into a more manageable
form that you can easily
deal with tomorrow.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
You need new ideas now,
so go to the far reaches
of your imagination.
Your mind will wander to
gloomy places and places
that sparkle and hum with
magic. You will find some-
thing useful in both places.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
You’ll enjoy an experience
for its educational value.
You don’t know or even
care right now where it
goes from here. It’s inter-
esting and enriching for
the moment, and that’s
what counts now.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (May
22). This is the start of a
great new adventure. You
have financial luck through
July — invest judiciously.
In September, you’ll be
tempted by distractions,
but if you instead choose
to work with great tenacity
toward a challenging goal,
your life will transform in a
beautiful way in November.
Family additions arrive
in January. Pisces and
Sagittarius people adore
you. Your lucky numbers
are: 26, 8, 11, 12 and 10.
AND/OR
Verge
5/22/11
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 3F
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
JUMBLE
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE ANSWERS
By Henri Arnold and
Mike Argirion
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
©1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS
MINUTE MAZE
PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAY’S SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
5/22
5/22
5/22
5/22
5/22
1. The head frog called for a
conference to resolve bickering
about pond privileges. He dubbed
the meeting, "Make us Better
Batrachians."
2. Picking your own subject and
speaking your mind is one thing. But
changing the subject without
changing your mind is tact.
3. The veteran stone carver wanted
his son to follow in his footsteps.
The son disliked the idea. He did not
want to be a chip off the old block.
4. The new math teacher said he
would extend the class curriculum
to include extradition.
DEAR ABBY
Woman’s loose lips sink
ship of budding romance
Dear Abby: I
met “Angie”
on a dating
site not long
ago. She’s an
intelligent,
open-minded
woman. So when one of our
first conversations turned
to sexual preferences, I felt
at ease revealing one of my
“likes” to her.
Today, Angie mentioned
that she had asked her girl-
friend about her experiences
with what I had discussed.
Clearly her intent wasn’t to
gossip, but nevertheless, I
felt betrayed. I had discussed
a personal part of myself in a
private conversation, and she
had divulged what I had said
without asking me.
Now I’m not sure I want to
continue talking to her. Con-
fidence is an essential part
of any relationship beyond a
casual friendship, and I don’t
want her friends being privy
to everything that goes on
between me and her, even
on a “promise not to tell any-
one” basis.
On the other hand, Angie
seemed concerned when she
realized I was upset, and her
intentions were not mali-
cious. Should I move on?
If not, how do I discuss my
feelings with Angie without
being confrontational?
— Wants It Private in Texas
Dear Wants It Private: An-
gie is not only open-minded,
she is also open-mouthed
when discussing intimate
matters. She and her girl-
friend talk about their sexual
preferences and activities,
or she wouldn’t have known
that her friend has had the
experience you discussed.
If you prefer your sex
life kept private, move on
because Angie isn’t likely
to change. If you are so at-
tracted to her that you’re
willing to have your private
life become an open book
— continue confiding in her
because it will happen.
Dear Abby: It’s the time of
year when preschool and
elementary school teachers
receive so many tokens of
thanks we don’t know what
to do with them.
Why not give a gift that
will really be appreciated?
Let your child help pick
out a book for the teacher’s
classroom library. The kids
know what is already there
and can be involved in find-
ing something new and
exciting. Most teachers can
always use a new addition to
their bookshelf.
— Reading is For Everyone
Dear R.I.F.E.: I love your
suggestion.
To receive a collection of Abby’s
most memorable — and most fre-
quently requested — poems and
essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check
or money order for $3.95 ($4.50
in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keep-
ers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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EQUIPMENT
gown with a hoop skirt when she
got married 28 years ago. “I was
a Civil War re-enactor,” she said.
And, thanks to all the brides
who decided to share vintage an-
ecdotes as well as gowns, Grube
will have lots to say when she
emcees the fashion show.
One bride got married three
months to the day her husband-
to-be return-
ed from
World War II.
Another de-
signed her
own dress
and had it
made by a
dressmaker
on Market
Street in
Wilkes-
Barre. A
third bought
the first dress
she tried on, then watched her
father hyperventilate.
“My advice to every engaged
‘Daddy’s little girl:’ Warn your fa-
ther before he sees you in your
wedding gown,” Betty Ann Duf-
fy wrote.
Various church members lent
wedding photos that will be on
display at the fashion show, in-
cluding the church’s administra-
tive assistant Carol Fett, who
has bridal pictures of her chil-
dren and her own wedding as
well some ancestral wedding
portraits dating to the 19th cen-
tury.
Future weddings are on the
minds of at least a few church
members, such as 5-year-old
Carleigh Thomas, who modeled
a contemporary flower-girl dress
during a recent photo shoot.
She’ll be a flower girl in real life,
for her Aunt Debbie later this
year.
But even though Faythe Ro-
berts’ 28-year-old gown seems a
perfect fit for her daughter, 27-
year-old fashion-show model
Amy Roberts saidshe doesn’t ex-
pect to wear it as a bride anytime
soon.
“She’d better not,” Faythe Ro-
berts said.
DRESSES
Continued from Page 1F
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
’Flower girl’ Carleigh Thomas, center, and ’brides’ Olivia Marquart, left, Amy Roberts and Lois Gdo-
vin model dresses from different eras.
Wedding memorabilia is on display at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
in Dallas, the site of a wedding-gown fashion-show fund-raiser.
What: ‘Bridal
Fashions from
the Past’
When: 7:30 p.m.
