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Understanding the Gospel of Luke

Understanding the Gospel of Luke

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Many people have very strong opinions about what they believe the Bible teaches. And since there are so many different churches with different beliefs and different practices, it is clear that they cannot possibly all be right. In every disagreement about what the Bible means at least one party has to have it wrong; and at times all the parties involved may have it wrong. That is because nobody has perfect understanding of everything that relates to biblical statements and teachings.

One major source of such conflicts in understanding, even amongst the various churches of God, is THE VAST NUMBER OF MISTRANSLATIONS found in virtually every translation of the Bible that is available to us, including the KJV...
Many people have very strong opinions about what they believe the Bible teaches. And since there are so many different churches with different beliefs and different practices, it is clear that they cannot possibly all be right. In every disagreement about what the Bible means at least one party has to have it wrong; and at times all the parties involved may have it wrong. That is because nobody has perfect understanding of everything that relates to biblical statements and teachings.

One major source of such conflicts in understanding, even amongst the various churches of God, is THE VAST NUMBER OF MISTRANSLATIONS found in virtually every translation of the Bible that is available to us, including the KJV...

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Published by: FreetosharePublications on Jul 25, 2011
Direitos Autorais:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/26/2013

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Following a few verses after the above statement, Luke 10:13-14 reads:
"Woe unto thee, CHORAZIN! woe unto thee, BETHSAIDA! for if the

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mighty works had been done in TYRE and SIDON, which have been done
in you, they had a great while ago repented, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.
But it shall be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the judgment, than for
you.And thou, CAPERNAUM, which art exalted to heaven, shalt be thrust
down to hell."

And Matthew 11:20-24 reads: "Then began he to upbraid the cities wherein
most of his mighty works were done, because they repented not: Woe unto
thee, CHORAZIN! woe unto thee, BETHSAIDA! for if the mighty works,
which were done in you, had been done in TYRE and SIDON, they would
have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. But I say unto you, It shall
be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the day of judgment, than for you.
And thou, CAPERNAUM, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought
down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had
been done in SODOM, it would have remained until this day. But I say
unto you, That it shall be more tolerable for the land of Sodom in the day
of judgment, than for thee."

These two quotations clearly refer to the same event. Yet Luke shows this
as taking place AFTER the transfiguration, while Matthew places this
event solidly BEFORE the transfiguration. Clearly Luke was not aware of
the exact circumstances in which some of the things he knew about had
taken place. So he recorded them in the contexts in which he believed they
occurred. And at times he made some mistakes in this regard. Placing
events into the wrong context is certainly not something we would
associate with divine inspiration.

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