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NASA: 112301main 114 pk july05

NASA: 112301main 114 pk july05

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Published by: NASAdocuments on Jan 12, 2008
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10/12/2011

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A variety of cameras and lenses are used to
support ascent imaging, including film and
digital cameras.
• 35mm film cameras are used at the pad and on
short, medium and long range camera sites
and provide the highest resolution dictating
they are the primary imagery to meet the
minimum size requirements for debris
identification during ascent.
• HDTV digital video cameras are co-located
with many of the 35mm cameras and provide
quick look capability. The digital video data
provides the ability to conduct expedited post-
launch imagery processing and review (quick
look) before the film is processed and
distributed.
• National Television Standards Committee
(NTSC) – backup for sites without HDTV.
• 70mm motion picture film cameras provide
“big sky” views.
• 16mm motion picture film cameras are used on
the Mobile Launch Platform and Fixed Service
Structure of the launch pad.
• Other cameras are located throughout the
launch pad perimeter and other locations
providing additional quick look views of the
launch.

Cameras are either fixed or mounted on a
tracker. A variety of trackers are used at the
different camera sites, the predominant tracker
being a Kineto Tracking Mount (KTM) tracker.
All of the trackers within close proximity to the
launch pads are remotely controlled. The
remaining trackers are remotely or manually
controlled on-site.

Figure3 Kineto Tracking Mount tracker

July 2005

IDENTIFYING & REPAIRING DAMAGE IN FLIGHT

35

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