Thursday
Where: St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church,
Dallas
Tickets: $10
More info: 675-
3859
IF YOU GO
’Bride’ Lois Gdovin of Shaver-
town models a wedding gown as
Alice Baer carries her train.
him. Despite having a loving wife
(Foster), two sons (Anton Yel-
chin, Riley Thomas Stewart) and
a job as a toy-company exec, Wal-
ter is sinking deeper and deeper
into depression. He’s feeling
downright suicidal when he dis-
covers abeaver puppet inaDump-
ster. He begins speaking through
the toy, first to himself, then to ev-
eryone else. Thanks tothe Beaver,
Walter begins to turn his life
around, at least for a little while.
From the beginning, Foster en-
visioned “The Beaver” as the por-
trait of a manunable torouse him-
self from a deep, dark funk.
“I wanted there to be a real fo-
cusonnot just chronicmedical de-
pression, whichWalter has, but al-
so on the other end of the spec-
trum, which is just sadness, the
sadness and heaviness of our lives
andwhat that means, forexample,
to Walter’s son.”
Foster maintains she drew on
her own experiences with “differ-
ent forms of depression.” She was
alsoinspiredbythetimeshespent
answering phones at the Trevor
Project, a non-profit organization
focused on suicide prevention
among gay and lesbian youths.
“It’s important … for people to
understandthat (whatever they’re
going through) isn’t something
that no one else has ever lived
through,” Foster says. “For them
tobeabletoconnect andreachout
to other people and to know that
they’renot aloneinthis–that’sthe
differencebetweenlifeor death. …
I think the film kind of addresses
that in an interesting way.”
During production, Foster and
Gibson had long discussions
about theBeaver anditsnovel per-
sonality. In the script, the Beaver
spoke ina poshBritishaccent, but
Gibson decided to do an edgier
Cockney brogue.
“We turned the Beaver more
blue collar because that felt right
as analter egotoa richmanwho’s
had everything handed down to
him,” Foster, 48, notes.
“It made sense to have a blue-
collar puppet who’s a leader and
who’s vital. …We didn’t want him
to be warm and fuzzy. I think we
wanted him to be menacing in
some ways and to have a real
strengthof character, andthat Mel
really brought to the process.”
A former child star who went
on to nab Oscars for her perform-
ances in “The Accused” and “Si-
lence of the Lambs,” Foster began
her directing career in 1991 with
“Little Man Tate,” in which she al-
so starred. After the release of the
film, she vowed never to direct
herself in a movie again. Her next
directorial outing, “Home for the
Holidays,” starred Holly Hunter,
Anne Bancroft and Robert Dow-
ney Jr. But when she began work
on “The Beaver,” Foster opted to
play Walter’s put-upon wife.
“It is challenging,” she says of
doing double duty. “I don’t find it
schizophrenic in any way. I find it
completely easy to move between
thetwo,”shesaid, notingthereare
a couple of challenges.
Foster’s next film, “Elysium,” is
suretoprovideherwithherplenty
of surprises. In the latest from
Neill Blomkamp(“District 9”) she
plays the head of state of an alien
planet. Beyond that, she can’t de-
scribe her character or the plot.
“These sci-fi movies are all real-
ly hush-hush,” she says. “I don’t
even own a screenplay.”
Foster opted to play a support-
ing role in “Elysium” for the
chance to collaborate with Blom-
kamp. “I think ‘District 9’ is as
closetoaperfect movieas youcan
get,” she says. “It’s just an extraor-
dinary film.”
During the past decade, Foster
hasn’t worked as steadily as she
did in the 1970s, 1980s and1990s,
and that’s because she wanted to
spend more time with her sons,
Charles, 13 and Kit, 9. Foster does
everything for her kids, she says,
“fromcleaning up vomit …or tak-
ing them to school.”
Still, she sometimes worries
shehasn’t doneagoodenoughjob
jugglingmotherhoodandacareer.
“It’s hard doing anything well,
but it’s especially hard doing 10
things well,” she says. “I think be-
ing a parent is a full-time job and
being an artist is a full-time job,
and you just have to be OK with
the fact that sometimes you’re not
going to be very good at either
one.”
FOSTER
Continued from Page 1F
Jodie Foster and Mel Gibson play husband and wife in ’The Bea-
ver,’ which Foster also directs. It’s her third time as director.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 5F
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“It’s a little bit of luxury
while still enjoying the out-
doors,” she said. “When you
go tent camping, you have to
bring everything with you —
sleeping bags, all the utensils,
supplies. You pack up the
whole car. With the cabins,
you don’t need to bring as
much stuff. You have more
time to spend enjoying the
trip.”
Even those who go the tradi-
tional route of sleeping on the
ground may be spending time
in a tent that has multiple
rooms, with separate quarters
that can be used for the kids
or as a screened-in porch for
chairs.
REI, the outdoor gear and
apparel retailer, has seen an
increase in overall sales for
family camping tents. “Some
of these tents are sized so four
to eight people can sleep in
them,” said REI spokeswoman
Courtney Coe. “They have a
room divider that allows sep-
arate places for parents and
kids to sleep comfortably, and
a screened room for families
to set chairs up in at night to
play cards and get away from
the bugs. You can also zip on
an optional garage vestibule
to give your family more stor-
age space.”
An eight-person model new
for this year, the REI Kingdom
8, sells for $489, but Coe
pointed out that some cus-
tomers buy the bigger tent
just for the space, even though
only two or three people in-
tend to use it.
On the other end of the
scale, a backpacker’s favorite
is a lightweight tent called the
REI Quarterdome that weighs
just a hair under 4 pounds.
“It’s open and airy, with easy
setup, packs well and is really
comfortable for two people,”
said Coe. REI also offers light-
weight sleeping pads, ham-
mocks and butterfly chairs.
At Cabela’s, the hunting,
fishing and outdoor gear
store, a new generation of
lightweight, streamlined,
easy-to-use “survival” kits is
“a growing gear category
among campers, including not
only hardcore backpackers but
also more leisurely family
campers,” according to spo-
keswoman Kristin Lauver.
