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JULY 18-24, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Affordable housing
Council discusses possibility
of more units. PAGE 3
Pony Club member eyes Olympics
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
As the 2012 Olympics ap-
proach, people all over the world
are anticipating the variety of
athletic events that will be fea-
tured in several of Londons are-
nas.
For one Hopewell resident,
Fiona Crawford, shes hoping
that, one day, shell find herself in
the spotlight at the Olympics in-
stead of just watching from afar.
Crawford, a recent graduate of
the Waldorf School in Princeton
and soon-to-be freshman at
Hopewell Valley Central High
School (CHS), is a member of the
Amwell Valley Hounds Pony
Club, and has been since she was
9 years old.
Although the name may be de-
ceiving at first glance, the Pony
Club offers a lot more than just
pony rides. Actually, the Pony
Club fosters knowledge and edu-
cation about all aspects of horses
and horseback riding.
The Amwell Valley Hounds
Pony Club is part of a larger,
worldwide organization known as
the United States Pony Club
(USPC). The USPC is an organiza-
tion that has had a number of its
members recruited for all aspects
of the 2012 Olympics and past
Olympics, ranging everywhere
from riders in the pentathlon to
torchbearers.
There are different Pony Club
regions all around the world,
Crawford said. Im in the New
Jersey region, but there are other
ones in other states, too.
Aside from learning how to
ride horses, the Pony Club re-
quires its members to learn the
anatomy and upkeep of a horse,
how to properly clean a stable,
how to distinguish between a
horse's different injuries, and al-
most all of the other aspects that
pertain to taking care of and
maintaining a horse.
The Pony Club also requires its
members to read several books
about ponies and horses to devel-
op a distinct familiarity with both
animals, and designates each of
its riders by different ratings.
Im a D-3, Crawford said.
The ratings work like this a D-1
is the beginning where you pretty
much have to learn the pony
parts, how to trot, canter and
walk. Also, you have to know
about cleaning the pony, if the
trailer is clean enough for the
horse, and stuff like that. Its
more basic. Then, the D-2 is all of
that, and you start to do more
jumping, and it starts to get more
serious in how your cleaning is.
Then, D-3 gets even harder, so you
have to have the right position
and know more about all of the
technicalities. Now, Im working
on my C-1, which is even harder.
Essentially, with each level a
rider advances to A-1 being the
highest level the information
they need to retain becomes more
challenging and labor-intensive
in order to fully educate each
rider to the USPC's standards.
Its a very holistic way of look-
ing at horse life, Crawford's
mother Jennifer Curtis said.
To advance from one level to
the next, Crawford has to read a
book specific to that level, and
pass a two-part evaluation that in-
volves a written test and physical
test (riding).
Not as easy as just looking pret-
ty on top of a well-groomed horse,
right? Well, for those of you who
may not be saturated with eques-
trian knowledge like Crawford is,
she made sure to distinguish the
differences between what she
does with the Pony Club and what
your standard show jumper does.
Special to The Sun
Fiona Crawford successfully jumps over one of the nine hurdles in the riding section of the USPC
Nationals tetrathlon at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky last year.
please see CRAWFORD, page 6
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN JULY 18-24, 2012
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WEST WIXBSBR 09180220
Off-Broadstreet Dessert The-
atre (OBT) in Hopewell is present-
ing Make Me A Match,
Lawrence Romans comedy about
a male matchmaker and the chal-
lenging job of finding Stephanie
Mills a mate. This show is week-
ends now through Aug. 18.
An overachiever in the work
force, Stephanie Mills, has decid-
ed she should consider her moth-
ers advice and start a family.
Stephanie, known as Steve or Ste-
vie to be more successful in the
corporate world, is looking for a
husband. Enter Robin, a match-
maker who quickly understands
Stevies quirks and lines up a few
clients for her to meet.
The fun begins when Robins
potential partners for Stevie
prove somewhat inappropriate.
Owen Grant immediately finds
Grace, Stephanies mom, very in-
triguing.
The self-assured and sleazy
Wendell Tucker seems to be ready
for business too quickly.
Will Robin ever find a match
for Stevie?
Newcomer Madeline Orton of
Kendall Park stars as the busi-
ness-like spitfire Stevie. The ac-
tress, a Rutgers theatre arts alum-
na, has performed at the Bickford
Theatre and Womens Theater
Company, and works full-time in
the arts.
OBT veteran Barry
Abramowitz of Lawrenceville
will appear as the untraditional
male matchmaker. In a slight
twist, two series ago, Abramowitz
appeared as the young man look-
ing for a match in Crossing De-
lancey at OBT. Abramowitz was
last seen at OBT as Quixote in the
successful musical Man of La
Mancha.
Catherine Rowe of Somerset
returns to OBT as the outrageous
Grace, Stevies mother. Grace has
decided after 60, people are enti-
tled to say whatever is on their
mind. Having first appeared at
OBT in 1985, Rowes last OBT
show was Savannah Disputa-
tion.
