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KMT RPS Aff

KMT RPS Aff

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Published by: AffNeg.Com on Jan 08, 2009
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10/16/2011

A NATIONAL RPS - DIVERSITY IN RENEWABLES – EMPIRICALLY PROVEN BY STATE-BASED
DEVELOPMENT
SOVACOOL AND COOPER 2007

[Ben and Chris, research fellow @ Centre for Asia and Globalization
and Exec Dir of Network for New Energy Choices, “Exploring How
Today’s Development Affects Future Generations Around the Globe:
State Efforts to Promote Renewable Energy: Tripping the Horse With
the Cart?”, SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT LAW AND POLICY,
Fall, lexis/ ttate]
A final criticism is that a national RPS or SBC would promote only least-cost options such as wind turbines and
landfill gas generators (and not solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, small-scale hydroelectric, and geothermal plants).
Existing state programs, however, reveal that mandates with broad qualifying resource eligibility actually have led
to the development of many different renewable resources. Utilities have already demonstrated that they can meet
state requirements by deploying a diverse portfolio of renewable resources that best match their service areas. By
geographically and monetarily expanding the market for renewable resources, a national RPS is likely to further
diversify the deployment of renewable energy technologies. In Nevada, geothermal energy may be cheaper to
develop than wind. In the Pacific Northwest, incremental hydroelectric power may be cheaper than solar. In the
Southeast, biomass may be the most affordable. A national RPS mandate with a fuel-based definition of eligible
renewable resources ensures that free market principles, rather than regulatory set-asides or political patronage,
determine which technologies will be most cost competitive in certain areas of the country. An added bonus is that
a national RPS decreases compliance costs for regulated utilities, since a technology-neutral mandate allows
utilities to meet RPS obligations using the technology that is most cost competitive for the fuels available.

ALL REGIONS HAVE THE ABILITY TO CREATE RENEWABLES
SOVACOOL AND COOPER 2007

[Ben and Chris, research fellow @ Centre for Asia and Globalization
and Exec Dir of Network for New Energy Choices, “Big Is Beautiful:
The Case for Federal Leadership on a National Renewable Portfolio
Standard”, ELECTRICITY JOURNAL, May, lexis/ ttate]
Even in the Southeast, where regulated utilities often claim there is a dearth of available renewable resources,
recent research has found commercially significant wind resources offshore in the Gulf of Mexico and the South
Atlantic.59 According to the National Hydro Association, the Southeast also has the potential to add 2,941MW of
incremental hydropower at existing dams, an amount second only to the Northwest/Rocky Mountain region.60 A
preliminary study undertaken by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) also found approximately 900MW of
energy available in from wind, biomass, solar, and incremental hydroelectric that could be "cost competitively"
developed by in the Southeast.61 And a study by the University of Tennessee suggests that forest and agricultural
by-products alone could generate up to 22.2 billion kWh of electricity in TVA's service area at competitive
prices.62

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