Gerber Bear Grylls Survival
kits, for example, include fire-
starting items and emergency
supplies, with a basic kit
weighing just 4.2 ounces
($23) and the ultimate ver-
sion just 9.4 ounces ($50).
The kits include fire starter,
waterproof matches, snare
wire, and a knife, with tools,
fishing and sewing supplies
and a survival blanket among
the added goodies in the ulti-
mate kit.
There are about 14,000
campgrounds in North Amer-
ica, Crider said, including na-
tional parks, with about 8,000
of the campgrounds privately
owned and operated. KOAs
exist in 475 locations.
CAMPING
Continued from Page 8F
AP PHOTOS
This is a park model unit in El
Capitan Canyon, a campground
resort near Santa Barbara.
A camper at the Lazy River at Granville Campground in Granville,
Ohio, uses a zip line, which is part of the entertainment package
there. Wireless Internet is another attraction.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF
RV PARKS AND CAMP-
GROUNDS: www.arvc.org/
KOA: www.koa.com
REI: www.rei.com
CABELA’S: www.cabelas.com
GREAT OUTDOORS CAMPING
PROMOTION: www.GoCampingA-
merica.com is offering coupons
and discounts at participating
campgrounds and related busi-
nesses June 1-25.
IF YOU GO
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 7F
BOOKS
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HARDCOVER FICTION
1. Dead Reckoning. Charlaine
Harris. Ace, $27.95
2. Buried Prey. John Sandford.
Putnam, $27.95
3. 10th Anniversary. James Pat-
terson & Maxine Paetro. Little,
Brown, $27.99
4. The Sixth Man. David Baldacci.
Grand Central, $27.99
5. The Land of Painted Caves.
Jean M. Auel. Crown, $30
6. Sixkill. Robert B. Parker. Put-
nam, $26.95
7. The Fifth Witness. Michael
Connelly. Little, Brown, $27.99
8. The Girl Who Kicked the Horn-
et’s Nest. Stieg Larsson. Knopf,
$27.95
9. Caleb’s Crossing. Geraldine
Brooks. Viking, $26.95
10. Those in Peril. Wilbur Smith.
Thomas Dunne, $27.99
11. The Snowman. Jo Nesbx. Knopf,
$25.95
12. Bel Air Dead. Stuart Woods.
Putnam, $25.95
13. I’ll Walk Alone. Mary Higgins
Clark. Simon & Schuster, $25.99
14. 2030. Albert Brooks. St. Mar-
tin’s, $25.99
15. She Walks in Beauty. Selected
by Caroline Kennedy. Voice,
$24.99
HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told
Me. Chelsea’s Family, Friends, &
Other Victims. Grand Central,
$24.99
2. The Dukan Diet. Dr. Pierre
Dukan. Crown, $26
3. Does the Noise in My Head
Bother You? Steven Tyler with
David Dalton. Ecco, $30
4. Bossypants. Tina Fey. LB/
Reagan Arthur, $26.99
5. The 17 Day Diet. Dr. Mike More-
no. Free Press, $25
6. In the Garden of Beasts. Erik
Larson. Crown, $26
7. Unbroken. Laura Hillenbrand.
Random House, $27
8. 20 Years Younger. Bob Greene.
Little, Brown, $27.99
9. Place of Yes. Bethenny Frankel
with Eve Adamson. Touchstone,
$24.99
10. Seal Team Six. Howard E.
Wasdin & Stephen Templin. St.
Martin’s, $26.99
11. Stories I Only Tell My Friends.
Rob Lowe. Holt, $26
12. If You Ask Me (and of Course
You Won’t). Betty White. Put-
nam, $25.95
13. Love Wins. Rob Bell. Harpe-
rOne, $22.99
14. Knowing Your Value. Mika
Brzezinski. Weinstein Books,
$22.95
15. The Heart and the Fist. Eric
Greitens. Houghton Mifflin Har-
court, $27
MASS MARKET
1. Worth Dying For. Lee Child. Dell,
$9.99
2. Water for Elephants. Sara
Gruen. Algonquin, $7.99
3. Storm Prey. John Sandford.
Berkley, $9.99
4. The Search. Nora Roberts. Jove,
$7.99
5. Game of Thrones. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $8.99
6. Something Borrowed. Emily
Giffin. St. Martin’s, $7.99
7. Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne
Objective. Eric Van Lustbader.
Vision, $9.99
8. A Clash of Kings. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $8.99
9. A Storm of Swords. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $8.99
10. Something Blue. Emily Giffin.
St. Martin’s, $7.99
11. Hannah’s List. Debbie Macom-
ber. Mira, $7.99
12. The Lincoln Lawyer. Michael
Connelly. Grand Central, $7.99
13. Savage Nature. Christine Fee-
han. Jove, $7.99
14. Dead in the Family. Charlaine
Harris. Ace, $7.99
15. A Feast for Crows. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $8.99
TRADE
1. Heaven Is for Real. Todd Burpo
with Lynn Vincent. Thomas
Nelson, $16.99
2. The Help. Kathryn Stockett.
Berkley, $16
3. Water for Elephants. Sara
Gruen. Algonquin, $14.95
4. Something Borrowed. Emily
Giffin. St. Martin’s Griffin, $14.99
5. The Immortal Life of Henrietta
Lacks. Rebecca Skloot. Broad-
way, $16
6. Life. Keith Richards. LB/Back
Bay, $16.99
7. A Visit from the Goon Squad.
Jennifer Egan. Anchor, $14.95
8. Lone Survivor. Marcus Luttrell.
LB/Back Bay, $15.99
9. Cutting for Stone. Abraham
Verghese. Vintage, $15.95
10. The 9th Judgment. James
Patterson & Maxine Paetro.