OBT veterans Charlie Leeder
of Trenton and John Bergeron of
Hopewell appear as two of Ste-
vies suitors. Havoc, laughter and
romance follow them as love fills
the air.
Enjoy summer desserts, coffee
or tea prior to the show. On Fri-
day and Saturday evenings, doors
open at 7 p.m. for dessert with an
8 p.m. curtain. On Sunday after-
noons, doors open at 1:30 p.m. for
dessert with a 2:30 p.m. curtain.
Admission on Friday and Sunday
is $29.50, Saturday is $31.50, and
there is a senior rate of $27.50 for
Sundays only. All prices include
dessert, the show and New Jersey
sales tax.
For reservations, contact the
theater at 5 S. Greenwood Ave.,
Hopewell, by calling (609) 466-2766
or visit www.off-broadstreet.com.
Sweet deal: Dessert with a show through August
JULY 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
At the Hopewell Township
Committee meeting on July 9,
HomeFront presented a proposal
to add on to its affordable housing
units on Scotch Road by building
another six-unit apartment build-
ing.
HomeFront, a non-profit organ-
ization geared toward providing
affordable housing for families in
need in Central Jersey, partnered
with Hopewell Township two
years ago to renovate two dilapi-
dated farmhouses on the 32-acre
stretch of farmland located at 449
Scotch Road, which are now af-
fordable housing units.
The project went really well,
and the families there are doing
well, Director of Operations and
Housing Developer for Home-
Front Celia Bernstein said. We
are very happy with it and they
are very happy with it. We hope
the township is happy with what
weve been able to put together
there. Based on those successes,
we were looking to develop an ad-
ditional project of six units.
Since HomeFront is planning
to develop these new units from
the ground up, instead of renovat-
ing buildings like it did with the
previous project, Bernstein ex-
plained how HomeFront conduct-
ed extensive interviews with staff
and with other families who live
in some of the groups other
housing units in Mercer County
to find out what theyd like to see
with the new units.
In Bernsteins presentation,
she provided an aerial view of
what the existing property looks
like with the existing apartment
units and what the additional
apartment building and set-up
roadways, parking lot, buffer
plantings would look like (loca-
tion wise), along with three-di-
mensional views of the front and
rear of the proposed units, and
blueprints for each floor plan.
We are anticipating to have
four two-bedrooms and two three-
bedrooms, Bernstein said. Each
family will have their own en-
trance from the front and from
the rear, and all of the utility
rooms will be entered separately
so the maintenance staff wont
have to go through the apart-
ments for utilities.
Bernstein further explained
how the new units, which will be
modular units, are going to essen-
tially mimic the designs of the ex-
isting units.
She also explained how she
presented this concept to the state
Department of Community Af-
fairs HOME CHDO (Communi-
ty Housing Development Organi-
zations) Production, which pro-
vides funding to assist in the de-
velopment of affordable housing
units, and which HomeFront has
used before for other projects.
They have given us a very fa-
vorable response, but they will
not be 100 percent of the funder,
so they are looking for some
match, Bernstein said. Match
Council in favor of affordable housing units
please see PRICE, page 12
Wendy Scloiland VMD Debbie Ellioii, DVM
20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN JULY 18-24, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too. The Hopewell Sun
reserves the right to reprint your letter in any
medium including electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
Y
ouve no doubt passed someone
texting while driving. The per-
sons focus isnt on the road. In-
stead, its on spelling a word correctly
or getting that last comment in.
But a bill in the state Senate it
passed recently by a 38-0 margin
would hike fines for texting-while-driv-
ing considerably. And repeat offenders
would face stiff fines and a possible
drivers license suspension.
If the bill passes in the Assembly,
and Gov. Christie signs the bill into
law, a first-time offender would face a
fine of $200, up from the current $100
fine.
A second offense would run a mo-
torist a $400 fine, and a third offense,
$600.
A three-time offender would be
slapped with three drivers-license
points.
And a fourth-time offender would be
subject to a license suspension of 90
days.
We applaud this bill and want to see
the Assembly pass it and the governor
sign it into law.
Though New Jersey already has
tough texting-while-driving laws on
the books, a short ride on any of the
states major roads would reveal the
penalties are not yet tough enough.
Far too often, people recklessly pay
more attention to their texting than
they do the road.
And quite frankly, the larger fines
and the prospect of losing a drivers li-
cense for up to three months for repeat
offenders is the right penalty for this
kind of behavior.
Its bad enough in 2012 when people
drive while speaking on the phone
(without the use of a headset or blue-
tooth device).
But texting is clearly worse. And
more distracting. And its time people
who gamble with the lives of others
while driving and texting pay a hefty
price for doing so.
This bill must pass in the Assembly,
and the governor must sign it into law.
Swiftly.
in our opinion
Texting bill is on the button
Fines for sending messages while driving would double under new law
Will you still text and drive?