Grand Central, $14.99
11. The Art of Racing in the Rain.
Garth Stein. Harper, $14.99
12. Room. Emma Donoghue. LB/
Back Bay, $14.99
13. Empire of the Summer Moon.
S.C. Gwynne. Scribner, $16
14. Born to Run. Christopher
McDougall. Vintage, $15.95
15. Matterhorn. Karl Marlantes.
Grove, $15.95
◆ B E S T S E L L E R S
Can there really be more sto-
ries to tell of the secrets, lies
and losses that followed World
War II?
Apparently so. Here is anoth-
er, a first novel by an English
writer living in France, and it’s
different from the many others.
The central characters of “22
Britannia Road” are Poles, not
Jews. Like the Jews, they are
hiding from the advancing and
then occupying German army,
but they are not evading depor-
tation and death camps but
conscription for the man and
relocation
and separa-
tion for his
wife and
child.
Janusz, the
man, after de-
serting from
the Polish ar-
my, makes
his way to France and then to
England, avoiding most of the
horror of battle. In France, he is
sheltered on a farm, where he
succumbs to the sensuous He-
lene. At first he fears, then ac-
cepts, that his wife and child
are dead. Later, in love with He-
lene and prepared to make a
new life in France, he almost
hopes they are.
Silvana, the wife, is deter-
mined to survive and protect
Aurek, her child. After she im-
petuously flees Warsaw, she
makes her way to the forest.
There, living an almost feral
life among the trees and ani-
mals, she and the child become
all and all to one another.
Miraculously, Janusz, Silva-
na and Aurek survive and re-
unite in England after the war.
Janusz has located a house for
them at 22 Britannia Road, and
there they will try to rebuild.
In four parallel narratives —
his and hers during the war, his
and hers after — their compli-
cated stories unfold. Janusz’s
story is all of a piece — flight,
fear, love, loss. But Silvana’s
story is a patchwork of lies, self-
delusion, guilt and hope. Ja-
nusz and Silvana become un-
easy partners in a delicate pas
de deux of revelation. Janusz
moves with a slow and fairly
steady grace, but Silvana trips
herself up, trying simultane-
ously to hide and uncover se-
crets about herself and her
child. Both Janusz and Silvana
are sympathetic in their desire
to build trust on half-truths and
their eventual acceptance of
the behavior wartime required
or coerced from them.
Having lost everyone else,
they are forced to find a solace
in one another. “They are unit-
ed in this at least: the over-
whelming desire to find the
dead in the living,” Hodgkin-
son writes. While this might
not seem to be the basis for a
marriage, it may, in fact, be a
positive place from which to re-
build. They share a lost country
and its ghosts.
Like all of “22 Britannia
Road,” the ending resists easy
and obvious sentimentality,
while allowing for genuine feel-
ing. Adding to the poignancy is
the final shift in point of viewto
Aurek, the innocent child of the
marriage. Hodgkinson gives
him the final glance into the
past, and he, it turns out, is not
simply the passive repository of
love and loss but has had his
own wondering gaze on his par-
ents and their lives.
‘22 Britannia Road’ addresses war-torn life during WWII
By BARBARA FISHER
Newsday
“22 Britannia Road” by Amanda
Hodgkinson; Viking (323 pages,
$25.95):
Sometimes you just want
someone to tell it to you straight.
Youmay look andfeel better than
your grandmother or even your
mother didat 50 but the idea that
50 is anything like 30, Tracey
Jacksonpractically screams, is ei-
ther a marketing scam or a line
made up by a 50-year-old guy in a
bar tryingtopickupa 30-year-old
woman.
We are fixatedonyouth. This is
not news and, by her own ac-
count, no one has tried harder
than Tracey Jackson to stay
young. Although her grandmoth-
er swore by Crisco to defeat wrin-
kles, Jackson, 52 and a screen-
writer in Southern California,
has access to the latest anti-aging
promises; Bikram yoga and Core
Fusion (her preferred, one hour a
day, six days a week regimen);
bioidenticals (her preferred hor-
mone treatment, after trying
HRT) andonandon. Jacksonhas
some great tips in “Between a
Rock and a Hot Place” that the
reader may not have heardabout,
like over-the-counter calcium
and magnesium as a sleep aid
(Jackson prefers Klonopin).
The trouble isn’t really with
the exterior — you won’t look
like a 30-year-old if you devote
half of each day to anti-aging but
you can look pretty good. No. It’s
much worse. The problemis that
this culture discards women ol-
der than 40 or barely recycles
them. Women older than 40 are
the ones who are called in a crisis
to pick up kids fromschool or ail-
ing parents or to taxi a friend to
the auto shop.
At 35, Jackson had written the
scripts for three films in the
iTunes top 35. By 47, she could
not find work. A working woman
all her life — through kids and
two marriages — she found un-
employment was the hardest ad-
justment of all, way harder than a
few wrinkles. While her friends
were, for example, off taking
pole-dancing lessons to improve
their sex lives, Jackson tried to
face the music.
“When you get to the ‘third
chapter,’ ‘second adulthood,’ or
whatever euphemism you prefer
for fifty, you are in the hardest de-
mographic to get rehired. You
have noidea howyouare goingto
move forward. There are somany
psychological hurdles to clear.”
Fromage 20 to 50, there’s a pretty
clear road map, whether or not
you choose to followit: marriage,
children, career, mortgage, etc.
After 50, for women in the U.S.,
there is no road map. Doesn’t
matter how much time you’ve
put in. Face it.