Despite the prospect of a much
tougher state texting-and-driving law,
we wonder if itll matter to local drivers.
Will you still text and drive if the new
law passes?
Its a little different than show jumping
because you actually have to have knowl-
edge, she said. Its not like you have
someone there doing everything for you.
Along with providing extensive and
comprehensive knowledge about horses
and riding, the Pony Club also engages its
members in preparing for a tetrathlon,
which is essentially a two or three-day
marathon, depending on the level of com-
petition (state or national), that involves
running, swimming, air rifle shooting and
horseback riding. The tetrathlon is just
one sport shy of defining the Olympics
pentathlon, which many members of the
USPC aspire to be a part of.
Since the minimum age to compete in a
tetrathlon is 11, Crawford has only been
competing for the last two years, but has
qualified to participate in them ever since
shes been a member of the Pony Club.
There are two tetrathlons that the USPC of-
fers a state-level competition and a na-
tional competition.
Crawford has competed in the New Jer-
sey tetrathlons, which include 30 of the
best riders in New Jersey. To qualify for the
National tetrathlons, you have to reach a
certain number of points, which Crawford
wasn't able to pinpoint because she has
trampled the qualification scores every
year.
For the last two years, she has also been
one of the highest scorers, if not the high-
est, at the New Jersey tetrathlons, which
has advanced her to the national tetrathlon
at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington,
Kentucky. Last year, Crawford placed sixth
at the Nationals out of the hundreds of
other Pony Club members from all over the
country.
Its like pony land, Crawford said.
There are so many horses, whether
theyre real or statues.
Curtis also explained how tetrathlons
have a unique way of scoring participants.
Every discipline running, swimming,
shooting, and riding has 1,100 points,
she said.
Curtis further explained how there is a
total of 4,400 points that a member can ob-
tain overall. However, just because a mem-
ber places first in a certain category does-
nt mean that they will receive the maxi-
mum number of points available.
Essentially, a perfect score of 1,100 in a
category depends on the average time or
score that the USPC sets. For example, al-
though Crawford scored first place in
swimming last year at nationals, she only
obtained 1,016 points because she was slow-
er than what the USPC's standard for first
place was.
Last year, Crawford also placed first in
running and riding, and only missed the
CRAWFORD
Continued from page 1
please see NATIONAL, page 11
Crawford one of highest scorers at state tetrathlons
JULY 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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The Hopewell Borough Recre-
ation Committees summer line-
up will continue with Friday
Night Concerts at Gazebo Park on
July 20 at 7 p.m. featuring Clear-
ing out the Cobwebs, and on
Aug. 3, featuring The Barncats.
Come out with your friends
and family and enjoy the music in
the park. Rained out concerts will
take place the Sunday following
at the same time.
Refreshments will be available
for purchase.
The Blawenburg Band will per-
form concerts at the Historic
Train Station on July 23 at 7:30
p.m., and will return on Aug. 6 at
the same time.
Saturday Starlight Movies at
the Historic Train Station will
begin on Sept. 1 at 8 p.m. and will
feature the film, Ferris Bueller's
Day Off.
Enjoy our feature film on the
big screen under the stars. Bring
your own chair or blanket.
Rained out movies will take place
the Sunday following at the same
time.
Join us every Wednesday at 7
p.m. at the Historic Train Station
for a friendly game of quoits and
horseshoes through Labor Day.
More information on these
events and others sponsored by
Hopewell Borough Recreation
can be found at www.hopewell-
boro-nj.us.
Concerts continue with
Clearing out the Cobwebs
Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
WEDNESDAY JULY 18
Hopewell Township Senior Adviso-
ry Board meeting: 2 p.m. at
Hopewell Valley Senior Center,
395 Reading St., Pennington. To
confirm meeting time and for
more information, visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Hopewell Township Zoning Board
of Adjustment special meeting:
7 p.m. at Hopewell Township
Municipal Building, 201 Washing-
ton Crossing-Pennington Road,
Titusville. For agenda, to confirm
meeting time and for more infor-
mation, visit www.hopewelltwp.
org.
Hopewell Public Library Book Club:
Discuss Wandering Afield by
Rachel Carson at 7 p.m. at
Hopewell Public Library. Explore
the unique and indigenous genre
of American nature writing fea-
turing some of the nations great-
est writers. Led by Jeff Hoagland,
resident naturalist and educa-
tional director of Stonybrook-Mill-
stone Watershed Association.
Afternoon at the Movies: Watch
Double Indemnity from 1:30 to
3:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
PJ Story Time: Ages 2 to 5. Siblings
welcome. 7 to 7:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Introduce
children to best age-appropriate
stories in childrens literature.
Action rhymes, songs and felt
board activities are part of the
program. Content of each story
time centers on a different
theme. Age-appropriate craft fol-
lows.
Bookworms Book Club: First to
third graders. 1 to 2 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Bring a
favorite book with the theme
tasty treats to share with the
group. Bring a lunch to eat during
the meeting. Registration
required.
Page Turners: Fourth to fifth
graders. 2 to 3 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. A different kind
of book club. Every week will read
aloud for the same book and then
work on an activity related to
what was read. Each week will get
further into the book. The book is
From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs.
Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L.
Konigsburg.
Action Book Club: Ages 12 and old-
er. 6 to 7 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Discuss The Lab by Jack
Heath. Vote on the next book to
be read for the August meeting.
THURSDAY JULY 19
Hopewell Township Open Space
Advisory Committee meeting:
7:30 p.m. To confirm meeting
time and for more information,
visit www.hopewelltwp.org.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 a.m. to noon at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
Super Scientists: First to third
grade. 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Each
week focuses on a different
experiment to explain the world.
This week is Gak and Bouncing
Balls. Registration required.
Game Night: Third grade and older.
6 to 7 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Play board games, listen to
music and enjoy some snacks.
Feel free to bring favorite board
games and friends!
Jr. Game Night: Kindergarten to
second grade. 7 to 8 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Board
games, group games and snacks.
Feel free to bring a favorite board
game or some friends!
Teen Game Night: Ages 12 and old-
er. 7 to 8 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Magic the Gathering, Set-
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JULY 18-24, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event. Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun,
108 Kings Highway East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
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CALENDAR
tlers of Catan, Pokemon, Chess,
Poker and more! Play board
games, listen to music and enjoy
some snacks. Feel free to bring
favorite games and some friends!
FRIDAY JULY 20
Pat McKinleys Toddler Tunes:
Ages newborn to 5. 10:30 to 11
a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Adult supervision required. Sing
and dance to classic childrens
songs played on live guitar.
Teen Take-Out Craft: Ages 12 and
older. 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Bring
home a magazine-wrapped pic-
ture frame craft.
SUNDAY JULY 22
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY JULY 23
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation.
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
nineAbove Craft Time: Ages 9 and
older. 6 to 7 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Make a cool craft
project every week. Registration
required.
Teen Advisory Group (TAG) meet-
ing: Ages 12 and older. 2 to 3 p.m.
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Participa-
tion counts as volunteer time.
TUESDAY JULY 24
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library.
Knitters of all levels welcome.
Join for a cozy evening of stitch-
ing and conversation. For more
information visit www.hopewell
publiclibrary.blogspot.com.
New Jersey Writers Society Sup-
port Group: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. All are
welcome to attend and enjoy the
challenges of becoming better
writers, defeating writers block
and perfecting the craft. No reg-
istration necessary.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5. 2 to 3 p.m.
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. Adult supervision
required. This program is a great
way to introduce children to
library story times and reading.
Age appropriate books are
shared with the group. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets, and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience.
After about 20 minutes of struc-
tured group time, there is time
for play and for socializing.
Lizard Guys Animal Show: All ages
welcome; those younger than 13
must have an adult present.
Come check out this live show
featuring reptiles and insects.
Anime Club: Ages 12 and older. 6 to 7
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Join for discussions, snacks,
movies and other activities. This
week, discuss favorites and make
candy sushi. Registration required.
JULY 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
2/1 SPECIAL
Bring in 2 Pieces Of Dry Cleaning,
Get 1 Shirt Laundered For FREE
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/31/12.
25% OFF
Household Items
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/31/12.
20% OFF
Repairs
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/31/12.
Theyre back!
SUMMER SAVINGS!
CALL 609-737-3373
Or email us at service@craftpennington.com
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Fast and Friendly Service Same-Day Dry Cleaning Senior Citizen Discount: 15% Off Any Dry Cleaning
Shoe Repair
SmaII Rug CIeaning
Up to 6' x 9'
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN JULY 18-24, 2012
Great Cars
From Good People
SERVICE SPECIALS
DETAILING SPECIAL
$
19
9
Hand Wash & Wax
Vacuum & Shampoo Carpets
Clean Windows, Door Jambs, etc.
Complete Vehicle Detail - Inside & Out
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 7/31/12.
Reg $179.95
LUBE OIL & FILTER CHANGE
$

00
0ff
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 7/31/12.
TIRE SPECIAL
$
400ff
Set of 4 Tires
$10 Per Tire/Minimum of 2
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 7/31/12.
PRE-OWNED SPECIALS
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including sunroof, amfm cd radio, leather seating, roof rails, t/glass,
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Rider Universitys colleges of
Business Administration; Contin-
uing Studies; Liberal Arts, Educa-
tion, and Sciences; and Westmin-
ster College of the Arts an-
nounced the names of undergrad-
uate students placed on the deans
list for the spring 2012 semester.
Hopewell residents on the
deans list are: John Hall, a Busi-
ness Administration major;
Robert Jones, a Business Ad-
ministration major; Kelly Kro-
lik, a Marine Sciences major; and
Taylor Krolik, an Environmen-
tal Science major.
Ian Lowry, a resident of
Hopewell, has been named to the
deans list at Drew University for
the Spring 2012 semester.