Don’t let yourself go and don’t
give up. “The truth is, it’s not
your grandmother’s fifty, and it’s
certainly not thirty, but it’s your
fifty. And though certain things
will eventuallycome toa halt, the
quality of your life doesn’t have
to.”
The book is nothing less than
what my own grandmother used
to call a “godsend.”
A road
map to life
after fifty
By SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Los Angeles Times
“Between a Rock and a Hot
Place: Why Fifty Is Not the New
Thirty” by Tracey Jackson; Har-
perCollins (304 pages, $25.99):
F
or those mourning the death of Stieg Larsson or the increasing deadliness of
Henning Mankell’s prose, don’t give up on the Scandinavian crime novel yet.
Knopf certainly hasn’t, having lured Norwegian writer Jo Nesbx to its publishing
house fromrival HarperCollins. •Andwhat a steal. His latest, “The Snowman,” is a
superb thriller — smart, stylish, beautifully paced and meticulously plotted. If, in
the end, Nesbx resorts to some melodramatic action, he’s earned it. I can’t wait to
see the movie, preferably with striking Oslo settings and Daniel Craig as Nesbx’s
main man, Harry Hole.
We’ve seen the likes of Hole before — the
world-weary, middle-agedpolice detective who
lets his work get in the way of lasting relation-
ships even though he’s unconvinced that his
work ultimately makes any difference. Also be-
fitting the type, he might even share a trait or
two with the bad guys. And, of course, he’s a
babe magnet.
The familiarity doesn’t matter. Nesbx is such
an insightful portraitist that Hole and all the
secondary characters are convincing at just
about every bloody turn. And Nesbx, like other
Nordic writers, is not for the faint of heart. Hole
is on the hunt for a serial killer whose victims
— mostly female — disappear. As their bodies
start surfacing in the second half of the book,
the tone gets ever more gruesome.
Chances are you’ll be hooked by then, as
Nesbx lays down a trail rich in Nordic atmo-
sphere — a snowman is left as the killer’s call-
ing card — and in character-driven develop-
ment. Hole’s suspects are finely drawn — a
plastic surgeon who has had contact with at
least two of the victims, a cuckolded husband
who seems to have it in for other women, a
smug TVpundit who may have had affairs with
some of the victims.
Despite frustrations
with his love life, the state
of affairs in Norway and a
battle withalcoholismthat
he seems to be on top of,
Hole’s outlook isn’t as
bleak as Inspector Kurt
Wallander’s in the Mankell
series. Though Nesbx
seems to swing from the
left — Hole talks about
“American society’s inherent fascism” at one
point — Nesbx isn’t nearly as dogmatic as his
Swedish colleagues. And the psychological as-
pects of the novel are on a par with Ruth Ren-
dell’s Inspector Wexford mysteries.
Ultimately, though, what sets Nesbx apart is
his ability to keep the pages turning — and
there are almost 400 of them — with such in-
tellectual dexterity. Hole keeps persevering,
seemingly, because he’s so good at what he
does anddoesn’t settle for easy explanations —
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Scandinavian chills: The ‘Snowman’ cometh
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C M Y K
PAGE 8F SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ T R A V E L
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Play at these courses:
Applewood Golf Course
454 Mt. Zion Road, Harding, PA (570) 388-2500
Arnold’s Golf Course
490B. West Third St., Nescopeck, PA (570) 752-7022
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club
260 Country Club Dr., Mountain Top, PA (570) 868-4653
Briarwood “East” & “West” Golf Clubs
4775 West Market Street, York, PA (717) 792-9776
Emanon Country Club
Old State Road, RR#1 Box 78, Falls, PA (570) 388-6112
Fernwood Hotel Resort
Route 209, Bushkill, PA (888) 337-6966
Hollenback Golf Course
1050 N. Washington St., Wilkes Barre, PA (570) 821-1169
Lakeland Golf Club
Route 107, Fleetville, PA (570) 945-9983
Maple Hill Public Golf Course
S. Ridge Rd., Springville, PA (570) 965-2324
Mill Race Golf Course
4584 Red Rock Road, Benton, PA (570) 925-2040
Morgan Hills Golf Course
219 Hunlock Harveyville Rd., Hunlock, PA (570) 256-3444
Mountain Laurel Golf Course
HC1, Box 9A1, White Haven (570) 443-7424
Mountain Valley Golf Course
1021 Brockton Mountain Dr., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2242
Sand Springs Country Club
1 Sand Springs Drive, Drums, PA (570) 788-5845
Shadowbrook Inn and Resort
Route 6E, East Tunkhannock, PA (800) 955-0295
Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort
1 River Rd., Shawnee On The Delaware, PA (800) 742-9633
Stone Hedge Country Club
49 Bridge St., Tunkhannock, PA (570) 836-5108
Sugarloaf Golf Course
18 Golf Course Road, Sugarloaf, PA (570) 384-4097
Towanda Country Club
Box 6180, Towanda, PA (570) 265-6939
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Twin Oaks Golf Course
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Villas Crossing Golf Course
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White Birch Golf Course
660 Tuscarora Park Rd., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2525
White Deer Golf Club
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N
EW YORK — These
days, camping isn’t just
pitching a tent in the
wilderness on a long hike, or
stopping at a campground far
from home on a road trip.
Instead, for many leisure
travelers, camping nowadays
may involve driving just a few
miles from home to spend the
night in a cabin with a roof,
bathroom, beds and electrici-
ty, or taking the kids to a place
that offers activities and en-
tertainment like scavenger
hunts or sports competitions.
Jolene Baxman organizes an
annual two-night trip for a
dozen mothers and their kids
to a Kampgrounds of America
facility in Petaluma, Calif., a
mere 5 miles from where she
lives. But they don’t pitch
tents. They rent a lodge with a
bathroom, indoor shower,
kitchenette, microwave, bar-
becue grill, and, of course,
beds. The moms take turns re-
laxing and making meals; the
kids swim and bike. At night,
they sing around a campfire
and toast marshmallows.