David Primer of Hopewell re-
ceived Bachelor of Science from
Emory College of Emory
University in Atlanta, Ga., on
May 14.
Hopewell Township is now ac-
cepting individual permit appli-
cations for the townships munici-
pal deer management program
for the 2012-2013 hunting season.
All applicants must be 14 years or
older and have a valid New Jersey
hunting license. There is a $25
non-refundable application fee.
Permitted hunters will be select-
ed by lottery process.
Once notified, successful appli-
cants are required to participate
in a site-specific hunter orienta-
tion course and pay an additional
$75 to receive their hunting and
parking permits. Permits will be
valid for the entire hunting sea-
son, Sept. 8 through Feb. 16, 2013.
Licensed hunters who are in-
terested in participating in the
program should visit
www.hopewelltwp.org for an ap-
plication form, parcel location
maps/number of hunters/per-
mitted weapons, rules and regula-
tions, township ordinance for
Deer Management and authoriz-
ing Resolution. Paper copies of
these documents are available in
the townships municipal build-
ing lobby.
All applications, additional
forms and releases must be sub-
mitted in person by the applicant
to the Hopewell Township Police
Department located at 201 Wash-
ington Crossing-Pennington Rd
in Titusville. Applications will
only be accepted from 8 a.m. until
4 p.m. from Monday through Fri-
day. The application deadline is
Friday, July 27, at 4 p.m. Only
completed applications will be
processed.
Apply for hunting license by July 27
on campus
JULY 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
55+ COMMUNTY, OPEN FLOOP PLAN,
2 BEOPOOMS, 2 BATHS, ALL NEW APPLANCES
NEW: Poo & Windows, Guttors,
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first place mark in the shooting
section, which she has recently
gotten better at.
Overall, Im starting to enjoy
shooting more because when I
first started, I was horrible at it,
she said. Im really starting to
improve because last year, I came
in dead last. And, it was kind of
funny because in everything else,
I got first. This year, I got second,
so Im trying to improve.
This year, Crawford is one out
of only two Pony Club members
in New Jersey who will advance
to the nationals competition from
July 25 to July 29. Crawford's
qualification score of 4,040 points
this year is 15 points more than
the score of the winner of last
year's national competition.
Crawford has been an active
athlete throughout her whole life,
which is what sets her apart from
other competitors and gives her
more of an upper hand when it
comes to tetrathlons.
I used to have her run with me
along the Canal because I figured
if she had slightly my genes, she
would be a good runner, Curtis
said. So, by the time she hit fifth
grade, she joined cross country at
her school. When she was really
little, around 4 years old, since I
was a competitive swimmer and
swim instructor, I taught her how
to swim, and always wanted her
to do swim team because I think
its just good that you know how
swim properly. So, shes done win-
ter swimming, and sometimes
shes done very light summer
swimming. Shes always been a
swimmer and a runner, and then
the horseback riding kind of
came from her own love.
At this year's national
tetrathlon, Crawford will compete
for three days. On the first day,
she will do five rounds of shoot-
ing, where she will have to shoot
at a darts-like target that's half
the size of a piece of computer
paper from 30 feet away. On the
second day, she'll have to ride
through a course with nine
jumps, and will also have to suc-
cessfully get off of the horse and
walk it through a paddock. Then
at night, she'll have to swim for
100 meters. On the third and final
day, she'll have to run 1,000 meters
in the morning, and then horse-
back ride again in the evening,
following the same guidelines as
the second day.
Since tetrathlons are straining,
Crawford prepares and condi-
tions for them year-round. She is
mostly self-driven during the
summer, since she isn't a part of a
swimming or cross-country club.
She practices swimming at the
Princeton Community Pool, and
takes daily runs around the Canal
with her mom, in the grass field
behind her house, or throughout
the streets of Hopewell Borough
near where she lives. And, when-
ever she has time, she goes up to
the shooting range she practices
at to improve her shooting skills.
Overall, it really fits in with
my moms work schedule because
she gets really busy, Crawford
said. So, one day, if she cant take
me up to shooting or riding, then
Ill just run in the field. Today, I
got up and I ran with my mom.
After that, she took me up to
swim. And later on, Im going to
go shooting.
Outside of the competition
world, Crawford enjoys anything
that is outdoors. Since she has
grown up without a television her
entire life, she's found other ways
to entertain herself.
I really like stuff outside, like
gardening and that kind of stuff,
she said. Im more of an outside
person. I cant really read or
watch T.V. if its not interesting. I
do love watching movies, but I
just need to be outside more.
For more information about
the Amwell Valley Hounds Pony
Club, visit www.avhpc.org.
NATIONAL
Continued from page 6
National competition is three days long
Special to The Sun
Fiona Crawford aims at one of her many targets with her five-pound
Russian air rifle during the shooting section of the USPC Nationals
tetrathlon at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Ky., last year.