“It’s not far from our homes
but it feels like we’re camp-
ing,” Baxman said. “We’re out
in the woods; it’s very beauti-
ful — lush trees and you don’t
hear any cars around. We’re
not in a tent, but it’s camping
to us.”
More than half of those stay-
ing with Kampgrounds of
America say they were at
home the night before arriv-
ing at the campground, ac-
cording to KOA CEO Jim Rog-
ers. That’s a 25 percent in-
crease over seven years.
Rogers says work demands,
kids’ schedules, high gas pric-
es and other concerns are all
contributing to the trend.
“They just want to stay within
reach and go away for shorter
time periods,” he said.
Rogers also said KOAs have
seen a 25 percent increase in
the use of roofed accommoda-
tions at their campgrounds.
“It’s attracting a whole new
breed of campers, people we
haven’t seen before,” he said.
In Ohio, the Lazy River at
Granville campground, 25
miles from Columbus, offers
activities and entertainment
ranging from a zipline to mag-
ic shows to arts and crafts. For
those who bring laptops and
TV sets, there is wireless In-
ternet and cable service. One
of the most popular attrac-
tions at Lazy River is the “bug
lady,” a local woman who
takes visitors on a walk in the
woods, where she points out
bugs. “She’s the Pied Piper of
bugs,” said Mark Kasper, own-
er of Lazy River. “She just en-
trances her audience.”
Kasper observed that when
he was young, “you’d go to the
state park and watch a pre-
sentation with a ranger and a
movie. Now it’s different. We
try to have everything the
modern-day person wants,
and yet you’re away from the
city.”
Jeff Crider, spokesman for
the National Association of
RV Parks and Campgrounds,
says “more and more camp-
grounds across the country
are offering organized activ-
ities that could range from na-
ture walks to special themed
weekend events like holiday
events or Father’s Day events.
You can still find plenty of
campgrounds that offer a nat-
ural setting and a nice envi-
ronment for kayaking, fishing,
or river tubing, but what the
parks are finding is that more
and more families want things
to do. And fun activities are a
way to get kids away from
computers and iPods and do
something as a family.”
In addition, campgrounds
that offer these types of activ-
ities find that people will stay
longer — three or four days
instead of just a weekend.
Crider said accommoda-
tions are also changing.
Campgrounds are investing in
everything from yurts and fur-
nished teepees to cottages
and cabins. A KOA in Herkim-
er, N.Y., just opened three fur-
nished cabins for rent that are
powered by solar panels, with
a backup propane generator.
“If they can provide rental
accommodations, then they
can make camping accessible
to everyone. It isn’t just people
who like to rough it in a tent or
who have an RV,” Crider said.
Dawn Tosner, of Valley
Stream, N.Y., has been going
to the KOA in Herkimer, N.Y.,
for 15 years. “When we first
started, we went tent camp-
ing,” she said. “We gradually
started using the cabins.” Last
year, joined by friends, she
tried an upgraded cabin with
all the comforts of home, in-
cluding a bathtub, stove and
TV.
Camping trends move indoors
AP PHOTOS
Take a look at a Kampgrounds of America Lodge in Petaluma, Calif. CEO Jim Rogers said KOAs have
seen a 25 percent increase in the use of roofed accommodations. ‘It’s attracting a whole new breed
of campers, people we haven’t seen before,’ he said, explaining work demands, kids’ schedules, high
gas prices and other concerns are all contributing to the trend.
By BETH J. HARPAZ
AP Travel Editor
See CAMPING, Page 5F
The interior of a Kampgrounds of America Lodge in Petaluma,
Calif., is rustic and cozy but modern.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 PAGE 1G
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110 Lost
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110 Lost
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PAGE 2G SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
NOTICE NOTICE
ALLEN J. TOGUT, MD
216 North River St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
is retiring from practice
on June 30, 2011
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
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150 Special Notices
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REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
This is a formal
invitation to take
Jeanne E. on an
adventure with
all my friends for
the most exciting
week of her life.
Let me know
when is good for
you. Noble Scott
will take the
week off from
fishing to help
make this hap-
pen.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
NEED IMMEDIATE
ACCESS to PA
NEWSPAPERS and
their key personnel?
The 2011 PNA Direc-
tory is available
online: annual fee of
4100 plus tax - or
hard copy $50 plus
tax & shipping. Con-
tact KristinBpa-
news.org or cal
717-703-3069
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
ADOPTION
DIVORCE
CUSTODY
Estates, DUI
ATTORNEY
MATTHEW LOFTUS
570-255-5503
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Divorce, Custody,
Support, PFA
FREE Consultation.
Atty. Josianne
Aboutanos
Wilkes-Barre
570-208-1118
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Attorney
Keith Hunter
Bankruptcies
MAHLER, LOHIN
& ASSOCIATES
(570) 718-1118
MARGIOTTI
LAW OFFICES
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult
Payment Plans
(570) 970-9977
Wilkes-Barre
(570) 223-2536
Stroudsburg
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from home.
*Medical *Business
*Paralegal* Comput-
ers *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call
888-220-3984
www .
CenturaOnline.com
380 Travel
ISLAND HOPPING IN
NEW ENGLAND
6/26-6/30
1-800-432-8069
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
YANKEES TRIP
TO CINCINNATI
June 20, 21 and 22
(Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday)
Catch the Yankees
take on the Reds at
The Great American
Ballpark in Cincin-
nati, Ohio
Trip Includes:
*Round trip bus
transportation
*Beer, soda & food
on the bus
*Great box level
seats to two games
(Mon & Tues night)
*Hotel accommoda-
tions at the Millenni-
um Hotel. Just three
blocks from stadium
and walking dis-
tance from Cincin-
nati Zoo and other
downtown attrac-
tions
Price: $350
Call 570-287-9701
for more info.