12 THE HOPEWELL SUN JULY 18-24, 2012
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being money or services to bring
together to make the project hap-
pen. And, because we are getting
our general contracting services
for free, were able to keep the
cost significantly down.
As part of the proposal, Bern-
stein presented a list of suggested
services that the township could
provide to aid the completion of
this project, which included side
work, foundations, footings, exca-
vations, soil removal (by Public
Works), driveways to the site
work and driveways around the
property, paving, removal of the
garage that is currently on site,
Dumpsters for the duration of the
construction, septic field design
and installation, management of
all of the land use approvals with-
in the township, permit and con-
struction fees, bringing water
services from the street to the
site, and bringing the gas service
to the site as well.
Township Administrator Paul
Pogorzelski has been working
closely with HomeFront on the
execution of this idea and be-
lieves that its possible to provide
some of what HomeFront needs,
however, he also voiced what
things would be slightly problem-
atic.
Things that we cannot do that
would be problematic for us to do,
and would be best served by con-
tractors, would be getting the
water service across Scotch
Road, he said. Im not sure
where the gas service is coming
from. Permit fees and land use ap-
provals would be something that
you [the committee] would have
to deal with directly. For the sep-
tic field, we can do some of the
construction, and design fees
would be out of pocket for us.
Dumpsters would also be an out-
of-pocket expense for us. We could
physically do the demolition, do
the driveway, and probably have a
contractor do the paving because
we could provide the materials,
but then again, thats a direct out
of pocket expense. Any excava-
tion or things like that, we can do,
because thats truly an in-kind
service.
Mayor Michael Markulec,
along with the other committee
members, were on board with the
idea, and were only concerned
with the total cost of all of the
items, which Pogorzelski roughly
estimated to be around $200,000.
Were going to get six afford-
able housing units for $200,000,
mostly of in-kind contributions,
so I think its a good deal for us,
Markulec said.
After the committee discusses
the issue and assesses the contri-
bution amount from the town-
ship, it needs to submit a letter of
support from the township in
order for Bernstein to approach
the state for funding and move
forward with the process.
The letter of support comes
with a commitment to provide
those services, Pogorzelski said.
Things what I would consider of
some cost would be use of the ex-
isting equipment, Public Works
staff, and things like that, but its
doable. The issue will be when,
because it has to fall in an off-
peak season for us, not in road or
leaf season, so there are probably
some small windows where we
can do that work. But, theres a
way to do it.
So what Ill do is meet with
Victor [Silvestrov] (director of
Public Works), and well create a
hypothetical schedule, Pogorzel-
ski said. And when we can do it,
well detail exactly what work we
can do. Ill present it to you [the
committee] and from that, if you
want to do a letter of support, we
would do that presumably at the
next meeting.
Overall, the committee mem-
bers all seemed receptive to the
idea, especially Markulec.
I think its a great project, and
I think we are definitely support-
ive of it, Markulec said. We just
need to dots some Is and cross
some Ts, and figure out exactly
what we can provide to you
[HomeFront].
Jason Mendelsohn, of Penning-
ton, has been awarded the Rank of
Eagle Scout from the Boy Scouts
of America. Mendelsohn is a
member of Troop No. 1776 in Ti-
tusville. Mendelsohns project in-
volved building three raised-soil
boxes and a portable white board.
The benefiting organization was
Stony Brook Elementary School in
Pennington. Mendelsohn is a 2012
graduate of Hopewell Valley Cen-
tral High School.
He is attending Rowan Univer-
sity this fall, where he will be ma-
joring in business/marketing.
While a Scout, he obtained more
than 45 merit badges and his
World Conservation Badge.
Price tag estimated at $200,000
PRICE
Continued from page 3
Mendelsohn earns Eagle Scout rank
Special to The Sun
A recent graduate of Hopewell Valley Central High School Jason
Mendelsohn recently received his Eagle Scout honor.
JULY 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 13
The following reports were on
file with the Hopewell Township
Police Department.
On July 1 at around 1:30 p.m.,
Officer Chris Vaccarino was on
patrol on Route 29 in the area of
the Mercer County Correction
Center. He observed a vehicle
parked outside of the corrections
center and ran a check on the li-
cense plate. The check revealed
that the registered owner of the
vehicle was wanted for several of-
fenses.
Officer Vaccarino made con-
tact with the registered owner
who was seated in the vehicle.
While doing so he detected the
odor of burnt marijuana. Further
investigation revealed that the
registered owner was not the
wanted person but a consent
search of his vehicle revealed a
small plastic bag of marijuana
within. The 52-year-old male was
placed under arrest. He was
processed at headquarters and
charged with possession of less
than 50 grams of marijuana.
He was released and his case
will be heard in municipal court.
On July 2 at 9:55 a.m., Officer
Chris Vaccarino observed a vehi-
cle stopped on Poor Farm Road
with the four way flashers on
while on patrol. He spoke briefly
to the driver and then as he began
to reposition his patrol car the
stopped vehicle began traveling
south on the road at a high rate of
speed.