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
SUZUKI`09
KING QUAD 750AXI
Hunter green. 214
miles. Excellent
condition. 50”
Moose plow with
manual lift included.
Asking $5,900
(570) 299-0560
TOMAHAWK`10
ATV, 125 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk mid
size 125cc 4 wheel-
er. Only $995 takes
it away!. Call
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
YAMAHA`04 RHINO
Excellent condition,
200 hours. Priced
to sell. $6,500 or
best offer. Call
Keith 570-971-4520
409 Autos under
$5000
BUICK `96 REGAL
3.8, 102,000
miles. Excellent
condition in &
out. 3 months
warranty. $3,295.
(570) 417-4731 or
(570) 675-0655
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
SATURN ‘99 SC1
3 door coupe. Only
122,000 miles.
Cd player, AC,
Moonroof, leather
interior, alloy rims,
Like New tires.
Fresh detail and Full
of GAS...
ONLY $2,999
For more pics or
information, call
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
412 Autos for Sale
2007 PONTIAC G6
GTP, 1 Owner,
Leather interior,
moonroof
$14,950
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
ACURA `08 RDX
Good Condition.
53,000 miles.
AWD, Full Power,
AM/FM, CD
Changer, Blue
Tooth, XM Radio,
Leather Interior
& Sunroof
$20,000
(570) 814-8398
Call after 9:30 a.m.
Audi `02 A4
1.8 Turbo, AWD,
Automatic, white
with beige leather
interior. 84,000
Miles. Very Good
Condition. $8,900
(570) 696-9809
(570) 690-4262
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
08 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL, Silver/grey
leather, sunroof
07 DODGE CALIBER
SXT,blue, 4 cyl auto
07 CHYSLER 300C
Hemi, AWD, Slate
grey, grey int
06 VW JETTA
blue, auto, leather
sunroof
06 PONTIAC G-6
Silver, 4dr, auto
05JAGUAR X-TYPE
3.0, hunter green,
tan leather (AWD)
03 HYUNDAI ACCENT
White, 4 door, 4cyl.
66,000 miles
04 MITSU GALLANT
gry, auto, 4cyl,55k
04 CHRYSLER PT
CRUISER GT, slvr,blk
lthr, auto, sunroof
01 NISSAN ALTIMA
4 dr, slvr, auto, 4cyl
01 AUDI S8 QUATRO
Burg./tan lthr.,
Nav., 360 HP, AWD
01 AUDI A8 L
cashmere beige,
tan lthr., nav., AWD
00 CADILLAC CATERA
silver/blk leather,
sunroof, 56K
00 NISSAN ALTIMA GXE
Blue/grey
leather, auto, 4cyl.
00 MERCEDES-BENZ
S-430 slvr/blck
lthr., 64,000 miles
00 SUBARU OUTBACK
STATION WAGON,
AWD (Burgundy/tan
leather, sunroof)
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
73 VW BEETLE CONV.
olympic blu, blck
top, 4 speed
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 DODGE NITRO SXT,
garnet red, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
06 JEEP COMMANDER
Slvr, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 DODGE RAM 1500
SLT, Quad cab, slvr,
5.7 hemi, auto, 4x4
06 DAKOTA QUAD CAB
SLT, silver, auto.,
V6, 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT white, V6,
4x4
05 MAZDA TRIBUTE S,
green, auto, V6,
4x4
05 GMC SIERRA
X-Cab, blk, auto,
4x4 truck
05 MERCURY MOUNT-
AINEER PREMIUM,
Silver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
05 CHEVY EQUINOX
Silver, 4 door, 4x4
05 FORD EXPLORER
XLT, white 4 door
4x4
04CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS, pewter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 FORD F-150
Heritage, X-cab,
blk, auto, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZ
ER, seafoam
grn/tan lthr., 4x4
04 NISSAN XTERRA SE
blue, auto, 4x4
04 GMC ENVOY XUV
slvr., 4 dr., V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, white, V6, 4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
gold, 4 dr., V6, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR
LX, green, 4 door,
entertainment sys.
7 pass. minivan
02 DODGE RAM 1500
reg cab, red, auto,
75K, 4x4
03 CHEVY 1500, V8,
X-cab, white, 4x4
02 DODGE RAM 1500
Quad Cab, SLT,
Red auto 4x4 truck
02 MERCURY MOUNT-
AINEER PREMIUM,
white, tan leather,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MAZDA TRIBUTE
White, auto, 4x4
01 DODGE RAM 1500
regular cab, 4x4,
with cap
00 FORD EXPEDITION
XLT, gold, 3rd seat
4x4
98 FORD F-150,
regular cab pick up
green, auto 4x4
98 FORD RANGER,
Flairside, reg cap
truck, 5 spd, 4x4
copper
AUDI `02 A4
3.0, V6, AWD
automatic, tiptronic
transmission. Fully
loaded, leather
interior. 92,000
miles. Good condi-
tion. Asking $9,500.
Call (570) 417-3395
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
AUDI `05 A4
Turbo, Navy Blue
with grey leather
interior, fully
loaded automatic.
93,000 miles. All
records. Excellent
condition. 4 new
tires & new
brakes. Asking
$8,000 or best
offer. Call for info
417-2010 Days
779-4325 Nights
07 Impala LS $8,995
09JEEP PATRIOT $12,995
08Taurus SEL $12,495
08RAM 1500 $12,495
04 BLAZER 4X4 $7,995
03 FOCUS SE $6,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
BMW `02 330
CONVERTIBLE
83K miles. Beautiful
condition. Newly
re-done interior
leather & carpeting.