Officer Vaccarino was able to
get turned around and eventually
got the vehicle stopped further
south on Poor Farm Road. Speak-
ing with the driver he learned
that he did not have a license or
registration for the vehicle with
him.
Further investigation revealed
that the driver, a 29-year-old
males license was suspended. He
also admitted that he had a small
amount of marijuana in his vehi-
cle and then gave Officer Vaccari-
no permission to search the vehi-
cle. Inside he found a small plas-
tic bag containing suspected mar-
ijuana. He was arrested and
processed at headquarters. He
was charged with possessing less
than 50 grams of marijuana, driv-
ing with a suspended drivers li-
cense and possession of CDS in a
vehicle. He was released and his
case will be heard in municipal
court.
On June 29 at 4:18 p.m., Officer
Robert Sparano responded to a
parking lot crash at the Hopewell
Crossing Shopping Center. There
he learned that a vehicle had
struck two parked cars. Upon
speaking to the driver involved,
he detected a strong odor of alco-
hol. He also observed the driver, a
48-year-old male to be very un-
steady on his feet.
The officer administered field
sobriety tests and placed the man
under arrest. He was processed at
headquarters and released. He
was charged with driving under
the influence, reckless driving
and having an open container of
alcohol in his vehicle.
This case will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
On June 29 at 7:32 p.m., Sgt.
Christopher Kascik responded to
a report of a disabled vehicle on
Route 546 near Scotch Road.
While attempting to assist the
motorist, a 48-year-old male, he
observed him to be exhibiting
signs of being under the influ-
ence. A search of his vehicle re-
vealed an alcoholic drink on the
floor.
He was placed under arrest
and processed at headquarters.
He was issued summonses for
driving under the influence and
reckless driving. He was released
to a relative and his case will be
heard in municipal court.
On July 4 at 2:55 a.m., Officer
John Ferner was detailed to
Model Avenue for the report of a
loud motorcycle racing up and
down the street. Officer Ferner
was able to observe a subject rid-
ing a motorcycle at 35 mph in a 25
mph zone. Officer Ferner fol-
lowed the motorcycle to an apart-
ment complex on Model Avenue
where the operator stopped and
the motorcycle fell over. As he
spoke to the operator, a 25-year-
old male, Officer Ferner detected
an odor of alcohol. He was given a
series of field sobriety tests and
placed under arrest. He was
processed at headquarters and
charged with DWI, reckless driv-
ing, speeding, illegal u-turn, fail-
ure to wear a helmet, and failure
to produce credentials. The man
was later released to an acquain-
tance and his case will be heard
in municipal court.
On July 3 at 4:35 p.m., Officer
Michael Toth responded to a
Washington Crossing Pennington
Road address for the report of a
residential burglary. Sometime
between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.,
someone forced entry to a rear
door of the home and removed
jewelry, a handgun, a rifle, two
iPads, and a digital camera. The
loss was estimated at $5,000. De-
tective Kevin Zorn is assisting
with this investigation.
police report
Join the 4-H Development
program for the 94th Annual
Mercer County 4-H Fair on Sat-
urday, July 28, and Sunday, July
29, at the Howell Living History
Farm in Titusville.
On Saturday, the Fair will
run from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m.,
and on Sunday, the Fair will
run from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Admission is free, as well as
the parking. For parking, there
is a suggested donation of
canned goods in support of Rut-
gers Against Hunger.
The 4-H Youth Development
program uses a learn-by-doing
approach, which enables youth
to develop knowledge, attitudes,
and skills they need to become
competent, caring, and con-
tributing citizens of the
world. The 4-H Fair is a culmi-
nation of a years hard work
done by 4-H leaders, youth
members, and parents.
The fair includes 4-H animal
shows and exhibits, food and
homemade ice cream, hay
rides, pony rides, music, farm
tours and demonstrations,
milking demonstrations, spin-
ning, felting, and fiber demon-
strations, childrens crafts and
activities, and displays by or-
ganizations such as the Master
Gardeners of Mercer County
and the Mercer County Eques-
trian Center.
Our fair is also an excellent
place for our members and the
residents of Mercer County to
showcase their talents and re-
ceive recognition for their indi-
vidual entries. For a complete
exhibit catalog, fair schedule
and map, visit mercer.njaes.rut-
gers.edu/4h/fair.
Mercer County 4-H Fair
set for July 28 and 29
Magic ruby slippers, singing
munchkins, a dancing scarecrow
and an Emerald City all come to
life again on the big screen when
Theater To Go presents a special
family sing-along of the classic
film The Wizard of Oz at Mer-
cer County Community Colleges
Kelsey Theatre.
This interactive presentation
will take place on Friday, Aug. 3,
at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 4, at 7
p.m.; and Sunday, Aug. 5, at 2 p.m.
Kelsey Theatre is located on the
colleges West Windsor campus,
1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor.