$13,500.
570-313-3337
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `03 530 I
Beige with tan
leather interior.
Heated seats, sun-
roof, 30 MPG high-
way. Garage kept.
Excellent condition
86,000 miles.
Asking $11,500.
(570) 788-4007
BMW `04 325i
5 Speed. Like New!!
New Tires, tinted
windows, sun roof,
black leather
interior. Only
57,000 Miles!!!
PRICE REDUCED TO
$14,000!!
For more info,
call (570) 762-3714
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $19,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
BUICK `05 LESABRE
3.8 V6, 20 city/29
highway. 42,000
miles. Last year
full size model.
Excellent condition
in & out. Roadster
cloth roof. Gold with
tan interior. $8,400
(570) 822-8001
BUICK `98 LESABRE
4 door. All leather.
114,000 miles. Great
shape. $2,600. Call
570-819-3140 or
570-709-5677
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,600
570-881-2775
CADILLAC `04
SEVILLE SLS
Beige. Fully loaded
Excellent condition.
Runs great. New
rotors, new brakes.
Just serviced.
108,000 miles. Ask-
ing $8,000. (570)
709-8492
CHEVROLET `05
TAHOE Z71
Silver birch with
grey leather interior,
3rd row seating,
rear A/C & heat,
4WD automatic with
traction control, 5.3l
engine, moonroof,
rear DVD player.
Bose stereo + many
more options. Imm-
aculate condition.
76,000 adult driven
miles. $15,600. Call
(570) 378-2886 &
ask for Joanne
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
CHEVROLET `88
MONTE CARLO SS
V8, automatic,
51,267 miles,
MUST SELL
$5,500
(570) 760-0511
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET `86
CORVETTE
4x3 manual, 3 over-
drive, 350 engine
with aluminum
heads. LT-1 exhaust
system. White with
red pearls. Custom
flames in flake. New
tires & hubs. 1
owner. 61,000 origi-
nal miles. $8,500
(570) 359-3296
Ask for Les
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVROLET ‘08
MALIBU LT
Black/black,
4 door sedan,
well equipped
Serviced with
warranty
KELLY AUTO SALES
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
CHEVY `06 COLORADO
Extended cab. Auto.
Power steering, a/c.
40k miles. 2 wheel
drive.
$12,600, negotiable.
570-678-5040
CHEVY `07 SSR
Great on Gas. Man-
ual, 5 speed trans.
75K miles. New
inspection. Bronze
with tan interior. Dri-
vetrain Warranty till
4/12. $7,500. Call
570-239-2746
CHRYSLER ‘06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
CHRYSLER `02
PT CRUISER
Inferno Red, flame
design. Chrome
wheels. 47,000
miles, one owner.
Looks and runs
great. New inspec-
tion. $5,800
Call (570) 472-1854
CHRYSLER `05
SEBRING LX
Low mileage, blue,
2 door, automatic.
Excellent condition
$8,000
(570) 740-7446
CHRYSLER `07 300
55,600 miles, auto-
matic, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
all power, AM/FM
radio, CD player,
new new brakes.
$10,900.
570-760-6983
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
CHRYSLER `93
LEBARON
CONVERTIBLE
56K Original Miles.
Radiant Red. Mint
condition, new
paint, automatic,
new battery, tune
up, brakes, top.
Needs convertible
top motor.
$4,300 OBO
(347) 452-3650
(In Mountain Top)
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `05 FREESTAR
LIMITED EDITION
Low mileage, fully
loaded, $10,999.
negotiable.
570-283-1691
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
FORD `98 TAURUS
Gold. Good condi-
tion Runs great.
87,000 miles, R-
title, Recently
inspected.
$2,700. Call
(570) 814-6198
FORD ‘02
FOCUS WAGON
Low mileage,
One owner
$6,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black top.
6,500 miles. One
Owner. Excellent
Condition. $18,500
570-760-5833
FORD ‘05 EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT
1/2 Ton, 4WD,
automatic, V6
$15,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HONDA `06 CIVIC EX
2 door, 5 speed, air,
power windows &
locks, sun roof, CD,
cruise & alloys.
Excellent condition,
very well main-
tained with service
records, remaining
Honda warranty.
65K, $10,500.
570-706-0921
HONDA `07 CIVIC
EX. 34k miles.
excellent condition,
sunroof, alloys, a/c,
cd, 1 owner, garage
kept. $13,000. Call
570-760-0612
HONDA `07 CIVIC
Sport SI. Red, with
black interior,
75,000 miles. 6
speed, spoiler and
body kit. Tinted win-
dows,
Reduced $11,900
(570) 714-0384
HONDA ‘06 CIVIC EX
4 cyl., automatic
sunroof, 62K
Serviced with
warranty
KELLY AUTO SALES
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
HONDAS!
‘10 Accord LX.
7K miles. Black / tan
cloth. $19,900
‘09 Accord EX.
V6 14K, Pearl White.
Leather. $21,700
‘08 Accord LX
PREMIUM: 20K, Sil-
ver. $17,495
‘08 Civic LX Coupe
44K. Gray. Newtires.
Warranty $14,895
‘01 Civic LX
57K. Silver. 5 Speed
Warranty. $8,450
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI ‘03
ELANTRA
4 cylinder,
automatic, cd,
1 owner.
Economy Car!
$4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
INFINITI `05 G35
Sports Coupe. Black
with slate leather.
Original owner. 69K
miles. Fully
equipped with navi-
gation, sunroof, etc.
Always maintained
by Infiniti dealer.
Very nice. $15,750.
570-339-1552
After 4pm