Based on the novel by L. Frank
Baum, the hit 1939 MGM film
starring Judy Garland won the
Academy Award for Best Score
and Best Original Song for Over
the Rainbow. Notable for its use
of special effects, Technicolor,
fantasy storytelling and unusual
characters, it has become one of
the most celebrated films of all
time. Audiences young and old
continue to thrill to the adven-
tures of Dorothy, the Scarecrow,
the Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion
and Toto too!
Theater To Gos master of cere-
monies will lead the audience
through several participation ac-
tivities before the film starts, in-
cluding games, a costume contest
and trivia complete with prizes!
Ticket prices include an Audi-
ence Participation Kit with items
to be used throughout the movie,
such as kazoos, bubbles and noise
makers.
In addition, everyone can sing
along to their favorite songs, in-
cluding Follow the Yellow Brick
Road, Ding Dong the Witch is
Dead, and many others, as the
words are projected on the film
screen.
Based in Lawrenceville, The-
ater To Go is a full-service theatri-
cal production company.
Known for murder mysteries
and comedy shows, the compa-
nys performances emphasize im-
provisation and audience partici-
pation. This will be their first in-
teractive film presentation at
Kelsey.
Tickets are $18 for adults and
$12 for children. For tickets, call
the Kelsey Theatre box office at
609-570-3333, or visit www.kelsey
theatre.net. Kelsey Theatre is
wheelchair accessible, with free
parking available next to the the-
ater. Also coming up as part of
Kelsey Theatres Summer 2012 Se-
ries is the 2nd Annual Kelsey
Theatre Awards Ceremony on
Aug. 11, and Nunsense, present-
ed by Shore Repertory Company,
Aug. 17-26.
For more information or to
purchase a discounted series
package for the final three shows,
visit www.kelseytheatre.net.
Sing along with The Wizard of Oz
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
JULY 18-24, 2012 PAGE 14
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Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
www.tricountyexteriors.com
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'llfixyourdripinjustonetrip!"
Lic.#13VH06774500
WE OFFER:
NewShingleRoofsSeamlessGutters Skylights
SidingSlateRoofRepairsRubberRoofs
Windows&DoorsCappingSoffits
Licensed Insured ResidentiaI & CommerciaI
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0 FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
TBI-CO0NTY BNTBBIOBS
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
EIectricaI Services
Concrete Masonry
BIG BOYS INC
Nasoo - 8estorat|oo
8r|ck - Po|ot|og
Steps - Fo0odat|oo - 0h|moey
609-672-4145
Free st|mates
POOLS
New Rebuild Service
Open Close Liners
Paint Removals
Patios Decks
Call: 908-359-3000
Home Improvement
Concrete Repair
For a free estimate Call CSI
NJ License #13VH06184500
(856)381-0249
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Cracks are our specialty.
Residential and Commercial Services
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
Wanted To Buy
UP TO $1100 CASH
For Cars or Trucks w|th bad
Eng|nes or Transm|ss|ons
$500 CASH For
Any Comp|ete Junk Car or Truck
W|th or W|thout T|t|e

m&m mOVINO
AND HA0LINO
CleanOutsHouses
GaragesYards
Local& LongDistance

Services
CLASSIFIED JULY 18-24, 2012 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 15
Ocean City New Jerseys #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
4255 Asbury Avenue
Very well kept townhouse.
This 4 bedrooms 2.5 bath two
story townhouse is in great
shape and is located only
3 houses from the beach. This
unit features c/a, g/h, ocean
views, wood burning fire-
place, storage, enclosed out-
side shower and 3 decks. This
property has a fantastic rental
history and is fully furnished!
JUST REDUCED FROM 599K!
$569,000
Academic Success:
Tutoring
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring,ndividualized
nstruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests
ACT, All Standardized Tests
H.S. Eng. Lit. and Writing;
Math to Pre-Calc., History
Elem. Phonics, Reading,
Math; Study Skills; E.S.L.
Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
Tutoring
Place your classified today!
856-427-0933
2012 VCLVC S601S
Lease for 36 Months
SIGN & DkIVL
$
338
*
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Closer Than You Think!
*Acquisition fee $995. No security deposit required. Available to qualified customers. Stock #12644. All prices with tax, tags, registration, acq. fees and documentation
fees additional. 36 month, 10,000 mile lease. Expires 7/31/12. MSRP $33,525. Total 4 Pay Max $1,800. Owner Loyalty included in example $1,000.
Volvo builds the cars, we build relationships.
VCLVC CI kINCL1CN
2931 U.S. 1 South
Lawrencev|||e, NI 08648
(609) 882-0600
8kIDGLWA1Lk VCLVC
1028 U.S. 22 Last
Somerv|||e, NI
(908) S26-7700
VCLVC CI LDISCN
842 U.S. 1 North
Ld|son, NI
(732) 248-0S00
VCLVCCCUN1k.CCM

WL WILL A
4 MCN1nS
1CWAkDS CUk
AMLN1S
*

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